US Dollar Rallies In The Wake Of CPI Inflation Data

Merchandise World Trade To Grow 1.2% YoY, ING Economics Expects

Summary:

  • U.S. inflation is running hotter than markets anticipated.
  • Core inflation reading is the one that concerns the Fed the most.
  • Core CPI increased by 0.6% in Augus

US CPI Inflation Missed Market Expectations

Data that showed U.S. inflation is running hotter than markets anticipated caused the Dollar to rise dramatically, giving the Federal Reserve more confidence to hike interest rates. After U.S. headline CPI inflation rose 8.3% year-over-year in August, defying expectations for a reading of 8.1%, stocks dropped and the safe-haven high-yielding Dollar surged, though it was still lower than July's 8.5%.

But contrary to forecasts for a decline, the month-over-month metric increased by 0.1%, the BLS reported, up from July's reading of 0%. The core inflation reading will be the one that concerns the Fed the most. Core CPI increased by 0.6% in August, exceeding both the 0.3% market expectation and the 0.3% result in July. Core CPI inflation is the form of inflation that the Fed may be able to control through higher interest rates because it is domestically based and therefore excludes external factors like energy prices.

Core CPI inflation increased by 6.3% on an annual basis, exceeding both July's 5.9% and the market's expectations of 6.1%.

With a 1.40% increase against the New Zealand Dollar and a 0.84% increase against the Euro, the dollar advanced versus all the major currencies.

"In response to the data, all G10 currencies weakened against the US dollar, with the largest losses seen in currencies that had recently benefited from the improvement in risk conditions. The pound, euro, yen, Kiwi dollar, Aussie dollar, and Swedish krona have now recorded losses in excess of one percent against the greenback, while the Norwegian krone posted the largest decline as it is down 2% on the day," says Jay Zhao-Murray, Market Analyst at Monex Canada.


Even though gasoline prices were down significantly, the U.S. inflation surprise still occurred, suggesting that the energy shock is still having an impact. However, everyone is still surprised by the lag. In the event that workers seek greater wage agreements and businesses increase their prices, the Fed will be eager to boost rates.

Sources: poundsterlinglive.com

Merchandise World Trade To Grow 1.2% YoY, ING Economics Expects

Rebecca Duthie

Remote Editor and writer Intern
FXMAG.COM

Rebecca has a bachelors degree in Investment Management, a Post Graduate Diploma in Financial Planning and is currently enrolled in a Masters program in International Management with a Specialization in International Finance.