yields

Asia Morning Bites

South Korea's inflation comes in below expectations. US non-farm payroll release later tonight. Powell slated to speak again at the weekend.

 

Global Macro and Markets

    Global markets:  Despite some reasonably strong data, US Treasury yields dipped slightly on Thursday. 2Y yields were down less than a basis point, but only after dropping below 4.14% and then recovering later on. 10Y yields followed a similar pattern of decline and recovery taking them down 3.2bp to 3.97%. Jerome Powell has a TV interview scheduled for the weekend, which could be interesting if he deviates from the recent message at the FOMC. Currencies also had a choppy day. EURUSD dropped below 1.08 at one point but is back up to 1.0874 now. Likewise, the AUD came close to dropping through 65 cents but has recovered to 0.6575 now. Cable did even better, finishing up on the day after a less dovish than expected Bank of England meeting. The JPY was roughly unchanged at 146.47. Other Asian FX

Focusing On US CPI, Fed, Commodities and Bank Of Japan - Saxo Market Call

Focusing On US CPI, Fed, Commodities and Bank Of Japan - Saxo Market Call

Saxo Strategy Team Saxo Strategy Team 11.02.2022 10:47
Podcast 2022-02-11 08:46 20 minutes to read Summary:  Today, we look at the hot US January CPI data hitting the markets yesterday, with an interesting attempt at a whiplash inducing bounce in sentiment just after the data release dealt an initial blow to sentiment as more Fed hikes were priced into the forward curve. Then markets turned south again when St. Louis Fed President and FOMC voter Stephen Bullard later administered a hawkish broadside with thoughts on an emergency Fed rate hike, a rapid path to 100 basis points of hikes and an imminent start to quantitative tightening. We also look at the impact on commodity markets from yesterday's developments and the Bank of Japan doubling down for now on its yield-curve-control policy and more. Today's pod features Peter Garnry on equities, Ole Hansen on commodities, and John J. Hardy hosting and on FX. Listen to today’s podcast and have a look at today’s slide deck. Follow Saxo Market Call on your favorite podcast app: Apple Spotify Podbean Sticher If you are not able to find the podcast on your favourite podcast app when searching for Saxo Market Call, please drop us an email at marketcall@saxobank.com and we'll look into it.   Questions and comments, please! We invite you to send any questions and comments you might have for the podcast team. Whether feedback on the show's content, questions about specific topics, or requests for more focus on a given market area in an upcoming podcast, please get in touch at marketcall@saxobank.com.
Fed And BoE Ahead Of Interest Rates Decisions. Having A Look At Nasdaq, S&P 500 and Dow Jones Charts

Many Would Want To Know The Near Future Of S&P 500

Monica Kingsley Monica Kingsley 11.02.2022 15:57
S&P 500 upswing was rejected – the intraday comeback didn‘t succeed. Risk-off posture won the day, and the dust is settling. Day 4-5 of the rally‘s window of opportunity that I talked on Monday, is proving as a milestone. Hot CPI data has increased the bets on Mar 50bp rate hike to a virtual certainty, and asset prices didn‘t like that. Not just stocks across the board, but commodities likewise (to a modest degree only) gave up intraday gains, turning a little red. Cryptos too ended down – it had been a good decision to cash in solid open long profits in S&P 500, oil and copper. Fresh portfolio highs reached over this 12+ months period (details on my homepage): What‘s the game plan for today? As the dollar closed flat while yields rose, I‘m not ruling out a reflexive intraday rebound attempt – after all, the bears should rule in the 2nd half of Feb most clearly. As time passes, the rips would be sold into unless bonds and tech can catch a solid bid. With focus on inflation, that‘s unlikely. Medium-term S&P 500 bias continues being short while commodity dips are to be cautiously bought. Crude oil looks to need to spend a bit more time around $90 while copper defending the low $4.50 is equally important. While silver didn‘t rise by nearly as much as the red metal did, it is down approximately as much in today‘s premarket – the white metal would recover on a less headline heavy day. Remember that PMs are trading sideways to up, with decreasing sensitivity to rising 10-year yield, and have done historically well when rate hikes finally start. Let‘s move right into the charts (all courtesy of www.stockcharts.com). S&P 500 and Nasdaq Outlook S&P 500 momentum has sharply shifted to the downside, and today‘s recovery attempts are likely to be sold into. I‘m keeping a keen eye on bonds, tech and risk-on in general – not expecting miracles. Credit Markets HYG keeps showing the way, resolutely down as of yesterday. With rising yields not propelling even financials, the bears have returned a few days earlier than they could – in a show of strength. Gold, Silver and Miners Miners issued a warning to gold and silver – yesterday brought a classic short-term top sign. I‘m though not ascribing great significance to it, for it isnt‘a turning point. Gold would be relatively unmoved while silver recovers however deep setback it suffers today. Crude Oil Crude oil appears to need more time to base – while the upside is being rejected for now, the selling attempts aren‘t materializing at all. Higher volume adds to short-term indecision, but strong (long) hands are to win. Copper Copper is running into selling pressure, and looks in need of consolidation in order to overcome $4.60. The red metal remains true to its reputation for volatility. Bitcoin and Ethereum Cryptos are taking their time, and the bulls need to act. Given that volume isn‘t disappearing, the bears have a short-term advantage. Summary S&P 500 looks to be getting under pressure soon again, today. There is no support from bonds, unless these stage an intraday risk-on reversal. The momentum is with the sellers, and rips are likely to be sold as markets digest yet more hawkish Fed action slated for March. Digest and slated are the key words – the Fed‘s hand is being forced here. Commodities and precious metals are likely to do best in what‘s coming – the 5-10 day window of bullish S&P 500 price action, is slowly closing down. Thank you for having read today‘s free analysis, which is available in full at my homesite. There, you can subscribe to the free Monica‘s Insider Club, which features real-time trade calls and intraday updates for all the five publications: Stock Trading Signals, Gold Trading Signals, Oil Trading Signals, Copper Trading Signals and Bitcoin Trading Signals.
Mining Stocks Don't Stay As Strong As Gold

Mining Stocks Don't Stay As Strong As Gold

Przemysław Radomski Przemysław Radomski 11.02.2022 15:41
  In line with bearish bets, miners have thrown a match. Gold, however, doesn’t want to leave the ring without a fight. How long will it stay high? While gold remains relatively firm despite stock market turbulence, rising real yields, and bearish technical indicators, even a confluence of headwinds hasn’t been able to knock the yellow metal off its lofty perch. However, mining stocks haven’t been so lucky. With my short position in the GDXJ ETF offering a great risk-reward proposition, the junior gold miners’ underperformance has played out exactly as I expected. Moreover, with major spikes in volume preceding predictable sell-offs (follow the vertical dashed lines below), I’ve warned on several occasions that the GDX ETF is prone to tipping its hand – we saw this volume spike in January, which was the 2022 top (as of today). In addition, with mining investors’ power drying up by the day, the medium-term looks equally unkind. Please see below: On Wednesday, gold miners fell. Even though they declined by just $0.06, it was profound. The miners were following gold higher during the early part of Wednesday’s (Feb. 9) session, but they lost strength close to the middle thereof and were back down before the closing bell. If the gold price reversed and then declined during the day, that would have been normal. However, gold stayed up. This tells us that the buying power has either dried up or is drying up. When everyone who wanted to get into the market is already in it, the price can do only one thing (regardless of bullish factors) – fall. Those who are already in can then sell. Monitoring the markets for this kind of cross-sector performance is one of the more important gold trading tips. Look, I’m not saying that declines now are “guaranteed”. There are no guarantees in the markets. There might be buyers that haven’t considered mining stocks that would now enter the market, but history tells us that this is unlikely. Instead, declines are very likely to follow. Yesterday’s big daily decline confirmed my above comments. Gold miners declined much more than gold did, and they did so at above-average volume. The latter indicates that “down” is the true direction in which the precious metals market is heading. To that point, the HUI Index provides clues from a longer-term perspective. When we analyze the weekly chart, it highlights investors’ anxiety. For example, after hitting an intraweek high of roughly 260, the HUI Index ended the Feb. 10 session at roughly 250 – just 3.99 up from last Friday – that’s an intraweek reversal. Furthermore, with the index still in a medium-term downtrend, shades of 2013 still profoundly bearish, and sharp declines often preceded by broad head and shoulders patterns (marked with green), there are several negatives confronting the HUI Index. As such, a sharp drawdown will likely materialize sooner rather than later. Please see below: Finally, the GDXJ ETF is the gift that keeps on giving. For example, with lower highs and lower lows being part of the junior miners’ roughly one-and-a-half-year journey, false breakouts have confused many investors. However, while I’ve been warning about the weakness for some time, more downside is likely on the horizon. To explain, I wrote on Feb. 10: I emphasized before that juniors hadn’t moved above their 50-day moving average, and that they stayed below their rising blue resistance line. Consequently – I wrote – the downtrend in them remained clearly intact. Yesterday’s reversal served as a perfect confirmation of the above. The previous breakdowns were verified in one of the most classic ways. The silver price has been quite strong recently, which is also something that we see close to the local tops. The reversals in mining stocks, the situation in gold, outperformance of silver, AND the situation in the USD Index (the medium-term support held) together paint a very bearish picture for the precious metals market in the short and medium term. All in all, if the weakness continues, I expect the GDXJ ETF to challenge the $32 to $34 range. However, please note that this is my expectation for a short-term bottom. While the GDXJ ETF may record a corrective upswing at this level, the downtrend should continue thereafter, and the junior miners should fall further over the medium term. In conclusion, gold showcased its steady hand throughout the recent volatility. However, mining stocks have cracked under the pressure. With the latter’s underperformance often a bearish omen for the former, the yellow metal’s mettle may be tested over the medium term. As such, while the long-term outlooks for gold, silver, and mining stocks remain profoundly bullish, a final climax will likely unfold before their secular uptrends continue. Thank you for reading our free analysis today. Please note that the above is just a small fraction of today’s all-encompassing Gold & Silver Trading Alert. The latter includes multiple premium details such as the targets for gold and mining stocks that could be reached in the next few weeks. If you’d like to read those premium details, we have good news for you. As soon as you sign up for our free gold newsletter, you’ll get a free 7-day no-obligation trial access to our premium Gold & Silver Trading Alerts. It’s really free – sign up today. Przemyslaw Radomski, CFAFounder, Editor-in-chiefSunshine Profits: Effective Investment through Diligence & Care * * * * * All essays, research and information found above represent analyses and opinions of Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA and Sunshine Profits' associates only. As such, it may prove wrong and be subject to change without notice. Opinions and analyses are based on data available to authors of respective essays at the time of writing. Although the information provided above is based on careful research and sources that are deemed to be accurate, Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA and his associates do not guarantee the accuracy or thoroughness of the data or information reported. The opinions published above are neither an offer nor a recommendation to purchase or sell any securities. Mr. Radomski is not a Registered Securities Advisor. By reading Przemyslaw Radomski's, CFA reports you fully agree that he will not be held responsible or liable for any decisions you make regarding any information provided in these reports. Investing, trading and speculation in any financial markets may involve high risk of loss. Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA, Sunshine Profits' employees and affiliates as well as members of their families may have a short or long position in any securities, including those mentioned in any of the reports or essays, and may make additional purchases and/or sales of those securities without notice.
The Swing Overview - Week 6 2022

The Swing Overview - Week 6 2022

Purple Trading Purple Trading 13.02.2022 23:00
The Swing Overview - Week 6 The record inflation rate in the US over the past 40 years sparked another wave of volatility in the markets on fears of more aggressive Fed action against an overheated economy. Unexpectedly strong US labour market data also came as a shock to markets. As a consequence, yields in the US 10-year bonds rose and broke the 2% mark. Equity indices, on the other hand, weakened towards the end of the week and we will see whether strong supports will be tested again under the influence of these fundamentals. Rising bond yields are not good news for gold either, which has so far responded to the strengthening dollar and rising yields by weakening. The macroeconomic data from the US Inflation and labour market data were clearly among the most anticipated macroeconomic events last week. Year-on-year inflation in the US rose to 7.5% in January 2022. This is the highest reading since February 1982 and is also higher than analysts' estimates, that had expected inflation to be around 7.3%. The reasons for the higher inflation are rising energy costs, a tight labor market and disruptions in supply chains, which are multiplied by strong demand in a recovering economy. The biggest contributors to rising inflation were energy prices, which rose by 27%, and fuel prices, which rose by 40%. Figure 1: The inflation in the US In terms of the labour market, the US economy created 467,000 new jobs in January. This was much more than the analysts' forecast, who estimated that, given the spread of the Omicron variant, only 150 thousand new jobs would be created in the US in January. Figure 2: The US jobs growth (NFP) This very strong data means one thing. The Fed will tighten the economy and probably at a much faster pace than the market expects. And this is also the reason for the further rise in the US 10-year bond yields, which have surpassed the 2% mark and reached their highest level since August 2019. Along with this, the dollar index, which had made a correction last week, has also started to strengthen.   Figure 3: 10-year government bond yield on the 4H chart and the USD index on the daily chart A strong dollar, rising yields and the economy tightening at a faster pace than the market expects are clearly negative news for equity indices and also gold.   The NASDAQ and the SP500 Earnings season continues in the US. Of the well-known companies, Pfizer (NYSE:PFE) reported results last week. While the company's earnings were higher than expectations, the pharmaceutical giant also reported that it expects revenue for 2022 to be USD 32 billion, below analysts' expectations, who were hoping for growth of around USD 33.8 billion.  Facebook continues to lose ground after last week's washout, causing the share price to drop from USD 320 to USD 220 in one week.   Figure 4: The NASDAQ index on H4 and D1 chart The NASDAQ started last week with a rise and the price approached the resistance according to the H4 chart. The information about record inflation had a strong negative impact on technology stocks and the price was moving near the support at the end of the week, which is in the range near 14,392 - 14,530 according to the H4 chart. Significant support is in the area at 13,750-13,950 according to the daily chart. The nearest resistance according to the H4 chart is at 15,050 - 15,080.   Figure 5: The SP 500 on H4 and D1 chart   There has been a very similar pattern on the SP 500 index to the NASDAQ. The price got to the resistance which is defined by the horizontal resistance area at 4,580 - 4,600. At the same time, there is a confluence with the broken trend line of the rising channel below which the index is moving. Support according to the H4 chart is at 4440 - 4454. According to the daily chart, significant support is at 4,225 - 4,300.   German DAX index Figure 6: The DAX on H4 and daily chart There is no clear direction on this index recently. We can probably say that the index is moving in a sideways trend which according to the daily chart is defined by the strong resistance at 16,300 (all-time high) and the support which has already been tested several times in the area between 14,850 - 15,000. The current move shows that the rising channel has been broken to the downside and also that the moving averages on the H4 chart EMA 50 and SMA 100 are in a bearish constellation. This together with the higher inflation data and also the recently announced hawkish ECB policy would suggest more of a move down to the aforementioned support. The nearest horizontal resistance according to the H4 chart is at 15,532 - 15,620. The next resistance according to the H4 chart is at 15,727 - 15,757.   The EUR/USD near strong resistance The EURUSD approached the strong 1.15 level but after the US inflation data was announced, the pair started to fall strongly. Thus, according to the H4 chart, a false break of the resistance arose, which is in the band around 1.1480 which tends to be a strong signal for further weakening. Figure 7: EURUSD on H4 and daily chart The possibility of a weakening is also indicated by the development of the interest rate differential that is present in the yields between the 10-year bonds of Germany and the US. This has recently been very strongly correlated with developments on the EURUSD. Figure 8: Correlation of the interest rate differential between German and US 10-year bonds with the EURUSD currency pair on H4   The interest rate differential is starting to decline and this should suggest that the EURUSD might weaken. The nearest resistance is at the 1.1460 - 1.1480 band. The nearest support according to the H4 chart is at 1.1360 - 1.1370. The next one is at 1.1270 - 1.1280.   Gold Gold is taken by many investors as a hedge against inflation. But lately, gold seems to be losing in the battle for inflation protection to US Treasuries, which carry some yield, while gold does not deliver any yield. Gold is most responsive to the value of the US dollar. If the dollar rises, gold tends to depreciate and vice versa. Recent developments in the USD index suggest that the dollar could strengthen again this week, which should mean a test of support for gold. Figure 9: Gold on H4 and D1 charts   The nearest resistance according to the H4 chart is in the area of 1,835 - 1,841. Then the next resistance according to the daily chart is at 1,847 - 1,852. The nearest support is at 1 788 - 1 795 and then 1 780 - 1 784 USD per troy ounce of gold.  
Should Someone Tell The Price Of Gold It's Time To Review Its Incoming "Oponents"?

Should Someone Tell The Price Of Gold It's Time To Review Its Incoming "Oponents"?

Przemysław Radomski Przemysław Radomski 15.02.2022 16:00
  Gold continues to benefit from the market turmoil and has apparently forgotten about medium-term problems. Meanwhile, the rising USD and a hawkish Fed await confrontation. With financial markets whipsawing after every Russia-Ukraine headline, volatility has risen materially in recent days. With whispers of a Russian invasion on Feb. 16 (which I doubt will be realized), the game of hot potato has uplifted the precious metals market. However, as I noted on Feb. 14, while the developments are short-term bullish, the PMs’ medium-term fundamentals continue to decelerate. For example, while the general stock market remains concerned about a Russian invasion, U.S. Treasury yields rallied on Feb. 14. With risk-off sentiment often born in the bond market, the safety trade benefiting the PMs didn’t materialize in U.S. Treasuries. As a result, bond traders aren’t demonstrating the same level of fear. Please see below: Source: Investing.com Furthermore, while the potential conflict garners all of the attention, the fundamental issues that upended the PMs in 2021 remain unresolved. For example, with inflation surging, St. Louis Fed President James Bullard said on Feb. 14 that “the last four [Consumer Price Index] reports taken in tandem have indicated that inflation is broadening and possibly accelerating in the U.S. economy.” “The inflation that we’re seeing is very bad for low- and moderate-income households,” he said. “People are unhappy, consumer confidence is declining. This is not a good situation. We have to reassure people that we’re going to defend our inflation target and we’re going to get back to 2%.” As a result, Bullard wants a 50 basis point rate hike in March, and four rate hikes by July. Please see below: Source: CNBC Likewise, while San Francisco Fed President Mary Daly is much less hawkish than Bullard, she also supports a rate hike in March. Source: CNBC As a result, while the PMs can hide behind the Russia-Ukraine conflict in the short term, their medium-term fundamental outlooks are profoundly bearish. As mentioned, Bullard highlighted inflation’s impact on consumer confidence, and for a good reason. With the University of Michigan releasing its Consumer Sentiment Index on Feb. 11, the report revealed that Americans’ optimism sank to “its worst level in a decade, falling a stunning 8.2% from last month and 19.7% from last February.” Chief Economist, Richard Curtin said: “The recent declines have been driven by weakening personal financial prospects, largely due to rising inflation, less confidence in the government's economic policies, and the least favorable long term economic outlook in a decade.” “The impact of higher inflation on personal finances was spontaneously cited by one-third of all consumers, with nearly half of all consumers expecting declines in their inflation adjusted incomes during the year ahead.” Please see below: To that point, I’ve highlighted on numerous occasions that U.S. President Joe Biden’s re-election prospects often move inversely to inflation. With the dynamic still on full display, immediate action is needed to maintain his political survival. Please see below: To explain, the light blue line above tracks the year-over-year (YoY) percentage change in inflation, while the dark blue line above tracks Biden’s approval rating. If you analyze the right side of the chart, you can see that the U.S. President remains in a highly perilous position. Moreover, with U.S. midterm elections scheduled for Nov. 8, the Democrats can’t wait nine to 12 months for inflation to calm down. As a result, there is a lot at stake politically in the coming months. As further evidence, as inflation reduces real incomes and depresses consumer confidence, the Misery Index also hovers near crisis levels. Please see below: To explain, the blue line above tracks the Misery Index. For context, the index is calculated by subtracting the unemployment rate from the YoY percentage change in the headline CPI. In a nutshell, when inflation outperforms the unemployment rate (the blue line rises), it creates a stagflationary environment in America. To that point, if you analyze the right side of the chart, you can see that the Misery Index is approaching a level that coincided with the global financial crisis (GFC). As a result, reversing the trend is essential to avoid a U.S. recession. As such, with inflation still problematic and the writing largely on the wall, the market-implied probability of seven rate hikes by the Fed in 2022 is nearly 93% (as of Feb. 10). Please see below: Ironically, while consumers and the bond market fret over inflation, U.S. economic growth remains resilient. While I’ve been warning for months that a bullish U.S. economy is bearish for the PMs, continued strength should turn hawkish expectations into hawkish realities. To that point, the chart above shows that futures traders expect the U.S. Federal Funds Rate to hit 1.75% in 2022 (versus 0.08% now). However, Michael Darda, Chief Economist at MKM Partners, expects the Fed’s overnight lending rate to hit 3.5% before it’s all said and done. “We have this booming economy with high inflation and a rapid recovery in the labor market – much different relative to the last cycle,” he said. “The Fed is behind the curve this time. They are going to have to do more.”  Singing a similar tune, John Thorndike, co-head of asset allocation at GMO, told clients that “inflation is now here, [but] the narrative is that inflation goes away and markets tend to struggle with change. It is more likely than not that real yields and policy rates need to move above inflation during this cycle.” The bottom line? While the Russia-Ukraine drama distracts the PMs from the fundamental realities that confront them over the medium term, their outlooks remain profoundly bearish. Moreover, while I’ve noted on numerous occasions that the algorithms will enhance momentum in either direction, their influence wanes materially as time passes. As such, while headline risk is material in the short-term, history shows that technicals and fundamentals reign supreme over longer time horizons. Thus, while the recent flare-up is an unfortunate event that hurts our short position, the medium-term developments that led to our bearish outlook continue to strengthen. In conclusion, the PMs rallied on Feb. 14, as the Russia-Ukraine conflict is the primary driver moving the financial markets. However, while the PMs will ride the wave as far as it takes them, they ignored that the USD Index and U.S. Treasury yields also rallied. Moreover, with Fed officials ramping up the hawkish rhetoric, the PMs' fundamental outlook is more bearish now than it was in 2021 (if we exclude the Russia-Ukraine implications). As a result, while the timeline may have been delayed, lower lows should confront gold, silver, and mining stocks in the coming months. Thank you for reading our free analysis today. Please note that the above is just a small fraction of today’s all-encompassing Gold & Silver Trading Alert. The latter includes multiple premium details such as the targets for gold and mining stocks that could be reached in the next few weeks. If you’d like to read those premium details, we have good news for you. As soon as you sign up for our free gold newsletter, you’ll get a free 7-day no-obligation trial access to our premium Gold & Silver Trading Alerts. It’s really free – sign up today. Przemyslaw Radomski, CFAFounder, Editor-in-chiefSunshine Profits: Effective Investment through Diligence & Care * * * * * All essays, research and information found above represent analyses and opinions of Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA and Sunshine Profits' associates only. As such, it may prove wrong and be subject to change without notice. Opinions and analyses are based on data available to authors of respective essays at the time of writing. Although the information provided above is based on careful research and sources that are deemed to be accurate, Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA and his associates do not guarantee the accuracy or thoroughness of the data or information reported. The opinions published above are neither an offer nor a recommendation to purchase or sell any securities. Mr. Radomski is not a Registered Securities Advisor. By reading Przemyslaw Radomski's, CFA reports you fully agree that he will not be held responsible or liable for any decisions you make regarding any information provided in these reports. Investing, trading and speculation in any financial markets may involve high risk of loss. Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA, Sunshine Profits' employees and affiliates as well as members of their families may have a short or long position in any securities, including those mentioned in any of the reports or essays, and may make additional purchases and/or sales of those securities without notice.
Stumbling Again

Stumbling Again

Monica Kingsley Monica Kingsley 16.02.2022 15:53
S&P 500 rebound goes on reflexively, but stormy clouds are gathering – I‘m looking for the bears to reassert themselves over the next couple of days latest. The credit markets posture is far from raging risk-on even though select commodities are recovering (what else to expect in a secular commodities bull) and precious metals suffered a modest setback (not a reversal though). Crypto recovery is nodding towards the risk-on upturn that is though likely to get checked soon.It‘s great that tech was the driver of yesterday‘s S&P 500 upswing, but for how long would it keep leadership now that attention is shifting back towards inflation. Yesterday I wrote that: (...) rebound looks approaching as stocks might lead bonds in the risk appetite. When the East European tensions get dialed down, S&P 500 can be counted on to lead, probably more so when it comes to value than tech. That‘s why the tech participation is key as it would make up for the evaporating risk premium in energy. Or precious metals – these are likely to rise once again when the spotlight shifts to the inadequacy of Fed‘s tightening in the inflation fight.So far the stock market advance hasn‘t met a brick wall, but value upswing has been sold into (unlike tech‘s). Energy stocks lost, but are likely to come back – and the next microrotation might not be powerful enough to carry S&P 500 higher. Anyway without a HYG upswing, stock bulls are facing stiff headwinds.Let‘s move right into the charts (all courtesy of www.stockcharts.com).S&P 500 and Nasdaq OutlookS&P 500 rebounded on low volume but that wouldn‘t be an issue in a healthy bull market – the trouble is that this 2022 price action isn‘t very healthy.Credit MarketsHYG didn‘t trade on a strong note, and the rise in yields continues almost unabated. This is what I meant yesterday by saying that we may be though nearing the point of credit market reprieve – as much as that‘s compatible with rate raising cycle.Gold, Silver and MinersPrecious metals suffered a temporary setback – they easily gave up some of the safe haven gains, which isn‘t surprising. The bulls though haven‘t lost control, and that‘s key.Crude OilCrude oil dip was bought, and there wasn‘t much bearish conviction to start with. The general uptrend is likely to continue, and $90 appears likely to hold over the next few days definitely.CopperCopper is now in for some backing and filling, but managed to catch up with other commodities a little yesterday. The red metal remains range bound, but making good bullish progress.Bitcoin and EthereumCryptos are paring back yesterday‘s advance, and unless the mid Feb lows give, they‘re likely to muddle through with a modest bullish bias till the attention shifts to the Fed again.SummaryS&P 500 bulls‘ opportunity seems slipping away with each 1D or 4H candle, and I‘m not counting on the credit markets to ride to stocks‘ rescue. The commodities bull though is likely to carry on with little interference – and so does the precious metals bull as the yield curve keeps compressing. Slowdown in economic growth with rampant inflation and the realization that the Fed tightening hasn‘t had the effect, is awaiting, and would usher in strong gold and silver gains.Thank you for having read today‘s free analysis, which is available in full at my homesite. There, you can subscribe to the free Monica‘s Insider Club, which features real-time trade calls and intraday updates for all the five publications: Stock Trading Signals, Gold Trading Signals, Oil Trading Signals, Copper Trading Signals and Bitcoin Trading Signals.
After A Large Amplitude GBPUSD Seems To Be Stable, But Maybe It Will Start Rising Again?

After A Large Amplitude GBPUSD Seems To Be Stable, But Maybe It Will Start Rising Again?

8 eightcap 8 eightcap 17.02.2022 03:09
Today we’re looking at the GBPUSD as buyers continue to hold firm and now only face one level of resistance both they can get the new uptrend back on track. Fundamentally a few things remain on the radar. Russian/Ukrainian Situation, we’ve seen recently that fair ups are supporting the USD and any new escalations could drive the USD higher which would hurt the GBPUSD. T-note yields are another ongoing factor but yields have settled for now but new highs could once again hurt risk pairs including the GBPUSD. US inflation and UK inflation. US inflation and rate rises could be starting to be factored in unless we see a new spike. The minutes didn’t do much to drive the USD this week, while a new rise in UK inflation definitely supported the GBP yesterday giving the GBPUSD a nice boost in Wednesday’s session. With that in mind let’s look at some of the technicals we’re watching on the GBPUSD chart. For now, we see price stuck in consolidation with support and resistance currently holding price. Overall we can see two new uptrends in play, on the short and medium times. Price also sits above all three moving averages and the short term MAs are trading above the 86 MA. While support remains firm we will continue to look for buyers to push at a new continuation. The key to this is a break above the two resistance points. This could confirm a new breakout and start suggesting that the medium-term trend could continue. A break below support and a move back to the new Med-trend would be a small warning sign and further evidence would be required before thinking that the trend is going to continue. GBPUSD D1 Chart The post Forex News: GBPUSD setting up for a continuation? appeared first on Eightcap.
Bearish Turn Coming

Bearish Turn Coming

Monica Kingsley Monica Kingsley 17.02.2022 15:57
Thanks to Fed minutes, the S&P 500 closed modestly up, but could have taken the stronger credit markets cue. Instead, the upswing was sold into – the selling pressure is there, and neither value nor tech took the opportunity to rise, even against the backdrop of a weakening dollar. That‘s quite telling – the stock market correction hasn‘t run its course yet, and whatever progress the bulls make, is being countered convincingly. Precious metals adored the combo of yields and dollar turning down – and reacted with the miners‘ outperformance. The silver to copper ratio is basing, and the white metal looks to have better short-term prospects than the red one. Still in the headline sensitive environment we‘re in, gold would be stronger than silver until inflation is recognized for what it is. If there‘s one thing that the aftermath of Fed minutes showed, it‘s that the commodities superbull is alive and well, and that precious metals likewise are acting very positively in this tightening cycle. Suffice to say that gold has a track record of turning up once the rate hikes finally start… Excellent, the portfolio is positioned accordingly. Let‘s move right into the charts (all courtesy of www.stockcharts.com). S&P 500 and Nasdaq Outlook S&P 500 rebound is getting suspect, and should stocks close on a weak note today, it‘s clear that today‘s wobbling Philly Fed Manufacturing Index won‘t be balanced out by the succession of Fed speakers – the signs of real economy headwinds are here. Credit Markets HYG upswing could have had broader repercussions, and it‘s quite telling it didn‘t. The risk-on turn would likely be sold into, with consequences. Gold, Silver and Miners Precious metals suffered a temporary setback only indeed – I‘m looking for the gains to continue as the miners outperformance just can‘t be overlooked. Crude Oil Crude oil dipped some more, and the dip was again bought. Given the late session wavering, I‘m looking for some more sideways and volatile trading ahead before the upswing reasserts itself. Copper Copper continues trading sideways, but with bullish undertones. More consolidation before another upswing attempt is probable. Bitcoin and Ethereum Cryptos are turning down, but still haven‘t broken either way out of the current range. Both Bitcoin and Ethereum are sending a message of caution. Summary S&P 500 bulls‘ opportunity seems increasingly slipping away given that the buyers couldn‘t defend gains after Fed minutes release. The upturn in credit markets is likely to prove of fleeting shelf life, and would exert downward pressure upon stocks. As I wrote yesterday (and talked extensively within today‘s article chart captions), the commodities bull is likely to carry on with little interference – and so would the precious metals bull as the yield curve keeps compressing, and the beginning of rate hikes would mark further headwinds for the real economy at a time of persistent inflation that could be perhaps brought down to 4-5% official rate late this year (which would leave the mainstream wondering why it just isn‘t transitory somewhat more – what an irony). The Fed‘s tools to be employed are simply insufficient to break the inflation‘s back, that‘s it. Thank you for having read today‘s free analysis, which is available in full at my homesite. There, you can subscribe to the free Monica‘s Insider Club, which features real-time trade calls and intraday updates for all the five publications: Stock Trading Signals, Gold Trading Signals, Oil Trading Signals, Copper Trading Signals and Bitcoin Trading Signals.
Is It Worth Adding Gold to Your Portfolio in 2022?

Is It Worth Adding Gold to Your Portfolio in 2022?

Arkadiusz Sieron Arkadiusz Sieron 17.02.2022 16:29
  Gold prices declined in 2021 and the prospects for 2022 are not impressive as well. However, the yellow metal’s strategic relevance remains high. Last month, the World Gold Council published two interesting reports about gold. The first one is the latest edition of Gold Demand Trends, which summarizes the entire last year. Gold supply decreased 1%, while gold demand rose 10% in 2021. Despite these trends, the price of gold declined by around 4%, which – for me – undermines the validity of the data presented by the WGC. I mean here that the relevance of some categories of gold demand (jewelry demand, technological demand, the central bank’s purchases) for the price formation is somewhat limited. The most important driver for gold prices is investment demand. Unsurprisingly, this category plunged 43% in 2021, driven by large ETF outlfows. According to the report, “gold drew direction chiefly from inflation and interest rate expectations in 2021,” although it seems that rising rates outweighed inflationary concerns. As the chart below shows, the interest rates increased significantly last year. For example, 10-year Treasury yields rose 60 basis points. As a result, the opportunity costs for holding gold moved up, triggering an outflow of gold holdings from the ETF. As the rise in interest rates is likely to continue in 2022 because of the hawkish stance of the Fed, gold investment may struggle this year as well. The end of quantitative easing and the start of quantitative tightening may add to the downward pressure on gold prices. However, there are some bullish caveats here. First, gold has remained resilient in January, despite the hawkish FOMC meeting. Second, the Fed’s tightening cycle could be detrimental to the US stock market and the overall, highly indebted economy, which could be supportive of gold prices. Third, as the report points out, “gold has historically outperformed in the months following the onset of a US Fed tightening cycle”. The second publication released by the WGC last month was “The Relevance of Gold as a Strategic Asset 2022”. The main thesis of the report is that gold is a strategic asset, complementary to equities and bonds, that enhances investment portfolios’ performance. This is because gold is “a store of wealth and a hedge against systemic risk, currency depreciation, and inflation.” It is also “highly liquid, no one’s liability, carries no credit risk, and is scarce, historically preserving its value over time.” Gold is believed to be a great source of return, as its price has increased by an average of nearly 11% per year since 1971, according to the WGC. Gold can also provide liquidity, as the gold market is highly liquid. As the report points out, “physical gold holdings by investors and central banks are worth approximately $4.9 trillion, with an additional $1.2 trillion in open interest through derivatives traded on exchanges or the over-the-counter (OTC) market.” Last but not least, gold is an excellent portfolio diversifier, as it is negatively correlated with risk assets, and – importantly – this negative correlation increases as these assets sell off. Hence, adding gold to a portfolio could diversify it, improving its risk-adjusted return, and also provide liquidity to meet liabilities in times of market stress. The WGC’s analysis suggests that investors should consider adding between 4% and 15% of gold to the portfolio, but personally, I would cap this share at 10%.   Implications for Gold What do the recent WGC reports imply for the gold market? Well, one thing is that adding some gold to the investment portfolio would probably be a smart move. After all, gold serves the role of both a safe-haven asset and an insurance against tail risks. It’s nice to be insured. However, investing in gold is something different, as gold may be either in a bullish or bearish trend. You should never confuse these two motives behind owning gold! Sometimes it’s good to own gold for both insurance and investment reasons, but not always. When it comes to 2022, investment demand for gold may continue to be under downward pressure amid rising interest rates. However, there are also some bullish forces at work, which could intensify later this year. If you enjoyed today’s free gold report, we invite you to check out our premium services. We provide much more detailed fundamental analyses of the gold market in our monthly Gold Market Overview reports and we provide daily Gold & Silver Trading Alerts with clear buy and sell signals. In order to enjoy our gold analyses in their full scope, we invite you to subscribe today. If you’re not ready to subscribe yet though and are not on our gold mailing list yet, we urge you to sign up. It’s free and if you don’t like it, you can easily unsubscribe. Sign up today! Arkadiusz Sieron, PhDSunshine Profits: Effective Investment through Diligence & Care
Wondering How Inflation And Fed Reaction Will Affect Gold

Wondering How Inflation And Fed Reaction Will Affect Gold

Arkadiusz Sieron Arkadiusz Sieron 18.02.2022 16:05
  Not only won’t inflation end soon, it’s likely to remain high. Whether gold will be able to take advantage of it will depend, among others, on the Fed. Do you sometimes ask yourself when this will all end? I don’t mean the universe, nor our lives, nor even this year (c’mon, guys, it has just started!). I mean, of course, inflation. If only you weren’t in a coma last year, you would have probably noticed that prices had been surging recently. For instance, America finished the year with a shocking CPI annual rate of 7.1%, the highest since June 1982, as the chart below shows. Now, the key question is how much higher inflation could rise, or how persistent it could be. The consensus is that we will see a peak this year and subsequent cooling down, but to still elevated levels. This is the view I also hold. However, would I bet my collection of precious metals on it? I don’t know, as inflation could surprise us again, just as it did to most of the economists (but not me) last year. The risk is clearly to the upside. As always in economics, it’s a matter of supply and demand. There is even a joke that all you need to turn a parrot into an economist is to teach it to say ‘supply’ and ‘demand’. Funny, huh? When it comes to the demand side, both the money supply growth and the evolution of personal saving rate implies some cooling down of inflation rate. Please take a look at the chart below. As you can see, the broad money supply peaked in February 2021. Assuming a one-year lag between the money supply and price level, inflation rate should reach its peak somewhere in the first quarter of this year. There is one important caveat here: the pace of money supply growth has not returned to the pre-pandemic level, but it stabilized at about 13%, double the rate seen at the end of 2019. Inflation was then more or less at the Fed’s target of 2%, so without constraining money supply growth, the US central bank couldn’t beat inflation. As the chart above also shows, the personal saving rate has returned to the pre-pandemic level of 7-8%. It means that the bulk of pent-up demand has already materialized, which should also help to ease inflation in the future. However, not all of the ‘forced savings’ have already entered the market. Thus, personal consumption expenditures are likely to be elevated for some time, contributing to boosted inflation. Regarding supply factors, although some bottlenecks have eased, the disruptions have not been fully resolved. The spread of the Omicron variant of the coronavirus and regional lockdowns in China could prolong the imbalances between booming demand and constrained supply. Other contributors to high inflation are rising producer prices, increasing house prices and rents, strong inflation expectations (see the chart below), and labor shortages combined with fast wage growth. The bottom line is that, all things considered – in particular high level of demand, continued supply issues, and de-anchored inflation expectations – I forecast another year of elevated inflation, but probably not as high as in 2021. After reaching a peak in a few months, the inflation rate could ease to, let’s say, around 4% in December, if we are lucky. Importantly, the moderate bond yields also suggest that inflation will ease somewhat later in 2022. What does it mean for the gold market? Well, I don’t have good news for the gold bulls. Gold loves high and accelerating inflation the most. Indeed, as the chart below shows, gold peaks coincided historically with inflation heights. The most famous example is the inflation peak in early 1980, when gold ended its impressive rally and entered into a long bearish trend. The 2011 top also happened around the local inflationary peak. The only exception was the 2005 peak in inflation, when gold didn’t care and continued its bullish trend. However, this was partially possible thanks to the decline in the US dollar, which seems unlikely to repeat in the current macroeconomic environment, in which the Fed is clearly more hawkish than the ECB or other major central banks. The relatively strong greenback won’t help gold shine. Surely, disinflation may turn out to be transitory and inflation may increase again several months later. Lower inflation implies a less aggressive Fed, which should be supportive of gold prices. However, investors should remember that the US central bank will normalize its monetary policy no matter the inflation rate. Since the Great Recession, inflation has been moderate, but the Fed has tightened its stance eventually, nevertheless. Hence, gold may experience a harsh moment when inflation peaks. Thank you for reading today’s free analysis. We hope you enjoyed it. If so, we would like to invite you to sign up for our free gold newsletter. Once you sign up, you’ll also get 7-day no-obligation trial of all our premium gold services, including our Gold & Silver Trading Alerts. Sign up today! Arkadiusz Sieron, PhDSunshine Profits: Effective Investment through Diligence & Care.
Markets News: Crude Oil, Gold, EuroStoxx 600, Copper

Analysing Macro, The Conflict In Eastern Europe, Standard And Poor 500 And US100

Purple Trading Purple Trading 21.02.2022 12:53
The Swing Overview – Week 7 Macroeconomic events last week had a secondary impact on market volatility. The "big story" that is currently moving the markets is the situation in Ukraine. Equity indices weakened and retested their strong supports. Last week's winner, on the other hand, is the gold, which, due to these geopolitical uncertainties, surprisingly strengthened to USD 1,900 per ounce, where it last traded in June 2021.   Macroeconomic data from the US  US industrial inflation on an annual basis came in at 9.7%, up from 9.8% in the previous month. This is the first decline in industrial inflation since April 2020. Retail sales reported very strong data, rising 3.8% in January (previous month was down 2.5%).  In the labor market, there was an unexpected increase in initial jobless claims of 248k (expectations were for a 219k increase). FOMC meeting minutes released on Wednesday did not indicate that the Fed was seriously considering a 0.50% rate hike in March. This gave the markets and risk currencies a temporary boost, but the main driver of the markets last week was the situation in Ukraine. Geopolitical tensions in Ukraine Last week Friday, when Jake Sullivan, the White House national security adviser, warned that Russia could attack Ukraine "any day now", sent stock indices into the red and investors focused on so-called "save havens" such as the US bonds and the gold, which rallied strongly. In contrast, commodity currencies, stock indices and cryptocurrencies, which are seen as risky assets, weakened. This suggests what might happen if an invasion actually took place. At the moment, however, both sides seem to be open to diplomatic solution of the crisis. This brings some relief and cautious optimism even though further developments are unclear.  Let’s have a look at how the US bond yields are reacting to the situation: Figure 1: 10 year government bond yield on the 4H chart and the USD index on the daily chart Demand for these bonds has been rising as investors view the US government bonds as a "save haven" in times of uncertainty. This increases the price of these bonds. Since there is an inverse relationship between the price of bonds and their interest yield, a rise in the price of bonds then pushes down their yields. This explains why the yield on these bonds fell on Friday last week as a result of the news of a possible Russian attack.   Overall, however, yields on these bonds continue to rise as investors anticipate a rise in the US interest rates. This in turn has had a negative effect on the technology stocks in the NASDAQ index in particular.   NASDAQ a SP500 Figure 2: The US NASDAQ index on H4 and D1 chart The NASDAQ started last week on Friday with a significant decline as the other indices.  Then there was a correction of this decline as news emerged that Russia was withdrawing some of its troops from the Ukrainian border and that military exercises were over. However, the next report was that the US was not seeing any change at the border with Ukraine and the NASDAQ index fell again. The current situation is that both sides have agreed to further negotiations.  It can be seen from this how sensitive the indices are to such news. We therefore recommend that our clients keep an eye on any breaking news that emerges in relation to the situation in Ukraine.  The nearest resistance according to the H4 chart is at 14,606 - 14,673. The next resistance is then 15050 - 15100.  Support according to the H4 chart is at 14,050 - 14,100.  Significant support according to the daily chart is at 13,750-13,950.  As for the US SP 500 index, the situation is similar here.   Figure 3: SP 500 on H4 and D1 chart The nearest resistance is at 4,471 – 4,491. The next strong resistance is in the area at 4,580 - 4,600.  Support according to the H4 chart is at 4,357 – 4,367. According to the daily chart, significant support is at 4,225 - 4,300.   German DAX index Germany reported ZEW economic sentiment, which came in at 54.3 (previous month 51.7). This indicates an improving outlook for the German economy over the next six months. However, this index was under pressure last week as were the US indices.  Figure 4: The DAX on H4 and daily chart  On February 14, the index fell to 14,841, where the previous support is. The zone of this strong support according to the daily chart is quite wide: 14,800 - 15,000. The nearest resistance according to the H4 chart is 15,440 - 15,530. The next resistance then immediately follows this zone and is in the 15 534 - 15 617 range.   The EUR/USD under pressure The EURUSD has shown that in times of political uncertainty, this pair tends to weaken. The decline was justified in terms of technical analysis by the false break of the resistance, which is in the area of 1.1465 - 1.1480. Figure 5: EURUSD on H4 and daily chart The nearest resistance according to the H4 chart is in the area of 1.1380 - 1.1400. Support according to the H4 chart is at 1.1280 - 1.1300. Very strong support according to the daily chart is then at 1.1120 - 1.1140.   The Gold The gold surprised last week with unexpected strength based on the situation around Ukraine. News that Russia may attack Ukraine any day has caused the gold price to rise. It eventually reached $1,900 per troy ounce, where it last traded in June 2021.  Figure 6: The gold on the H4 and D1 chart The nearest resistance according to the daily chart is USD 1,900 - 1,916 per troy ounce of gold.  The nearest support is 1,872 - 1,878. The most significant support is then at 1 845 - 1 852 USD per troy ounce. Once geopolitical tensions calm down and US government bond yields continue to rise, this should be negative news for gold. 
Explained: When bonds and stocks trade in tandem and when the correlation is inverse

Explained: When bonds and stocks trade in tandem and when the correlation is inverse

FXStreet News FXStreet News 22.02.2022 15:58
In times of trouble, bonds are seen as a safe haven and yields fall with stocks.Normally, lower yields boost stocks, an inverse correlation.Understanding the situation is key to trading markets. Could you explain to me the relationship between the movement of 10-year US government bonds and US stock indices? This is a question we have received from a user and the answer is complicated – it depends on the current market focus.Markets are currently in times of trouble, with Russia and Ukraine apparently on the brink of war. Every negative headline prompts investors to sell stocks and buy bonds – moving yields down. So, yields and shares move in tandem. One example is the announcement by Russian President Vladimir Putin about the recognition of the breakaway Donetsk and Luhansk regions. Every optimistic headline sends money to stocks and away from Treasuries, pushing yields up, alongside equities. Examples include announcements of high or top-level meetings trying to resolve the situation. Headline-driven markets tend to experience this straightforward correlation between yields and stocks.However, the correlation is inverse when fear of war does not grip markets. In such situations, investors focus on the Federal Reserve. If they think there is a higher chance of more rate hikes, they sell both stocks and bonds – with yields rising to reflect expectations of elevated borrowing costs. Statements about the need for a 50 bps rate hike or strong economic data are examples of such behavior. When some Fed official says the path of rate hikes is slower, investors are happy to push yields lower by buying bonds and they also purchase stocks, which have a bigger advantage when the comparative safe investment in Treasuries results in a lower yield. A comment by a Fed official about settling for a standard 25 bps rate hike triggers such a reaction. Normal markets tend to experience an inverse correlation between bonds and stocks.
Let‘s Try Again

Let‘s Try Again

Monica Kingsley Monica Kingsley 23.02.2022 15:53
S&P 500 had a wild swings day, and didn‘t rise convincingly – credit markets didn‘t move correspondingly either. The upswing looks postponed unless fresh signs of broad weakness arrive. Yesterday‘s session didn‘t tell much either way – the countdown to the upswing materializing, is on even though tech didn‘t take advantage of higher bond prices. That can still come.VIX though reversed to the downside, and the relatively calmer session we‘re likely going to experience today, would be consistent with a modest attempt for stocks to move higher. I‘m though not looking for a monstrous rally, even though we‘re trading closer to the lower end of the wide S&P 500 range for this year than to its upper border. The 4,280s are so far holding but as the Mar FOMC approaches, we‘re likely to see a fresh turn south in the 500-strong index. For now, the talk of raising rates is on the back burner – Europe is in the spotlight.Note that the flight to safety on rising tensions (Treasuries, gold and oil up) didn‘t benefit the dollar. Coupled with the yields reprieve, that makes for further precious metals gains – the bull run won‘t be toppled if soothing news arrives. Likewise crude oil isn‘t going to tank below $90, and remain there. Commodities can be counted on to keep running – led by energy and agrifoods, with base metals (offering a helping hand to silver) in tow. As I wrote weeks ago, this is where the real gains are to be found.Let‘s move right into the charts (all courtesy of www.stockcharts.com).S&P 500 and Nasdaq OutlookS&P 500 volume moved a little up, meaning the buying interest is still there – convincing signs of a trend change are though yet not apparent. Should prices prove to have trouble breaking lower over the next 1-2 days, this could still turn out a good place for a little long positon.Credit MarketsHYG continues basing, and keeps trading in a risk-off fashion, which is why I can‘t be wildly bullish stocks for now. Stock market gains are likely to remain subdued, noticeably subdued – as a bare minimum for today.Gold, Silver and MinersPrecious metals fireworks continue, but a little reprieve is developing – nothing though that would break the bull. The run is only starting, and would continue through the rate raising cycle.Crude OilCrude oil is fairly well bid, and doesn‘t appear to be really dipping any time soon. Oil stocks are preparing for an upswing, and would remain one of the best performing S&P 500 sectors. Tripple digit oil is a question of time.CopperCopper‘s moment in the spotlight is approaching as commodities keeps pushing higher, and base metals are breaking up. All of these factors are inflationary.Bitcoin and EthereumCryptos are attempting to move up today, and further gains are likely. I‘m though looking for the 50-day moving average in Bitcoin (corresponding roughly to the mid Feb lows in Ethereum) to prove an obstacle.SummaryS&P 500 didn‘t break to new lows overnight, and appears to be picking up somewhat today. The anticipated rebound might materialize later today, and would require bond participation to be credible. I‘m not looking for sharp gains within this upswing though – the correction looks very much to have further to run. It‘s commodities and precious metals where the largest gains are to be made, with the European tensions taking the focus off inflation (momentarily). The pressure on the Fed to act decisively, is though still on as various credit spreads tell – and the same goes for the compressed yield curve speaking volumes about the (precarious) state of the real economy.Thank you for having read today‘s free analysis, which is available in full at my homesite. There, you can subscribe to the free Monica‘s Insider Club, which features real-time trade calls and intraday updates for all the five publications: Stock Trading Signals, Gold Trading Signals, Oil Trading Signals, Copper Trading Signals and Bitcoin Trading Signals.
It Begins

It Begins

Monica Kingsley Monica Kingsley 24.02.2022 16:00
S&P 500 reprieve that wasn‘t – the buyers didn‘t arrive, and the overnight military action sparking serious asset moves, shows that buying the dip would have been a bad idea. And it still is. Risk-on assets are likely to suffer, and I‘m not looking for a sharp, V-shaped rebound. The partial retracement seen in cryptos wouldn‘t translate to much upside in paper assets – it will likely be sold into as the bottom would take time to form. The safe haven premium seen in precious metals, crude oil and other real assets would ebb and flow, but a higher base has been established. The world has changed overnight, and recognition thereof is still pending.I think it‘s clear why I had been derisking as much as possible, wary of volatility both ways in paper assets, and betting instead on a mix of real assets. This has been hugely paying off to subscribers and readers likewise favoring gold and crude oil with some copper added for good measure.Let‘s move right into the charts (all courtesy of www.stockcharts.com).S&P 500 and Nasdaq OutlookThis isn‘t how an S&P 500 bottom looks like – downswing continues with more volatility ahead.Credit MarketsHYG is going down again, and credit markets are turning risk-off – look for Treasuries to do relatively better next, with little impact upon stocks.Gold, Silver and MinersPrecious metals fireworks continue, and the upswing got a poweful ally. Whatever retracement seen next, would be marginal in light of the developments.Crude OilCrude oil upswing can be counted on to continue, and oil stocks would remain among the best performing S&P 500 pockets. Black gold is though notorious for its wild volatility, and the coming days won‘t be an exception.CopperCopper upswing would take time to develop, especially now – but the breakout in base metals is on, the inflationary messaging is still there and thriving.Bitcoin and EthereumCryptos aren‘t in a rally mode, but are attempting to put in a low. I don‘t think it would hold, the dust hasn‘t settled yet.SummaryS&P 500 is plunging, and attempting to base, but more selling would inevitably hit. The overnight dust hasn‘t settled yet, but the panic lows would not happen today. Even if it weren‘t for geopolitics, stocks were in rough waters for weeks already, in a serious, yields and liquidity driven correction, with a slowing real economy on top. For all the short-term focus, the buying opportunity would materialize only once the Fed turns – by autumn 2022. The best places to be in right now, are those presented below – precious metals and commodities – as inflation fires continue to rage on.Thank you for having read today‘s free analysis, which is available in full at my homesite. There, you can subscribe to the free Monica‘s Insider Club, which features real-time trade calls and intraday updates for all the five publications: Stock Trading Signals, Gold Trading Signals, Oil Trading Signals, Copper Trading Signals and Bitcoin Trading Signals.
The Swing Overview - Week 9

The Swing Overview - Week 9

Purple Trading Purple Trading 07.03.2022 20:22
The Swing Overview - Week 9 The war in Ukraine continues, and although we all want this tragic event to be ended immediately, but unfortunately, according to last statements of Russian officials, it looks like the war will drag on for a longer period of time. Investors have reacted to this development by selling risk assets, including the Czech koruna. Stock indices are losing ground and the DAX in particular has been under heavy pressure. On the other hand, commodities such as oil, gold, and coal are strengthening strongly. Somewhat surprising is the development in the Australian dollar, which usually weakens in the events of geopolitical uncertainties. However, there is a reason for its current rise. More on this in our article. Conflict in Ukraine   Vladimir Putin probably did not expect to encounter such a brave resistance from Ukraine and that  almost the whole world would send Russia into isolation through significant sanctions. The list of companies and actions that have cut ties with Russia is growing day by the day and Western companies are leaving Russia. Thus, for Russians, foreign goods (food, clothing, furniture, electronics, cars) will gradually become very rare. Probably the strongest sanction that Russia has felt so far, was the freeze of the Russian Central Bank's foreign exchange reserves. In response, the Russian ruble began to depreciate significantly on February 28, 2022, and has already lost more than 30% of its pre-invasion value. In response, the Russian Central Bank intervened by raising the interest rate to 20%, which temporarily halted the ruble's fall.    Figure 1: The Russian ruble paired with the USD and the euro Meanwhile, Western countries have not exhausted all options to stop Russia in this war through economic sanctions in case of further escalation of the conflict yet. The fact that European countries might stop taking Russian gas is also at stake. This would, of course, have a very significant impact on the entire European economy. However, these are still just some economic losses, which can not be   compared at all with the losses of lives experienced by the unprecedentedly attacked Ukraine. In any case, this crisis seems to have the potential to surpass in its consequences the crisis that occurred in Russia in 1998, which led to inflation exceeding 80% and central bank interest rates reaching 150%.   Data from the US economy The ISM manufacturing sentiment indicator for February came in at 58.6 which is better than expected and points to an optimistic development of the US economy. In the labour market sector, the ADP (non-farm job change) indicator was reported, which showed that 475 thousand jobs were created in America in February (compared to 509 thousand in January). The number of unemployment claims reached 215 thousand last week, which was less than expected 226 thousand. Thus, the data show that the US economy is doing well so far and the US Fed is going to raise interest rates at its next meeting on March 16, 2022. Jerome Powell said that he would support a 0.25% rate hike. Powell also said that the war in Ukraine means significant uncertainty for monetary policy.   The US dollar and bond yields The US dollar continues to strengthen, as the USD index shows. In addition to the expected US interest rate hike, the US dollar bullishness is explained by demand for US government bonds in times of uncertainty. Demand for these bonds then pushes down their yields, which continue to fall. Figure 2: 10-year government bond yield on the 4H chart and USD index on the daily chart Index SP500 The US SP 500 index moved in a consolidation range last week. This shows that investors have so far viewed the conflict in Ukraine as an event that is more or less a regional event and therefore saw cheap stocks as a buying opportunity.  However, the sanctions adopted by Western countries will of course also have an impact on the global economy, especially if the conflict deepens further. This concern was then reflected at the end of the week when the index started to weaken. Figure 3: The SP 500 on H4 and D1 chart   Resistance according to the H4 chart is in the region of around 4,410 - 4,420. The nearest support according to the H4 chart is at 4255 - 4284. Significant support is at 4,100 - 4,113. German DAX index In contrast to the SP 500 index, there was a big sell-off in the DAX, showing that investors are worried, among other things, that a further escalation of the conflict could lead to a disruption in the supply of Russian gas, on which Germany is heavily dependent.  According to the daily chart, it looks like the DAX index is now in free fall and is breaking through support barriers as if they did not exist. It looks like the market is starting to show signs of panic selling by inexperienced investors.  If you are speculating in the short term, then bear in mind that short term speculation against such a strong downtrend is very disadvantageous and risky.   Figure 4: DAX on H4 and daily chart     Current resistance is in the area of 13,655 - 13,756. The price is now at support at 13,400, which is already slightly broken, but the closing of the whole session will be crucial. The next support is then at 13 000 - 13 100.   The Czech koruna is losing significantly The Czech koruna has long benefited from the interest rate differential, which has been very favourable for the koruna against the euro and has been the reason why the koruna has appreciated strongly since November 2021. But the Czech koruna, along with other Central European currencies, is a currency that is losing ground heavily in the current conflict.   Figure 5: The EURCZK on the daily chart   Firstly, there is the concern that the Czech Republic is geographically quite close to Ukraine, even though the Czech Republic does not have very significant exports directly with Ukraine nor Russia (in total, around 3% of total Czech exports). At the same time, there is concern about the Czech Republic's dependence on Russian gas. If the taps are closed, then the koruna could shoot above  CZK 27 per euro. Currently, the EURCZK pair is trading at the resistance level of 25. 80 - 25.90.   The Australian dollar The Australian dollar is a currency that tends to weaken during major global crises. In particular, the AUDJPY pair is correlated with the SP 500 index in the short term. Currently, however, the Australian dollar is strengthening.  This is because the Australian economy is export-oriented and exports commodities such as gold, iron ore, coal and gas.  All these commodities are now in high demand. Europe, for example, is realising that dependence on Russian gas is not paying off and is looking for alternatives. A temporary solution will be to rebuild coal-fired power stations. Germany and Italy have already started to buy coal stocks, which are therefore appreciating strongly. As a result, the price of coal has sky-rocketed, with one tonne reaching a record price of the USD 400. Figure 6: The coal price   The gold, traditionally seen as a safe haven in times of uncertainty, is also strengthening. The gold has also been helped by a fall in US bond yields.   Figure 7: The gold on H4 and D1 charts   In terms of technical analysis, the gold stopped at the resistance of $1,973 per ounce. The nearest support according to the daily chart is  $1,870 - 1,878 per ounce. The rise in commodity prices then resulted in the strengthening of the Australian dollar.     Figure 8: The AUDJPY currency pair on D1 chart   The AUDJPY broke the resistance in the range of 0.8400 - 0.8420, which became the new support. The next resistance is then at the level of 85.90 - 86.20.  
How the latest CPI affected Bitcoin

How the latest CPI affected Bitcoin

Alex Kuptsikevich Alex Kuptsikevich 10.03.2022 15:19
Consumer prices in the USA rose by 0.8% in February as expected. Inflation for the same month a year earlier was 7.9% compared to 7.5% a month earlier and in line with average forecasts.Over the last 12 months, the actual data has exceeded the forecast ten times, so the stabilisation seen in February is regarded as cautiously good news. Previously, market participants had assumed that inflation would peak in February, but the latest round of commodity prices makes these forecasts overly optimistic. In peacetime, markets would have priced in more decisive monetary policy tightening moves by the Fed. However, investors have recently discounted expectations of a rate hike by 50 points, contrary to a jump in commodity prices. The markets assume that the Fed will be much more cautious in tightening policy. This thesis is doubly true against the background of falling government bond yields and widening spreads between them and high-yield bonds.When the Fed has limited capacity to respond to inflation, this is bad news for the dollar because it undermines its long-term prospects for maintaining purchasing power. In this regard, the impulsive pressure on the US currency immediately after the release should not be surprising.Long term, this is also good news for bitcoin, which is not subject to inflation. However, the short-term reaction could well be mixed, as fears of a new stock market decline are also added to this cocktail, as stocks "don't like" accelerating inflation.
AUD/USD finds support near 0.7300 mark on Russian President Putin’s comments

AUD/USD finds support near 0.7300 mark on Russian President Putin’s comments

FXStreet News FXStreet News 11.03.2022 13:37
AUD/USD witnessed fresh selling on Friday and snapped two successive days of the winning streak.Dovish remarks by RBA Governor Lowe, modest USD strength exerted some downward pressure.A goodish recovery in the risk sentiment helped limit further losses for the perceived riskier aussie.The AUD/USD pair recovered a few pips from the daily low, around the 0.7300 mark touched in the last hour and was last seen trading around the 0.7325 region.The pair struggled to capitalize on its gains recorded over the past two trading sessions and witnessed some selling on Friday in reaction to dovish-sounding remarks by the RBA Governor Philip Lowe. During his opening address to the Australian Banking Association, Lowe said that the RBA will not be pressured by financial markets to raise interest rates until prices are rising at a sustainable pace.Apart from this, some intraday US dollar buying exerted additional downward pressure on the AUD/USD pair. That said, hopes of a diplomatic solution to the Ukraine crisis lifted the global risk sentiment and acted as a headwind for the safe-haven greenback. The optimism was fueled by comments from Russian President Vladimir Putin, saying that there are certain positive shifts in talks with Ukraine.The latest developments triggered a goodish move up in the equity markets, which, in turn, extended some support to the perceived riskier aussie. The risk-on mood, along with firming expectations for an imminent start of the policy tightening by the Fed pushed the US Treasury bond yields higher. This should act as a tailwind for the USD and keep a lid on any meaningful upside for the AUD/USD pair.Hence, it will be prudent to wait for some follow-through buying before confirming a near-term bullish bias amid the risk of a further escalation in tensions between Russia and the West. In fact, US President Joe Biden is set to call for an end of normal trade relations with Russia later this Friday, alongside the Group of Seven nations and European Union leaders.
Gold Likes Recessions - Could High Interest Rates Lead to One?

Gold Likes Recessions - Could High Interest Rates Lead to One?

Finance Press Release Finance Press Release 11.03.2022 16:52
We live in uncertain times, but one thing is (almost) certain: the Fed’s tightening cycle will be followed by an economic slowdown – if not worse.There are many regularities in nature. After winter comes spring. After night comes day. After the Fed’s tightening cycle comes a recession. This month, the Fed will probably end quantitative easing and lift the federal funds rate. Will it trigger the next economic crisis?It’s, of course, more nuanced, but the basic mechanism remains quite simple. Cuts in interest rates, maintaining them at very low levels for a prolonged time, and asset purchases – in other words, easy monetary policy and cheap money – lead to excessive risk-taking, investors’ complacency, periods of booms, and price bubbles. On the contrary, interest rate hikes and withdrawal of liquidity from the markets – i.e., tightening of monetary policy – tend to trigger economic busts, bursts of asset bubbles, and recessions. This happens because the amount of risk, debt, and bad investments becomes simply too high.Historians lie, but history – never does. The chart below clearly confirms the relationship between the Fed’s tightening cycle and the state of the US economy. As one can see, generally, all recessions were preceded by interest rate hikes. For instance, in 1999-2000, the Fed lifted the interest rates by 175 basis points, causing the burst of the dot-com bubble. Another example: in the period between 2004 and 2006, the US central bank raised rates by 425 basis points, which led to the burst of the housing bubble and the Great Recession.One could argue that the 2020 economic plunge was caused not by US monetary policy but by the pandemic. However, the yield curve inverted in 2019 and the repo crisis forced the Fed to cut interest rates. Thus, the recession would probably have occurred anyway, although without the Great Lockdown, it wouldn’t be so deep.However, not all tightening cycles lead to recessions. For example, interest rate hikes in the first half of the 1960s, 1983-1984, or 1994-1995 didn’t cause economic slumps. Hence, a soft landing is theoretically possible, although it has previously proved hard to achieve. The last three cases of monetary policy tightening did lead to economic havoc.It goes without saying that high inflation won’t help the Fed engineer a soft landing. The key problem here is that the US central bank is between an inflationary rock and a hard landing. The Fed has to fight inflation, but it would require aggressive hikes that could slow down the economy or even trigger a recession. Another issue is that high inflation wreaks havoc on its own. Thus, even if untamed, it would lead to a recession anyway, putting the economy into stagflation. Please take a look at the chart below, which shows the history of US inflation.As one can see, each time the CPI annul rate peaked above 5%, it was either accompanied by or followed by a recession. The last such case was in 2008 during the global financial crisis, but the same happened in 1990, 1980, 1974, and 1970. It doesn’t bode well for the upcoming years.Some analysts argue that we are not experiencing a normal business cycle right now. In this view, the recovery from a pandemic crisis is rather similar to the postwar demobilization, so high inflation doesn’t necessarily imply overheating of the economy and could subsidy without an immediate recession. Of course, supply shortages and pent-up demand contributed to the current inflationary episode, but we shouldn’t forget about the role of the money supply. Given its surge, the Fed has to tighten monetary policy to curb inflation. However, this is exactly what can trigger a recession, given the high indebtedness and Wall Street’s addiction to cheap liquidity.What does it mean for the gold market? Well, the possibility that the Fed’s tightening cycle will lead to a recession is good news for the yellow metal, which shines the most during economic crises. Actually, recent gold’s resilience to rising bond yields may be explained by demand for gold as a hedge against the Fed’s mistake or failure to engineer a soft landing.Another bullish implication is that the Fed will have to ease its stance at some point in time when the hikes in interest rates bring an economic slowdown or stock market turbulence. If history teaches us anything, it is that the Fed always chickens out and ends up less hawkish than it promised. In other words, the US central bank cares much more about Wall Street than it’s ready to admit and probably much more than it cares about inflation.Having said that, the recession won’t start the next day after the rate liftoff. Economic indicators don’t signal an economic slump. The yield curve has been flattening, but it’s comfortably above negative territory. I know that the pandemic has condensed the last recession and economic rebound, but I don’t expect it anytime soon (at least rather not in 2022). It implies that gold will have to live this year without the support of the recession or strong expectations of it.Thank you for reading today’s free analysis. We hope you enjoyed it. If so, we would like to invite you to sign up for our free gold newsletter. Once you sign up, you’ll also get 7-day no-obligation trial of all our premium gold services, including our Gold & Silver Trading Alerts. Sign up today!Arkadiusz Sieron, PhDSunshine Profits: Effective Investment through Diligence & Care.
Credit Markets Keeps Downward Move, S&P 500 (SPX) Trades Lower Than Usual, Bitcoin (BTC) Price Is... Quite Stable (Sic!)

Credit Markets Keeps Downward Move, S&P 500 (SPX) Trades Lower Than Usual, Bitcoin (BTC) Price Is... Quite Stable (Sic!)

Monica Kingsley Monica Kingsley 14.03.2022 13:09
S&P 500 bulls again missed the opportunity, and credit markets likewise. Not even the virtual certainty of only 25bp hike in Mar is providing much relief to the credit markets. Given that the real economy is considerably slowing down and that recession looks arriving before Q2 ends, the markets continue forcing higher rates (reflecting inflation). In a risk-on environment, value and cyclicals such as financials would be reacting positively, but that‘s not the case right now. At the same time, equal weighted S&P 500 (that‘s RSP) hasn‘t yet broken below its horizontal support above $145, meaning its posture isn‘t as bad as in the S&P 500. Should it however give, we‘re going considerably below 4,000. That‘s why today‘s article is titled hanging by a thread. Precious metals and commodities continue consolidating, and the least volatile appreciation opportunity presents the red metal. And it‘s not only about copper – crude oil market is going through supply realignment, and demand is not yet being destroyed on a massive scale. Coupled with the long-term underinvestment in exploration and drilling (US is no longer such a key producer as was the case in 2019), crude oil prices would continue rising on fundamentals, meaning the appreciation pace of Feb-Mar would slow down. Precious metals would have it easy next as the Fed is bound to be forced to make a U-turn in this very short tightening cycle (they didn‘t get far at all, and inflation expectations have in my view become unanchored already). Let‘s move right into the charts (all courtesy of www.stockcharts.com). S&P 500 and Nasdaq Outlook S&P 500 bears won the day, and Nasdaq remains in a sorry state. 4,160s are the line in the sand, breaking which would accelerate the downswing. Inflation is cutting into the earnings, and stocks aren‘t going to like the coming Fed‘s message. Credit Markets HYG didn‘t keep at least stable – the pressure in the credit markets is ongoing, and the stock market bulls don‘t have much to rejoice over here. Gold, Silver and Miners Precious metals downswings are being bought, and are shallow. The sellers are running out of steam, and the opportunity to go somewhat higher next, is approaching. Crude Oil Crude oil is stabilizing, but it may take some time before the upswing continues with renewed vigor. As for modest extension of gains, we won‘t be disappointed. Copper Copper had one more day of fake weakness, but the lost gains of Friday would be made up for next – and given no speculative fever here to speak of, it would have as good lasting power as precious metals. Bitcoin and Ethereum Cryptos remain undecided, but indicate a little breathing room, at least for today. Still, I wouldn‘t call it as risk-on constellation throughout the markets. Summary S&P 500 is getting in a precarious position, but the internals aren‘t (yet) a screaming sell. Credit markets continue leading lower, and the risk-off positioning is impossible to miss. Not even financials are able to take the cue, and rise. It‘s that the rise in yields mirrors the ingrained inflation, and just how entrenched it‘s becoming. No surprise if you were listening to me one year ago – the Fed‘s manouevering room got progressively smaller, and the table is set for the 2H 2022 inflation respite (think 5-6% year end on account of recessionary undercurrents) to be superseded with even higher inflation in 2023, because the Fed would be forced later this year to turn back to easing. Long live the precious metals and commodities super bulls! Thank you for having read today‘s free analysis, which is available in full at my homesite. There, you can subscribe to the free Monica‘s Insider Club, which features real-time trade calls and intraday updates for all the five publications: Stock Trading Signals, Gold Trading Signals, Oil Trading Signals, Copper Trading Signals and Bitcoin Trading Signals.
Unveiling the Hidden Giant: The Growing Dominance of Non-Bank Financial Institutions

GameStop (GME) Stock News and Forecast: What to expect from GameStop earnings

FXStreet News FXStreet News 15.03.2022 16:27
GameStop stock is back on the top trending list but still struggling. GME stock is down 43% year to date. GameStop releases earnings on Thursday after the close. GameStop (GME) is back on the top trending lists, though it has not been seen for a while. Some other stocks have taken the limelight, recently some micro-cap oil stocks, but these have gone back to sleep now as the crowd moves on. GameStop was the original though, and it releases earnings after the close on Thursday. This is generating some attention on the usual social media sites and helping the GME stock price too. At the time of writing, GME stock is up 1.4% at $79.05. GameStop Stock News GameStop earnings are out after the close with a conference call afterward. GME is expected to report earnings per share (EPS) of $0.84 and revenue of $2.22 billion. This would be a marked improvement on Q3 earnings, which it reported on December 8. Back then EPS was forecast at $-0.52 but came in way behind at $-1.39. Revenue came in ahead of forecasts back then too. GME lost 10% the day after its Q3 earnings. We remain bearish on GME stock though and cannot argue against the current trend. The stock has lost 65% over the last nine months and has been on a one-way spiral. The current environment is punishing high growth stocks, and the recent spike in yields will only add to that. It needs blockbuster earnings on Thursday from GME to change that sentiment. GME still trades on a very high multiple compared to other consumer stocks, and rising inflation will hurt. GameStop is also a high street store. It pays wages, electricity, etc., all of which are rising and will continue to do so. GameStop Stock Forecast GME stock closed below our key support at $86 on Monday. This will likely lead to more selling pressure. That will bring GME quickly down to $70, and we may then see a stabilization period as volume is quite strong around the $70 level. GameStop (GME) stock chart, daily    
The Commodities Feed: Anticipating LNG Strike Action and Market Dynamics

AMC Stock Price: AMC Entertainment spikes 8% on Wednesday

FXStreet News FXStreet News 17.03.2022 08:29
AMC stock gains on Tuesday as equities and growth stocks rally. More gains are likely on Wednesday for AMC shares as peace hopes rise for Ukraine. AMC Entertainment also saw increased attention from its investment in Hycroft Mining. AMC shares are up 8% to $15.65 as better prospects for peace in Ukraine seem to be lifting up the entire market. The Nasdaq has risen an optimistic 2.7% about one hour into Wednesday's session. Further positivity is in motion with the start of the Federal Reserve's Federal Open Market Committee two-day meeting that is expected to usher in a 25 basis point rise in the fed funds rate. The rise in interest rates should slow this year's hike in inflation. This price action is certainly exciting for AMC apes, who have witnessed AMC stock drop to the low $13s earlier this week. AMC Entertainment did benefit in Tuesday's afternoon session from its acquisition of Hycroft Mining, but it seems the stock is gaining more interest on Wednesday for this buy. Now its acquisition target, HYMC, has seen its shares go in the opposite direction on Wednesday. HYMC stock is trading down 9% at $1.37 at the time of writing. AMC stock closed higher on Tuesday as investors took comfort from the continued collapse in oil prices and hoped for some form of peace in Ukraine. It was oil that was the big driver for equity markets, and growth stock, in particular, bounced hard as this sector had seen the bigger losses since the year began. It is hard to see guess whether this movie can be sustained long term though as yields have once again moved up. This should stall growth stocks. A peace deal would see further gains for all sectors, but then these may be capped if yields keep rising. The Fed decision later on Wednesday will give us more clarity on this. AMC Stock News The big news yesterday though for AMC apes was the investment in Hycroft Mining by AMC. This was right out of left field and remains a puzzling one to say the least. Hycroft Mining is a gold and silver miner with one mine in Nevada. The company has not turned a profit since 2013 and last November said it may need to raise capital to meet future financial obligations. The company also laid off over half of its workforce at the mine last November. This is a pretty high-risk investment and perhaps AMC and AMC apes are used to that. It was only a small outlet as CEO adam Aron alluded to. Nevertheless, the Hycroft Mining (HYMC) stock price soared as retail investors piled into the name. By the opening of the regular session on Tuesday, HYMC stock was trading nearly 100% higher, but it closed only 9% higher at $1.52 having traded up to $2.97. The reason for the dramatic turnaround was probably a bit of reality set into investors once they had a look at Hycroft Mining and its financial condition. The main reason was a Bloomberg report saying that Hycroft Mining could do a $500 million share sale by as early as next Tuesday. We understand the sale is ongoing and being led by B.Riley Securities. AMC Stock Forecast We were quite negative on this deal on Tuesday and remain so. At least it is not a big investment for AMC, but it still reads poorly. This will not endear AMC stock to further credibility in our view. CNBC carried out a report yesterday about the surge in price and volume trading in HYMC stock before the AMC announcement: "Small mining firm with troubled history saw big spikes in stock price, trading volume ahead of AMC deal." Tuesday's move took AMC back up to our resistance level at $14.54, which was a key breakdown level. Below this and AMC remains bearish. Above $14.54 is neutral. We remain bearish on AMC with a target price of $8.95. AMC stock chart, daily Prior Update: AMC stock opened higher on Wednesday as the stock market remains on edge over the potential for some form of a peace deal in Ukraine. Oil prices falling sharply has also helped investor sentiment. AMC is currently trading at $14.77 for a gain of exactly 2% after 5 minutes of the regular session on Tuesday. Hycroft Mining (HYMC) stock is trading 4% lower at the same stage on Wednesday. Later we get the Fed interest rate decision which may hamper more progress from growth stocks but for now, it is full steam ahead. AMC is back among the top trending stocks on social media sites and interest seems high. $14.54 remains a key level for AMC to hold above if it wants to have put a bottom formation in place. Otherwise, it will return to the bearish trend and look to target $8.95 in our view.
Interaction Between Price Of Gold (XAUUSD) And Fed's Interest Rate Decision

Interaction Between Price Of Gold (XAUUSD) And Fed's Interest Rate Decision

Przemysław Radomski Przemysław Radomski 17.03.2022 16:07
  The Fed will want to keep inflation under control, and that could have miserable consequences for gold and miners. Will we see a repeat from 2008?  The question one of my subscribers asked me was about the rise in mining stocks and gold and how it was connected to what was happening in bond yields. Precisely, while short-term and medium-term yields moved higher, very long-term yields (the 30-year yields) dropped, implying that the Fed will need to lower the rates again, indicating a stagflationary environment in the future. First of all, I agree that stagflation is likely in the cards, and I think that gold will perform similarly to how it did during the previous prolonged stagflation – in the 1970s. In other words, I think that gold will move much higher in the long run. However, the market might have moved ahead of itself by rallying yesterday. After all, the Fed will still want to keep inflation under control (reminder: it has become very political!), and it will want commodity prices to slide in response to the foregoing. This means that the Fed will still likely make gold, silver, and mining stocks move lower in the near term. In particular, silver and mining stocks are likely to decline along with commodities and stocks, just like what happened in 2008. Speaking of commodities, let’s take a look at what’s happening in copper. Copper invalidated another attempt to move above its 2011 high. This is a very strong technical sign that copper (one of the most popular commodities) is heading lower in the medium term. Yes, it might be difficult to visualize this kind of move given the recent powerful upswing, but please note that it’s in perfect tune with the previous patterns. The interest rates are going up, just like they did before the 2008 slide. What did copper do before the 2008 slide? It failed to break above the previous (2006) high, and it was the failure of the second attempt to break higher that triggered the powerful decline. What happened then? Gold declined, but silver and mining stocks truly plunged. The GDXJ was not trading at the time, so we’ll have to use a different proxy to see what this part of the mining stock sector did. The Toronto Stock Exchange Venture Index includes multiple junior mining stocks. It also includes other companies, but juniors are a large part of it, and they truly plunged in 2008. In fact, they plunged in a major way after breaking below their medium-term support lines and after an initial corrective upswing. Guess what – this index is after a major medium-term breakdown and a short-term corrective upswing. It’s likely ready to fall – and to fall hard. So, what’s likely to happen? We’re about to see a huge slide, even if we don’t see it within the next few days. In fact, the outlook for the next few days is rather unclear, as different groups of investors can interpret yesterday’s developments differently. However, once the dust settles, the precious metals sector is likely to go down significantly. Gold is up in today’s pre-market trading, but please note that back in 2020, after the initial post-top slide, gold corrected even more significantly, and it wasn’t really bullish. This time gold doesn’t have to rally to about $2,000 before declining once again, as this time the rally was based on war, and when we consider previous war-based rallies (U.S. invasion of Afghanistan, U.S. invasion of Iraq, Russia’s invasion of Crimea), we know that when the fear-and-uncertainty-based top was in, then the decline proceeded without bigger corrections. Thank you for reading our free analysis today. Please note that the above is just a small fraction of today’s all-encompassing Gold & Silver Trading Alert. The latter includes multiple premium details such as the targets for gold and mining stocks that could be reached in the next few weeks. If you’d like to read those premium details, we have good news for you. As soon as you sign up for our free gold newsletter, you’ll get a free 7-day no-obligation trial access to our premium Gold & Silver Trading Alerts. It’s really free – sign up today. Przemyslaw Radomski, CFAFounder, Editor-in-chiefSunshine Profits: Effective Investment through Diligence & Care * * * * * All essays, research and information found above represent analyses and opinions of Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA and Sunshine Profits' associates only. As such, it may prove wrong and be subject to change without notice. Opinions and analyses are based on data available to authors of respective essays at the time of writing. Although the information provided above is based on careful research and sources that are deemed to be accurate, Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA and his associates do not guarantee the accuracy or thoroughness of the data or information reported. The opinions published above are neither an offer nor a recommendation to purchase or sell any securities. Mr. Radomski is not a Registered Securities Advisor. By reading Przemyslaw Radomski's, CFA reports you fully agree that he will not be held responsible or liable for any decisions you make regarding any information provided in these reports. Investing, trading and speculation in any financial markets may involve high risk of loss. Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA, Sunshine Profits' employees and affiliates as well as members of their families may have a short or long position in any securities, including those mentioned in any of the reports or essays, and may make additional purchases and/or sales of those securities without notice.
US 20-City house prices decreased by 1.3% month-on-month

SAVILLS: STRONG Q1 EXPECTED FOR EUROPEAN REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT DESPITE GEOPOLITICAL EVENTS

Finance Press Release Finance Press Release 21.03.2022 11:27
  Preliminary figures compiled by Savills suggest that the total real estate investment volume in Europe for the first quarter of the year will reach approximately €70bn, a 19.5% increase year-on-year. Despite geopolitical events, the real estate advisor expects solid European investment activity for the remainder of the year, notably fuelled by large portfolio and entity deals. Savills anticipates total European real estate investment volumes for 2022 to reach between €300bn and €330bn, which would be 5-10% above the five-year average, as long as the Russia/Ukraine crisis doesn’t last too long and doesn’t have a long-term impact on the European economy. Lydia Brissy, Director, European Research at Savills, says: “Given the current context, we expect most of the investment activity this year will focus on Western Europe and particularly, the core countries of UK, Germany and France. Our preliminary Q1 figures suggest that those three countries have received 66.6% of the total European investment volume this quarter, up from 61.4% last year.” Tomasz Buras, CEO, Savills Poland, says: “The hostilities in Ukraine are having a stronger impact on the Polish real estate market than on Western European markets. Developers are facing severe disruptions to supplies of building materials and reduced availability of construction workers. Tenants have already suffered from rising inflation and energy charges, further fuelled by the weakening Polish zÅ‚oty relative to the euro, a currency in which rents are denominated. We are, however, seeing a surge in demand on the residential rental market and more enquiries for office and warehouse space from companies wanting or forced to relocate operations to Poland. Cross-border investors are likely to remain more cautious in the coming weeks, leading to a short-term dip in real estate investment volumes, albeit with a potential for a strong rebound if the armed conflict is quickly resolved peacefully.” James Burke, Director, Regional Investment Advisory EMEA at Savills, says: “For perhaps the first time since the Covid-19 pandemic, prime offices are looking like an increasingly attractive defensive investment as they are relatively protected from higher inflation due to the indexation of rents across core European cities. Based on our preliminary figures, prime office yields compressed further by an average of 17 bps year on year to 3.40% in Q1 2022. Office yield spreads to risk-free rates continue to illustrate the sector’s attractiveness despite some more recent increases in bond yields. Given this, we believe the potential for further yield compression is less likely, and we forecast a stable outlook on pricing throughout 2022.”
S&P 500 (SPX) Up, Crude Oil Up, Credit Markets Up, Bitcoin Price Oops...

S&P 500 (SPX) Up, Crude Oil Up, Credit Markets Up, Bitcoin Price Oops...

Monica Kingsley Monica Kingsley 21.03.2022 15:37
S&P 500 did really well through quad witching, and the same goes for credit markets. 4-day streak of non-stop gains – very fast ones. Short squeeze characteristics in the short run, makes me think this rally fizzles out before the month ends – 4,600 would hold. We‘re likely to make a higher low next, and that would be followed by 4-6 weeks of rally continuation before the bears come back with real force again. July would present a great buying opportunity in this wild year of a giant trading range. As I wrote yesterday: (…) The paper asset made it through quad witching in style - both stocks and bonds. The risk-on sentiment however didn't sink commodities or precious metals. Wednesday's FOMC brought worries over the Fed sinking real economy growth but Powell's conference calmed down fears through allegedly no recession risks this year, ascribing everything to geopolitics. Very convenient, but the grain of truth is that the Fed wouldn't indeed jeopardize GDP growth this year - that's the context of how to read the allegedly 7 rate hikes and balance sheet shrinking this year still. Not gonna happen as I stated on Thursday already. Such are my short- and medium-term thoughts on stocks. Copper remains best positioned to continue rising with relatively little volatility while crude oil isn‘t yet settled (its good times would continue regardless of the weak volume rally of last two days, which is making me a little worried). Precious metals are still basing, and would continue moving higher best on the Fed underperforming in its hawkish pronouncements. No way they‘re hiking 7 times this year and shrinking balance sheet at the same time as I wrote on Thursday – Treasury yields say they‘ll take on inflation more in 2023. 2022 is a mere warm-up. Let‘s move right into the charts (all courtesy of www.stockcharts.com). S&P 500 and Nasdaq Outlook S&P 500 is now past the 4,400 – 4,450 zone, and hasn‘t yet consolidated. This week would definitely though not be as bullish as the one just gone by – the bulls will be challenged a little. Credit Markets HYG eked out more gains, but the air is slowly becoming thinner. As the sentiment turns more bullish through no deep decline over the coming few days, that‘s when junk bonds would start wavering. Gold, Silver and Miners Precious metals aren‘t turning down for good here – I think they‘re deciphering the Fed story of hiking slower than intended, which in effect gives inflation a new lease on life. Not that it was wavering, though. More upside in gold and silver to come. Crude Oil Crude oil is rising again, but look for a measured upswing that‘s not free from headwinds. While I think we would climb above $110 still, I‘m sounding a more cautious note given the decreasing volume – I would like to see more conviction next. Copper Copper is behaving, and would continue rising reliably alongside other commodities. It‘s also the best play considering downside protection at the moment. Bitcoin and Ethereum Bitcoin isn‘t recovering Sunday‘s setback – but the Ethereum upswing bodes well for risk taking today, even that doesn‘t concern cryptos all too much. Summary S&P 500 has a bit more to run before running into headwinds, which would happen still this week. Credit markets are a tad too optimistic, and rising yields would leave a mark especially on tech. Value, energy and materials are likely to do much better. Crude oil is bound to be volatile over the coming weeks, but still rising and spiking – not yet settled. Copper and precious metals present better appreciation opportunities when looking at their upcoming volatility. Within today‘s key analysis, I‘ve covered the path of stocks, so do have a good look at the opening part. Finally, cryptos likewise paint the picture of risk-on trades not being over just yet. Thank you for having read today‘s free analysis, which is available in full at my homesite. There, you can subscribe to the free Monica‘s Insider Club, which features real-time trade calls and intraday updates for all the five publications: Stock Trading Signals, Gold Trading Signals, Oil Trading Signals, Copper Trading Signals and Bitcoin Trading Signals.
Gold To Go Head To Head With Fed And Inflation

Gold To Go Head To Head With Fed And Inflation

Przemysław Radomski Przemysław Radomski 23.03.2022 15:17
  The Fed's hawkish alerts seem like a voice in the wilderness to gold investors. However, a carefree attitude can backfire on them – in just a few months. An epic battle is unfolding across the financial markets as the Fed warns investors about its looming rate hike cycle and the latter ignores the ramifications. However, with perpetually higher asset prices only exacerbating the Fed's inflationary conundrum, a profound shift in sentiment will likely occur over the next few months. To explain, I highlighted in recent days how the Fed has turned the hawkish dial up to 100. Moreover, I wrote on Mar. 22 that it's remarkable how much the PMs' domestic fundamental outlooks have deteriorated in recent weeks. Yet, prices remain elevated, investors remain sanguine, and the bullish bands continue to play.  However, with inflation still rising and the Fed done playing games, the next few months should elicit plenty of fireworks. For example, with another deputy sounding the hawkish alarm, San Francisco Fed President Mary Daly said on Mar. 22: "Inflation has persisted for long enough that people are starting to wonder how long it will persist. I'm already focused on letting make sure this doesn't get embedded and we see those longer-term inflation expectations drift up." As a result, Daly wants to ensure that the "main risk" to the U.S. economy doesn't end up causing a recession. Please see below: Source: Reuters Likewise, St. Louis Fed President James Bullard reiterated his position on Mar. 22, telling Bloomberg that “faster is better,” and that “the 1994 tightening cycle or removal of accommodation cycle is probably the best analogy here.” Please see below: Source: Bloomberg   Falling on Deaf Ears To that point, while investors seem to think that the Fed can vastly restrict monetary policy without disrupting a healthy U.S. economy, a major surprise could be on the horizon. For example, the futures market has now priced in nearly 10 rate hikes by the Fed in 2022. As a result, should we expect the hawkish developments to unfold without a hitch? Please see below: To explain, the light blue, dark blue, and pink lines above track the number of rate hikes expected by the Fed, BoE, and ECB. If you analyze the right side of the chart, you can see that the light blue line has risen sharply over the last several days and months. For your reference, if you focus your attention on the material underperformance of the pink line, you can see why I’ve been so bearish on the EUR/USD for so long. Also noteworthy, please have a look at the U.S. 2-Year Treasury yield minus the German 2-Year Bond yield spread. If you analyze the rapid rise on the right side of the chart below, you can see how much short-term U.S. yields have outperformed their European counterparts in 2021/2022. Source: Bloomberg/ Lisa Abramowicz More importantly, though, with Fed officials’ recent rhetoric encouraging more hawkish re-pricing instead of talking down expectations (like the ECB), they want investors to slow their roll. However, investors are now fighting the Fed, and the epic battle will likely lead to profound disappointment over the medium term. Case in point: when Fed officials dial up the hawkish rhetoric, their “messaging” is supposed to shift investors’ expectations. As such, the threat of raising interest rates is often as impactful as actually doing it. However, when investors don’t listen, the Fed has to turn the hawkish dial up even more. If history is any indication, a calamity will eventually unfold.  Please see below: To explain, the blue line above tracks the U.S. federal funds rate, while the various circles and notations above track the global crises that erupted during the Fed’s rate hike cycles. As a result, standard tightening periods often result in immense volatility.  However, with investors refusing to let asset prices fall, they’re forcing the Fed to accelerate its rate hikes to achieve its desired outcome (calm inflation). As such, the next several months could be a rate hike cycle on steroids.  To that point, with Fed Chairman Jerome Powell dropping the hawkish hammer on Mar. 21, I noted his response to a question about inflation calming in the second half of 2022. I wrote on Mar. 22: "That story has already fallen apart. To the extent it continues to fall apart, my colleagues and I may well reach the conclusion we'll need to move more quickly and, if so, we'll do so." To that point, Powell said that “there’s excess demand" and that "the economy is very strong and is well-positioned to handle tighter monetary policy." As a result, while investors seem to think that Powell’s bluffing, enlightenment will likely materialize over the next few months. Please see below: Source: Reuters Furthermore, with Goldman Sachs economists noting the shift in tone from “steadily” in January to “expeditiously” on Mar. 21, they also upped their hawkish expectations. They wrote: “We are now forecasting 50bp hikes at both the May and June meetings (vs. 25bp at each meeting previously). The level of the funds rate would still be low at 0.75-1% after a 50bp hike in May, and if the FOMC is open to moving in larger steps, then we think it would see a second 50bp hike in June as appropriate under our forecasted inflation path.” “After the two 50bp moves, we expect the FOMC to move back to 25bp rate hikes at the four remaining meetings in the back half of 2022, and to then further slow the pace next year by delivering three quarterly hikes in 2023Q1-Q3. We have left our forecast of the terminal rate unchanged at 3-3.25%, as shown in Exhibit 1.” Please see below: In addition, this doesn’t account for the Fed’s willingness to sell assets on its balance sheet. For context, Powell said on Mar. 16 that quantitative tightening (QT) should occur sometime in the summer and that shrinking the balance sheet “might be the equivalent of another rate increase.” As a result, investors’ lack of preparedness for what should unfold over the next few months has been something to behold. However, the reality check will likely elicit a major shift in sentiment.  In contrast, the bond market heard Powell’s message loud and clear, and with the U.S. 10-Year Treasury yield hitting another 2022 high of ~2.38% on Mar. 22, the entire U.S. yield curve is paying attention. Please see below: Source: Investing.com Finally, the Richmond Fed released its Fifth District Survey of Manufacturing Activity on Mar. 22. With the headline index increasing from 1 in February to 13 in March, the report cited “increases in all three of the component indexes – shipments, volume of new orders, and number of employees.” Moreover, the prices received index increased month-over-month (MoM) in March (the red box below), while future six-month expectations for prices paid and received also increased (the blue box below). As a result, inflation trends are not moving in the Fed’s desired direction. Please see below: Source: Richmond Fed Likewise, the Richmond Fed also released its Fifth District Survey of Service Sector Activity on Mar. 22, nd while the headline index decreased from 13 in February to -3 in March, current and future six-month inflationary pressures/expectations rose MoM. Source: Richmond Fed The bottom line? While the Fed is screaming at the financial markets to tone it down to help calm inflation, investors aren't listening. With higher prices resulting in more hawkish rhetoric and policy, the Fed should keep amplifying its message until investors finally take note. If not, inflation will continue its ascent until demand destruction unfolds and the U.S. slips into a recession. As such, if investors assume that several rate hikes will commence over the next several months with little or no volatility in between, they're likely in for a major surprise. In conclusion, the PMs declined on Mar. 22, as the sentiment seesaw continued. However, as I noted, it's remarkable how much the PMs' domestic fundamental outlooks have deteriorated in recent weeks. Thus, while the Russia-Ukraine conflict keeps them uplifted, for now, the Fed's inflation problem is nowhere near an acceptable level. As a result, when investors finally realize that a much tougher macroeconomic environment confronts them over the next few months, the shift in sentiment will likely culminate in sharp drawdowns. Thank you for reading our free analysis today. Please note that the above is just a small fraction of today’s all-encompassing Gold & Silver Trading Alert. The latter includes multiple premium details such as the targets for gold and mining stocks that could be reached in the next few weeks. If you’d like to read those premium details, we have good news for you. As soon as you sign up for our free gold newsletter, you’ll get a free 7-day no-obligation trial access to our premium Gold & Silver Trading Alerts. It’s really free – sign up today. Przemyslaw Radomski, CFAFounder, Editor-in-chiefSunshine Profits: Effective Investment through Diligence & Care * * * * * All essays, research and information found above represent analyses and opinions of Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA and Sunshine Profits' associates only. As such, it may prove wrong and be subject to change without notice. Opinions and analyses are based on data available to authors of respective essays at the time of writing. Although the information provided above is based on careful research and sources that are deemed to be accurate, Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA and his associates do not guarantee the accuracy or thoroughness of the data or information reported. The opinions published above are neither an offer nor a recommendation to purchase or sell any securities. Mr. Radomski is not a Registered Securities Advisor. By reading Przemyslaw Radomski's, CFA reports you fully agree that he will not be held responsible or liable for any decisions you make regarding any information provided in these reports. Investing, trading and speculation in any financial markets may involve high risk of loss. Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA, Sunshine Profits' employees and affiliates as well as members of their families may have a short or long position in any securities, including those mentioned in any of the reports or essays, and may make additional purchases and/or sales of those securities without notice.
Bonds Speculators take a pause on their 10-Year Treasury Notes bearish bets

Bonds Speculators take a pause on their 10-Year Treasury Notes bearish bets

Invest Macro Invest Macro 27.03.2022 13:27
By InvestMacro | COT | Data Tables | COT Leaders | Downloads | COT Newsletter Here are the latest charts and statistics for the Commitment of Traders (COT) data published by the Commodities Futures Trading Commission (CFTC). The latest COT data is updated through Tuesday March 22nd and shows a quick view of how large traders (for-profit speculators and commercial entities) were positioned in the futures markets. Highlighting the COT bonds data is the pullback in the 10-Year Bond bearish bets this week. The speculative position in the 10-Year Bond has risen for two straight weeks following three straight weeks of declines (or rising bearish bets). The last two week’s rise has shaved off over 113,886 contracts from the total bearish position and brings the current standing to the least bearish level of the past five weeks at a total of -263,834 contracts. The 10-Year has been under pressure like most all bond markets as the Federal Reserve has started raising interest rates with an outlook of more rate increases to come. The 10-Year yield (as bond prices fall, yields rise) has been sharping surging to the upside with the close this week right around the 2.50 percent level, marking its highest yield since May of 2019. The speculator’s 10-Year bond pullback this week will likely be short-lived and it will be interesting to see if this latest bout of inflation, growth and central bank rate rises will be enough to finally break the multi-decade bull market for bonds. The bond markets with higher speculator bets were the 10-Year Bond (57,163 contracts), Fed Funds (91,899 contracts) and the 5-Year Bond (50,964 contracts). The bond markets with lower speculator bets were the 2-Year Bond (-27,015 contracts), Eurodollar (-128,245 contracts), Ultra 10-Year (-21,571 contracts), Long US Bond (-11,687 contracts) and the Ultra US Bond (-32,279 contracts). Data Snapshot of Bond Market Traders | Columns Legend Mar-22-2022 OI OI-Index Spec-Net Spec-Index Com-Net COM-Index Smalls-Net Smalls-Index Eurodollar 10,832,338 41 -2,656,722 0 3,074,395 100 -417,673 13 FedFunds 2,132,176 81 -13,382 38 29,682 63 -16,300 18 2-Year 2,297,315 20 -47,448 73 126,538 48 -79,090 10 Long T-Bond 1,128,229 36 32,551 95 -5,394 18 -27,157 31 10-Year 3,807,553 51 -263,834 31 464,339 80 -200,505 32 5-Year 3,774,450 36 -296,338 31 544,383 80 -248,045 13   3-Month Eurodollars Futures: The 3-Month Eurodollars large speculator standing this week equaled a net position of -2,656,722 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly lowering of -128,245 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -2,528,477 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bearish-Extreme with a score of 0.0 percent. The commercials are Bullish-Extreme with a score of 100.0 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bearish-Extreme with a score of 12.5 percent. 3-Month Eurodollars Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 4.2 75.7 3.6 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 28.7 47.4 7.4 – Net Position: -2,656,722 3,074,395 -417,673 – Gross Longs: 451,791 8,204,977 389,102 – Gross Shorts: 3,108,513 5,130,582 806,775 – Long to Short Ratio: 0.1 to 1 1.6 to 1 0.5 to 1 NET POSITION TREND: – Strength Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 0.0 100.0 12.5 – Strength Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bearish-Extreme Bullish-Extreme Bearish-Extreme NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX: – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: -11.9 11.0 5.8   30-Day Federal Funds Futures: The 30-Day Federal Funds large speculator standing this week equaled a net position of -13,382 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly advance of 91,899 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -105,281 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bearish with a score of 38.0 percent. The commercials are Bullish with a score of 63.5 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bearish-Extreme with a score of 18.3 percent. 30-Day Federal Funds Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 7.1 77.0 1.8 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 7.7 75.6 2.6 – Net Position: -13,382 29,682 -16,300 – Gross Longs: 150,828 1,640,744 38,998 – Gross Shorts: 164,210 1,611,062 55,298 – Long to Short Ratio: 0.9 to 1 1.0 to 1 0.7 to 1 NET POSITION TREND: – Strength Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 38.0 63.5 18.3 – Strength Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bearish Bullish Bearish-Extreme NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX: – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: -5.2 5.6 -10.5   2-Year Treasury Note Futures: The 2-Year Treasury Note large speculator standing this week equaled a net position of -47,448 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly fall of -27,015 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -20,433 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bullish with a score of 72.7 percent. The commercials are Bearish with a score of 47.5 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bearish-Extreme with a score of 9.9 percent. 2-Year Treasury Note Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 15.9 73.9 6.1 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 18.0 68.4 9.6 – Net Position: -47,448 126,538 -79,090 – Gross Longs: 365,795 1,697,892 140,374 – Gross Shorts: 413,243 1,571,354 219,464 – Long to Short Ratio: 0.9 to 1 1.1 to 1 0.6 to 1 NET POSITION TREND: – Strength Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 72.7 47.5 9.9 – Strength Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bullish Bearish Bearish-Extreme NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX: – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: -7.3 5.2 5.5   5-Year Treasury Note Futures: The 5-Year Treasury Note large speculator standing this week equaled a net position of -296,338 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly lift of 50,964 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -347,302 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bearish with a score of 31.2 percent. The commercials are Bullish with a score of 79.7 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bearish-Extreme with a score of 12.9 percent. 5-Year Treasury Note Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 9.1 81.6 7.1 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 16.9 67.2 13.7 – Net Position: -296,338 544,383 -248,045 – Gross Longs: 342,471 3,081,019 268,697 – Gross Shorts: 638,809 2,536,636 516,742 – Long to Short Ratio: 0.5 to 1 1.2 to 1 0.5 to 1 NET POSITION TREND: – Strength Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 31.2 79.7 12.9 – Strength Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bearish Bullish Bearish-Extreme NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX: – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: -28.8 21.1 -2.5   10-Year Treasury Note Futures: The 10-Year Treasury Note large speculator standing this week equaled a net position of -263,834 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly advance of 57,163 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -320,997 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bearish with a score of 31.4 percent. The commercials are Bullish-Extreme with a score of 80.0 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bearish with a score of 32.0 percent. 10-Year Treasury Note Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 10.8 77.9 7.9 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 17.8 65.7 13.2 – Net Position: -263,834 464,339 -200,505 – Gross Longs: 412,030 2,966,196 302,390 – Gross Shorts: 675,864 2,501,857 502,895 – Long to Short Ratio: 0.6 to 1 1.2 to 1 0.6 to 1 NET POSITION TREND: – Strength Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 31.4 80.0 32.0 – Strength Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bearish Bullish-Extreme Bearish NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX: – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: -9.5 -2.3 18.6   Ultra 10-Year Notes Futures: The Ultra 10-Year Notes large speculator standing this week equaled a net position of -91,321 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly decrease of -21,571 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -69,750 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bearish-Extreme with a score of 3.6 percent. The commercials are Bullish-Extreme with a score of 100.0 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bearish with a score of 41.2 percent. Ultra 10-Year Notes Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 9.7 80.5 9.3 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 16.7 63.9 18.8 – Net Position: -91,321 214,698 -123,377 – Gross Longs: 125,921 1,045,958 120,546 – Gross Shorts: 217,242 831,260 243,923 – Long to Short Ratio: 0.6 to 1 1.3 to 1 0.5 to 1 NET POSITION TREND: – Strength Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 3.6 100.0 41.2 – Strength Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bearish-Extreme Bullish-Extreme Bearish NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX: – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: -35.7 27.0 20.8   US Treasury Bonds Futures: The US Treasury Bonds large speculator standing this week equaled a net position of 32,551 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly lowering of -11,687 contracts from the previous week which had a total of 44,238 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bullish-Extreme with a score of 95.2 percent. The commercials are Bearish-Extreme with a score of 18.4 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bearish with a score of 31.0 percent. US Treasury Bonds Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 9.7 72.6 13.8 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 6.9 73.1 16.3 – Net Position: 32,551 -5,394 -27,157 – Gross Longs: 109,965 819,658 156,236 – Gross Shorts: 77,414 825,052 183,393 – Long to Short Ratio: 1.4 to 1 1.0 to 1 0.9 to 1 NET POSITION TREND: – Strength Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 95.2 18.4 31.0 – Strength Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bullish-Extreme Bearish-Extreme Bearish NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX: – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: 21.3 -18.7 -5.4   Ultra US Treasury Bonds Futures: The Ultra US Treasury Bonds large speculator standing this week equaled a net position of -298,523 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly fall of -32,279 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -266,244 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bullish with a score of 63.4 percent. The commercials are Bearish with a score of 40.0 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bullish with a score of 59.1 percent. Ultra US Treasury Bonds Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 5.6 81.2 12.6 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 29.2 61.0 9.2 – Net Position: -298,523 255,630 42,893 – Gross Longs: 70,425 1,026,988 158,649 – Gross Shorts: 368,948 771,358 115,756 – Long to Short Ratio: 0.2 to 1 1.3 to 1 1.4 to 1 NET POSITION TREND: – Strength Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 63.4 40.0 59.1 – Strength Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bullish Bearish Bullish NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX: – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: 7.1 -14.1 8.3   Article By InvestMacro – Receive our weekly COT Reports by Email *COT Report: The COT data, released weekly to the public each Friday, is updated through the most recent Tuesday (data is 3 days old) and shows a quick view of how large speculators or non-commercials (for-profit traders) were positioned in the futures markets. The CFTC categorizes trader positions according to commercial hedgers (traders who use futures contracts for hedging as part of the business), non-commercials (large traders who speculate to realize trading profits) and nonreportable traders (usually small traders/speculators) as well as their open interest (contracts open in the market at time of reporting).See CFTC criteria here.
Euro (EUR), Japanese Yen And Dollar (USD) Interactions. Dollar Index (DXY) Looks Quite Fine. A Year Full Of Fed Decisions...

Euro (EUR), Japanese Yen And Dollar (USD) Interactions. Dollar Index (DXY) Looks Quite Fine. A Year Full Of Fed Decisions...

Alex Kuptsikevich Alex Kuptsikevich 28.03.2022 12:44
There has been a lot of talk lately about the decline of the US dollar's reserve status. However, investors and traders should separate long-term trends from short-term market impulses. Reserve fund managers often prefer to refrain from active selling so as not to cause unnecessary market turbulence, so all reserve trends are stretched out over decades. As long as there is no real threat to the existence of the dollar and the solvency of the US government, managers will avoid making active moves to sell dollar assets. And all the revolutionary changes, such as switching to national currencies, will only result in CBs buying fewer new dollars. But it has little effect on the exchange rate. Right now, we are seeing the opposite picture, as the main competitors are under pressure. Investors are getting rid of the Japanese yen as the Bank of Japan accelerates its currency printing to buy bonds out of the market to stem rising yields. The local government is overburdened with debt, and the economy is still stalling. The only market solution is a devaluation of the yen, which would make exports from Japan more competitive and boost domestic spending. The single currency is suffering from a spike in energy prices and economic problems related to the war in Ukraine. Trading below 1.1000, the EURUSD pair is now where it was heading for the last six months before the pandemic. The medium-term outlook for the dollar is largely influenced by the extent to which the Fed will be able to implement policy tightening. More accurately, how Fed policy compares with the policy of the Bank of Japan, the ECB, or another major central bank. The Fed is clearly acting with greater amplitude, setting itself up for 7 rate hikes this year, which is far more than one would expect from Japan or the eurozone. Moreover, the US remains much further away from the war in Ukraine in business and trade terms than its biggest competitors, which means it can continue to benefit from capital inflows as a haven.
What Is Going On Financial Markets Today? Russia Will Not Resume Deliveries Of Gas

Gaining Canadian, Australian And US Yields In Focus. Won, Baht And PLN Weaken

Marc Chandler Marc Chandler 28.03.2022 14:41
March 28, 2022  $USD, BOJ, China, Currency Movement, German, Interest Rates, nuclear, Russia, Ukraine Overview: Yields are surging.  Canada and Australia's two-year yields have jumped 20 bp, with the US yield up 10 bp to 2.37% ahead of the $50 bln sale later today.  The US 10-year yield has risen a more modest three basis points to 2.50%, flattening the 2-10-year yields curve.  The 5–30-year curve has inverted for the first time since 2016.  European 10-year benchmark yields have risen 3-7 bp.  Tech stocks helped power the Hang Seng and Australia eked out a small gain, but most equity markets in the Asia Pacific region sold off for third consecutive session.  Led by financials, utilities, and communication, the Stoxx 600 has risen by about 0.75% in the European morning.  US futures are trading with a heavier bias.  The greenback is firm, with the yen again under the most pressure.  It is trading briefly above JPY125 in late morning activity in Europe, before pulling back.  The Australian dollar is the only major currency higher on the day.  Emerging market currencies are mostly lower.  The South Korean won, and Thai baht are hardest hit alongside the Polish zloty.  The jump in yields takes some shine off gold, which reached $1966 last week.  It is now straddling the $1930 area.  The $1900 area may offer important support.  The lockdown in Shanghai is sparking concerns about oil demand.  May WTI is off almost 4% after last week's 10.5% rally.  There is also speculation (hope) that OPEC+ agrees to boost output at this week's meeting.  US natural gas prices are little changed after rising in every session last week.  Europe's benchmark has risen by a little more than 8% today after falling 2.4% last week.  Iron ore is a little firmer, while copper is falling for the third session in a row.  May wheat is offered, giving back 2.4% after last week's 3.6% a rally.    Asia Pacific The Bank of Japan entered the market to reinforce the 0.25% cap of the 10-year yield.  Its first offer to buy an unlimited amount of bonds failed to draw any interest.  The second attempt had to buy JPY64.5 bln (~$525 mln).  The BOJ recognizes it is engaged in a struggle now and has pre-announced will be there for the next three sessions.  Separately, we note that according to the latest Nikkei poll, support for Prime Minister Kishida has risen six percentage points to 61%, with high marks given for handling the Russia's invasion of Ukraine.   On the one hand, China rejects the sanction regime against Russia, it says, because it is being imposed with a UN resolution.  On the other hand, reports suggest that Beijing and mainland companies are asking US officials for clarification with the idea in mind to understand what is permitted.  China and India purchases, for example, of Russian oil is not violating the sanctions.   There was thought that China would abandon its strict zero-Covid course.  Some suggested that the easing of restrictions in Hong Kong could be a prelude to a change by Beijing.  However, that does not appear to be the case.  Yesterday, Beijing announced a lockdown of Shanghai, China's largest city (population estimated around 25 mln).  The eastern half of city will be locked down for four days starting today.  This covers the financial district.  The purpose is mass testing.  The western half of the city will be locked down as of April 1.  Residents will be barred from leaving home and public transportation and ride-hailing services will be halted. A record 5500 cases were said to have been reported on Saturday. Recall that earlier this month, Shenzhen, an important tech hub was locked down. China is taking a new initiative though that has not been widely reported. It appears that China and the Solomon Islands are close to a security pact.  The leaked documents suggest that the pact could lead to a Chinese military presence there.  The Solomon Islands did not confirm the leaked details but did acknowledge that it was broadening out its security arrangements and China would be included in the changes.  This is a blow to Australia, which had seemingly secured the strategically located country into the Western alliance.  Solomon Islands had abandoned Huawei in 2018 and struck an agreement with Australia to build a 2500-mile internet cable to it. Last year, Australia sent some police to help quell riots in Honiara, the capital of the Solomon Islands, over economic problems, and anti-Chinese sentiment.  Yet, China has been making inroads.  For example, in 2019, Honiara dropped its recognition of Taiwan.  The US has acted belatedly.  Its embassy was closed in 1993 and not re-opened until last month.  As the map here shows, a Chinese presence in the Solomon Islands would compromise Australia's security.     The BOJ's defense of its Yield Curve Control policy in the face of surging global yields and especially US rates keeps the yen on the defensive.  The yen edged higher at the end of last week for the first time in six sessions, but its losses have accelerated today.  As we have noted the last significant high was in 2015 and then the greenback reached about JPY125.85. The notable high before that was in 2002, a little above JPY135.  The Australian dollar is firm.  It posted a marginal new five-month high near $0.7540.  It is approaching last October's high by $0.7550.  It is the fifth consecutive advance, if sustained, and it would be the ninth gain in the past 10 sessions.  The positive terms-of-trade shock seems to the be chief driver.  A pre-election due first thing Wednesday in Canberra is expected to include a cut in the fuel tax for six months, support for first-time home buyers, and boost funds for roads and rails.  The election is expected to be called by late May.  The greenback gapped higher against the Chinese yuan, reaching a little more than CNY6.3810, but has subsequently trended lower to fill the nearly fill the gap (the pre-weekend high) by CNY6.3680.  The PBOC's reference rate for the dollar was lower than the Bloomberg survey anticipated (CNY6.3732 vs. CNY6.3740).    Europe In an unexpected turn of events, Germany's Economic Minister Habeck, a member of the Green Party, suggested that he is open to re-examining the decision to close the county's remaining three nuclear plants later this year.  Previously, the Greens and Habeck ruled out this option.  Still, the surge in energy prices and the belated efforts to reduce its dependence on Russia is pushing the pragmatic Greens (realos) in this direction.  Merkel's push to close the nuclear energy plants after Japan's nuclear accident in 2011 resulting in increased reliance on Russia and spurred the Nord Stream 2 pipeline.  Among the scenarios that were bandied about before Russia's invasion of Ukraine was that it could pursue a limited objective of securing the entire regional claims Donetsk and Luhansk.  Since the war began, Western sources has played up different scenarios, one of total occupation of Ukraine.  The narrative it tells now is that after having suffered some significant setbacks, for which the higher range of estimates suggest Russia has lost as many soldiers (15k) in Ukraine as it did in 10 years in Afghanistan.  Russia admits to less than a tenth of those estimated deaths in Ukraine.  Even taking into account the number of injuries inflicted, the lower bottom of NATO's range is (7k).  It is quite clear that both sides have it in their interest to, shall we say, see what they want.  Still, the point now is that Russia's 1st Deputy General of the Chief of Staff suggested Russian forces will focus on gaining the full control of the Luhansk, for which it may be nearly there, and Donetsk, which is thought to be a little more than half secured.  The idea is that when the territory is militarily secure, a referendum would be held to formally join Russia.  Strategically, a land-bridge to Crimea will also be secured.   The euro was sold to an eight-day low near $1.0945 after holding above $1.0960 last week.  It popped up in early European turnover to the session of just below $1.10.  That is an important level in the coming days, with large options expiring there.  The nearly 585 mln euro expiry today is the smallest.  Tomorrow's expiring options are for almost 2.5 bln euros and the same for Wednesday ahead of Thursday's nearly 2.9 bln euro expirations.  If the upside is blocked, look for a test on $1.09 and below there is this month's low slightly ahead of $1.08.  Sterling is testing last week's low by $1.3120.  A break targets the $1.3070 area, and possibly $1.30, which was seen in the middle of the month. It last traded below there in late 2020, when it found a base around $1.2880.    America The US Treasury indicated that Russia could use frozen funds to make debt payments until May 25.   Next Monday, there is a $2.2 bln debt servicing payment due.  Some covenants allow for the rouble payments, but these reportedly do not.  After May 25, it needs to raise money other ways, including selling its oil and gas.  Over the weekend, President Biden implied relations with Russia cannot be normalized while Putin is in control.  It was later walked back by Secretary of State Blinken.  However, with the US claiming Putin is a war criminal, it is hard not to conclude that the US seeks regime change.  Some might find the US assertion of war crimes more powerful and compelling if Washington or Moscow were signatory members of the International Court of Justice.  If you are keeping records of such things, Beijing is not a member either.  The ICJ does not have authority over non-members.   President Biden is struggling in the polls.  His support is around 40%, near the levels that Trump experienced at the same time of his presidency.  One poll found that some 70% have little confidence in his handling of Russia and the war.  This suggests that his base has also softened.  Meanwhile, Biden is expected to unveil new budget proposals, which will include record spending for "peace" time.  He is expected to formally endorse the previous Senate Democrat proposal for a "billionaires' tax that would be extended to unrealized gains.  It is said to raise $360 bln over the next 10 years.  At the same time, without the Covid-related spending and income replaces, the budget deficit will be projected to fall.  The median forecast in Bloomberg's survey has the budget deficit falling to 5.1% of GDP this year form 10.8% last.   Lastly, there seems to be a misunderstanding about trend growth in the US.  Some observers talk about a growth recession as the most likely or best outcome that can be anticipated.  Yet the 2% pace or so bandied about can hardly be called a "growth recession” because for the Fed this would simply be a return to trend growth.  The Fed estimates that the long-term growth rate is 1.8%-2.0%.   On tap today is the US February advanced goods trade balance.  It was a record deficit in January.  Wholesale and retail inventories are also due.  Retail inventories rose by an average of 2.3% a month in Q4 21.  They are expected to have risen by about 1.4% after January's 1.9% increase.  Wholesale inventories rose by an average of 2.2% in Q4 21.   They are rising at about half that pace in the first two months of Q1 22.  We have noted that the inventory cycle is maturing, and it will not provide the tailwind as it did previously, and especially in Q4 21. The Dallas manufacturing survey is expected to have soften a little.     The US dollar has a nine-day drop in tow against the Canadian dollar coming into today's session.  It is pinned near the pre-weekend low around CAD1.2465.  It has not been above CAD1.2505 today.  We anticipate some near-term consolidation that could see the greenback trade toward CAD1.2520-CAD1.2540.  The US dollar is poised to snap an 11-day slide against the Mexican peso.  During that run, the greenback fell from around MXN21.06 to about MXN19.91.  It has been up to MXN20.12 today and since then it has found support ahead of MXN20.00.  We suspect near-term potential extends into the MXN20.20-MXN20.22 area.       Disclaimer
US ADP Employment March Preview: Private job creation slows while yield curve flattens

US ADP Employment March Preview: Private job creation slows while yield curve flattens

FXStreet News FXStreet News 29.03.2022 16:43
US ADP payrolls are foreseen at 438K in March, NFP at 475K.US yield curve is flattening, rings recession alarm amid 50-bps May Fed rate hike bets.Fed Chair Powell believes the labor market is strong enough, recession unlikely.The US private sector hiring is seen slowing in March after the American companies added more jobs than expected in February. The US ADP private employment report, due on Wednesday at 12.15 GMT, usually provides a good hint at Friday’s full jobs report, so investors will be looking for clues on any potential labor market slowdown.Pace of jobs creation slows in the USThe Automatic Data Processing (ADP) is forecast to show that US companies have created 438,00 new jobs in March, less than the previous month’s addition of 475,000. In February, business payrolls rose more than the expected 375,000 figure. ADP’s payroll data represent firms employing nearly 26 million workers in the US and its monthly release shows the employment change in the economy.Source: FXStreetOn Friday, the US Labor Department will release the Nonfarm Payrolls, which is expected to show that the economy has likely added 475,000 new jobs in March after a surprise increase of 678,000 reported in February.The Automatic Data Processing ADP jobs report is usually considered a proxy to the official Nonfarm Payrolls figures, which will be released on Friday, April 1.The disparity between the two indicators in recent months, however, makes the ADP result unreliable to gauge the NFP trend and, therefore, could have a limited market impact.US yield curve flattens, Fed remains hawkishHeading into the monthly payrolls data, the Russia-Ukraine conflict rages on while the odds of a 50-basis points (bps) Fed rate hike in May almost appears a done deal.Against this backdrop, the yields on the US Treasuries have rallied to three-year highs, although the increase in the longer-dated yields has failed to match the pace of the advance in the shorter ones. The spread between the two- and 10-year yields narrowed to its lowest since early 2020 on Tuesday. The flattening of the yield curve is usually indicative of a likely recession, as investors remain worried that the aggressive Fed’s tightening would damage the US economy over the longer term.At the March FOMC meeting, Fed Chair Jerome Powell said that the labor market is strong enough that a recession is unlikely. Although Powell remains optimistic about the economy and labor market, he said in his speech last week, “this is a labor market that is out of balance," adding "we need the labor market to be sustainably tight."To concludeMarkets are pricing in a roughly 60% chance of a 50-bps rate hike at the Fed’s May meeting.A slowdown in the hiring pace in the world’s biggest economy could likely feed the risks of a recession, especially in the face of soaring inflation. This could pour cold water on the recent Fed’s hawkishness.The ADP report, however, is unlikely to have any major impact on the US dollar and other related markets. Friday’s NFP release will hold the key to gauging the Fed’s policy action going forward.
10-Year Treasury Bonds Speculator bets surge to 177-week bearish high

10-Year Treasury Bonds Speculator bets surge to 177-week bearish high

Invest Macro Invest Macro 02.04.2022 17:53
By InvestMacro | COT | Data Tables | COT Leaders | Downloads | COT Newsletter Here are the latest charts and statistics for the Commitment of Traders (COT) data published by the Commodities Futures Trading Commission (CFTC). The latest COT data is updated through Tuesday March 29th and shows a quick view of how large traders (for-profit speculators and commercial entities) were positioned in the futures markets. Highlighting the COT bonds data is the surge in the 10-Year Bond bets this week. The speculative position in the 10-Year Bond saw a sharp jump in bearish bets this week (by -212,723 contracts) that marked the largest one-week bearish gain in the past two hundred and seventy-eight weeks, dating all the way back to November 29th of 2016. The 10-Year had shed bearish bets in the previous two weeks but has now seen higher bearish bets in four out of the past six weeks. This rising bearish sentiment has pushed the current net speculator standing (total of -476,557 contracts) to the most bearish level in the past one-hundred and seventy-seven weeks, dating back to November 6th of 2018 when positions were over -500,000 contracts. The 10-Year Bond price has also been dropping sharply and the 10-Year Bond yield rose to the highest level since April of 2019 above the 2.50 percent level this week (interest rates rise as bond prices fall). The outlook for Central Bank interest rate increases likely signals that there is much more weakness ahead for bonds (and gains in bond yields) and speculator sentiment will likely become more bearish. The bonds markets that saw higher speculator bets this week were Eurodollar (233,321 contracts) and the Ultra 10-Year (17,885 contracts). The bonds markets that saw lower speculator bets this week were 2-Year Bond (-11,754 contracts), 10-Year Bond (-212,723 contracts), Long US Bond (-16,550 contracts), Fed Funds (-1,024 contracts), 5-Year Bond (-65,052 contracts) and the Ultra US Bond (-25,035 contracts). Data Snapshot of Bond Market Traders | Columns Legend Mar-29-2022 OI OI-Index Spec-Net Spec-Index Com-Net COM-Index Smalls-Net Smalls-Index Eurodollar 10,936,414 43 -2,423,401 4 2,851,684 96 -428,283 10 FedFunds 2,130,653 81 -14,406 38 35,287 64 -20,881 7 2-Year 2,251,100 18 -59,202 70 161,882 55 -102,680 0 Long T-Bond 1,109,506 33 16,001 90 -3,123 19 -12,878 42 10-Year 3,669,449 41 -476,557 0 657,549 100 -180,992 36 5-Year 3,756,307 35 -361,390 20 598,864 86 -237,474 16   3-Month Eurodollars Futures: The 3-Month Eurodollars large speculator standing this week totaled a net position of -2,423,401 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly increase of 233,321 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -2,656,722 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bearish-Extreme with a score of 4.5 percent. The commercials are Bullish-Extreme with a score of 95.9 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bearish-Extreme with a score of 10.2 percent. 3-Month Eurodollars Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 4.1 74.7 3.9 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 26.2 48.6 7.9 – Net Position: -2,423,401 2,851,684 -428,283 – Gross Longs: 447,292 8,166,593 431,468 – Gross Shorts: 2,870,693 5,314,909 859,751 – Long to Short Ratio: 0.2 to 1 1.5 to 1 0.5 to 1 NET POSITION TREND: – Strength Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 4.5 95.9 10.2 – Strength Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bearish-Extreme Bullish-Extreme Bearish-Extreme NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX: – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: -2.5 2.2 2.2   30-Day Federal Funds Futures: The 30-Day Federal Funds large speculator standing this week totaled a net position of -14,406 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly decline of -1,024 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -13,382 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bearish with a score of 37.8 percent. The commercials are Bullish with a score of 64.2 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bearish-Extreme with a score of 6.6 percent. 30-Day Federal Funds Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 8.1 77.1 1.3 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 8.8 75.4 2.3 – Net Position: -14,406 35,287 -20,881 – Gross Longs: 172,450 1,642,231 27,817 – Gross Shorts: 186,856 1,606,944 48,698 – Long to Short Ratio: 0.9 to 1 1.0 to 1 0.6 to 1 NET POSITION TREND: – Strength Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 37.8 64.2 6.6 – Strength Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bearish Bullish Bearish-Extreme NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX: – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: -4.6 4.7 -4.0   2-Year Treasury Note Futures: The 2-Year Treasury Note large speculator standing this week totaled a net position of -59,202 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly reduction of -11,754 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -47,448 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bullish with a score of 70.3 percent. The commercials are Bullish with a score of 55.2 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bearish-Extreme with a score of 0.0 percent. 2-Year Treasury Note Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 14.0 76.4 6.2 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 16.6 69.2 10.8 – Net Position: -59,202 161,882 -102,680 – Gross Longs: 314,664 1,719,719 140,420 – Gross Shorts: 373,866 1,557,837 243,100 – Long to Short Ratio: 0.8 to 1 1.1 to 1 0.6 to 1 NET POSITION TREND: – Strength Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 70.3 55.2 0.0 – Strength Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bullish Bullish Bearish-Extreme NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX: – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: 11.4 -4.9 -15.1   5-Year Treasury Note Futures: The 5-Year Treasury Note large speculator standing this week totaled a net position of -361,390 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly fall of -65,052 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -296,338 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bearish-Extreme with a score of 19.8 percent. The commercials are Bullish-Extreme with a score of 86.3 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bearish-Extreme with a score of 15.8 percent. 5-Year Treasury Note Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 8.2 82.6 7.2 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 17.9 66.6 13.5 – Net Position: -361,390 598,864 -237,474 – Gross Longs: 309,236 3,101,800 270,067 – Gross Shorts: 670,626 2,502,936 507,541 – Long to Short Ratio: 0.5 to 1 1.2 to 1 0.5 to 1 NET POSITION TREND: – Strength Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 19.8 86.3 15.8 – Strength Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bearish-Extreme Bullish-Extreme Bearish-Extreme NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX: – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: -29.8 21.9 -2.7   10-Year Treasury Note Futures: The 10-Year Treasury Note large speculator standing this week totaled a net position of -476,557 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly decrease of -212,723 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -263,834 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bearish-Extreme with a score of 0.0 percent. The commercials are Bullish-Extreme with a score of 100.0 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bearish with a score of 36.5 percent. 10-Year Treasury Note Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 7.5 80.2 9.0 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 20.5 62.2 13.9 – Net Position: -476,557 657,549 -180,992 – Gross Longs: 276,588 2,941,177 328,695 – Gross Shorts: 753,145 2,283,628 509,687 – Long to Short Ratio: 0.4 to 1 1.3 to 1 0.6 to 1 NET POSITION TREND: – Strength Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 0.0 100.0 36.5 – Strength Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bearish-Extreme Bullish-Extreme Bearish NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX: – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: -46.0 26.3 18.9   Ultra 10-Year Notes Futures: The Ultra 10-Year Notes large speculator standing this week totaled a net position of -73,436 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly boost of 17,885 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -91,321 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bearish-Extreme with a score of 8.4 percent. The commercials are Bullish-Extreme with a score of 97.6 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bearish with a score of 35.8 percent. Ultra 10-Year Notes Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 9.7 80.7 9.0 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 15.2 65.2 18.9 – Net Position: -73,436 205,679 -132,243 – Gross Longs: 128,735 1,071,757 119,198 – Gross Shorts: 202,171 866,078 251,441 – Long to Short Ratio: 0.6 to 1 1.2 to 1 0.5 to 1 NET POSITION TREND: – Strength Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 8.4 97.6 35.8 – Strength Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bearish-Extreme Bullish-Extreme Bearish NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX: – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: -23.1 20.1 7.5   US Treasury Bonds Futures: The US Treasury Bonds large speculator standing this week totaled a net position of 16,001 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly lowering of -16,550 contracts from the previous week which had a total of 32,551 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bullish-Extreme with a score of 89.8 percent. The commercials are Bearish-Extreme with a score of 19.1 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bearish with a score of 42.4 percent. US Treasury Bonds Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 9.1 73.1 14.6 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 7.7 73.4 15.7 – Net Position: 16,001 -3,123 -12,878 – Gross Longs: 100,986 810,834 161,498 – Gross Shorts: 84,985 813,957 174,376 – Long to Short Ratio: 1.2 to 1 1.0 to 1 0.9 to 1 NET POSITION TREND: – Strength Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 89.8 19.1 42.4 – Strength Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bullish-Extreme Bearish-Extreme Bearish NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX: – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: 13.3 -14.7 4.1   Ultra US Treasury Bonds Futures: The Ultra US Treasury Bonds large speculator standing this week totaled a net position of -323,558 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly decline of -25,035 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -298,523 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bullish with a score of 53.2 percent. The commercials are Bullish with a score of 56.4 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bullish with a score of 53.1 percent. Ultra US Treasury Bonds Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 5.3 82.2 11.9 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 30.4 59.8 9.2 – Net Position: -323,558 288,970 34,588 – Gross Longs: 68,282 1,059,413 152,895 – Gross Shorts: 391,840 770,443 118,307 – Long to Short Ratio: 0.2 to 1 1.4 to 1 1.3 to 1 NET POSITION TREND: – Strength Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 53.2 56.4 53.1 – Strength Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bullish Bullish Bullish NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX: – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: 2.7 -4.7 2.2   Article By InvestMacro – Receive our weekly COT Reports by Email *COT Report: The COT data, released weekly to the public each Friday, is updated through the most recent Tuesday (data is 3 days old) and shows a quick view of how large speculators or non-commercials (for-profit traders) were positioned in the futures markets. The CFTC categorizes trader positions according to commercial hedgers (traders who use futures contracts for hedging as part of the business), non-commercials (large traders who speculate to realize trading profits) and nonreportable traders (usually small traders/speculators) as well as their open interest (contracts open in the market at time of reporting).See CFTC criteria here.
Many Of Us Are Into US Bonds. Let's Have A Look At The Inverted Curve

Many Of Us Are Into US Bonds. Let's Have A Look At The Inverted Curve

Chris Vermeulen Chris Vermeulen 04.04.2022 13:18
The worldwide bond market – including private and government debt -- currently represents about $120 trillion in outstanding obligations. The United States accounts for roughly $46 trillion (39%). The U.S. government finances its spending by collecting taxes and issuing debt. More specifically, the U.S. Treasury funds deficit spending by issuing debt instruments with a range of maturities. Treasury Bills have maturities from one month to one year. Treasury Notes have maturities from two to ten years. Very long-term debt is issued as Treasury Bonds with 20- and 30-year maturities. Treasury yields rise and fall depending on demand and expectations for the economy over various timeframes. Competitive bidders set yields in a “primary market” auction process with an inverse relationship between prices and yield. Note that market participants, not the U.S. Federal Reserve (a.k.a. Fed), determine these prices and yields. The Fed sets a target for a very short-term (overnight) Fed Funds Rate and a Discount Rate. Their policy of lowering or raising those rates holds significant influence but does not have direct control over the debt auctioning process. The yield curve plots the current yield of a range of government notes and bonds in the “primary market.” Here’s a U.S. yield curve plot showing both a normal and an inverted curve. The red line shows what is typically viewed as a “normal” curve where longer-term debt has a higher yield than shorter-term debt. That reflects a view that inflation will erode returns over a longer period, and therefore, a higher yield is expected. The blue line shows an inverted curve where shorter-term debt has a higher yield than longer-term. Why Does the Curve Invert? The yield curve is typically described as steepening, flattening, or inverting. A steep curve reflects expectations of higher inflation and interest rates that come with a more robust economy. The curve typically flattens or even inverts when Fed policy is in a tightening cycle of raising rates in the near term. That implies that investors have less confidence in the longer-term economic outlook and expect that the Fed may have to cut rates at some point in the future to stimulate the economy. What Does an Inverted Curve Mean? In the past 60 years, every U.S recession has been preceded by at least a partially inverted yield curve. That delay has ranged between 6 and 36 months with an average of 22 months. But every yield curve inversion has not been followed by a recession. As a predictor of a recession, an inverted yield curve suggests but does not guarantee a recession. Remember that a recession is technically defined as two successive quarters of negative GDP growth. There can undoubtedly be economic slowdowns that are shallow and temporary that do not qualify as a full-blown recession. Perhaps it’s more accurate to say that an inverted yield curve is a relatively reliable predictor of an economic slowdown but not necessarily a recession. Is it Different This Time? Maybe. Over the last two years, the Fed took a very unusual step of implementing “Quantitative Easing” to stimulate economic recovery after the “Covid Crash” in March 2020. The Fed has been adding to its balance sheet by buying longer-dated bonds. As the economy has strengthened, the Fed has announced that it will shift to selling bonds to reduce its balance sheet. Many observers think that this action by the Fed has kept the long-term yields -- in particular, the 10-year -- artificially low, and those yields are likely to rebound when the Fed stops selling its excess. If that were to happen, then the yield curve could suddenly steepen. There’s also debate over which parts of the yield curve to compare. Historically, comparing the 2- and 10- year yields (the “2/10”) has been a widely used benchmark. Some observers say comparing 3-month and 10-year yields is a better indicator. And without an inversion in the 3mo/10yr, there is much more doubt about an imminent recession. What Does This Mean for Stocks? We shouldn’t make investing decisions based just on the yield curve discussion. It’s certainly interesting. And it may well be a predictor of an economic slowdown if not a recession. But it is only one piece of a many-pieced puzzle. As a trader and investor, I focus more on technical indicators of stock price action and stock index valuations. Even in a recession, some sectors do well while others do poorly. Money is always moving. That’s the ball that I’m keeping my eye on.
The Swing Overview - Week 14 2022

The Swing Overview - Week 14 2022

Purple Trading Purple Trading 11.04.2022 06:41
The Swing Overview - Week 14 Equity indices weakened last week on news of rising interest rates and a tightening of the US economy. The euro is also weakening not only because it is under pressure from the ongoing war in Ukraine and sanctions against Russia, but also from the uncertainty of the upcoming French presidential election. The outbreak of the coronavirus in China has fuelled negative sentiment in oil, where the market fears an excess of supply over demand. The US dollar was the clear winner in this environment.  The USD index strengthens along with US bond yields According to the US Fed meeting minutes released on Wednesday, the Fed is prepared to reduce its balance sheet by the USD 95 billion per month from May this year.  In addition, the Fed is ready to raise interest rates at a pace of 0.50%. Thus, at the next meeting, which will take place in May, we can expect a rate increase from the current 0.50% to 1.00%. This option is already included in asset prices.     As a result of this the yields on US 10-year bonds continued to rise and has already reached 2.64%. The US dollar in particular is benefiting from this development and is approaching the level 100. Figure 1: US 10-year bond yields and USD index on the daily chart   Equity indices under pressure from high interest rates The prospect of aggressive interest rate hikes is having a negative impact on investor sentiment, particularly for growth stocks. However, it is positive for financial sector stocks. High yields on the US bonds are attractive to investors, who will thus prefer this yield to, for example, investments in gold, which does not yield any interest. Figure 2: SP 500 on H4 and D1 chart   The US SP 500 index is currently moving in a downward correction, which is shown on the H4 chart. Prices could move in a downward channel that is formed by a lower high and a lower low. The SP 500 according to the H4 chart is below the SMA 100 moving average, which also indicates bearish tendencies.   The nearest resistance according to the H4 chart is in the range of 4,513 - 4,520. The next resistance is around 4,583 - 4,600. A support is at 4 450 - 4 455.   German DAX index A declining channel has also formed for the DAX index. The price is below the SMA 100 moving average on the H4 chart, where at the same time the SMA 100 got below the EMA 50, which is a strong bearish signal. Figure 3: German DAX index on H4 and daily chart According to the H4 chart, the nearest resistance is in the range between 14,340 - 14,370. There is also a confluence with the moving average EMA 50 here. The next resistance is at 14,590 - 14,630. A support is at 14,030 - 14,100.   The DAX is influenced by the upcoming French presidential election, the outcome of which could have a major impact on the European economy.    The euro remains in a downtrend The Euro is negatively affected by the sanctions against Russia, which will also have a negative impact on the European economy. In addition, uncertainty has arisen regarding the French presidential election. Although the victory of the far-right candidate Marine Le Pen over the defending President Emmanuel Macron is still unlikely, the polls suggest that it is within the statistical margin of error. And this makes markets nervous.   A Le Pen victory would be bad for the economy and France's overall international image. It would weaken the European Union. That's why this news sent the euro below 1.09. The first round of elections will be held on Sunday April 10 and the second round on April 24, 2022.    Figure 4: EURUSD on H4 and daily chart. The nearest resistance according to the H4 chart is at 1.0930 - 1.0950. The significant resistance according to the daily chart is 1.1160 - 1.1190.  A support is at 1.080 - 1.0850.   According to the technical analysis, the euro is in a downtrend, but as it is currently at significant support levels, any short speculation could be considered only after the current support is broken and retested to validate the break.   The crude oil continues to descend The oil prices fell for a third straight day after the Paris-based International Energy Agency (IEA) announced it would release 60 million barrels of its members' reserves to the open market, adding to an earlier reserve release of 180 million barrels announced by the United States. In total, 240 million barrels would be delivered to the market over six months, resulting in a net inflow of 1.33 million barrels a day.   That would be more than triple the monthly production additions of 400,000 barrels per day by the world's oil producers under the OPEC+ alliance led by Saudi Arabia and controlled by Russia.   Adding to the negative sentiment on oil was a coronavirus outbreak in Shanghai, the largest in two years, which forced a more than week-long closure of China's second-largest city. This raises concerns about demand among oil consumers in the Chinese economy, which has a significant impact on prices. Figure 5: Brent crude oil on the H4 and daily charts. Brent crude oil is thus approaching support, which according to the H4 chart is at around USD 97-99 per barrel. The nearest resistance according to the H4 chart is at the price of USD 106 per barrel. The more significant resistance is at USD 111-112 per barrel of the Brent crude.   
The Swing Overview - Week 13 2022

The Swing Overview - Week 13 2022

Purple Trading Purple Trading 11.04.2022 06:41
The Swing Overview - Week 13 Equity indices closed the first quarter of 2022 in a loss under the influence of geopolitical tensions. The Czech koruna strengthened as a result of the CNB raising interest rates to 5%, the highest since 2001. The US supports the oil market by releasing 180 million barrels from its strategic reserves. War in Ukraine   The war in Ukraine has been going on for more than a month and there is still no end in sight. Ongoing diplomatic negotiations have not led to a result yet. Meanwhile, Russian President Putin has decided that European countries will pay for Russian gas in rubles. This has been described as blackmailing from Europe's point of view and is not in line with the gas supply contracts that have been concluded. A way around this is to open an account with Gazprombank where the gas can be paid for in euros. Geopolitical tensions are therefore still ongoing and are having a negative effect on stock markets.   Equity indices have had their worst quarter since 2020 US and European equities posted their biggest quarterly loss since the beginning of 2020, when the COVID-19 pandemic broke out and the global economy was in crisis. Portfolio rebalancing at the end of the quarter boosted demand for bonds and kept yields lower.   On Tuesday, the yield curve briefly inverted, meaning that short-term bonds yields were higher than  long-term bonds. An inverted yield curve is a signal of a recession according to many economists. It means that future corporate profits should be rather behind expectations and stock prices might reflect it.    On Thursday, the S&P 500 index fell 1.6%. The Dow Jones industrial index also fell by 1.6% and the Nasdaq Composite index fell by 1.5%. The European STOXX 600 index closed down by 0.94%. Even after last week's rally, as investors celebrated signs of progress in peace talks between Russia and Ukraine, the S&P 500 index is still down 5% for the first three months, its worst quarterly performance in two years.  Figure 1: SP 500 on H4 and D1 chart   The SP 500 index reached the resistance level at 4,600, which it broke, but then closed below it. This indicates a false break. The new nearest resistance is in the range of 4,625 - 4,635. Support is at 4,453 and then significant support is at 4,386 - 4,422.   German DAX index The DAX index has rallied since March 8 and has reached the resistance level which is in the 14,800 - 15,000 range.  However, the index started to weaken in the second half of the week. The news that Russia will demand payments for gas in rubles, which Western countries refuse, contributed to the index's weakening. The fear of gas supply disruption then caused a sell-off.    Figure 2: German DAX index on H4 and daily chart Resistance is between 14,800 - 15,000 according to the daily chart. The nearest support according to the H4 chart is at 14,100 - 14,200.   The euro remains in a downtrend The euro was supported at the beginning of the week by hopes for peace in Ukraine. However, by the end of the week, the Ukrainian President warned that Russia was preparing for more attacks and the Euro started to weaken. News of Russia's demand to pay for gas in rubles had a negative effect on the euro as well. Figure 3: The EURUSD on the H4 and daily charts. From a technical point of view, we can see that the EURUSD according to the daily chart has reached the resistance formed by EMA 50 (yellow line). The new horizontal resistance is in the area of 1.1160 - 1.1180. Support is at 1.0950 - 1.0980. The euro still remains in a downtrend.   CNB raised the interest rate In the fight against the inflation, the CNB decided to further raise the interest rate by 0.50%. Currently, the base rate is at 5%, where it was last in 2001. The interest rate hike is aimed at slowing inflation by slowing demand through higher borrowing costs.   Figure 4: Interest rate developments in the Czech Republic In addition, a strong koruna should support the slowdown in inflation. The koruna could appreciate especially against the euro due to higher interest rates. However, the strengthening of the koruna is conditional on the war in Ukraine not escalating further.  We can see that the koruna against the euro is approaching a support around 24.30. The low of this year was 24.10 korunas for one euro. Figure 5: USD/CZK and EUR/CZK on the daily chart. The koruna is also strengthening against the US dollar. Here, however, the situation is slightly different in that the US Fed is also raising rates and is expected to continue raising rates until the end of the year. Therefore, the interest rate differential between the koruna and the dollar is less favourable than between the koruna and the euro. The appreciation of the koruna against the dollar is therefore slower.   Currently, the koruna is at the support of 22 koruna per dollar. The next support is at 21.70 and then 21.10 koruna per dollar, where this year's low is.   Oil has weakened Oil prices saw the deep losses after the news that the United States will release up to 180 million barrels from its strategic petroleum reserves as part of measures to reduce fuel prices. US crude oil fell 5.4% and Brent crude oil fell 6.6% on Thursday after the news. Figure 6: Brent crude oil on a monthly and daily chart We can see that a strong bearish pinbar was formed on a  monthly chart. The nearest support is in the zone 103 – 106 USD per barel. A strong support is around 100 USD per barel which will be closely watched.  
Welcome Back to 1994!

Welcome Back to 1994!

David Merkel David Merkel 23.03.2022 03:03
Image Credit: Aleph Blog with help from FRED || Believe it or not, I used FRED before it was a web resource — it was a standalone “bulletin board” that I woul dial into on my computer modem I’ve talked about this here: Estimating Future Stock Returns, December 2021 UpdateTime for Another Convexity Crisis?The First Priority of Risk Control (2009, this tells the story of what I did during the 1994 crisis.) And recently I have tweeted about it. Mortgage rates are surging faster than expected, prompting economists to lower their home sales forecasts https://t.co/IiX2gPlAnI 1994 scenario re-occurring. Falling prepayments makes MBS lengthen, leading indexed bond managers to sell low-coupon MBS forcing rates still higher— David Merkel (@AlephBlog) March 22, 2022 We may be in the 1994 scenario where mortgage durations are extending, dragging the long end of the yield, as those that hedge duration are forced to sell, setting up a self-reinforcing move up in yields.— David Merkel (@AlephBlog) March 22, 2022 The MBS coupon stack is a lot flatter in 2022 than in 1994. There is more than 4X the mortgage debt now than in 1994. Lots of pent-up negative convexity. I lived through that in 1994, and made money off it.— David Merkel (@AlephBlog) March 22, 2022 Then from the piece Classic: Avoid the Dangers of Data-Mining, Part 2 “In 1992-1993, there were a number of bright investors who had “picked the lock” of the residential mortgage-backed securities market. Many of them had estimated complex multifactor relationships that allowed them to estimate the likely amount of mortgage prepayment within mortgage pools. Armed with that knowledge, they bought some of the riskiest securities backed by portions of the cash flows from the pools. They probably estimated the past relationships properly, but the models failed when no-cost prepayment became common, and failed again when the Federal Reserve raised rates aggressively in 1994. The failures were astounding: David Askin’s hedge funds, Orange County, the funds at Piper Jaffray that Worth Bruntjen managed, some small life insurers, etc. If that wasn’t enough, there were many major financial institutions that dropped billions on this trade without failing. What’s the lesson? Models that worked well in the past might not work so well in the future, particularly at high degrees of leverage. Small deviations from what made the relationship work in the past can be amplified by leverage into huge disasters.“ Finally from the piece What Brings Maturity to a Market: Negative Convexity: Through late 1993, structurers of residential mortgage securities were very creative, making tranches in mortgage securitizations that bore a disproportionate amount of risk, particularly compared to the yield received. In 1994 to early 1995, that illusion was destroyed as the bond market was dragged to higher yields by the Fed plus mortgage bond managers who tried to limit their interest rate risks individually, leading to a more general crisis. That created the worst bond market since 1926. ================================================== I am not saying it is certain, but I think it is likely that we are experiencing a panic in the mortgage bond market now. Like 1994, we have had a complacent Fed that left policy rates too low for too long. Both were foolish times, where policy should have been tighter. This led to massive refinancing of mortgages, and many new mortgages at low rates. But when that happens with most mortgages being low rate, if the Fed hints at or starts raising rates, prepayments will fall and Mortgage-Backed Securities [MBS] will lengthen duration while falling in price. Bond managers, most of whom are indexed and want a fixed duration, will start selling long bonds and MBS, leading long rates to rise, and the cycle temporarily becomes self-perpetuating. This is likely the situation that we are in now, and it very well may make the Fed overreact as they did in 1994. All good economists know the monetary policy acts with long and variable lags. But the FOMC for PR reasons acts as if their actions are immediate. Thus they become macho, and raise their rates too far, leading to a crash. (Can we eliminate the Fed? Gold was better, if we regulated the banks properly. Or, limit the slope of the yield curve.) I’m planning on making money on the opposite side of this trade if I am right. I will buy long Treasuries after the peak. I am watching this regularly, and will act when it is clear to me, but not the market as a whole, which in late 1994 to early 1995 did not know which end was up. Anyway, that’s all. The only good part of this environment is that my bond portfolios are losing less than the general market.
The Swing Overview - Week 16 2022

The Swing Overview - Week 16 2022

Purple Trading Purple Trading 22.04.2022 15:00
The Swing Overview - Week 16 Jerome Powell confirmed that the Fed will be aggressive in fighting the inflation and confirmed tighter interest rate hikes starting in May. Equity indices fell strongly after this news. Inflation in the euro area reached a record high of 7.4% in March. Despite this news, the euro continued to weaken. The sell-off also continued in the Japanese yen, which is the weakest against the US dollar in last 20 years.  The USD index strengthens along with US bond yields Fed chief Jerome Powell said on Thursday that the Fed could raise interest rates by 0.50% in May. The Fed could continue its aggressive pace of rate hikes in the coming months of this year. US 10-year bond yields have responded to this news by strengthening further and have already reached 2.94%. The US dollar has also benefited from this development and has already surpassed the value 100 and continues to move in an uptrend. Figure 1: US 10-year bond yields and USD index on the daily chart Earnings season is underway in equities Rising interest rates continue to weigh on equity indices, which gave back gains from the first half of the last week and weakened significantly on Thursday following the Fed’s information on the aggressive pace of interest rate hikes.   In addition, the earnings season, which is in full swing, is weighing on index movements. For example, Netflix and Tesla reported results last week.   While Netflix unpleasantly surprised by reducing the number of subscribers by 200,000 in 1Q 2022 and the company's shares fell by 35% in the wake of the news, Tesla, on the other hand, exceeded analysts' expectations and the stock gained more than 10% after the results were announced. Tesla has thus shown that it has been able to cope with the supply chain problems and higher subcontracting prices that are plaguing the entire automotive sector much better than its competitors.   The decline in Netflix subscribers can be explained by people starting to save more in an environment of rising prices. Figure 2: The SP 500 on H4 and D1 chart The SP 500 index continues to undergo a downward correction, which is shown on the H4 chart. The price has reached the resistance level at 4,514-4,520. The price continues to move below the SMA 100 moving average (blue line) on the daily chart which indicates bearish sentiment.  The nearest resistance according to the H4 chart is at 4,514 - 4,520. The next resistance is around 4,583 - 4,600. The support is at 4,360 - 4,365.   The German DAX index The DAX is also undergoing a correction and the last candlestick on the daily chart is a bearish pin bar which suggests that the index could fall further. Figure 3: The German DAX index on H4 and daily chart This index is also below the SMA 100 on the daily chart, confirming the bearish sentiment. The price has reached a support according to the H4 chart, which is at 14,340 - 14,370. However, this is very likely to be overcome quickly. The next support is 13 910 - 14 000. The nearest resistance is 14 592 - 14 632.   The DAX is affected by the French presidential election that is going to happen on Sunday April 24, 2022. According to the latest polls, Macron is leading over Le Pen and if the election turns out like this, it should not have a significant impact on the markets. However, if Marine Le Pen wins in a surprise victory, it can be very negative news for the French economy and would weigh on the DAX index as well.   The euro remains in a downtrend The Fed's hawkish policy and the ECB's dovish rhetoric at its meeting on Thursday April 14, 2022, which showed that the ECB is not planning to raise rates in the short term, put further pressure on the European currency. The French presidential election and, of course, the ongoing war in Ukraine are also causing uncertainty.  Figure 4: The EURUSD on the H4 and daily charts. The inflation data was reported last week, which came in at 7.4% on year-on-year basis. The previous month inflation was 5.9%. This rise in inflation caused the euro to strengthen briefly to the resistance level at 1.0930 - 1.0950. However, there was then a rapid decline from this level following the Fed's reports of a quick tightening in the economy. A support is at 1.0760 - 1.0780.   The sell-off in the Japanese yen is not over The Japanese yen is also under pressure. The US dollar has already reached 20-year highs against the Japanese yen (USD/JPY) and it looks like the yen's weakening against the US dollar could continue. This is because the Bank of Japan has the most accommodative monetary policy of any major central bank and continues to support the economy while the Fed will aggressively tighten the economy. Thus, this fundamental suggests that a reversal in the USD/JPY pair should not happen anytime soon. Figure 5: The USDJPY on the monthly chart In terms of technical analysis, the USD/JPY price broke through the strong resistance band around the price of 126.00 seen on the monthly chart. The currency pair thus has room to grow further up to the resistance, which is in the area near 135 yens per dollar.  
Indonesia's Inflation Slips, Central Bank Maintains Rates Amidst Stability

US Dollar (USD) Continues To Trump Euro (EUR) And British Pound (GBP). EUR Fails To Get Boost Post Macron Election Victory - Good Morning Forex!

Rebecca Duthie Rebecca Duthie 25.04.2022 11:28
Summary: Macron's victory was supposedly expected to stabilize EUR. Fed further increase in yields strengthening USD. USD continues to strengthen against the EURO inlight of further US yield increases. Market sentiment for this currency pair is bearish as of market open today, the price is down almost 0,6%. On friday the Fed announced a further increase in the bond yields, this marks the seventh consecutive week that the Fed has increased the US yields. The European Central bank is still behind the Fed on their yield increases, the expectation for this change is increasing but the increased expectations are not helping the EUR to strengthen against the USD. EUR/USD Price Chart Read Next: ECB Announcements to Possibly Tighten Monetary Policy Strengthens the Euro. EUR/USD, EUR/GBP, AUD/NZD and EUR/CHF All Increased The EURO showed overall strengthening against the GBP over the past week. Since the market opened this morning the market sentiment for this currency pair is bullish. The EUR has strengthened against the GBP continuously over the last week. Today the increase has shown almost 0,3%. The EUR is strengthening as a result of the uncertainty with the Bank of England's future yields and the inflation causing personal spending to decrease, hampering the economy. In addition, the EUR strengthened against the GBP inlight of Macron taking the win in the French elections. EUR/GBP Price Chart   Read next: A Reward For A Transaction!? What Is Kishu Inu Coin? ($KISHU) Let's Take A Look At This New Altcoin | FXMAG.COM   EUR/JPY showing bullish signals. Since the market opened this morning the market sentiment is bullish for this currency pair. Despite the bullish sentiment, the price has still fallen by almost 0,8% since this morning. This currency pair is sensitive to trends in broad based market sentiment trends, therefore, inlight of Macron’s victory causing changes in market sentiment it is not surprising this price is seeing volatility. EUR/JPY Price Chart CHF Strengthening. Market sentiment for the currency pair is bullish at the moment. However, despite the bullish signals the price has still fallen almost 4% since the market opened this morning. The Swiss Franc has strengthened today causing this fall. EUR/CHF Price Chart Sources: finance.yahoo.com, dailyfx.com, poundsterlinglive.com Read next: Monetary Policy Drives EUR/USD, The Future of the EUR/GBP Awaits the Bank Of England's Speech - Good Morning Forex  
The Swing Overview – Week 17 2022

The Swing Overview – Week 17 2022

Purple Trading Purple Trading 03.05.2022 11:04
The Swing Overview – Week 17 Major stock indices continued in their correction and tested strong support levels. In contrast, the US dollar strengthened strongly and is at its highest level since January 2017. The strengthening of the dollar had a negative impact on the value of the euro and commodities such as gold, which fell below the $1,900 per ounce. The Bank of Japan kept interest rates low and the yen broke the magic level 130 per dollar. The USD index strengthened again but the US GDP declined The US consumer confidence in the month of April came in at 107.3, a slight decline from the previous month when consumer confidence was 107.6.   The US GDP data was surprising. The US economy decreased by 1.4% in 1Q 2022 (in the previous quarter the economy grew by 6.4%). This sharp decline surprised even analysts who expected the economy to grow by 1.1%. This result is influenced by the Omicron, which caused the economy to shut down for a longer period than expected earlier this year.    The Fed meeting scheduled for the next week on May 4 will be hot. In fact, even the most dovish Fed officials are already leaning towards a 0.5% rate hike. At the end of the year, we can expect a rate around 2.5%.   The US 10-year bond yields continue to strengthen on the back of these expectations. The US dollar is also strengthening and is already at its highest level since January 2017, surpassing 103 level.  Figure 1: US 10-year bond yields and the USD index on the daily chart   Earnings season is underway in equities Earnings season is in full swing. Amazon's results were disappointing. While revenue was up 7% reaching $116.4 billion in the first quarter (revenue was $108.5 billion in the same period last year), the company posted an total loss of $8.1 billion, which translated to a loss of $7.56 per share. This loss, however, is not due to operating activities, but it is the result of the revaluation of the equity investment in Rivian Automotive.   Facebook, on the other hand, surprised in a positive way posting unexpectedly strong user growth, a sign that its Instagram app is capable of competing with Tik Tok. However, the revenue growth of 6.6% was the lowest in the company's history.    Apple was also a positive surprise, reporting earnings per share of $1.52 (analysts' forecast was $1.43) and revenue growth of $97.3 billion, up 8.6% from the same period last year. However, the company warned that the closed operations in Russia, the lockdown in China due to the coronavirus and supply disruptions will negatively impact earnings in the next quarter.   Figure 2: The SP 500 on H4 and D1 chart In terms of technical analysis, the US SP 500 index is in a downtrend and has reached a major support level on the daily chart last week, which is at 4,150. It has bounced upwards from this support to the resistance according to the 4 H chart which is 4,308 - 4,313. The next resistance according to the H4 chart is 4,360 - 4,365.  The strong resistance is at 4,500.   German DAX index German businessmen are optimistic about the development of the German economy in the next 6 months, as indicated by the Ifo Business Climate Index, which reached 91.8 for April (the expectation was 89.1). However, this did not have a significant effect on the movement of the index and it continued in its downward correction. Figure 3: German DAX index on H4 and daily chart The index is below the SMA 100 on both the daily chart and the H4 chart, confirming the bearish sentiment. The nearest support according to the H4 is 13,600 - 13,650. The resistance is 14,180 - 14,200. The next resistance is 14,592 - 14,632.   The euro has fallen below 1.05 The euro lost significantly last week. While the French election brought relief to the markets as Emmanuel Macron defended the presidency, geopolitical tensions in Ukraine continue to weigh heavily on the European currency. The strong dollar is also having an impact on the EUR/USD pair, pushing the pair down. The price has fallen below 1.05, the lowest level since January 2017.    Figure 4: EURUSD on H4 and daily chart The euro broke through the important support at 1.0650 - 1.071, which has now become the new resistance. The new support was formed in January 2017 and is around the level 1.0350 - 1.040.   Japan's central bank continues to support the fragile economy The Bank of Japan on Thursday reinforced its commitment to keep interest rates at very low levels by pledging to buy unlimited amounts of 10-year government bonds daily, sparking a fresh sell-off in the yen and reviving government bonds. With this commitment, the BOJ is trying to support a fragile economy, even as a surge in commodity prices is pushing the inflation up.   The decision puts Japan in the opposite position to other major economies, which are moving towards tighter monetary policy to combat soaring prices. Figure 5: The USD/JPY on the monthly and daily chart In fresh quarterly forecasts, the central bank has projected core consumer inflation to reach 1.9% in the current fiscal year and then ease to 1.1% in fiscal years 2023 and 2024, an indication that it views the current cost-push price increases as transitory.   In the wake of this decision, the Japanese yen has continued to weaken and has already surpassed the magical level 130 per dollar.   Strong dollar beats also gold Anticipation of aggressive Fed action against inflation, which is supporting the US dollar, is having a negative impact on gold. The rising US government bond yields are also a problem for the yellow metal. This has put gold under pressure, which peaked on Thursday when the price reached USD 1,872 per ounce of gold. But then the gold started to strengthen. Indeed, the decline in the US GDP may have been something of a warning to the Fed and prevent them from tightening the economy too quickly, which helped gold, in the short term, bounce off a strong support. Figure 6: The gold on H4 and daily chart Strong support for the gold is at $1,869 - $1,878 per ounce. There is a confluence of horizontal resistance and the SMA 100 moving average on the daily chart. The nearest resistance according to the H4 chart is 1 907 - 1 910 USD per ounce. The strong resistance according to the daily chart is then 1 977 - 2 000 USD per ounce of gold. Moving averages on the H4 chart can also be used as a resistance. The orange line is the EMA 50 and the blue line is the SMA 100.  
The Swing Overview - Week 18 2022

The Swing Overview - Week 18 2022

Purple Trading Purple Trading 16.05.2022 10:51
The Swing Overview - Week 18 In the war against rising inflation, central banks in the US, the UK and Australia raised interest rates this week. Britain, meanwhile, warned of the risk of a recession. The CNB also raised rates. They have thus reached their highest levels since 1999. The key interest rate in the Czech Republic is now 5.75%.   The main stock indices have weakened strongly in response to the monetary tightening policies of the major economies and are at significant support levels. The negative sentiment on the indices is confirmed by the VIX fear indicator, which is above 30. The US dollar, on the other hand, continues to ride on the winning wave. The Fed raised interest rates by 0.5% The Fed raised rates by 0.5% points on Wednesday as expected, the highest jump in 22 years. This took the interest rate to 1%. The Fed chief announced that further half a percentage point rate hikes will continue at the next meetings in June and July. Powell also stated that the US economy is doing well and that it can withstand interest rate hikes without the risk of a recession and a significant increase in unemployment.   In addition to the rate hike, the Fed announced that in June it would begin reducing the assets on the bank's balance sheet that the central bank had accumulated during the pandemic. In June, July and August, the Fed will sell $45 billion of assets a month, and starting in September it will sell $95 billion a month.   Although Powell ruled out a 0.75% rate hike at the next meetings, interest rate futures markets continue to expect that possibility with about an 80% probability. Figure 1: The CME Fed Watch tool projections of the target interest rate for the next Fed meeting on June 15, 2022 Based on these expectations, US 10-year Treasury yields continue to strengthen and have surpassed the 3% mark. The US dollar is also strengthening and it is at the highest level since January 2017 and approaching 104.  Figure 2: The US 10-year bond yields and the USD index on the daily chart   Equity indices remain under pressure The SP 500 index initially rallied strongly following the announcement of the rate hike, after Powell ruled out a 0.75% rate hike in subsequent meetings. However, markets gave back all the gains the following day as interest rate futures continue to estimate an 80% probability that the next rate hike, which will take place in June 2022, will be 0.75%.   Figure 3: SP 500 on H4 and D1 chart Thus, in terms of technical analysis, the US SP 500 index continues to move in a downtrend below both the SMA 100 and EMA 50 moving averages with resistance, according to the 4 H chart, at 4,308 - 4,313. The next resistance, according to the H4 chart, is 4,360 - 4,365.  Strong resistance is at 4,500. The current support is 4 070 - 4 100.   German DAX index German industrial orders fell by 4.7% in March, which is more than expected. A major contributor to this negative result was a reduction in orders from abroad as the war in Ukraine hit demand in the manufacturing sector. The outlook is negative and some analysts suggest that the German economy is heading into recession. The reasons are the war in Ukraine, problems in supply chains and high inflation. The Dax index confirms these negative outlooks with a downward trend. Figure 4: German DAX index on H4 and daily chart The index continues to move below the SMA 100 on the daily chart and on the H4 chart, confirming the bearish sentiment. The nearest support according to the H4 is 13,600 - 13,650. Resistance is 14,300 - 14,330. The next resistance is 14,592 - 14,632.   The outlook for the euro remains negative HSBC bank on Thursday significantly cut its forecast for the euro, saying it expects the euro to weaken to parity against the US dollar this year, the first major investment bank to make such a prediction.   The post-pandemic economic environment, which has been damaged by the ongoing war in Ukraine, looks challenging for the European economy, potentially forcing the European Central Bank to tighten policy slowly compared to the U.S. Federal Reserve, which has begun an aggressive rate-hiking cycle.  This has raised the prospect of the single currency falling to levels not seen in two decades. HSBC said it expects the move to happen by the fourth quarter of 2022.   ECB board member Isabel Schnabel said this week that rates may need to be raised as early as July. The precursor to any rate hike must be an end to bond purchases and that could come in late June. Markets are pricing in a 90 basis point tightening in rates this year.   Figure 5: The EURUSD on H4 and daily chart The EUR/USD pair is in a clear downtrend with resistance at 1.0650 - 1.071. The important support is 1.05, but it has already been tested several times and could be broken soon. The next support is from January 2017 at around 1.0350 - 1.040.   The Czech koruna got another injection in the form of an interest rate hike The CNB raised the interest rate by 0.75%, which exceeded analysts' expectations who projected a 0.50% rise. The current rate now stands at 5.75%, the highest since 1999. Consumer price growth continues to rise and by raising the interest rate the central bank is trying to dampen this growth by raising the interest rate. Inflation is expected to reach 15% by mid-year. The CNB has an inflation target of 2% and inflation is expected to reach these levels in 2024.   The problem is economic growth, which is slowing significantly.  But maintaining price stability is clearly more important than the negative effects of higher rates on the real economy.  Figure 6: The USD/CZK and the EUR/CZK on the daily chart The Czech koruna has so far done best on the pair with the euro, as interest rates are zero on the euro. The koruna has been weakening significantly on the USD pair in recent days. The current significant resistance on the USD/CZK is CZK 23.50 per dollar and on the EUR/CZK it is 24.70.    Bank of England warned of recession and more than 10% inflation The Bank of England sent out a strong warning that Britain faces the twin dangers of recession and inflation above 10% when it raised interest rates by a quarter percentage point to 1% on Thursday. The pound fell more than a cent against the US dollar and hit its lowest level since mid-2020, below $1.24, as the gloominess of the BoE's new forecasts for the world's fifth-largest economy caught investors off guard.    The BoE also said it was also concerned about the impact of renewed COVID-19 lockdowns in China, which threaten to hit supply chains again and increase inflationary pressures.    The BoE's rate hike was the fourth since December, the fastest pace of policy tightening in 25 years. The central bank also revised up its price growth forecasts, which suggest it will peak above 10% in the final three months of this year. Previously, it had expected it to peak at around 8% in April. Markets expect interest rates to reach 2-2.25% by the end of 2022.  Figure 7: The GBP/USD on weekly and daily charts In terms of technical analysis, the GBP/USD is in a downtrend. The pound is trading at levels below 1.24 pounds per dollar and has reached to the support of 1.225-1.2330. The nearest resistance according to the weekly chart is at 1.2700-1.2750.   
The Swing Overview - Week 19 2022

The Swing Overview - Week 19 2022

Purple Trading Purple Trading 16.05.2022 10:59
The Swing Overview - Week 19 Stock indices continued to weaken strongly last week, while the US dollar has already surpassed the mark 104 and is at 20-year highs. However, a set of important data is behind us, which could bring some temporary relief to the equity markets. The Czech koruna weakened sharply after the appointment of the new CNB Governor Ales Michl, who is a proponent of a dovish approach. Thus, the rise in interest rates in the Czech Republic appears to be close to its peak.   Macroeconomic data The US consumer inflation for April was reported on Wednesday, which came in at 8.3% on year-on-year basis. Analysts were expecting inflation to be 8.1%. Although the figure achieved was higher than expectations, it was still lower than the 8.5% inflation figure achieved in March. On a month-on-month basis, the price increase in April was 0.3%, significantly lower than in March when prices rose by 1.5%.   On Thursday, industrial inflation was reported at 8.8% year-on-year and 0.4% month-on-month for April.   The positive thing about this data is that inflation declined from previous readings. However, it is important to note that the year-on-year comparison is based on data where inflation was also higher in the previous year due to the recovery from the Covid-19 pandemic.   The Fed chief reiterated that he expects another 0.50% point rise in interest rates at the next two Fed meetings. He also mentioned that a higher rate hike cannot be ruled out if necessary.   The US 10-year bond yields came down from their peak and made a slight correction. However, the US dollar continued to strengthen and broke the resistance at 104. The dollar is thus at 20-year highs. Figure 1: US 10-year bond yields and USD index on the daily chart   Equity indices heavily oversold The strong dollar, rising US bond yields, the war in Ukraine and the effects of the lockdown in China were the main reasons for the decline in equity indices. The SP 500 index hit 3,860, the lowest level since March 2021. This is also where long-term support is. However, the important macro data is behind us and the market has processed all the available fundamental information. This could bring temporary relief to the markets and the index could make an upward correction. The fall in 10-year bond yields, gives this move some boost as well.   Figure 2: The SP 500 on H4 and D1 chart However, from a technical analysis perspective, the US SP 500 index remains in a current downtrend as the markets have formed lower low and is also below both the SMA 100 and EMA 50 moving averages on the H4 and daily charts. The nearest resistance is 4040 - 4070. The next resistance is at 4,140 and especially 4,293 - 4,300. The support is at 3,860 - 3,900.   German DAX index In macroeconomic data, the German ZEW Economic Sentiment for May was reported last week and showed a reading of -34.3, an improvement from the previous month's reading of -41.0. Inflation in Germany for April is at 7.4% on year-on-year basis and up 0.8% from March (the previous month's increase was 2.5%). Figure 3: German DAX index on H4 and daily chart The index continues to move in a downtrend along with the major world indices. The price has reached the SMA 100 moving average on the H4 chart, which tends to signal resistance in a downtrend. The price is moving below the SMA 100 on both the daily chart and the H4 chart, confirming the bearish sentiment. The nearest support according to the H4 is 13,600 - 13,650. The resistance is 14,300 - 14,330. The next resistance is 14,592 - 14,632.   The big sell-off in the euro continues The euro fell to 1.0356 against the dollar, the lowest value since January 2017. This value is also an area of significant support where price could stall. Fundamentally, the euro's depreciation is due to the strong dollar and the Fed's hawkish policy, which contrasts with the ECB's policy of not raising rates yet.    Figure 4: The EURUSD on H4 and daily chart Eurozone inflation data will be reported next week, which could be an important catalyst for further movement. The significant support is priced around 1.0350 - 1.040. The current resistance is at 1.05.   Czech koruna weakened strongly on the new governor appointment The President Miloš Zeman surprised with the appointment of Ales Michl for the governor of the CNB. Michl is known for his dovish views, having spoken out against raising interest rates at recent meetings. His appointment was welcomed in the markets by a strong depreciation of the Czech koruna. However, the bank later intervened in the markets by selling part of its foreign exchange reserves to prevent further depreciation of the Czech koruna.   It is important to know that the Bank's monetary policy is decided by the seven-member Bank Board. So far, the proportion for voting on rate hikes has been 5:2. But by the end of June, the president must appoint 3 new board members. This could significantly change the voting ratio on the board and set a new course for the bank's policy, which would mean a halt to the rise in interest rates. However, it is likely that at the June board meeting the board, still with the old composition, will decide on further interest rate increases. Figure 5: The USD/CZK and the EUR/CZK on the daily chart The Czech koruna has reached 24.36 against the dollar and 25.47 against the euro, from which it started to descend after the CNB interventions.  
The Swing Overview – Week 20 2022

The Swing Overview – Week 20 2022

Purple Trading Purple Trading 02.06.2022 16:36
The Swing Overview – Week 20 The markets remain volatile and fragile, as shown by the VIX fear index, which has again surpassed the level 30 points. However, equity indices are at interesting supports and there could be some short-term recovery. The euro has bounced off its support in anticipation of tighter monetary policy and the gold is holding its price tag above $1,800 per troy ounce. Is the gold back in investors' favor again? Macroeconomic data The week started with a set of worse data from the Chinese economy, which showed that industrial production contracted by 2.9% year-on-year basis and the retail sales fell by 11.1%. The data shows the latest measures for the country's current COVID-19 outbreak are taking a toll on the economy. To support the slowing economy, China cut its benchmark interest rate by 0.15% on Friday morning, more than analysts expected. While this will not be enough to stave off current downside risks, markets may respond to expectation of more easing in the future. On a positive note, data from the US showed retail sales rose by 0.9% in April and industrial production rose by 1.1% in April. Inflation data in Europe was important. It showed that inflation in the euro area slowed down a little, reaching 7.4% in April compared to 7.5% in March. In Canada, on the other hand, the inflation continued to rise, reaching 6.8% (6.7% in March) and in the UK inflation was 9% in April (7% in the previous month). Several factors are contributing to the higher inflation figures: the ongoing war in Ukraine, problems in logistics chains and the effects of the lockdown in China. Concerns about the impact of higher inflation are showing up in the bond market. The benchmark 10-year US Treasury yield has come down from the 3.2% it reached on 9 May and is currently at 2.8%. This means that demand for bonds is rising and they are once again becoming an asset for times of uncertainty.  Figure 1: US 10-year bond yields and USD index on a daily chart   Equity indices on supports Global equities fell significantly in the past week, reaching significant price supports. Thus, there could be some form of short-term bounce. Although a cautious rally began on Thursday, which was then boosted by China's decision to cut interest rates in the early hours of Friday, there is still plenty of fear among investors and according to Louis Dudley of Federated Hermes, cash holdings have reached its highest level since September 2001, suggesting strong bearish sentiment. Supply chain problems have been highlighted by companies such as Cisco Systems, which has warned of persistent parts shortages. That knocked its shares down by 13.7%. The drop made it the latest big-stock company to post its biggest decline in more than a decade last week. The main risks that continue to cause volatility and great uncertainty are thus leading investors to buy "safe" assets such as the US bonds and the Swiss franc. Figure 2: The SP 500 on H4 and D1 chart From a technical analysis perspective, the US SP 500 index continues to move in a downtrend as the market has formed a lower low while being below both the SMA 100 and EMA 50 moving averages on the H4 and daily charts. The nearest resistance is 4,080 - 4,100. The next resistance is at 4,140 and especially 4,293 - 4,300. Support is at 3,860 - 3,900 level. German DAX index The index continues to move in a downtrend along with the major world indices. The price has reached the support which is at 13,680 – 13,700 and the moving average EMA 50 on the H4 chart is above the SMA 100. This could indicate a short-term signal for some upward correction. However, the main trend according to the daily chart is still downwards. The nearest resistance is at 14,260 - 14,330 level. Figure 3: German DAX index on H4 and daily chart The euro has bounced off its support The EUR/USD currency pair benefited last week from the US dollar moving away from its 20-year highs while on the euro, investors are expecting a tightening economy and a rise in interest rates, which the ECB has not risen yet as one of the few banks. Figure 4: The EURUSD on H4 and daily chart   Significant support is at the price around 1.0350 - 1.040. Current resistance is at 1.650 - 1.700.   The Gold in investors' attention again The gold has underperformed over the past month, falling by 10% since April when the price reached USD 2,000 per ounce. But there is now strong risk aversion in the markets, as indicated by the stock markets, which have fallen. The gold, on the other hand, has started to rise. Inflation fears are a possible reason, and investors have begun to accumulate the gold for protection against rising prices. The second reason is that the gold is inversely correlated with the US dollar. The dollar has come down from its 20-year highs, which has allowed the gold to bounce off its support.  Figure 5: The gold on H4 and daily chart The first resistance is at $1,860 per ounce. The support is at $1,830 - $1,840 per ounce. The next support is then at $1,805 - $1,807 and especially at $1,800 per ounce.
The Swing Overview - Week 22 2022

The Swing Overview - Week 22 2022

Purple Trading Purple Trading 07.06.2022 13:59
The Swing Overview - Week 22 Equity indices continued to rise for a second week despite rising inflation and sanctions against Russia. Economic data indicate optimistic consumer expectations and the easing of the Covid-19 measures in China also brought some relief to the markets. The Bank of Canada raised its policy rate to 1.5%. The Eurozone inflation hit a new record of 8.1%, giving further fuel to the ECB to raise interest rates, which is supporting the euro to strengthen.   Macroeconomic data The US consumer confidence in economic growth for May came in at 106.4. The market was expecting 103.9. This optimism points to an expected increase in consumer spendings, which is a positive development. The optimism was also confirmed by data from the manufacturing sector. The ISM PMI index in manufacturing rose by 56.1 in May, an improvement on the April reading of 55.4. The manufacturing sector is therefore expecting further expansion.   On the other hand, data from the labour market were disappointing. The ADP Non Farm Employment indicator (private sector job growth) was well below expectations as the economy created only 128k new jobs in May (the market was expecting 300k new jobs). The unemployment claims data held at the standard 200k level. However, the crucial indicator from the labour market will be Friday's NFP data.   Quarterly wage growth for 1Q 2022 was 12.6% (previous quarter was 3.9%). This figure is a leading indicator on inflation. Faster inflation growth could lead to a higher-than-expected 0.50% rate hike at the Fed's June meeting.   The US 10-year Treasury yields have rebounded from 2.6% and have started to rise again. They are currently around 2.9%. However, the US Dollar Index has not yet reacted to the rise in yields. The reason is that the euro, which has appreciated significantly in recent days, has the largest weight in the USD index. Figure 1: US 10-year bond yields and USD index on the daily chart   The SP 500 Index The SP 500 index has continued to strengthen in recent days. The market seems to be accepting the expected 0.50% rate hike and while economic data points to some slowdown, forward looking consumers‘ and managers’ expectations are optimistic.  Figure 2: The SP 500 on H4 and D1 chart   The US SP 500 index is approaching a significant resistance level, which is in the 4,197-4,204 range. The next one is at 4,293 - 4,306. The nearest support is at 4 075 - 4 086.    German DAX index Figure 3: German DAX index on H4 and daily chart Germany's manufacturing PMI for May came in at 54.8. The previous month it was 54, 6. Thus, managers expect expansion in the manufacturing sector. Surprisingly, German exports rose in April despite the disruption of trade relations with Russia. Exports in Germany grew by 4.4% even though exports to Russia fell by 10%.  The positive data has an impact on the DAX index. However, the bulls in DAX may be discouraged by the expected ECB interest rate hike.   The DAX has reached resistance in the 14,600 - 14,640 area. The nearest significant support is at 14,300 - 14,330, where the horizontal resistance is coincident with the moving average EMA 50 on the H4 chart.   The euro continues to rise Bulls on the euro were supported by inflation data, which reached a record high of 8.1% in the eurozone for the month of May. Inflation increased by 0.8% on a monthly basis compared to April. Information from the manufacturing sector exceeded expectations, with the manufacturing PMI for May coming in at 54.6, indicating optimism in the economy. The ECB will meet on Thursday 9/6/2022 and it might be surprising. While analysts do not expect a rate hike at this meeting, rising inflation may prompt the ECB to act faster.  Figure 4: The EUR/USD on H4 and daily chart The EUR/USD currency pair is reacting to the rate hike expectations by gradual strengthening. A resistance is at 1.0780 The nearest support is now at 1.0629 - 1.0640 and then at 1.0540 - 1.0550.   The Bank of Canada raised the interest rate The GDP in Canada for Q1 2022 grew by 2.89% year-on-year (3.23% in the previous period). On a month-on-month basis, the GDP grew by 0.7% (0.9% in February). This points to slowing economic growth.  Canada's manufacturing PMI for May came in at 56.8 (56.2 in April ), an upbeat development. The Bank of Canada raised its policy rate by 0.50% to 1.5% as expected by analysts. In addition to the rate hike, the Canadian dollar is positively affected by the rise in oil prices as Canada is a major exporter. Figure 5: The USD/CAD on H4 and daily chart The USD/CAD currency pair is currently in a downward movement. The nearest resistance according to the daily chart is 1.2710-1.2730. Support according to the daily chart is in the range of 1.2400-1.2470.  
The Swing Overview – Week 23 2022

The Swing Overview – Week 23 2022

Purple Trading Purple Trading 17.06.2022 08:53
The Swing Overview - Week 23 Major global stock indices broke through their support levels after several days of range movement in response to the tightening economy, the ongoing war in Ukraine, slowing economic growth and high inflation. The Reserve Bank of Australia raised its interest rate by 0.50%. The ECB decided to start raising interest rates by 0.25% from July 2022. The winner of last week is the US dollar, which continues to strengthen. Macroeconomic data Data from the US labour market was highly anticipated. The job creation indicator, the so-called NFP, surprised the markets positively. Analysts expected that 325,000 new jobs had been created in May. In fact, 390 thousand jobs were created in the US. Unemployment is at 3.6%. The information on the growth of hourly wages, which is a leading indicator of inflation, was important. Average hourly earnings rose 0.3% in May, less than analysts who expected 0.4%.   Unemployment claims reached 229,000 this week. This is the highest levels since 3/3/2022. However, this is not an extreme increase. The number of claims is still in the pre-pandemic average area. Nevertheless, it can be seen that since 7/4/2022, when the number of applications reached 166 thousand, the number of applications is slowly increasing and this indicator will be closely monitored.  The ISM index of purchasing managers in the US service sector reached 55.9 in May. This is lower than the previous month's reading of 57.1. A value above 50 still points to expansion in the sector although the decline in the reading indicates  economy.   The yield on the US 10-year bond is close to its peak and is currently around 3%. The rise in yields has been followed by a rise in the US dollar. The dollar index has surpassed 103. The reason for the strengthening of the dollar is the aggressive tightening of the economy by the US Fed, which began reducing the central bank's balance sheet on June 1, 2022. In practice, this means that the Fed will let expire the government bonds it previously bought as part of QE and will not reinvest them further. The first tranche of bonds will expire on June 15, so the effect of this operation remains to be seen. Figure 1: The US 10-year bond yields and USD index on the daily chart   The SP 500 Index The SP 500 index has been moving in a narrow range for the past few days between 4,200, where resistance is and 4,080, where support has been tested several times. This support was broken and has become the new resistance as we can see on the H4 chart.   Figure 2: The SP 500 on H4 and D1 chart   The catalyst for this strong initiation move is the strong US dollar and rising bond yields. Therefore, the current resistance is in the 4,075 - 4,085 range.  The nearest support is 3,965 - 3,970 according to the H4 chart. The next support is 3,879 - 3,907.   German DAX index Macroeconomic data that affected the DAX was manufacturing orders for April, which fell 2.7% month-on-month, while analysts were expecting a 0.3% rise. Industrial production in Germany rose by 0.7% in April (expectations were for 1.0%). The war in Ukraine has a strong impact on the weaker figures. The catalyst for breaking support was the ECB's decision to raise interest rates, which the bank will start implementing from July 2022. Figure 3: German DAX index on H4 and daily chart The DAX is below the SMA 100 moving average according to the daily and H4 chart. This shows a bearish sentiment. The nearest resistance is 14,300 - 14,335. Support is at 13,870 - 13,900 according to the H4 chart.   The ECB left the interest rate unchanged  The ECB left interest rates unchanged on June 9, 2022, so the key rate is still at 0.0%. However, the bank said that it will proceed with a rate hike from July, when the rate is expected to rise by 0.25%. The next hike will then be in September, probably again by 0.25%. The bank pointed to the high inflation rate, which is expected to reach 6.8% for 2022. Inflation is expected to fall to 3.4% in 2023 and 2.1% in 2024.  Figure 4: The EUR/USD on H4 and daily chart According to the bank, a significant risk is Russia's unjustified aggression against Ukraine, which is causing problems in supply chains and pushing energy and some commodity prices up. The result is a slowdown in the growth of the European economy. The bank also announced that it will end its asset purchase program as of July 1, 2022. This is the soft end of this program, as the money that will flow from matured assets will continue to be reinvested by the bank. In practice, this means that the ECB's balance sheet will not be further inflated, but for now, unlike the Fed’s balance sheet, the bank has no plans to reduce its balance sheet. This, coupled with the more moderate rate hike plans and the existence of the above risks, has supported the dollar and the euro has begun to weaken sharply in response to the ECB announcement. The resistance is 1.0760-1.0770. Current support at 1.063-1.064 is broken and it will become new resistance if the break is confirmed. The next support according to the H4 chart is 1.0530 - 1.0550.   Australian central bank surprises with aggressive approach In Australia, the central bank raised its policy rate by 0.50%. Analysts had expected the bank to raise the rate by 0.25%. Thus, the current rate on the Australian dollar is 0.80%. However, this aggressive increase did not strengthen the Australian dollar, which surprisingly weakened. The reason for this is the strong US dollar and also the risk off sentiment that is taking place in the equity indices.  Also impacting the Aussie is the situation in China, where there is zero tolerance of COVID-19. This will impact the country's economic growth, which is very likely to fall short of the 5.5% that was originally projected.  Figure 5: The AUD/USD on H4 and daily chart According to the H4 chart, the AUD/USD currency pair has broken below the SMA 100 moving average, which is a bearish signal. The nearest resistance is 0.7140 - 0.7150. The support is in the zone 0.7030 - 0.7040. 
The Swing Overview – Week 24 2022

The Swing Overview – Week 24 2022

Purple Trading Purple Trading 17.06.2022 16:54
The Swing Overview - Week 24 We've had a week in which the world's major stock indices took a bloodbath in response to rising inflation, which is advancing faster than expected. Central banks have played a major part in this drama. As expected, the US, the UK and, surprisingly, Switzerland raised interest rates. Japan, on the other hand, is still one of the few countries that decided to keep interest rates at their original level of - 0.10%. Macroeconomic data The 0.75% interest rate hike to 1.75%, which was 0.25% higher than the Fed announced at the last meeting, might not have come as a surprise to the markets given that inflation for May was 8.6% on year-on-year basis (8.3% for April). The market reacted strongly in response to the inflation data, and a sell-off in equity indices and a strengthening US dollar followed.   The 0.75% rate hike is the highest since 1994 and the next Fed meeting is expected to see another rate hike again in the range of 0.50% to 0.75%. The Fed is trying to stop rising inflation with this aggressive approach. The problem is that economic projections point to slowing economic growth. Retail data for May fell by 0.3%, which was a surprise to the markets. This is the first drop in consumer spending in 2022. The Fed also lowered GDP growth projections and unemployment is expected to rise as well. All of this points to the risk of stagflation.     But the labour market data is still good. The number of initial claims in unemployment reached 229k last week, down from 232k the previous week. The US dollar hit a new high for the year at 105.86 in response to high inflation and a faster tightening economy. The US 10-year bond yields also rose, reaching 3.479%. Figure 1: The US 10-year bond yields and the USD index on the daily chart   The SP 500 Index The SP 500 index, like other global indices, was in a bloodbath last week as data on rising US inflation in particular surprised. Major supports according to the H4 chart were very quickly broken and the market is showing that it is still in a bearish mood. According to the daily chart, another lower low has formed which together with the lower highs confirms this bearish trend.   Figure 2: The SP 500 on H4 and D1 chart   A support according to the H4 chart is in the 3,645 - 3,675 range. The nearest resistance is at 3,820 - 3,835. A broken support in the 3,710 - 3,732 area can also be considered as resistance. The most important news is behind us and the market could take a breath for a while. The low levels could also be noticed by long-term investors who will be buying dip. But for speculators, it is very risky to speculate on a market reversal in a downtrend.   German DAX index The German DAX index offers a very similar picture to the SP 500. The ZEW economic sentiment indicator in Germany for the month of June showed a deterioration in sentiment among institutional investors and analysts, with the index reading coming in at -28.0. The ongoing war in Ukraine is undoubtedly influencing this pessimism. The end of this tragic event is still not in sight. What is clear, however, is that the longer the conflict continues, the stronger the impact on the European economy will be.    Figure 3: German DAX index on H4 and daily chart The DAX is in a clear downtrend and broke through significant support at 13,300 last week. The nearest resistance according to the H4 chart is 13,250 - 13,300. Significant resistance is at 13,650 - 13,700. A new support according to the H4 chart is at 12,950 - 12,980.   The euro has rejected lower readings  Information about higher inflation in the US and a rate hike sent the EUR/USD pair to support levels at 1.0370. However, the level was not broken and the euro then took a strong move from this area. Investors seem to assume that the ECB will have to respond with a higher than 0.25% rate hike announced at the last meeting. Figure 4: The EUR/USD on H4 and daily chart According to the H4 chart, the nearest resistance is at 1.0560 - 1.0600. The next resistance is then at 1.0760-1.0770. Current support is at 1.0340 - 1.0370 according to the daily chart.   The Bank of England raised rates as expected Rising inflation did not leave the Bank of England in dovish mood as it raised its key rate by 0.25% as expected. The current rate is 1.25%. Inflation may be approaching double digits, but the bank could not afford to be more aggressive. In Britain, economic activity has already fallen and the GDP is falling at its fastest pace in a year. On a month-on-month basis, the GDP in Britain fell by 0.3%.  Manufacturing production fell by 1% in April. Figure 5: The GBP/USD on H4 and daily chart The GBP/USD currency pair had a very dramatic week, first breaking below 1.20, only to stage an unprecedented rally later. Anyway, according to the H4 chart and also the daily chart, the pound is below the SMA 100 moving average, which indicates a bearish sentiment. There are also clear lower lows and lower highs on the daily chart, confirming the downtrend.   The UK interest rate hike did send the GBP/USD currency pair to 1.24, but the price did not stay there for long time as the pound descended from higher values, underlining the overall downtrend. The nearest resistance is at 1.24. A support is then at 1.1930 - 1.2000.   Central Bank of Japan still dovish   In the early hours of Friday morning, the Bank of Japan was also deciding on rates. There, as expected, everything remains as it was, i.e. the rate remains negative at - 0.10%. This situation means a favourable interest rate differential between the US dollar and the Japanese yen in favour of the dollar. It is therefore no surprise that the USD/JPY pair has reached its highest level since 2002. However, the weak yen is a big problem for the Japanese economy, as it makes imports of basic manufacturing raw materials more expensive and thus contributes to inflation. Figure 6: The USD/JPY on H4 and monthly charts The USD/JPY pair has reached the resistance level at 134.5 - 135.0, the highest level since 2002. A support according to the H4 chart is at 131.50 - 131.80.  
The Swing Overview – Week 25 2022

The Swing Overview – Week 25 2022

Purple Trading Purple Trading 27.06.2022 13:52
The Swing Overview – Week 25 There was a rather quiet week in which the major world stock indices shook off previous losses and have been slowly rising since Monday. However, this is probably only a temporary correction of the current bearish trend.  The CNB Bank Board met for the last time in its old composition and raised the interest rate to 7%, the highest level since 1999. However, the koruna barely reacted to this increase. The reason is that the main risks are still in place and fear of a recession keeps the markets in a risk-off sentiment that benefits the US dollar. Macroeconomic data We had a bit of a quiet week when it comes to macroeconomic data in the US. Industrial production data was reported, which grew by 0.2% month-on-month in May, which is less than the growth seen in April, when production grew by 1.4%. While the growth is slower than expected, it is still growth, which is a positive thing.   In terms of labor market data, the number of jobless claims held steady last week, reaching 229k. Thus, compared to the previous week, the number of claims fell by 2 thousand.   The US Dollar took a break in this quiet week and came down from its peak which is at 106, 86. Overall, however, the dollar is still in an uptrend. The US 10-year bond yields also fell last week and are currently hovering around 3%. The fall in bond yields was then a positive boost for equity indices. Figure 1: US 10-year bond yields and USD index on the daily chart   The SP 500 Index The SP 500 index has been gaining since Monday, June 20, 2022. However, this is probably not a signal of a major bullish reversal. Fundamental reasons still rather speak for a weakening and so it could be a short-term correction of the current bearish trend. The rise is probably caused by long-term investors who were buying the dip. Next week the US will report the GDP data which could be the catalyst for further movement.  Figure 2: The SP 500 on H4 and D1 chart   The index has currently reached the resistance level according to the H4 chart, which is in the region of 3,820 - 3,836. The next strong resistance is then in the area of 3,870 - 3,900 where the previous support was broken and turned into the resistance. The current nearest support is 3 640 - 3 670.    German DAX index The manufacturing PMI for June came in at 52.0. The previous month's PMI was 54.8. While a value above 50 indicates an expected expansion, it must be said that the PMI has essentially been declining since February 2022. This, together with other data coming out of Germany, suggests a certain pessimism, which is also reflected in the DAX index. Figure 3: German DAX index on H4 and daily chart The DAX broke support according to the H4 chart at 12,950 - 12,980 but then broke back above that level, so we don't have a valid breakout. Overall, however, the DAX is in a downtrend and the technical analysis does not show a stronger sign of a reversal of this trend yet. The nearest resistance according to the H4 chart is 13,130 - 13,190. The next resistance is then at 13 420 - 13 440. Strong support according to the daily chart is 12,443 - 12,600.   Eurozone inflation at a new record Consumer inflation in the Eurozone for May rose by 8.1% year-on-year as expected by analysts. On a month-on-month basis, inflation added 0.8% compared to April. The rise in inflation could support the ECB's decision to raise rates possibly by more than the 0.25% expected so far, which is expected to happen at the July meeting.  Figure 4: EUR/USD on H4 and daily chart From a technical perspective, the euro has bounced off support on the pair with the US dollar according to the daily chart, which is in the 1.0340 - 1.0370 range and continues to strengthen. Overall, however, the pair is still in a downtrend. The US Fed has been much more aggressive in fighting inflation than the ECB and this continues to put pressure on the bearish trend in the euro. The nearest resistance according to the H4 chart is at 1.058 - 1.0600. Strong resistance according to the daily chart is at 1.0780 - 1.0800.   The Czech National Bank raised the interest rate again Rising inflation, which has already reached 16% in the Czech Republic, forced the CNB's board to raise interest rates again. The key interest rate is now at 7%. The last time the interest rate was this high was in 1999. This is the last decision of the old Bank Board. In August, the new board, which is not clearly hawkish, will decide on monetary policy. Therefore, it will be very interesting to see how they approach the rising inflation.   The current risks, according to the CNB, are higher price growth at home and abroad, the risk of a halt in energy supplies from Russia and generally rising inflation expectations. The lingering risk is, of course, the war in Ukraine. The CNB has also decided to continue intervening in the market to keep the Czech koruna exchange rate within acceptable limits and prevent it from depreciating, which would increase import inflation pressures. Figure 5: The USD/CZK and The EUR/CZK on the daily chart Looking at the charts, the koruna hardly reacted at all to the CNB's decision to raise rates sharply. Against the dollar, the koruna is weakening somewhat, while against the euro the koruna is holding its value around 24.60 - 24.80. The appreciation of the koruna after the interest rate hike was probably prevented by uncertainty about how the new board will treat inflation, and also by the fact that there is a risk-off sentiment in global markets and investors prefer so-called safe havens in such cases, which include the US dollar.  
The Swing Overview - Week 26 2022

The Swing Overview - Week 26 2022

Purple Trading Purple Trading 04.07.2022 10:50
The Swing Overview - Week 26 2022 After ashort-term upward correction, the indices resumed their bearish trend and closed the week in the red. Along with this risk-off sentiment, commodity currencies weakened, as did the British pound and the euro. Gold is losing ground as a means of inflation protection and has fallen back below the USD 1,800 per ounce. The US dollar, on the other hand, is still the strongest currency amid the looming recession. Macroeconomic data The number of new home sales in the US for May reached 696,000, beating expectations of 588,000. This is positive news.   On the other hand, the negative news is the drop in consumer confidence, which reached 98.7 for May (103.2 the previous month). The drop in consumer confidence is expected to affect consumer spendings. It is evident that American consumers are reluctant to spend in times of rising prices and are accumulating savings for the future. This is of course contributing to the economic slowdown and the risk of a recession in the US is thus becoming stronger. This was confirmed by the GDP data, which fell for the third month in a row.   The fall in GDP last month was 1.6%. GDP was therefore negative in 1Q 2022. If it is also negative in 2Q2022, it will be an official confirmation of the recession defined by two negative quarters in a row. Jerome Powell suggested this week that the risk of the economy being damaged by higher rates is less important than restoring price stability. This heightens fears that a slowdown in the US economy will take the whole world down with it. So in times when central banks are tackling inflation, this risk will set the tone for some time.    This situation is positive for the US dollar, which is seen by investors as a safe haven asset in times of uncertainty. The dollar therefore remains close to this year's highs.  Although the yield on 10-year US Treasuries has fallen below 3%, the overall trend in bond yields is still upwards. Figure 1: US 10-year bond yields and USD index on the daily chart   The SP 500 Index The strengthening on the SP 500 Index that we have seen in the week of June 20 was really just a short-term correction to the overall downtrend, as we have previously suggested. Last week saw another sell-off and so the overall downtrend on the index continues.   Figure 2: The SP 500 on H4 and D1 chart   The nearest resistance according to the H4 chart is in the range of 3,810 - 3,820. The next resistance is 3,930 - 3,950. A support is 3 640 - 3 670.    German DAX index  The German Ifo Business Climate Index which measures the expectations of manufacturers, builders and sellers for the next 6 months continued to show a value of 92.3, which is worse than the previous month when the index value was 93.0. The fall in the reading suggests some pessimism, accentuated by current market uncertainties, which include the impact of the war in Ukraine and high inflation, which in Germany for the month of June was 7.6% year-on-year. However, inflation fell by 0.1% month-on-month.   The labour market has also indicated problems. The number of unemployed in Germany rose by 133 000, while the market had expected a fall of 6 000. This was very negative news, which triggered a strong sell-off on the Dax on Thursday. On the other hand, retail sales were positive, rising by 0.6% in May, while a 5.4% decline was recorded in April. Figure 3: German DAX index on H4 and daily chart The DAX has broken support according to the H4 chart at 12,850, which has now become the new resistance, which is in the 12,820 - 12,850 range. The next resistance according to the H4 chart is then at 13,280 - 13,375. The strong support according to the daily chart is 12,443 - 12,620, which price is currently approaching.    Eurozone inflation at a new record Eurozone consumer inflation reached another record high in June, rising by 8.6% year-on-year. This is higher than analysts' expectations, who predicted a rise of 8.4%. Inflation is therefore continuing to rise, so the expectation that the ECB could raise rates by more than 0.25% in July is on target and this could support the euro's growth. On the other hand, there is a strong dollar which could continue to slow down bulls on the euro.   Figure 4: EUR/USD on H4 and daily chart The nearest resistance according to the H4 chart is at 1.048 - 1.0500. The next resistance is at 1.0600 - 1.0610. Support is at 1.0360 - 1.0380.   Gold broke the $1,800 price tag The development in gold has once again confirmed that investors prefer US bonds instead of gold, which, in addition to being considered a "safe haven" along with the US dollar, also brings a small but still certain return. The strong dollar is not good news for gold, which has fallen below the key support of USD 1,800 per ounce.  Figure 5: Gold on H4 and daily chart The nearest resistance according to the H4 chart is therefore in the zone of USD 1,800 - 1,807 per ounce. Below this resistance we have several supports. The closest one is 1 780 - 1 787 USD per ounce.  
The Swing Overview - Week 26 2022 - 08.07.2022

The Swing Overview - Week 26 2022 - 08.07.2022

Purple Trading Purple Trading 08.07.2022 09:47
The Swing Overview - Week 26 2022 After ashort-term upward correction, the indices resumed their bearish trend and closed the week in the red. Along with this risk-off sentiment, commodity currencies weakened, as did the British pound and the euro. Gold is losing ground as a means of inflation protection and has fallen back below the USD 1,800 per ounce. The US dollar, on the other hand, is still the strongest currency amid the looming recession. Macroeconomic data The number of new home sales in the US for May reached 696,000, beating expectations of 588,000. This is positive news.   On the other hand, the negative news is the drop in consumer confidence, which reached 98.7 for May (103.2 the previous month). The drop in consumer confidence is expected to affect consumer spendings. It is evident that American consumers are reluctant to spend in times of rising prices and are accumulating savings for the future. This is of course contributing to the economic slowdown and the risk of a recession in the US is thus becoming stronger. This was confirmed by the GDP data, which fell for the third month in a row.   The fall in GDP last month was 1.6%. GDP was therefore negative in 1Q 2022. If it is also negative in 2Q2022, it will be an official confirmation of the recession defined by two negative quarters in a row. Jerome Powell suggested this week that the risk of the economy being damaged by higher rates is less important than restoring price stability. This heightens fears that a slowdown in the US economy will take the whole world down with it. So in times when central banks are tackling inflation, this risk will set the tone for some time.    This situation is positive for the US dollar, which is seen by investors as a safe haven asset in times of uncertainty. The dollar therefore remains close to this year's highs.  Although the yield on 10-year US Treasuries has fallen below 3%, the overall trend in bond yields is still upwards. Figure 1: US 10-year bond yields and USD index on the daily chart   The SP 500 Index The strengthening on the SP 500 Index that we have seen in the week of June 20 was really just a short-term correction to the overall downtrend, as we have previously suggested. Last week saw another sell-off and so the overall downtrend on the index continues.   Figure 2: The SP 500 on H4 and D1 chart   The nearest resistance according to the H4 chart is in the range of 3,810 - 3,820. The next resistance is 3,930 - 3,950. A support is 3 640 - 3 670.    German DAX index  The German Ifo Business Climate Index which measures the expectations of manufacturers, builders and sellers for the next 6 months continued to show a value of 92.3, which is worse than the previous month when the index value was 93.0. The fall in the reading suggests some pessimism, accentuated by current market uncertainties, which include the impact of the war in Ukraine and high inflation, which in Germany for the month of June was 7.6% year-on-year. However, inflation fell by 0.1% month-on-month.   The labour market has also indicated problems. The number of unemployed in Germany rose by 133 000, while the market had expected a fall of 6 000. This was very negative news, which triggered a strong sell-off on the Dax on Thursday. On the other hand, retail sales were positive, rising by 0.6% in May, while a 5.4% decline was recorded in April. Figure 3: German DAX index on H4 and daily chart The DAX has broken support according to the H4 chart at 12,850, which has now become the new resistance, which is in the 12,820 - 12,850 range. The next resistance according to the H4 chart is then at 13,280 - 13,375. The strong support according to the daily chart is 12,443 - 12,620, which price is currently approaching.    Eurozone inflation at a new record Eurozone consumer inflation reached another record high in June, rising by 8.6% year-on-year. This is higher than analysts' expectations, who predicted a rise of 8.4%. Inflation is therefore continuing to rise, so the expectation that the ECB could raise rates by more than 0.25% in July is on target and this could support the euro's growth. On the other hand, there is a strong dollar which could continue to slow down bulls on the euro.   Figure 4: EUR/USD on H4 and daily chart The nearest resistance according to the H4 chart is at 1.048 - 1.0500. The next resistance is at 1.0600 - 1.0610. Support is at 1.0360 - 1.0380.   Gold broke the $1,800 price tag The development in gold has once again confirmed that investors prefer US bonds instead of gold, which, in addition to being considered a "safe haven" along with the US dollar, also brings a small but still certain return. The strong dollar is not good news for gold, which has fallen below the key support of USD 1,800 per ounce.  Figure 5: Gold on H4 and daily chart The nearest resistance according to the H4 chart is therefore in the zone of USD 1,800 - 1,807 per ounce. Below this resistance we have several supports. The closest one is 1 780 - 1 787 USD per ounce.  
The Swing Overview - Week 27 2022

The Swing Overview - Week 27 2022

Purple Trading Purple Trading 08.07.2022 10:27
The Swing Overview - Week 27 2022 The fall in US bond yields, the rise in the US dollar and the sharp weakening in the euro, which is heading towards parity with the dollar. This is how the last week, in which stock indices cautiously strengthened and made a correction in the downward trend, could be characterised. It is worth noting that Germany has a negative trade balance for the first time since May 1991. Is the country losing its reputation as an economic powerhouse of Europe? Macroeconomic data The ISM in manufacturing, which shows purchasing managers' expectations of economic developments in the short term, came in at 53.0 for June.  While a value above 50 still indicates an expected expansion in the sector, the trend since the beginning of the year has been declining, indicating worsening of optimism.   Unemployment claims reached 231,000 last week. This is still a level that is fairly normal. However, we note that this is the 6th week in a row that the number of claims has been rising. The crucial news on the labour market will then be shown in Friday's NFP data.   On Wednesday, the minutes of the last FOMC meeting were presented, which confirmed that another 50-75 point rate hike is likely in July. The minutes also stated that the Fed could tighten further its hawkish policy if inflationary pressures persist. The Fed's target is to push inflation down to around 2%.   The Fed's hawkish tone has led to a strengthening of the dollar, which has reached a level over 107, its highest level since October 2002. Following the presentation of the FOMC minutes, the US Treasury yields started to rise again. Figure 1: The US 10-year bond yields and the USD index on the daily chart   The SP 500 Index The temporary decline in US Treasury yields was the reason for the correction in the bearish trend in equity indices. However, the bear market still continues to be supported fundamentally by fears of an impending recession.  Figure 2: The SP 500 on H4 and D1 chart   The nearest resistance according to the H4 chart is in the 3,930 - 3,950 range. A support is at 3,740 - 3,750 and then 3,640 - 3,670.    German DAX index The German manufacturing PMI for June came in at 52.0 (previous month 54.8). The downward trend shows a deterioration in optimism.    It is worth noting that Germany's trade balance is negative for the first time since May 1991, i.e. imports are higher than exports. The current trade balance is - EUR 1 billion. The market was expecting a surplus of 2.7 billion. Rising prices of imported energy and a reduction in exports to Russia have contributed to the negative balance. Figure 3: German DAX index on H4 and daily chart The DAX is in a downtrend. On the H4 chart, it has reached the moving average EMA 50. The resistance is in the range of 12,900 - 12,960. Strong support on the daily chart is 12,443 - 12,500, which was tested again last week.    Euro is near parity with the USD Even high inflation, which is already at 8.6%, has not stopped the euro from falling. It seems that parity with the dollar could be reached very soon. The negative trade balance in Germany has contributed very significantly to the euro's decline.  Figure 4: EUR/USD on H4 and daily chart The nearest resistance according to the H4 chart is at 1.020 - 1.021. Support according to the daily chart would be only at parity with the dollar at 1.00. Reaching this value would represent a unique situation that has not occurred on the EUR/USD pair since 2002.   Australia raised interest rates The Reserve Bank of Australia raised the interest rate by 0.50% as expected. The current interest rate now stands at 1.35%. According to the central bank, the Australian economy has been solid so far thanks to commodity exports, the prices of which have been rising. Unemployment is 3.9%, the lowest level in 50 years.   One uncertainty is the behaviour of consumers, who are cutting back on spending in times of high inflation. A significant risk is global development, which is influenced by the war in Ukraine and its impact on energy and agricultural commodity prices.   Figure 5: The AUD/USD on H4 and daily chart The AUD/USD is in a downtrend and even the rate hike did not help the Australian dollar to strengthen. However, there has been some correction in the downtrend. The resistance according to the H4 chart is 0.6880 - 0.6900. The support is at 0.6760 - 0.6770.  
What Does Inflation Rates We Got To Know Mean To Central Banks?

What Does Inflation Rates We Got To Know Mean To Central Banks?

Purple Trading Purple Trading 15.07.2022 13:36
The Swing Overview – Week 28 2022 This week's new record inflation readings sent a clear message to central bankers. Further interest rate hikes must be faster than before. The first of the big banks to take this challenge seriously was the Bank of Canada, which literally shocked the markets with an unprecedented rate hike of a full 1%. This is obviously not good for stocks, which weakened again in the past week. The euro also stumbled and has already fallen below parity with the usd. Uncertainty, on the other hand, favours the US dollar, which has reached new record highs.   Macroeconomic data The data from the US labour market, the so-called NFP, beat expectations, as the US economy created 372 thousand new jobs in June (the expectation was 268 thousand) and the unemployment rate remained at 3.6%. But on the other hand, unemployment claims continued to rise, reaching 244k last week, the 7th week in a row of increase.   But the crucial news was the inflation data for June. It exceeded expectations and reached a new record of 9.1% on year-on-year basis, the highest value since 1981. Inflation rose by 1.3% on month-on-month basis. Energy prices, which rose by 41.6%, had a major impact on inflation. Declines in commodity prices, such as oil, have not yet influenced June inflation, which may be some positive news. Core inflation excluding food and energy prices rose by 5.9%, down from 6% in May.   The value of inflation was a shock to the markets and the dollar strengthened sharply. We can see this in the dollar index, which has already surpassed 109. We will see how the Fed, which will be deciding on interest rates in less than two weeks, will react to this development. A rate hike of 0.75% is very likely and the question is whether even such an increase will be enough for the markets. Meanwhile, there has been an inversion on the yield curve on US bonds. This means that yields on 2-year bonds are higher than those on 10-year bonds. This is one of the signals of a recession. Figure 1: The US Treasury yield curve on the monthly chart and the USD index on the daily chart   The SP 500 Index Apart from macroeconomic indicators, the ongoing earnings season will also influence the performance of the indices this month. Among the major banks, JP Morgan and Morgan Stanley reported results this week. Both banks reported earnings, but they were below investor expectations. The impact of more expensive funding sources that banks need to finance their activities is probably starting to show.   We must also be interested in the data in China, which, due to the size of the Chinese economy, has an impact on the movement of global indices. 2Q GDP in China was 0.4% on year-on-year basis, a significant drop from the previous quarter (4.8%). Strict lockdowns against new COVID-19 outbreaks had an impact on economic situation in the country. Figure 2: SP 500 on H4 and D1 chart The threat of a recession is seeping into the SP 500 index with another decline, which stalled last week at the support level, which according to the H4 is in the 3,740-3,750 range. The next support is 3,640 - 3,670.  The nearest resistance is 3,930 - 3,950. German DAX index The German ZEW sentiment, which shows expectations for the next 6 months, reached - 53.8. This is the lowest reading since 2011. Inflation in Germany reached 7.6% in June. This is lower than the previous month when inflation was 7.9%. Concerns about the global recession continue to affect the DAX index, which has tested significant supports. Figure 3: German DAX index on H4 and daily chart Strong support according to the daily chart is 12,443 - 12,500, which was tested again last week. We can take the moving averages EMA 50 and SMA 100 as a resistance. The nearest horizontal resistance is 12,950 - 13,000.   The euro broke parity with the dollar The euro fell below 1.00 on the pair with the dollar for the first time in 20 years, reaching a low of 0.9950 last week. Although the euro eventually closed above parity, so from a technical perspective it is not a valid break yet, the euro's weakening points to the headwinds the eurozone is facing: high inflation, weak growth, the threat in energy commodity supplies, the war in Ukraine. Figure 4: EUR/USD on H4 and daily chart Next week the ECB will be deciding on interest rates and it is obvious that there will be some rate hike. A modest increase of 0.25% has been announced. Taking into account the issues mentioned above, the motivation for the ECB to raise rates by a more significant step will not be very strong. The euro therefore remains under pressure and it is not impossible that a fall below parity will occur again in the near future.   The nearest resistance according to the H4 chart is at 1.008 - 1.012. A support is the last low, which is at 0.9950 - 0.9960.   Bank of Canada has pulled out the anti-inflation bazooka Analysts had expected the Bank of Canada to raise rates by 0.75%. Instead, the central bank shocked markets with an unprecedented increase by a full 1%, the highest rate hike in 24 years. The central bank did so in response to inflation, which is the highest in Canada in 40 years. With this jump in rates, the bank is trying to prevent uncontrolled price increases.   The reaction of the Canadian dollar has been interesting. It strengthened significantly immediately after the announcement. However, then it began to weaken sharply. This may be because investors now expect the US Fed to resort to a similarly sharp rate hike. Figure 5: USD/CAD on H4 and daily chart Another reason may be the decline in oil prices, which the Canadian dollar is correlated with, as Canada is a major oil producer. The oil is weakening due to fears of a drop in demand that would accompany an economic recession. Figure 6: Oil on the H4 and daily charts Oil is currently in a downtrend. However, it has reached a support value, which is in the area near $94 per barrel. The support has already been broken, but on the daily chart oil closed above this value. Therefore, it is not a valid break yet.  
China's Property Debt Crisis, Economic Momentum, and Upcoming Meetings: A Market Analysis

A Pick Up In Yields May Come, The Question Is Open As US Treasury Yields Remain Rangebound

Saxo Bank Saxo Bank 18.08.2022 11:38
Summary:  Today we note a further softening in sentiment, in part on a pick up in yields, but that story has yet to really trigger as long US treasury yields remain rangebound, if teasing important levels. We note important supports for the crude oil outlook, the crack spread picture in the energy complex, the still very low valuation of energy stocks relative to the broader market, stocks and earnings on our radar, FX developments as we keep the USDCNH chart front and center as a potential aggravator of weakening risk sentiment and more. Today's pod features Peter Garnry on equities, Ole Hansen on commodities and John J. Hardy hosting and on FX. Listen to today’s podcast - slides are found via the link Follow Saxo Market Call on your favorite podcast app: Apple  Spotify PodBean Sticher If you are not able to find the podcast on your favourite podcast app when searching for Saxo Market Call, please drop us an email at marketcall@saxobank.com and we'll look into it.   Questions and comments, please! We invite you to send any questions and comments you might have for the podcast team. Whether feedback on the show's content, questions about specific topics, or requests for more focus on a given market area in an upcoming podcast, please get in touch at marketcall@saxobank.com.   Source: Podcast: As risk sentiment rolls over, is crude oil set to rally?
USA: Mid-term election are said to be stock market driver. Republicans' gains may play in favour of stocks and bonds

USA: Mid-term election are said to be stock market driver. Republicans' gains may play in favour of stocks and bonds

ING Economics ING Economics 08.11.2022 09:10
China's re-opening story doesn't seem to be getting much traction outside social media, and US mid-term election expectations may play a bigger role ahead of results expected tomorrow morning Asia time Source: shutterstock Macro outlook Global Markets: There was another day of equity market gains on Monday following on from the almost inexplicable gains made after the stronger-than-expected payrolls number on Friday. Newswires are pinning the latest increases onto a pre-Mid-term election rally, with expected Republican gains being cited as positive for bonds and therefore for equities. Flying in the face of that theory, 2Y US Treasury yields rose 6.3bp, while the 10Y put on 5.5bp, taking it to 4.214%. There was virtually no data of note yesterday to pin market moves on. Chinese stocks were pretty flat on the day, and you might expect them to improve today on the Wall Street Journal’s re-opening story, but equity futures don’t seem to have made much of this (see also below). Against this happy-go-lucky backdrop, the EURUSD has again made it back above parity. Other G-10 currencies also made decent gains yesterday and we might expect some catch-up today from the likes of the CNY, which was weaker yesterday, trading in a range around 7.23.  The KRW and INR made robust gains yesterday. The KRW is now trading just above 1400. G-7 Macro: The US NFIB small firm optimism index is our pick of the day, with its deep mine of activity and price indicators. Recent results have shown price and wage pressures coming off sharply. We’d anticipate more of the same today. We had September consumer credit for the US early this morning, which was quite soft, which will support “pivotists”. Eurozone retail sales may also be worth a look later if you want convincing that the region is already in recession. China:  The WSJ reported that the Chinese government is considering relaxing Covid measures. This could theoretically move the market, though doesn't seem to be having much impact yet. After Beijing’s marathon and Shanghai Expo, China should be better able to gauge how big events stress their healthcare system. But we believe that relaxation from existing measures is more likely after 2022. China re-allocated some of its Local Government Special Bond quotas for 2023, aiming for bond sales in the last two months of 2022. Local governments have to use up funding from this bond sale by 1H23. This should be supportive for the economy via finishing uncompleted home projects and existing infrastructure projects. It also highlights the fiscal stress faced by local governments. Taiwan: Taiwan will release trade data later today. Our forecast is for a year-on-year contraction as demand for semiconductors should be weak from China, the US and Europe What to look out for: US NFIB survey and Fed speakers Australia consumer confidence (8 November) South Korea BoP balance (8 November) Japan leading index (8 November) Taiwan trade and CPI inflation (8 November) US NFIB business optimism (8 November) Fed’s Mester, Barkin and Collins speak (8 November) South Korea unemployment (9 November) Japan trade balance BoP (9 November) China CPI and PPI inflation (9 November) US mortgage application (9 November) Fed’s Williams speaks (9 November) Philippines GDP (10 November) US CPI inflation and initial jobless claims (10 November) Fed’s Barkin, Logan and Waller speak (10 November) Japan PPI inflation (11 November) Malaysia GDP (11 November) US Univ of Michigan sentiment (11 November) Fed’s Mester and George speak (11 November) Read this article on THINK TagsEmerging Markets Asia Pacific Asia Markets Asia Economics Disclaimer This publication has been prepared by ING solely for information purposes irrespective of a particular user's means, financial situation or investment objectives. The information does not constitute investment recommendation, and nor is it investment, legal or tax advice or an offer or solicitation to purchase or sell any financial instrument. Read more
Rates and Cycles: Central Banks' Strategies in Focus Amid Steepening Impulses

The Average Hourly Earnings Adding To Inflationary Pressures

TeleTrade Comments TeleTrade Comments 08.11.2022 09:12
The US 10-year Treasury bond yield extends its gains ahead of the US Consumer Price Index (CPI) for October. The US 10s-2s yield curve inverted the most since the Paul Volcker era, and the spread widened the most, more than 60 bps. Money market futures have priced in a 50 bps rate hike, as shown by the CME FedWatch Tool. As the Asian Pacific session gets to an end, the US Treasury bond yields continued to advance, courtesy of the last week’s rate hike by the US Federal Reserve, lifting 75 bps to the Federal Funds rate (FFR) to 4%, while Fed officials laid the ground for additional increases though seen as a dovish rate hike. However, Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell commented that even though the pace of increases would be “less aggressive,” the peak would be higher. Therefore, the US 10-year benchmark note rate sits at a 4.229% gain of one bps. The US 10-year Treasury bond yield retreated on US jobs data US and European equity futures edge higher. Last week’s US employment data, which reflected that ha labor market is still tight, showed signs that it could be easing as the Unemployment Rate increased from 3.5% to 3.7%. Nevertheless, the Average Hourly Earnings, although lower than the previous month’s reading, they’re adding to inflationary pressures. The United States bond market reacted negatively to date, with the 10-year benchmark rate sliding from 4.209% to 4.163%.  Fed officials reiterated Jerome Powell’s message for higher rates, while the US 10s-2s yield curve further inverted Regarding inflationary pressures, the Boston and Richmond Fed Presidents Susan Collins and Thomas Barkin said that the United States economy needs more interest rate increases, but not at an aggressive pace. Collins said that the Federal Reserve might slow down the pace to balance growth and inflation risks as the Fed struggles to achieve a “soft landing.” Echoing her comments was Thomas Barkin, who added that the peak of rates would surpass the September projections. That said, the US 2-year Treasury bond yield, the most sensitive to the Federal Funds rate (FFR) adjustments, tumbled to 4.663%, following the jobs report after hitting a YTD high at 5.134%. It should be noted that the 2-year yield exceeded the 10-year benchmark note rate by 60 bps during the last week, as the 10s-2s yield curve inverted the deepest since the 1980s, which is usually seen as a leading indicator that precedes recessions by 12 to 18 months. Meanwhile, some sources cited by Bloomberg said that “Now it’s about the ultimate destination” of the policy rate, according to analysts at Bank of America Corp., whose forecast for the terminal level ranges from 5%-5.25%. Traders focus on October’s CPI, and expectations for a Federal Reserve 50 bps increase are at 52% In the meantime, investors are bracing for the October Consumer Price Index (CPI) report. Asides from this, money market futures expect that the US Federal Reserve would hike 50 bps, as shown by the CME FedWatch Tool, with odds of lifting 50 bps at 52%, while for 75 bps, chances lie at 48%.    
USD/JPY Weekly Review: Strong Dollar and Yen's Resilience in G10 Currencies

Financial Instruments In Which You Can Invest - Stocks And Bonds

Kamila Szypuła Kamila Szypuła 05.11.2022 11:52
Among the various financial instruments in which you can invest, two of extremely different nature stand out - shares and bonds. They are in the form of a document or a record in the IT system. Thanks to them, investors have a chance to multiply their funds. Many of us learn very early what stocks and bonds are. Some people then catch the bug and dream about quickly accumulating capital that they will be able to invest in one of the financial instruments. Of course, most novice investors dream of doing fast and spectacular things, making risky decisions and earning huge amounts of money. The beginnings can be difficult, so it is worth learning to understand them better. Stocks A stock is a form of security that indicates the holder has proportionate ownership in the issuing corporation and is sold predominantly on stock exchanges. Corporations issue shares to raise funds to run the business, and the shareholder, shareholder, may have a claim on a portion of the company's assets and profits. A shareholder is considered to be the owner of the issuing company, which is determined by the number of shares owned by the investor in relation to the number of shares issued. Owning shares gives you the right to vote at shareholders' meetings, receive dividends if and when they are paid, and the right to sell your shares to someone else. If you own the majority of shares, your voting power increases so you can indirectly control the direction of the company. Most often, stocks are bought and sold on exchanges such as the Nasdaq or the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE). After a company is listed on an IPO, its shares become available to investors who can buy and sell on the stock exchange. Typically, investors use a brokerage account. Stock price is influenced, among other things, by supply and demand factors in the market. Bonds Bonds are units of corporate debt issued by companies and securitized as transferable assets. A bond is referred to as a fixed income instrument because the bonds have traditionally paid debtors a fixed interest rate (coupon). Companies sell bonds to finance ongoing operations, new projects or acquisitions. Governments sell bonds for funding purposes, and also to supplement revenue from taxes. There is the different types of bonds: Corporate bonds are issued by public and private companies to fund day-to-day operations, expand production, fund research or to finance acquisitions. Government bonds is a debt security issued by a government to support government spending and obligations. Government bonds can pay periodic interest payments called coupon payments. Municipal bonds - issued by local governments, Bonds of legal entities, e.g. corporate bonds. Bond valuation: The market prices bonds based on their specific characteristics. The price of a bond fluctuates daily as with any other publicly traded security. The price of a bond is inversely proportional to interest rates. The price of a bond fluctuates in response to changes in interest rates in the economy. This is because, for a fixed rate bond, the issuer has promised to pay the coupon based on the face value of the bond. While there are a few specialized bond brokers out there, most online and discount brokers these days offer access to the bond markets and you can buy them more or less like you would with stocks. Bonds are typically less volatile than stocks and are generally recommended to be at least part of a diversified portfolio. For this reason, bonds are often good for investors who are looking for an income and want to keep their capital. In general, experts advise that older people or those approaching retirement should shift their portfolio weight more to bonds. The Differences Bonds differ from stocks in several ways. Bondholders are creditors of the corporation and are entitled to interest and repayment of invested capital. Creditors have legal priority over other stakeholders in the event of bankruptcy Source: The Psychology of Investing
Rates and Cycles: Central Banks' Strategies in Focus Amid Steepening Impulses

Bonds Have Not Been Able To Perform The Function Of Mitigating The Risks

Saxo Bank Saxo Bank 25.11.2022 08:58
Summary:  After chasing the runaway inflation train from behind for eight months and signs of economic slowdown emerging, the Fed is ready to adjust its pace to a lower gear in 2023 and move into a risk management mode and become data-dependent. As a downturn in the economy and the impacts of past rate hikes continue to haunt equities and high-year credits, U.S. treasury notes and investment-grade bonds are increasingly valuable to an investment portfolio in providing it with yields and potential risk reduction. Bonds did not work in the past 12 months but things are starting to change For the best part of 2022, the prices of equities and bonds fell together, and the 60-40 portfolios performed poorly. Bonds have not been able to perform the function of mitigating the risks of stock market selloffs. The primary reason for this phenomenon was that the decline in equities resulted from higher interest rates, which also drove bond prices down. When inflation was the problem, both equities and bonds tend to fall together (Figure 1). When inflation starts to plateau and the number one concern of the markets is shifting from inflation to deceleration in growth, which was the result of the aftermath of past aggressive rate hikes to fight inflation, equities and bonds tend to behave differently, with bond prices rising as equities declining. This potential shift in the equity-bond dynamic makes bonds a valuable asset class to be included in an investment portfolio in the coming months. Figure 1: S&P 500 and 10-year Treasury Note Yield; Source: Saxo, Bloomberg. The Fed‘s modus operandi has shifted from chasing a runaway inflation train from behind to data-dependent risk management The US inflation train left the station in March 2021 (Figure 2) but the Fed waited for a full year before they raised the policy interest rate for the first time in March 2022. The inaction of the Fed from March 2021 to February 2022 (red zone in Figure 2) and its now infamous notion of the transitoriness of inflation put the Fed in an awkward position of chasing the inflation train from behind (the blue zone in Figure 2). The Fed started small in March 2022 and then quickly abandoned its initial gradualism and rushed to the new normal of 75bps rate hikes four times in a row since June 2022. During this phase of chasing from behind, the rate of change in inflation have decelerated and the inflation rates seem to have plateaued at elevated levels. The distances between inflation rates and the Fed Fund target rate are converging. This development provides the Fed with some breathing room to consider slowing from the turbo-charged pace of monetary tightening to a lower gear. Figure 2: Consumer Price Indices & Fed Fund Target (upper bound); Source: Saxo, Bloomberg. The Fedspeak over the past two weeks and the minutes of the FOMC’s November meeting provide investors with a gap in the curtain to gauge the new phase of risk management in which the Fed’s pace of tightening and the terminal rate are becoming more data-dependent. According to the minutes, participants of the FOMC’s November remarked that: purposefully moving to a more restrictive policy stance was consistent with risk-management considerations…There was wide agreement that heightened uncertainty regarding the outlooks for both inflation and real activity underscored the importance of taking into account the cumulative tightening of monetary policy, the lags with which monetary policy affected economic activity and inflation, and economic developments.                                                                         Minutes of the FOMC Nov. 1-2, 2022, p.10 Inflation, especially services inflation, is still sticky but after raising its policy overnight Fed Fund rate target from 0.00-0.25% range to 3.75-4.00% in eight months, the Fed is finally signaling its intention to reduce the size of future rate hikes starting probably from December and adopting a data-dependent risk management approach going forward. It is important to reiterate here that the change in the Fed’s thinking and approach does not mean that the Fed is pivoting in the sense of having decided to end the current tightening cycle. The Fed needs time to allow the impact of the rate hikes over the past eight months to come about as monetary policy working with lags. In addition, the Fed needs time to assess the impact of the quantitative tightening as it winds down its balance sheet.  Figure 3: The Federal Reserve’s Balance Sheet Assets; Source: Saxo, Bloomberg. The market is already signaling to the Fed that the latter might have overdone the monetary tightening and could trigger a recession next year. The long end of the curve has been well bid with the 10-year yield falling to 3.69%, 65bps below its cycle high of 4.34%, and the 30-year yield declined to 3.73%, 69bps off its high of 4.42%, despite that the Fed raised its policy rate by 75bps since then. Short-term interest rates were driven by the Fed’s actions to raise the overnight Fed Fund rates while longer-dated bond yields fell on the prospect of slower growth or even a recession together with anchored long-term inflation. The market is signaling recession risks The yield spread between the 3-month treasury bill versus the 10-year treasury note tumbled to minus-63 (Figure 4), a level only seen in less than 12 months preceding the prior three recessions. According to the New York Fed’s study, the 3-month vs 10-year yield curve is the preferred indicator to the more popular 2-year vs 10-year yield curve to foretell a recession. We at Saxo are not calling for a U.S. recession as our base case for 2023 but we are expecting growth to decelerate and the risk of the U.S. economy dipping into recession is not negligible. Figure 4: 3-Month Treasury Bill vs 10-Year Treasury Note Yield Spread; Source: Saxo, Bloomberg. While none of the members of the FOMC mentioned the “R” word as per the November minutes, the Fed’s staff economists in their assessment of the economy presented to the FOMC suggested that “the possibility that the economy would enter a recession sometime over the next year as almost as likely as the baseline” projections. The inflection point may be near for bonds to contribute positively to the portfolio while equities slide lower as the economy and corporate earnings growth slow The past 375 bps increase in the policy rate have been working through the financial markets and the economy. Although not yet fallen into a recession, the U.S. economy has shown signs of slowing and companies are reporting weaker outlooks for their businesses. Analysts are revising down Q4 and 2023 earnings forecasts for companies other than those in the energy sector. In short, the equity market is facing multiple headwinds. After six rounds of increases and 375bps in total, the financial condition in the U.S. arguably has not yet entered into the restrictive territory. For example, the Chicago National Financial Conditions Index is still below zero, the threshold between tight (above zero) and loose (below zero) financial conditions (Figure 5). The Chicago National Financial Conditions Index is compiled from 105 financial indicators including stock prices. As equities may retreat on recession fear, margin compression, and earning downgrades, the proverbial Fed put for the equity market is nowhere in sight to bail out equity investors in case of a selloff. The carry or coupon income of bonds and potentials of capital appreciation (bond prices rise when yields fall) will be something very valuable to have in a portfolio to generate positive returns and reduce volatility as the Fed has likely moved past the chasing inflation from behind phase.  Figure 5: Chicago Fed National Financial Conditions Index; Source: Saxo, Bloomberg. The 3 to 7-year segment of the U.S. dollar yield curve tends to offer relatively better risks and rewards through Q1 2023 From the closing of Nov 1, 2022, the day before the FOMC decisions on Nov 2, to the present, yields for the short-dated bills through 1-year bills rose and yields for 2-year notes little-changed and those for 3-year notes through 30-year treasury bonds declined significantly (Figure 6).  Figure 6. Changes in yields since the last FOMC; Source: Saxo, Bloomberg. As the Fed is not done yet with rate hikes but only adjusting its pace, the short end of the curve through 2-year notes is likely to continue to rise or little-changed at best to reflect the Fed’s rate hikes. On the other hand, yields from 3 years onward may be poised to fall to reflect the outlook for an anchored long-term inflation rate (Figure 7) and deteriorating growth and recession risks.  Figure 7: Market implied long-term inflation; Source: Saxo, Bloomberg. On the balance of yields, potential capital gains, and duration risks, the 3-year to 7-year segment of the curve looks relatively attractive. It is important to note that while the yield curve tends to become increasingly inverted months ahead of a recession, it will steepen and turns positively sloped again shortly before the onset of a recession and through the recession and the subsequent recovery (Figure 8). For traders who are taking a punt in the market, the long ends may still be the place to be in. However, for investors who are looking for yields, long-term capital appreciation, and reducing risks for their portfolios for 2023, the 3-year to 7-year treasury notes may be the better place to be in. Moreover, after the recent sharp decline in yields, it may pay off for investors to be patient and wait for yields to bounce before gradually adding bonds to their portfolios through the first quarter of 2023, as opposed to taking a large position in bonds in one go at the current yield levels.   Sticking to investment grades until deep into an economic downturn or the onset of a recession In addition to selecting the tenor of bonds to invest in, investors have many alternatives in terms of credit quality. As a rule of thumb, bonds with better credit quality tend to yield less, and bonds with lesser credit quality tend to offer investors higher yields. One of the key factors for investors to consider is if the additional yields are compensating more than sufficient for the higher credit risks embedded in a bond. Credit risks are more than just default risks. Only considering whether a certain issuer will default or not is insufficient. For example, a deterioration in an issuer’s cashflows to cover interest payments may cause a downgrade in credit rating which in turn adversely affects the price of all the bonds issued by that company. Another factor to consider is the likely direction of change in credit spreads in general. For example, when the economy is entering into a recession, corporates in general tend to suffer from deterioration in cashflows and therefore lower creditworthiness for the issuers and wider credit spreads for their bonds. Credit spreads, in a sense, is a put option on the issuing company. Investors pick up an option premium (credit spread) on top of a risk-free rate (treasury yield) when investing in a corporate bond. In an economic downturn that causes equity volatilities to surge, credit spreads widen. As the U.S. economy is likely to slow down sharply or even enter into a recession, investors shall demand an above-average credit spread from high-yield bonds to compensate for the risks. Currently, U.S. high-yield corporate bonds on average are yielding 305 bps more than investment-grade bonds which are much lower than what they were during past recessions (Figure 9). In other words, high-yield bonds are not offering sufficiently attractive yields relative to investment-grade bonds given the stage of the business cycle we are in. Figure 9: U.S. High-yields vs Investment-grade Spread; Source: Saxo, Bloomberg. Regarding credit trends, it is noteworthy that among all the rating actions by Moody’s in October, credit upgrades accounted for just 42%. It was the first time in two years that Moody’s downgraded more issuers than upgraded. Likewise, U.S. banks were tightening lending standards. Increased difficulties in getting bank financing will take its toll on the corporate bond markets. Therefore, it is advisable to stick to investing in investment-grade bonds.  Figure 10: Net Percent of U.S. banks tightening Lending Standards for Commercial and Industrial Loans; Source: Federal Reserve Oct 2022 Senior Loan Officer Opinion Survey on Bank Lending Practices. Taking profits in the short position in the September 2023 3-month SOFR futures (SR3U3) As the Fed has moved into a risk management mode and the pace and path of monetary policy have become data dependent, investors who have taken a short position at around 97.20 in the 3-month SOFR futures September 2023 contract (SR3U3) that we noted on August 1, 2023, when the market underestimated the magnitude of incoming rate hikes from the Fed and prematurely priced in rate cuts in 2023, may consider taking profits. Although we still think inflation will be sticky and stay at elevated levels and the Fed is not cutting rates in 2023, the current level of SR3U3 at 95.185, which represents a 3-month (from Sep 20 to Dec 20, 2023) compound rate of the secured overnight financing rate at 4.815%, offers diminished upside on risks and rewards. On September 22, after the Sept FOMC meeting, we lowered our target of the trade to 95.25 (or 4.75%). The target is now reached and taking profits deems appropriate.  Figure 11. SOFR 3-month Futures Sep 2023 ; Source: Saxo, Bloomberg. Key Takeaways: The Fed has shifted to a risk management mode The pace and path of the Fed’s rate hikes in 2023 will be data dependent Equities are facing headwinds as the economy slipping into a sharp downturn or even recession Bonds are becoming attractive in providing yields and potentially reducing volatilities in an investment portfolio in 2023 Focussing on 3-7 year U.S. treasury notes or investment-grade corporate bonds Avoiding high-yield (non-investment-grade) bonds until deep into the economic downturn or onset of recession at credit spreads much wider than the current level in the second half of 2023 Taking profits in the short SOFR futures Source: https://www.home.saxo/content/articles/bonds/fixed-income-update-25112022
US Inflation Rises but Core Inflation Falls to Two-Year Low, All Eyes on ECB Rate Decision on Thursday

Essential Factors To Watch For 2023 And Stock Indices Are The Short-Term Bond Yields

Santa Zvaigzne Sproge Santa Zvaigzne Sproge 02.02.2023 14:34
„The future’s so bright, I gotta wear shades”, or about shares and ETFs „The future’s so bright, I gotta wear shades” is the title that, unfortunately, we cannot use to forecast 2023. Although, the new year will have to really work hard to surprise anyone who has lived through the past couple of years. It appears that all investors’ eyes are on China and its success in resuming economic activity. A rebounding China will boost imports of oil, commodities and raw materials while fueling demand for airline tickets, hotel rooms and foreign real estate. „Surely it will push up global inflation if China reopens fully,” says Iris Pang, chief economist for Greater China at ING Group NV. There is a risk that China will act more inflationary in 2023, but this risk seems limited due to the very real likelihood that supply will also improve in many sectors of the economy. Inflation and bond yields are the major risks for 2023 stock indices performance. While a mild recession in 2023 is almost certain, the Fed possibly will slow its rate hikes in case inflation starts to show signs of easing. With slowing growth, wage increases would slow, which, among others, would help stabilize corporate margins. „It’s astonishing,” said Harvard University professor Jeremy Stein, „If you told any one of us a year ago, ‚we’re going to have a bunch of 75 basis-point hikes,’ you’d have said, ‚Are you nuts? You’re going to blow up the financial system.’” Guess what? 75 basis-point hikes are done, and the financial system has not broken – and it is not even near that happening. Stock indices are open to another downward phase (we didn’t have a capitulation yet), but by the end of 2023, they could be back on the upward trend even if the world is in a „mild” recession. Investors should watch the market and remain cautious until the new trend is proven. However, someone may say it might be a good to have some exposure and adjust when your asset allocation gets out of whack. Essential factors to watch for 2023 and stock indices are the short-term bond yields, put/call ratio and bank liquidity. Finally, one should remember that stocks are hostages to the tyranny of round numbers, so it might be good for the support and resistance lines to be always near them. As we move further, let us look at what the companies expect the year 2023 to bring. We have studied the earnings forecasts of all 30 companies that are part of the Dow Jones Industrials index (US30). Read next: Santander Bank Polska Shareholders Can Expect A Solid Dividend, The ETH Liquid Staking Narrative Is Already Going Strong| FXMAG.COM It’s going to be tough at first, and then it’s downhill for the Dow Jones Collecting the data of Q1 2023 earnings per share forecasts, we can see that 12 of the 30 companies in this index (40%) are expected to improve their quarterly earnings, resulting in an 11.7% growth in EPS from Q4 2022 to Q1 2023. The average price-to-future earnings ratio within the index is expected to be 16.8, an improvement compared to the current average P/E ratio within the index of 18.5. The most considerable improvement for the upcoming quarter is forecasted by the aircraft and missile manufacturer Boeing Co., which was the only company within the index to record a loss in Q3 2022. In fact, if we exclude Boeing Co. data from the calculations, the estimated EPS growth in the following quarter diminishes to a meagre 2.00%. The second most substantial growth is forecasted by Goldman Sachs Group Inc., which is also expected to report the highest quarterly EPS (9.99) within the index. The investment bank would be able to boost its earnings by taking advantage of the increasing interest rate environment. Two companies expecting their EPS to decrease in the upcoming quarter are Chevron Corp. and McDonald’s Corp. The cumulative annual earnings figures are similarly presented. Cumulative EPS is calculated by summing annual EPS for all companies within the index, allowing us to evaluate the EPS changes between two periods. However, to compare the full annual periods, we have taken the expected results for the last quarter of 2022. The data show that the anticipated annual EPS increase in 2023 within the index would be 10.37% (6.19% if we exclude Boeing Co. as an outlier). Furthermore, 26 of the 30 companies in the index are likely to report year-on-year earnings growth. These results show that analysts are currently predicting a slowdown at a large proportion of companies in the medium term and a slow improvement by the end of next year. The companies’ employee retention activities and job postings share the same relatively gloomy sentiment for the upcoming year. Good morning, but unfortunately you are fired Last year, all major tech companies announced job cuts – some significant, some smaller. The motivation for companies to reduce the employee count comes from various factors, such as changing business models and a slowing economy. However, the biggest reason for the extensive tech firing in 2022 is the growth opportunities in cloud computing services and online shopping upon Covid-19 pandemic that drove people to organize their lives remotely. For example, due to this change in consumer behavior, Amazon doubled its workforce and had its most profitable period in the two years since the pandemic’s beginning. As the pandemic slowed in most of the world, such companies as Amazon were left with the high costs of rapid expansions, slower sales, and high inflation. Amazon’s growth stalled to the lowest rate in 20 years in mid-2022. During the period between April and September, Amazon laid off around 80,000 people around the world. In November, it announced another 10,000-employee layoff (the number was increased to 20,000 in December) and froze hiring. In total, Amazon’s downsizing amount to approximately 6.6% of its total workforce. While this has been the biggest job layoff in the history of Amazon in absolute terms, Amazon is experienced in managing its workforce amid recessions – it cut 1,500 jobs during the dot-com crash (which at that time was 15% of the staff). Besides large tech companies such as Amazon, Meta and Twitter, also startups – especially those emerging in response to the needs of a pandemic-hit world - and cryptocurrency companies are also feeling the pressure of inflation, the difficulty of raising new funding and, in the case of the latter, falling Bitcoin prices and investor sentiment. According to the Crunchbase database of public and private companies in the United States laying off employees, nearly 400 companies have announced layoffs, from which 21 reported a complete shutdown and 15 more fired 40% to 60% of their workforce. The major layoffs took place in Fintech, Crypto, E-commerce and Social media industries If anyone is wondering whether redundancies continue into 2023, they will (at least at Amazon). It has been confirmed by the company’s CEO Andy Jassy. Although, it is relatively safe to say that the layoffs would continue in 2023 for other tech companies and may spread out to other sectors as well. While the US labour market still shows meager unemployment data, if taking a closer look, it is visible that a considerable part of the hiring takes place in those industries trampled by the pandemic. And the downsizing among Tech companies also seems to become a problem for other sector workers. Among other (potentially more logical) factors is that corporate leaders are just people with a sense of herd unity. Therefore, if their competitors announce layoffs to prepare for the coming recession, they would probably consider doing the same. While it is harder to look for the silver lining in getting fired, it may be an absolute necessity for the company to undergo downsizing as part of a strategic restructuring. Downsizing allows companies to save cash, improve efficiency and, if necessary, survive economic slowdown. Nevertheless, it is crucial to do the due diligence and see what other activities the company is performing in order to optimize its operations – no company has earned billions by simply laying off employees. While cutting jobs is not necessarily bad for the company, the overall market typically perceives it as a negative sign, which is clearly reflected in its stock price. Studies involving 141 companies announcing layoffs between 1979 and 1997 and 1,445 companies announcing layoffs between 1990 and 1998 clearly show that downsizing negatively affects the companies’ stock prices following the news and in the longer period after the announcement. Interestingly, even though the key objective for downsizing typically is cost-cutting and optimization, not all companies achieve reliable results in this field. On the contrary, as a result, companies face the risk of losing valuable employees, may need to rehire some of them at a later stage and is likely to deal with a fall in customer service quality, productivity, and innovation due to demoralized workforce. The bottom line is that companies don’t fire employees if they are expecting a high growth period ahead. It is true whether we speak about one particular company or the market in general. Investors should pay attention to employee retention activities, reasons for necessary downsizing, and how the company expects to handle any negative consequences. Based on current market trends, it is safe to say that further downsizing will continue as we officially enter a recession in 2023. Good to watch ETFs Read the full Yearly Outlook 2023 by Conotoxia here!
Bulls Stumble as GBP/JPY Nears Key Resistance at 187.30

European Markets React to US Debt Ceiling Deal! A Mixed Open Expected. US Dollar Dominates CEE Markets: Concerns Over Economic Recovery Linger

Michael Hewson Michael Hewson 30.05.2023 09:11
Europe set for a mixed open, as debt ceiling deal heads towards a vote. By Michael Hewson (Chief Market Analyst at CMC Markets UK) With both the US and UK markets closed yesterday, there was a rather tepid response to the weekend news that the White House and Republican leaders had agreed a deal to raise the debt ceiling, as European markets finished a quiet session slightly lower. The deal, which lays out a plan to suspend the debt ceiling beyond the date of the next US election until January 1st 2025, will now need to get agreement from lawmakers on both sides of the political divide to pass into law. That could well be the hardest part given that on the margins every vote is needed which means partisan interests on either side could well derail or delay a positive outcome. A vote on the deal could come as soon as tomorrow with a new deadline of 5th June cited by US Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen. US markets, which had been rising into the weekend on the premise that a deal was in the making look set to open higher when they open later today, however markets in Europe appear to be less than enthused. That's probably due to concerns over how the economic recovery in China is doing, with recent economic data suggesting that confidence there is slowing, and economic activity is declining. Nonetheless while European stocks have struggled in recent weeks, they are still within touching distance of their recent record highs, although recent increases in yields and persistent inflation are starting to act as a drag. This is likely to be the next major concern for investors in the event we get a speedy resolution to the US debt ceiling headwind. We've already seen the US dollar gain ground over the last 3 weeks as markets start to price in another rate hike by the Federal Reserve next month, and more importantly start to price out the prospect of rate cuts this year. Last week's US and UK economic data both pointed to an inflationary outlook that is much stickier than was being priced a few weeks ago, with core prices showing little sign of slowing. In the UK core prices surged to a 33 year high of 6.8% while US core PCE edged up to 4.7% in April, meaning pushing back any possible thoughts that we might see rate cuts as soon as Q3. At this rate we'll be lucky to see rate cuts much before the middle of 2024, with the focus now set to shift to this week's US May jobs report on Friday, although we also have a host of other labour market and services data between now and then to chew over. The last few weeks have seen quite a shift, from the certainty that the Federal Reserve was almost done when it comes to rate hikes to the prospect that we may well see a few more unless inflation starts to exhibit signs of slowing markedly in the coming months. In the EU we are also seeing similar trends when it comes to sticky inflation with tomorrow's flash CPI numbers for May expected to show some signs of slowing on the headline number, but not so much on the core measure. On the data front today we have the latest US consumer confidence numbers for May which are expected to see a modest slowdown from 101.30 in April to 99, and the lowest levels since July last year. EUR/USD – has so far managed to hold above the 1.0700 level, with a break below arguing to a move back towards 1.0610. We need to see a rebound above 1.0820 to stabilise. GBP/USD – holding above the 1.2300 area for now with further support at the April lows at 1.2270. We need to recover back above 1.2380 to stabilise. EUR/GBP – currently struggling to move above the 0.8720 area, with main resistance at the 0.870 area. A move below current support at 0.8650 could see a move towards 0.8620. USD/JPY – having broken above the 139.60 area this now becomes support for a move towards 142.50 which is the 61.8% retracement of the down move from the recent highs at 151.95 and lows at 127.20. Further support remains back at the 137.00 area and 200-day SMA. FTSE100 is expected to open unchanged at 7,627 DAX is expected to open 17 points higher at 15,967 CAC40 is expected to open 30 points lower at 7,273
Rates Diverge: Flattening Yield Curves in US and Europe

Rates Spark: Navigating Uncertainty in the European Central Bank's Monetary Policy

ING Economics ING Economics 07.06.2023 08:55
Rates Spark: Enough out there to nudge market rates higher Weak economic data dents the European Central Bank’s ability to push rates up. Even if July and September hikes were fully priced in, Bund and swap will find it hard to rise above the top of their recent range. Direction is far from clear, but our preference is to position for upward pressure on yields.     Soft economic data dents ECB hawkish rhetoric For financial markets, a flurry of weak economic activity data – most prominently in the manufacturing sector such as yesterday’s German factory orders and tofay's industrial production – sits awkwardly with the European Central Bank's (ECB) message that more monetary tightening is needed.   The pre-meeting quiet period starts tomorrow, making today the last opportunity to skew investor expectations but markets pricing a 25bp hike at this meeting are unlikely to move much. Another important clue as to future policy moves will be in the staff forecasts released at the same time as next week’s policy decision.   The 2025 headline and core inflation projections at the March meeting stood at 2.1% and 2.2% annualised, above the ECB’s target and a clear signal that more tightening is needed – even above and beyond the path for interest rates priced by the market in late February.   Dovish-minded investors can point to a decline in oil and gas futures since the March meeting, as well as a downtick in consumer inflation expectations in the most recent survey released yesterday. Will this be enough for the ECB to no longer signal that it has ‘more ground to cover’? Probably not, but markets may not care. The focus among hawks is squarely on core inflation and the modest decline from a 5.7% peak in March to 5.3% in May hasn’t been met with much relief by the Governing Council, but it has pushed euro rates down relative to their dollar peers.        
California Leads the Way: New Climate Disclosure Laws Set the Standard for Sustainability Reporting

Central Bank Hikes Spark Concerns: Are More Rate Increases on the Horizon?

ING Economics ING Economics 09.06.2023 08:27
Rates Spark: Worries that more might be needed The Bank of Canada has resumed hiking after a pause, highlighting concerns that elsewhere more might be needed to bring inflation down even as the Fed is mulling a pause of its own. Market rates have adjusted higher again and look vulnerable to more upside in the near term, especially in the US, with supply looming early next week.   The Bank of Canada lends skip narratives globally more credibility If they need any evidence that the current tightening cycle is not of the usual type, rates markets only have to look at the Bank of Canada’s 25bp hike yesterday. It was a move that surprised the majority of economists and came after the bank stood pat since last hiking 25bp in January. The Bank of Canada has led Fed policy in many ways, when it came to starting quantitative tightening or reverting to larger hikes. Now it may well have jumped ahead with the “skip” narrative, just when FOMC members are mulling a pause of their own. While it was previously tempting for markets to read any pause already as the end of the tightening cycle, it shows that an adverse turn of the data can require central banks to tighten the policy screws further.   With regards to the markets’ pricing of the Fed, the implied probability of a hike next week increased moderately to 30%. The probability of a July hike briefly spiked above 90% before falling back to 80%, not far from where it sat before. Yet further out the SOFR OIS forwards for year-end are now back at their highest levels since March at just above 5%.   Inflation concerns and supply add near-term upside to yields   Supply remains a near term factor for rates However, it was longer rates in the 5- to 10-year area that underperformed, with 10Y USTs rising more than 12bp to close in on 3.8%. While the BoC’s decision delivered the decisive push, the rise in yields already started earlier. That may also be owed to the prospect of faster paced Treasury issuance after the lift of the debt ceiling weighing on markets.   True, the rebuild of the Treasury’s cash balance as indicated yesterday to US$425bn by the end of June will mostly come from additional bills issuance, but early next week markets also will face 3Y and 10Y Treasury auctions on Monday and a 30Y auction on Tuesday. It means the bond sales will come around the crucial US CPI release and just ahead of the FOMC decision, volatility events that may warrant additional price concessions.   The US Treasury is about to rebuild its cash account   Upside inflation risks outweigh softer data, also at the ECB In EUR rates markets as well, just ahead of the upcoming ECB meeting, worries about inflation continue to outweigh the impact of softer data. Market have been close to fully pricing a June hike for a while now and see at least one more hike until September. They see a 20% chance that we will have a third hike, reflecting the recent return of speculation that the ECB’s deposit rate could reach the 4% handle.   The ECB’s Schnabel and the Dutch central bank’s Knot were the latest to say more tightening was needed. Schnabel cautioned “given the high uncertainty about the persistence of inflation, the costs of doing too little continue to be greater than the costs of doing too much”. Our own economists also think a hike next week looks like a done deal. More interesting is what the ECB will signal around the further path ahead. Given the current tightening bias evident in minutes of the last meeting and recent commentary as well as the still painfully slow decline in inflation the door should be left open to deliver more. A second hike in July looks likely. A third in September is possible, but not yet the base case.   Today's data and market view The Bank of Canada’s resumption of rate hikes also lends credibility to the skip narrative that Fed officials have increasingly been pushing last week. Despite all positive signs on the inflation front and weaker data, the concern clearly is that central banks may still need to do more. Technical factors like the Treasury supply packed into early next week just ahead of the Fed decision can add a bearish tilt to the market until then, and at least to some added volatility. Main highlight on the data front are the weekly US initial jobless claims. Consensus here is for little change which would indicate a still relatively tight job market. In the eurozone we will get the final first quarter GDP figures. Supply certainly has been a theme in eurozone rates markets, too, especially with Spain printing a €13bn 10Y bond which added to the widening of periphery bond spreads. After recent busy primary markets, only Ireland is scheduled to be active - with two bond taps in the sovereign space today.  
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Rate Spark: Navigating Tightening Conditions and Market Expectations

ING Economics ING Economics 14.06.2023 13:54
Rates Spark: Is it a pause, or is it a skip? A hawkish hold need not be market moving for dollar rates, and a lot of financial tightening is still in the pipeline. Hot UK labour data adds to sterling curve flattening pressure - we think this will continue, especially when compared to dollar and euro rates.   The Fed will hold at this meeting, but expect some tightening from other sources ahead Directionally, a decision to hold rates steady at this meeting should not have a material effect on the level of market rates. What’s more important is the tone and language used by Chair Powell, where a hawkish tilt should prevent yields from seeing this event as a rationale to move lower. A surprise hike would deepen the inversion and likely shift the curve materially higher (by some 10bp in the 10yr, and by 20bp in the 2yr). That said, a hike is highly unlikely given that the market attaches a 90% probability to a hold at this meeting.   We will also get the Fed’s updated forecasts and dot plot chart for individual forecasts for the path of the Fed funds rate. In March, the Fed signalled rates would be left in a 5-5.25% range through to year-end, with rate cuts in 2024. We suspect there will be only minor tweaks in their forecasts – our predictions for what they will say are in the table below. Nonetheless, the big risk is that even if the Fed do hold rates steady it inserts a further hike into their central forecast. This would likely see markets firmly swing in favour of a 25bp move in July.   Even as the Fed holds, there is set to be a material tightening in conditions in the weeks and months ahead. Bills and other bond issues that had been held back are now being accelerated as the US Treasury looks to rebuild its cash balance. To the extent that money market funds buy extra bills, this likely means less use of the Fed’s reverse repo facility. At the same time, as the Treasury’s cash balance is increased there should be an associated fall in bank reserves held at the Fed. This will make things feel that bit tighter.     A combination of extra floating collateral and less liquidity should place some upward pressure on repo rates, adding to the tightening being felt generally. Also, there is an underlying tightening coming from the rises in market rates seen in the past few weeks. This is largely a part reversal of the falls in market rates seen in the wake of the Silicon Valley Bank collapse. But still, this is helping the Fed to do the tightening job that it believes needs doing.     Pitted against that, however, has been a tendency for credit spreads to tighten, volatility to fall and Libor OIS to re-tighten. These act to loosen conditions, but are also a consequence of the reduction in system stress as the debt ceiling was suspended and banking fears have receded, both of which the Fed welcomes.   ING's expectations for what the Federal Reserve will forecast today
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Poland's 2023 Budget Deficit Widens as Government Prioritizes Spending Over Liquidity Buffer

ING Economics ING Economics 16.06.2023 09:41
Poland's 2023 budget deficit higher as government plans to reduce liquidity buffer Last week, the Polish government presented an updated fiscal plan for 2023 with a PLN24bn (0.7% of GDP) higher deficit target, mainly on additional spending. Higher borrowing needs are intended to be financed by the reduction of the liquidity cushion rather than new issuance.   Loose fiscal policy in 2023 and 2024 Last Friday, Polish authorities announced that the 2023 budget act will be amended and the state budget deficit limit on a cash basis will be increased by PLN24bn from PLN68bn to PLN92bn (0.7% of GDP). The main reason behind such a move is the intention to boost one-off expenditure in 2023 (by PLN20.8bn), which we link to upcoming general elections in Poland in the autumn of this year. The majority of the spending will be on one-off higher subsidies to local governments (PLN14bn) and one-off bonuses for teachers (excluding academics). Total state budget revenues are expected to be PLN3.2bn lower than previously projected, with tax collections PLN8.5bn lower than assumed in the budget act. VAT receipts are PLN13.4bn short of initial assumptions.   As a reminder, a few weeks ago the government released a plan to increase permanent spending from 2024 onwards on child benefits (from PLN500 per child to PLN800) and provide free pharmaceuticals for youngsters and the elderly (totalling 0.7% of GDP next year). We hold our 2023 general government deficit estimate unchanged at 5.2% of GDP in 2023 and around 4% of GDP in 2024, as we already assumed loose fiscal policy in the election year.   Higher borrowing needs for 2023 but issuance lower The budget amendment means that 2023 net borrowing needs will increase to PLN150.6bn from PLN110.5bn initially planned, but it is not necessarily bad news for Polish government bonds (POLGBs) given plans regarding financing. According to the amended plan, the issuance of PLN T-bonds will be PLN21.9bn lower than initially planned. MinFin plans to cover new borrowing needs from an exceptionally high cash buffer, which should be reduced by PLN64.3bn. At the end of May, the Ministry of Finance had PLN117.6bn on budgetary accounts – since the Covid-19 pandemic it has stayed at a very high level.   Downward pressure on yields as demand-supply balance likely to improve POLGBs issuance so far this year is close to PLN60bn and by the end of 2023 fiscal authorities may tap domestic markets with PLN30bn given the amended financing plan. Taking into account the planned reduction in the budget account balance (liquidity buffer) this year and a more open approach to Eurobonds issuance (the equivalent of PLN38bn issued in euros and dollars by the government so far in 2023) it is likely to boost banking liquidity. Along with poor demand for mortgage loans due to high interest rates, and the rising chance of National Bank of Poland rate cuts before the end of 2023, it should support demand for POLGBs and may push its prices up.
Rates Diverge: Flattening Yield Curves in US and Europe

Rates Diverge: Flattening Yield Curves in US and Europe

ING Economics ING Economics 28.06.2023 08:25
Rates Spark: Different causes, same effect The US and European economic trajectories are diverging. Yields have followed, albeit more modestly. In both cases the result is ever flatter curves, helped by seasonal factors.   Yield differentials widen, but all curves flatten It is hard to completely dismiss technical factors when finding an explanation for the continued flattening of yield curves heading into the summer market lull. Expectations of calmer market conditions in the summer don’t always come true but worse liquidity make investors wary of keeping positions that carry negatively, for fear of being unable to exit them should markets move against them. We think this is an important factor adding a tailwind to the curve flattening. We think steepeners have been a popular trade in recent months as investors foresee the end of central banks’ hiking cycles. The problem is, these are costly to hold. For instance, a euro swap 2s10s steepener costs over 6bp per quarter in carry. Its US dollar equivalent cost over 17bp.   Of course, it helps that curve flattening is the rational reaction to a world where the economic outlook is worsening, look for instance at Europe or at the disappointing recovery in China. Add to that central banks adding another layer of hawkish paint at the European Central Bank‘s (ECB) Sintra conference which continues today, and you have the perfect recipe for a flatter curve. This thesis get an important reality check over the coming days in the eurozone, in the form of the June inflation data. Italy is the only country to publish its own today, but markets may well be tempted to extrapolate its finding to other countries until they publish their own.   One country that seems impervious to the overall gloom is the US. Perhaps due to its lower reliance on global demand for growth, or perhaps due to the resilience of its domestic job market. The result is the same. Markets increasingly believe the Fed will hike at least once more in this cycle. If US curve developments are highly correlated to its foreign peers, albeit for slightly more upbeat reasons, its curve has shifted upwards relative to its European peers. Despite arguably encouraging progress relative to Europe on the inflation front, euro-dollar yield differentials have widened. This yield divergence coincides with the divergence in economic surprise indices, albeit to a less spectacular extent.   EU gloom and US glee both result in flatter curves, helped by carry   Today's events and market view Italy is the first Eurozone member state to release its June inflation today. It will be followed by Germany and Spain tomorrow, and France and the eurozone on Friday. ECB monthly monetary aggregate data, including M3 growth, and Italian industrial production complete the list. US data is relatively thin today, with only mortgage applications and inventories to look out for. This will leave plenty of time for investors to scrutinise central banker comments with an all-star line-up comprising Fed, ECB, Bank of Japan and Bank of England governors. TLTRO and eurozone financial system nerds will also look at the 3m LTRO allotment which settles tomorrow, a day after today's June TLTRO repayments. Yesterday, settling with the repayments, the central bank allotted €18bn at the weekly main refinancing operations facility, the most since 2017. Presumably, some lenders find its 4% interest rate the most attractive option, or maybe the only available, to finance the repayment of TLTRO funds. Italy accounts for today’s euro sovereign bond supply with 2Y debt, followed in the afternoon by the US Treasury selling 2Y FRN and 7Y T-notes.
Navigating the European Landscape: Assessing the Significance and Variations of Non-Bank Financial Institutions

Navigating the European Landscape: Assessing the Significance and Variations of Non-Bank Financial Institutions

ING Economics ING Economics 29.06.2023 13:38
Relative to the banking sector, NBFIs remain less important: The European Central Bank noted that the sector had reached about 80% of the size of the banking sector in the eurozone in 2022. This is significant but remains much smaller when considering the size of the sector globally.   In both geographies, the sector has developed significantly after taking a hit during the global financial crisis, benefiting from the stricter regulations on banks and the search for higher returns. In its 2023 financial stability report, the IMF highlighted that the previous low interest rate environment had prompted NBFIs to shift their investments to riskier assets in the hope of finding higher returns. But with rising yields and a worsening outlook for credit risk, NBFIs have started to sell their riskier assets. With this development comes recent concerns over increasing NBFI vulnerabilities.   The share of both banks and non-banks in relation to total domestic financial assets differs significantly between countries.   Luxemburg, Ireland and the Netherlands have very important NBFI sectors, the first two because they host many investment funds as the latter has a large pension fund sector. On the other hand, in France and Spain, total domestic financial assets remain mostly dominated by traditional banks. Variations in the NBFI sector size and type between Europe and the rest of the world, and also between European countries, indicate that Europe not equally exposed to the NBFI sector’s vulnerabilities.   NBFI share of total domestic financial assets varies significantly between countries In Europe, the share of NBFIs of total domestic financial assets is the highest in Luxemburg      
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Central and Eastern Europe: Disinflation, Rate Cuts, and Divergence in the Region

ING Economics ING Economics 06.07.2023 13:33
Disinflation continues across Central and Eastern Europe, opening up the possibility of central bank rate cuts. However, lower inflation does not necessarily mean faster rate cuts. The local story will increasingly create divergence across the region.   Poland: Central bank easing around the corner Second-quarter growth in Poland most likely underperformed (with flat or negative year-on-year growth), given poor retail sales, industrial output and a 45.1 point manufacturing PMI reading in June. Consumer sentiment is improving but from a very low level. Moreover, real wages will just start to grow in the third quarter, after around a year of declines. Plus, the government’s cheap mortgage scheme has only recently started, arriving too late to give a boost to housing construction this year. Net exports are to be a key GDP driver this year. We expect no policy changes from the National Bank of Poland in July. However, we estimate that the chances of a rate cut after the August Monetary Policy Council break have increased to 65-70%. This is following the guidance provided by some MPC members, including President Adam Glapinski, and the lower-than-expected June CPI print. We see more than one interest rate cut in 2023 as possible. Our short-term inflation forecast is optimistic, with CPI falling to single digits in August. Our long-term CPI forecasts are substantially far less favourable, however. Core inflation may stabilise around 5% year-on-year in 2024-25 given the tight labour market, the large rise in the minimum wage and the valorisation of 500+ child benefits. The zloty continues to benefit from a mix of the current account surplus, more FX sales on the market by the Ministry of Finance, inflows from foreign direct investment, and portfolio capital. Some investors seem to expect a more market-friendly political environment after the parliamentary elections. We expect all those factors to persist at least until the elections. We expect EUR/PLN to gradually sink to, or slightly below, 4.40 in the coming weeks. Despite higher overall 2023 borrowing needs after the state budget amendment, the government aims to finance them via the reduction of the sizeable cash buffer (PLN117bn as of the end of May) and FX funding, hence limiting Polish government bond (POLGBs) issuance compared to the initial budget bill. In tandem with the expectations for monetary policy easing, this suggests a further drop in yields across the curve and some tightening in asset swaps.    
EUR/USD Faces Resistance at 1.0774 Amid Inflation and Stagflation Concerns

FX Daily: Underdogs Rally Ahead of US CPI Release

ING Economics ING Economics 12.07.2023 09:08
FX Daily: Underdogs make a comeback ahead of US CPI It has been a good week for the underdogs in the G10 FX world. The Japanese yen, Norwegian krone, Swedish krona and Swiss franc led the gains against the dollar over the last week. This may well be a position adjustment against the risk of a benign US CPI print today and a tweak in Bank of Japan policy at the end of the month. Today's CPI reading will therefore be key.   USD: Benign CPI could unlock a leg lower lower in the dollar Another European morning follows another Asian session where USD/JPY has led the dollar lower. The Japanese yen has now appreciated 3.6% against the dollar over the last week, closely followed by NOK (+3.4%), SEK (+2.7%) and CHF (+2.4%). We discussed some of the push-pull factors driving the dollar in yesterday's update, but the outperformance of these underdog currencies clearly points to some position adjustment at work. The broad-based nature of the rally in these currencies suggests investors may be anticipating a more benign US price environment like the one we saw in November last year when the US started to print core inflation at 0.3% month-on-month after a string of 0.6% releases. That nicely brings us to today's main event, which is the June CPI release at 14:30CET. Expectations are for a more benign 0.3% MoM core reading - the lowest since last November - and base effects bringing the headline CPI down to just 3.1% YoY - the lowest since March 2021. Assuming no nasty upside surprises here, this may be enough to firm up a view that a 25bp Fed hike may well be the last in the cycle. If so, DXY could make a run at the year's lows near 100.80. A quick word on the yen. Developments in USD/JPY - especially the sell-off in early Asia - seem to be led by selling in the JGB bond market. Here, 30-year JGB yields are rising - spreads between 30-year US and Japanese government bonds have narrowed 12bp over the last week - and the Nikkei equity index is underperforming. This has all the hallmarks of position adjustment before the 28 July Bank of Japan (BoJ) policy meeting, where expectations are growing that the BoJ could switch to targeting the five-year part of the JGB yield curve - another small step to policy normalisation. In short, then, this USD/JPY move looks driven by the private not public sector (i.e. no intervention) and something like 138.25 looks like a near-term target for USD/JPY assuming today's US CPI data does not surprise on the upside    
Unraveling the Path Ahead: Gold and Silver Prices Amidst Fed Expectations

Unraveling the Path Ahead: Gold and Silver Prices Amidst Fed Expectations

Craig Erlam Craig Erlam 13.07.2023 08:19
The recent retreat of gold prices to around $1,900 per ounce and silver prices to the area of $22 per ounce has sparked questions about the future direction of these precious metals. Market participants are eager to determine if gold and silver will find support at these levels, potentially leading to a rebound or a push towards historic highs. In seeking insights into this matter, we turn to the expertise of financial analyst Craig Erlam. According to Erlam, the expectations surrounding the actions of the Federal Reserve (Fed) play a significant role in shaping the outlook for both gold and silver prices. The impact of Fed decisions on yields and the value of the US dollar cannot be underestimated.   Erlam highlights the recent boost that gold and silver prices received following positive inflation data. This indicates that unless there is a substantial shift in the opposite direction, the current momentum could support prices in the short term. While economic data has been volatile, there is a growing sense of progress. The key lies in the policymakers' interpretation of this progress in the days ahead.       FXMAG.COM: The gold price has made a retreat to the vicinity of $1,900 per ounce. What's next for gold prices - will the King of Metals find support there from which to bounce? The silver price has made a retreat back to the area of $22 per ounce and what's next for the metal - does it have a chance to head toward historic highs?   Craig Erlam: In both cases, a lot comes down to what the Fed is expected to do, and what impact that has on yields and the dollar. As we've seen today, some very encouraging inflation data has given both gold and silver a big lift and unless we see a significant shift the other way, that could support prices in the near term. The economic data has been volatile but it does feel like we're finally seeing progress. We'll see from policymakers over the coming days whether they view recent progress to be substantial enough.
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Economic Outlook: UK Economy Contracts in May, US PPI Slows Further

Michael Hewson Michael Hewson 13.07.2023 08:34
UK economy set to contract in May, US PPI to slow further   We saw another day of strong gains for European markets yesterday, with the FTSE100 undergoing its best one-day gain since early June, after US CPI came in below forecasts.   US markets also saw strong gains with the S&P500 and Nasdaq 100 breaking above their highs of this year, and pushing up to their highest levels since April 2022, with the Nasdaq 100 leading the gains.   Asia markets followed suit with strong gains across the board despite the latest set of China trade data for June showing that economic activity slowed further. Exports fell by -12.4% from a year ago, missing expectations by a large margin, while imports also declined more than expected, by -6.8%, further reinforcing concerns about deflation, but on the more positive side increasing expectations of stronger stimulus by Chinese authorities in the weeks ahead.        Yesterday's US CPI numbers for June were never likely to change the calculus behind another 25bps rate hike when the Fed meets in two weeks' time, but they have altered the story when it comes to what might come next, and it is this that markets are reacting to, with the US dollar and yields falling back sharply.   The nature of yesterday's numbers suggest that whatever other Fed officials would have us believe in the context of their current hawkishness, further rate hikes beyond this month will be a big ask, and probably won't happen, hence the weakness seen in both the US dollar, and US yields seen so far this week.   That said we can still expect Fed officials to continue to adopt a hawkish tone on the basis that theywon't want markets to prematurely start pricing in rate cuts and will want to keep the option of further hikes very much on the table.     Nonetheless the shift seen in the last few days does help to explain why the US dollar has slipped so much against the Japanese yen, although some are suggesting it is because we might see a policy shift from the Bank of Japan when it meets at the end of this month. Whichever way you come at it from, the net effect is likely to be the same, in that US and Japanese rates are likely to converge, rather than diverge. Today's PPI numbers for June are expected to reinforce the disinflation trends being seen rippling out through the global economy. On the headline numbers PPI is expected to see another sharp slowdown from 1.1% in May to 0.4% in June, while core PPI is forecast to slow down more modestly from 2.8% to 2.6%. Whichever way you look at it, further weakness here is likely to trickle down into the CPI numbers in the coming months, and reinforce the disinflationary narrative, but more importantly signal that US rate hikes are done bar the move in two weeks' time.     Yesterday's US inflation numbers could prove to be good news for UK homeowners, if yesterday's move in UK yields is any guide, in that they might reduce the pressure on the Bank of England to be more aggressive in terms of their own rate hiking policy.   If this month's expected July hike from the Federal Reserve is in fact the last one, then the Bank of England may only need to do another 50bps in August before similarly signalling a pause, which means that UK current terminal rate pricing is too high. This would be an enormous relief for mortgage holders worried that the base rate might rise as high as 6.5%.  The problem for the UK is the energy price cap is keeping inflation levels way too high, and now it has outlived its usefulness it really ought to be scrapped. It was useful in containing the upside, however by way of its design its not reflecting the sharp declines in gas prices in the last 12 months.      Consequently, it is contriving to exert upward pressure on wages as consumers struggle with the higher cost of living due to energy prices not coming down quickly enough. This failure is likely to be reflected in today's UK economic data for May, which is expected to see manufacturing and industrial production to sharp 0.4% declines in economic activity for both. The monthly GDP numbers for May are also forecast to show a -0.3% contraction due to the multiple bank holidays during the month, as well as widespread public sector strike action, with index of services seeing a sharp slowdown from 0.3% in April to -0.2%. The weak performance in May is likely to act as a sizeable drag on Q2 GDP, although we should see some of that recovered in June.             EUR/USD – broke higher through the highs of this year and could well retest the highs of March 2022 at 1.1185. This becomes next resistance, with a break targeting the 1.1485 area, with support now at 1.1020.     GBP/USD – has encountered resistance at the 1.3000 area. We need to see a break above 1.3020 to target a move towards 1.3300, and the March 2022 highs. Support now comes in at the 1.2850 area.       EUR/GBP – failed again at the 0.8500 area, with the rebound currently holding below the 0.8570/80 area. A break above here targets the 50-day SMA which is now at 0.8610.     USD/JPY – slid down to the 138.15 area where we have cloud support. If this gives way, we could see further losses towards 137.20. We now have resistance back at the 140.20 area.     FTSE100 is expected to open 4 points higher at 7,420     DAX is expected to open 20 points higher at 16,043     CAC40 is expected to open 23 points higher at 7,356    
UK Economy Contracts, US PPI Slows, and Global Markets Respond

UK Economy Contracts, US PPI Slows, and Global Markets Respond

Ipek Ozkardeskaya Ipek Ozkardeskaya 13.07.2023 08:35
The fever is breaking.  By Ipek Ozkardeskaya, Senior Analyst | Swissquote Bank   US inflation eased to 3%. It's still not the 2% targeted by the Federal Reserve (Fed), but it's approaching. Core inflation on the other hand eased more than expected to 4.8%. That's still more than twice the Fed's 2% policy target, but again, the US inflation numbers are clearly on the right path, the services inflation including shelter costs is easing, and all this is good news for breaking the Fed hawks back amid mounting tension over the past few weeks.   There hasn't been much change in the expectation of another 25bp hike at the Fed's next policy meeting, which is now given a more than 90% chance, but the expectation for a September hike fell, the US 2-year dropped to 4.70% after the CPI data, while the 10-year yield fell to 3.85%.   One big question is: if inflation is easing at a – let's say - pleasing speed, why would the Fed bother raising the interest rates more? Wouldn't it be better to just wait and see where inflation is headed?   Well yes, but the Fed officials certainly continue thinking that 4.8% is still too hot, and that the risk of a U-turn in inflation expectations, and inflation is still to be carefully managed. Because the favourable base effect due to energy prices will gently start fading away in the coming months and the result on inflation will be less appetizing. Then the rising energy prices today could fuel price dynamics again in the coming months, and if China manages to fuel growth thanks to ample monetary and fiscal stimulus, the impact on global inflation could be felt. And if you listen to Richmond Fed's Thomas Barkin, that's exactly what comes out: 'if you back off too soon, inflation comes back stronger'. But the possibility of two more rate hikes following the most aggressive hiking cycle from the Fed starts looking a bit stretched with the actual data. Due to release today, the US producer price inflation is expected to have fallen to the lowest levels since the pandemic, we could even see some deflation.   And a potential Chinese boost to inflation looks much less threatening today compared to a couple of months ago. Chinese exports plunged 12.4% in June, worse than a 7.5% drop printed in May and worse than the market forecasts of a 9.5% decline. The June decline in Chinese exports marked the steepest fall in sales since February 2020. Deteriorating foreign demand on the back of high inflation and rising interest rates continued taking a toll on Chinese trade numbers. In the meantime, imports fell 6.8%, the fourth straight month of decrease due to persistently weak domestic demand.   China will likely recover at some point, but we will unlikely see the Chinese growth put a severe pressure on commodity markets. That's one good news for inflation watchers. The other one is that the US student loan repayments will resume from October, and that should act as a restrictive fiscal action, and help the Fed tame inflation. Therefore, even though there could be an uptick in inflation figures in the coming months, we will unlikely see inflation spike back above 4-5% again. But we will also unlikely to see it fall to 2% easily.  
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US Dollar Plunges: Implications for Global Markets

Ipek Ozkardeskaya Ipek Ozkardeskaya 13.07.2023 08:36
US dollar plunges  The selloff in the US dollar accelerates post-CPI, with the dollar index approaching the 100 level with big and steady steps. This is good news for inflation in the rest of the world, because the softer the US dollar, the softer the energy and raw material prices negotiated in terms of US dollars. In the same way the dollar appreciation fueled inflation globally, its depreciation could help ease it as well.   The EURUSD spiked to 1.1150, Cable advanced past the 1.30 level, while the dollar-yen extended losses below the 140 psychological mark. In precious metals, gold is thriving on the back of softer yields and the softer dollar. The price of an ounce rallied past $1960 and consolidates near $1955 at the time of writing.   In energy, oil bulls target the 200-DMA, that stands near the $77pb level, yet the $77/80 range will be hard to drill as the higher the energy the prices, the higher the inflation expectations, and the higher the inflation expectations, the tighter the Fed policy. The tighter the Fed policy, the stronger the odds of recession, and the stronger the odds of recession, the softer the global energy demand, and the softer the energy prices.        In equities, soft US inflation and decline in US yields pushed the S&P500 to a fresh high since April 2022. The index flirted with the 4500 level on expectation that the Fed will hike one more time and stop, and that the actual tightening cycle could very well end with a soft landing. Nasdaq 100, on the other hand, rallied to the highest levels since the beginning of last year. Meta for example jumped 3.70% on the back of inflation optimism and the news that its Threads platform is growing while dampening traffic on rival Twitter.  On a side note, because Nasdaq 100 is now over-concentrated in Mega Cap stocks, there will be a rebalancing in the weightings of the index. Nasdaq has a rule stating that the aggregate total of individual weights above 4.5% in the index shouldn't exceed 48% of the total weighting. And today, the Magnificent Seven is worth around 55% of Nasdaq 100. So, the changing weights could weigh on Nasdaq, as the best performing stocks will see their weight drawn down.    
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Weaker US Inflation Leads to Dollar Weakness and Demand for Risky Assets

InstaForex Analysis InstaForex Analysis 14.07.2023 16:24
The US consumer price index turned out to be much weaker than forecasts, leading to a drop in yields and a sharp increase in demand for risky assets. Inflation dropped from 4% YoY to 3% (forecast at 3.1%), the core index from 5.3% to 4.8% (forecast at 5.0%). The main reason for the decrease was the group of volatile goods and services – prices for airline tickets, hotel rooms, and used cars. Fed rate futures slightly changed - the likelihood of a rate hike in July even slightly increased to 92%, while the start of the easing cycle was shifted from May to March 2024.     This is possibly due to the fact that we don't know if this pace of decline will be sustainable. Richmond Fed President Barkin spoke after the report and urged not to pay attention to the fall in inflation, as long as the labor market remains too tense, inflation could return to high levels, and then it would take much more effort.   Meester from the Cleveland Fed essentially said the same thing - as long as wage growth is 4.5-5.0%, with productivity growth of less than 1.5%, it is too early to talk about price stability. Markets quickly reacted and the dollar noticeably weakened, September Brent futures crossed the barrier of 80 dollars a barrel, while demand for commodity currencies increased. The New Zealand dollar rose sharply, despite the fact that the Reserve Bank of New Zealand kept the rate at 5.5% and hinted that it expects further inflation decline from peak levels.   USD/CAD The Bank of Canada, as expected, raised the benchmark rate by 0.25% to 5.00% at Wednesday's meeting.   The forecast for the start of the easing cycle is postponed to the indefinite future, and according to analysts at Scotiabank, another increase should be expected in September or October. The main reason for such estimates is the high likelihood that inflation in Canada is slowing down much slower than in the US, and economic growth is more stable.   The Bank of Canada's updated forecasts claim that GDP will grow by 1.8% this year, 1.5% next year, and 2.5% in 2025, all amid expectations of a recession in the US.   Also, considering that the Canadian labor market has appeared more stable since the time of COVID restrictions, its recovery was faster than in the US. In general, the week is likely to end in the positive for the loonie, there are fewer factors that could turn the Canadian dollar's course towards weakening.   The net short position on CAD has been liquidated, weekly change +0.51 billion, a long position of 270 million has been formed. The positioning is neutral for now, but the trend is towards further demand for the Canadian dollar. The calculated price is noticeably lower than the long-term average.       USD/CAD continues to trade lower, although it has not yet managed to reach the target of 1.3040/60 outlined a week earlier. We expect the pair to fall further, the next target after passing the lower band of the channel will be the technical level of 1.30. USD/JPY The Bank of Japan published its latest regional economic report on July 10. One of the key topics is the comments by the leaders of the BoJ's regional offices regarding the pace of growth in average wages, which is key to understanding the BoJ's position on methods of responding to high inflation. Most of the reports indicate that there is a nationwide increase in average wages by around 5%, in some cases, it rises to 7%, as high inflation reduces real household incomes.   In May, the average wage across Japan grew by 2.5% YoY compared to 0.8% in April. At the same time, comments clearly trace the idea that changing the yield curve control policy means subjecting stability to unjustified risk. Nobody wants to take responsibility, and the question of whether practical steps will be taken at the July meeting remains open.   In regards to the yen exchange rate, this uncertainty does not compel us to expect the pair to strengthen. The net short position on the yen grew by 0.7 billion over the reporting week to -10.5 billion, positioning is confidently bearish. The calculated price is higher than the long-term average and is directed upwards. The yen sharply corrected, the main reason for the decline is the US dollar's weakness and the growth of the Japanese stock market, which continues to receive foreign capital in large volumes.  
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Asia Morning Bites: Fed's Impact on Global Markets, Focus on ECB and BoJ Decisions

ING Economics ING Economics 28.07.2023 08:24
Asia Morning Bites After the Fed, attention now shifts to the BoJ tomorrow and ECB later today.   Global Macro and Markets Global markets:  US equities didn’t hate Jerome Powell’s message last night at the FOMC following the latest 25bp rate hike. But they didn’t love it either. That probably suggests Powell got it about right in terms of the overall tone. (see our detailed note here). The door is left wide open for more hikes, the question is, will they actually deliver?   The S&P 500 was down just 0.02%, while the NASDAQ fell only 0.12%. Practically flat on the day. Chinese stocks were a bit more subdued also, maybe figuring that the earlier Politburo comments were more hot air than cold cash, and the CSI 300 drifted 0.21% lower, while the Hang Seng index fell 0.36%. US Treasury markets clearly felt that they were appropriately priced for the FOMC message, and 2Y yields came off just 2.3bp, while the 10Y dropped just 1.8bp to 3.867%. These slight yield reductions enabled the EUR to claw a little ground back against the USD, and EURUSD rose to 1.1083. Other G-10 currencies – GBP and  JPY made gains against the USD, though the AUD lost some ground after their June inflation figures, which on the whole, could have been better even though they did show inflation still dropping (see our note here for more detail). Asian FX had a mixed day. The CNY has begun to drift weaker again after its Politburo-induced strengthening earlier. But there were some positive outcomes from the THB and MYR. G-7 macro:  After the FOMC excitement, which turned out not to be so exciting after all, it’s the turn of the ECB today. Here’s a cheat sheet from our European economists, rates and FX strategists, who think that they may veer towards a more data-dependent strategy after this meeting, which could be viewed as a slightly dovish tilt and lead to a weaker EUR. On top of that, we also get Advance 2Q GDP from the US, with a consensus view of 1.8%QoQ annualized growth – only slightly down from 2.0% in 1Q23. Any upside surprise is likely to see bond yields pushing higher again. China: Industrial profits data for June will not likely buck the trend of other weak data. Industrial production growth remained weak in June, while producer price inflation turned more negative. So a  further dip from May’s -12.6%YoY outcome seems possible. What to look out for: ECB and BoJ China industrial profits (27 July) ECB policy decision (27 July) US personal consumption, durable goods orders initial jobless claims (27 July) South Korea industrial production (28 July) Japan Tokyo CPI and BoJ policy (28 July) Australia PPI (28 July) US personal spending, core PCE, University of Michigan sentiment (28 July)
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FX Daily: Dollar Demand Persists Amidst Waiting Game

ING Economics ING Economics 07.08.2023 08:50
FX Daily: Waiting game keeps the dollar in demand Another mixed US jobs report on Friday has maintained choppy conditions in FX markets. While consensus expects the dollar to edge lower through the year, we are yet to see both the decline in inflation and activity (particularly jobs data) that would cement this trend. Key inputs to FX markets this week will be Thursday's CPI data and the Treasury refunding.   USD: CPI and quarterly refunding will be the highlights Friday's release of a mixed US July jobs report was enough to deliver some calm to the US bond market. Recall that the sharp sell-off at the long end of the curve had upset benign market conditions on Wednesday and Thursday last week. Lower headline employment in July saw 10-year Treasury yields drop nearly 15bp on Friday and investors jump back into their preferred high-yielding currencies such as the Mexican peso.  Looking ahead, we see two key US highlights this week. The main event will be Thursday's release of July CPI figures. Despite base effects nudging the YoY rate higher, MoM readings should deliver another benign 0.2% outcome at the core level and provide another piece of disinflation evidence for the Fed. The problem for FX markets is that it seems that disinflation is not enough to get the dollar lower. Instead, we also need to see signs of softening activity - especially in the labour markets. Unless initial claims spike on Thursday or consumer sentiment falls sharply on Friday, there are few real signs of softer activity coming through just yet. The second highlight of the week will be the US Treasury's quarterly refunding, where a collective $103bn of three, ten, and thirty-year US Treasuries are auctioned Tuesday through Thursday. It is very rare to have a bad Treasury refunding - e.g. consistently low bid to cover ratios or other such metrics. But the risk is that dealers build concessions into bond prices ahead of the auctions - keeping US yields firm and the investment environment mixed. On the face of it then, this week looks unlikely to trigger the kind of benign dollar decline around which the Rest of the World currencies can rally.  Additionally, events in the Black Sea and what they could mean for food and energy prices could keep investors nervous about embracing disinflation trends. For today, we doubt Fed speakers will have a meaningful impact on the dollar and can see DXY trading well within a 101.80-102.80 range.
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Global Market Update: US Stocks Bounce, Yields Rise, and China's Data Awaited

ING Economics ING Economics 16.08.2023 11:52
Global Macro and Markets Global markets:  US stocks bounced on Monday, but that wasn’t because the interest rate environment improved, yields on US Treasuries continued their upward march. The yield on 2Y US Treasuries rose 7.2bp to 4.967%, not far off the effective Fed funds rate of 5.33%, which tells you all you need to know about the market’s expectations for rate cuts over the next two years (not much), while yields on the 10Y rose 3.9bp to 4.191%. The S&P 500 nonetheless managed to rise 0.57%, and the NASDAQ rose 1.05%. Chinese stocks in contrast had another bad day ahead of today’s activity data releases. The Hang Seng dropped 1.58%, while the CSI 300 fell 0.73%. Higher yields mean a stronger USD. The EURUSD has now fallen to 1.0905 and actually pushed below 1.09 yesterday. This has dragged down G-10 currencies. The AUD has fallen to 0.6488. Cable is down to 1.2682 and the JPY has pushed up to 145.52. Asian FX was all weaker against the USD, with the peso leading the pack. The PHP has risen to 56.810. The CNY has risen back to 7.2573, and although one of the best performers of the day, the INR briefly rose above 83 to the USD, before moving slightly below. This puts it at its weakest since October 2022, and slightly outside the range in which it has traded since that time. Is this time for an upwards break? That depends on whether the RBI thinks that maintaining this tight band is worth the cost in FX reserves.   G-7 macro:  Yesterday’s macro calendar was devoid of interest, but today we get more to consider. US advance retail sales for July are released, and the consensus expectation is for a relatively robust 0.4% MoM figure, with a stronger core series. This is in line with the market’s recent conversion to the soft-landing hypothesis and could see further rate cuts priced out of the curve for 2024/25. Elsewhere, we have UK labour data for July. Here, the attention may be on the weekly earnings data, which are expected to pick up into the mid-7% range. That won’t allow the Bank of England to let its inflation guard down. And in Germany, the ZEW survey is expected to remain very bombed out. China: Later this morning, we get the monthly data dump, where the general message is likely to be one of ongoing meagre growth. But while in the past, weak numbers may have spurred thoughts of a government stimulus package, hopes seem to be waning for the traditional fiscal response to economic weakness given the overhang of debt in the economy. China also decides on the rate for the 1Y Medium-term lending facility. No change is expected this month, with the consensus building behind a September cut.   Indonesia:  July trade figures are set for release today.  Both exports and imports are likely to remain in deep contraction with the overall trade balance set to dip to $2.6bn, down from $3.5bn.  Exports and imports will be lower for July given lower commodity prices compared to last year.  The narrowing trade surplus is a fading support for the IDR which is under pressure recently.  Government officials recently implemented a partial restriction for export earnings with exporters asked to keep a portion of earnings on shore.    What to look out for: US retail sales plus China data activity data China medium-term lending facility (15 August) Australia RBA minutes and wage price index (15 August) China industrial production and retail sales (15 August) Indonesia trade balance (15 August) Japan industrial production (15 August) US retail sales (15 August) New Zealand RBNZ policy (16 August) US building permits, housing starts and industrial production (16 August) Japan trade balance (17 August) Singapore NODX (17 August) Australia employment report (17 August) Philippines BSP policy (17 August) US initial jobless claims (17 August) Japan CPI inflation (18 August) Malaysia GDP (18 August) Taiwan GDP (18 August)
Pound Slides as Market Reacts Dovishly to Wage Developments

The Everything Selloff: Examining Global Market Trends Amidst Growing Concerns

Ipek Ozkardeskaya Ipek Ozkardeskaya 18.08.2023 08:00
The everything selloff By Ipek Ozkardeskaya, Senior Analyst | Swissquote Bank   The global selloff intensified yesterday, after the FOMC minutes released Wednesday highlighted that the Federal Reserve (Fed) continues to see significant risks to inflation. And if that's not enough, Atlanta Fed's GDPNow printed an eye-popping growth forecast of 5.8% for Q3 on Wednesday, up from 5% printed a day before. Atlanta Fed computes this number using the data available to them at a time t, therefore the number is not necessarily accurate, but it reflects the positive data released lately, and fuels worries that with such a strong growth, the US inflation could only make a U-turn and take a lift. Yesterday, the Philly Fed index printed a surprisingly strong number, as well. This is why, we continue to see the upside pressure in yields persist, in the US and around the world, though we saw some respite in the US 2-year yield that bounced lower from the 5% mark earlier in the week, and the 10-year yield spiked above 4.30% before falling back to 4.25% this morning.   But note that there is more to this story. Long story short, the US Treasury has been printing a lot of T bills lately, and fell well behind the government bond issuance, and the latter helped keeping US liquidity well contained since the US exited its debt ceiling crisis after which the Treasury started refilling its general account. That was supposed to pull liquidity away from the market. But in the meantime, the Fed was pushing liquidity into the system by reverse repo operations, allowing the money market funds to buy T bills and release cash. The problem is, nowadays, the percentage of T bills approaches the 20% level, which is a self-induced limit for the Treasury, and the Treasury will shift back to issuing bonds, instead of T bills. The latter will increase the amount of sovereign bonds in the system at a time the Fed is decreasing its balance sheet by QT, and the banks don't necessarily want to buy bonds either. So, the increasing supply, and the decreasing demand for US sovereigns will be one major force pushing the US yield curve higher. And if the strong economic data translates into higher inflation, the impact on yields will likely be higher. So, yes, the US 30-year yield is at the highest levels since 2011 and that looks appetizing, especially if the risk sentiment sours – due to multiple reasons ranging from geopolitical tensions to China worries – but the downside risks in the US sovereign bonds market prevails. And Bill Ackman said earlier this month that the 30-year yield could hit the 5% mark.  And the upside pressure in sovereign yields is true for other parts of the world as well, because obviously when the US coughs the world catches a cold. More precisely, higher US yields also translate into a stronger US dollar, and a stronger US dollar is inflationary for the rest of the world. If nothing, the energy and raw material prices that are negotiated in USD terms on international markets simply become more expensive when imports are reverted back to local currencies, and that, alone, is enough to push inflation higher in the rest of the world when the US dollar appreciates. The EURUSD fell to 1.0856, the AUDUSD slipped below 64 cents and the USDJPY spiked above 146.50. The correction is in play this morning and we could see the US dollar retreat further into the weekly closing bell, but the stronger dollar trend is clearly in play and it is worrying. Looking at yields elsewhere the US, the 10-year gilt yield has now surpassed the levels last seen during the Liz Truss induced disaster peak and is headed toward the 5% psychological mark while the German 10-year yield hit 2.70%, a level last seen in 2011 as well. Even the Japanese 10-year yield, which is controlled by the BoJ and should not exceed the 50bp benchmark by 'too much', goes up significantly.  As a result, the selloff in equities deepens. The S&P500 sank to 4370 yesterday and is getting ready to test the minor 23.6% Fibonacci retracement on October to July rally, and the base of that positive trend, while Nasdaq 100 is no more than 8 points from its own 23.6% retracement and already fell below the ascending trend base. The Stoxx600 slumped below the 200-DMA and is flirting with its own 23.6% retracement level, and the Japanese Nikkei, which was one of the rising stars of the year, and which recorded a rally past 30% since January, has fallen below its 23.6% retracement and is preparing to test the 100-DMA.   And note that this simultaneous selloff in stocks and bonds is a sign that the market liquidity is draining. Bitcoin, which is a gauge of market liquidity, slumped more than 7% yesterday and traded close to the $25K level. According to CoinGlass, $1 billion left cryptocurrencies over the past 24 hours and Bitcoin suffered almost half of the liquidations.   
UK Public Sector Borrowing Sees Decline in July: Market Insights - August 22, 2023

UK Public Sector Borrowing Sees Decline in July: Market Insights - August 22, 2023

Michael Hewson Michael Hewson 22.08.2023 08:41
06:00BST Tuesday 22nd August 2023 UK public sector borrowing set to slow in July   By Michael Hewson (Chief Market Analyst at CMC Markets UK)     We saw a lacklustre start to the week yesterday, European markets just about managing to eke out a small gain, although the FTSE100 finished the day slightly below the flat line, closing lower for the 7th day in a row.    The retreat from the intraday highs appeared to be driven by a rise in yields with both UK and German yields seeing strong gains towards their highs of last week. The move higher in yields also saw US 10-year and 30-year yields hit their highest levels since 2007, but unlike in Europe the rise in yields didn't act as a brake on US markets, which managed solid gains led by the Nasdaq 100. US chipmaker Nvidia was a notable outperformer looking to revisit its record highs of earlier this month ahead of its Q2 earnings which are due to be released tomorrow. As we look ahead to today's European open the strong finish in the US looks set to translate into a similarly positive start here in a couple of hours' time, however it's difficult to escape the feeling that stock markets are starting to look increasingly vulnerable.     Economic uncertainty in China, stagnation or weak growth in Europe and the UK, the only positives appear to be coming from the US where the economy is looking reasonably resilient, hence the rise in yields there. It's slightly harder to explain why yields in the UK and Europe are rising aside from the fact that rates are likely to stay higher for longer.     On the economic data front the only data of note is the latest July public sector borrowing numbers for the UK, which are expected to see a fall to £3.9bn from £17.1bn in May. With total debt now at levels of 100% of GDP the rise in rates is extraordinarily painful given how much of its existing debt is linked to inflation and the retail price index. Having to pay out over £100bn a year in interest is money that might have been better spent elsewhere. It's just a pity that the government didn't take greater advantage of the low-rate environment we saw less than 2 years ago, as had been suggested from a number of quarters at the time. We also have the latest CBO industrial orders for August which are expected to slip back to -12 from -9 in July.     In the US we have July existing home sales which are expected to decline for the second month in a row, by -0.2%. We also have comments from the following Federal Reserve policymakers. Chicago Fed President Austan Goolsbee who leans towards the dovish side will be speaking at an event on youth unemployment alongside the more hawkish Fed governor Michelle Bowman.     We also have Richmond Fed President Thomas Barkin whose most recent comments suggest he sees the prospect of a soft landing for the US economy, although he is not a voting member this year.     EUR/USD – finding support just above the 1.0830 area. Still feels range bound with resistance at the 1.1030 area. Below 1.0830 targets the 200-day SMA.     GBP/USD – continues to look supported while above the twin support areas at 1.2610/20. We need to see a move through the 1.2800 area, to signal potential towards 1.3000. A break below 1.2600 targets 1.2400.       EUR/GBP – continues to find support for now at the 0.8520/30 area. A move below 0.8500 could see 0.8480. Above the 100-day SMA at 0.8580 targets the 0.8720 area.     USD/JPY – looks to be retesting the August highs on the way towards the 147.50 area. Below the 144.80 area, targets a move back to the 143.10 area.     FTSE100 is expected to open 6 points higher at 7,264     DAX is expected to open 48 points higher at 15,651     CAC40 is expected to open 30 points higher at 7,228  
Earnings, Soft PMIs, and Market Dynamics: Impact on Yields, Dollar, and Key Developments

Earnings, Soft PMIs, and Market Dynamics: Impact on Yields, Dollar, and Key Developments

Ed Moya Ed Moya 24.08.2023 12:47
Earnings and soft services PMIs sends yields and dollar lower Fed rate hike odds for September 20th meeting stand at 11% (down from yesterday’s 16%) Russian mercenary leader Prigozhin may have died in plane crash The US dollar remained near session lows against the Japanese yen after the Treasury’s mixed 20-year auction.  The bond market rally that started yesterday is holding up after decent demand saw a 4.499% yield, which was higher than the pre-sale yield of 4.490%, and obviously above the 3.954% prior 20-year bond auction.  Eventually the bond market will fixate over foreign demand, but for now the Treasury doesn’t seem to be seeing have any trouble with the extra issuance.   PMIs Both the dreadful eurozone PMIs and softening US ones helped keep the bond market rally going and that should help with the global disinflation process. Rates are coming down and so are Fed rate hiking expectations.   Earnings For a second consecutive quarter, Foot Locker significantly slashed their guidance.  Wall Street was already skeptical of how Foot Locker would finish the year, but the outlook just went from bad to abysmal.  Foot Locker suspended their dividend and cut their full-year sales and earnings guidance, noting softening trends in July. A tough consumer backdrop is only going to get worse, which could lead to a few ugly quarters for the footwear chain. Abercrombie & Fitch Co. earnings were the exact opposite to what came out of Foot Locker.  Abercrombie is raising their outlook as their customers appear to be bucking the trend we saw from Macy’s and Kohls.   All the signs are there for the outlook to get worse for the consumer. Mortgage rates are over 7% for the first time in nearly 2 decades.  Credit card debt just jumped over $1 trillion as Generation X has the highest balance.  The US job market is showing signs of cooling and that should continue as consumer spending softens.   USD/JPY daily chart     The USD/JPY chart is tentatively pulling back as global bond rates decline following weak global PMIs.  Despite the two-day slide, a bullish bias might remain if the long end of the curve sees rates remaining elevated.  If bearish momentum remains, the 142.75 will provide initial support.  To the upside the 147.50 provides key resistance, while the 150.00 level remains a key price barrier.
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UK Yields Fall Amid Economic Uncertainty as BoE Considers Further Rate Hikes

Craig Erlam Craig Erlam 25.08.2023 09:34
UK yields fall amid economic uncertainty BoE expected to raise rates twice more this year to 5.75% Cable testing key support for a second day   The pound is on the decline again on Thursday, having fallen over the last couple of days on the back of some worrying economic figures from the UK. Whether we’re talking about a blip in the data or cracks finally appearing in the economy after a very aggressive tightening cycle from the Bank of England, traders are paring back expectations for interest rates once more. We’re seeing UK 10-year bonds rising today (yields falling) which goes against the trend we’re seeing across Europe, the US, and Japan, for example. Two more hikes are still priced in over the coming months but that could be pared back further if the data continues on the same path, especially if we see some better wage numbers following the spike in the three months to June. That weakness in the pound may be helping the FTSE to outperform today, with it being one of the only European indices still in the green after early gains – seemingly driven by knockout earnings from Nvidia – fizzled out over the course of the day.   Fourth time’s a charm? The pound has fallen close to 1.26 on three other occasions so far this month, each time falling a little short somewhere between 1.2610 and 1.2620 before rebounding higher.   The least convincing of these rebounds came yesterday, with the price once again trending down today to once again come close to those prior lows. The difference so far today is there’s no sign of a recovery and, at the time of writing, the price remains below the 55/89-day simple moving average band. On each of the last three occasions, the price closed back within here or higher. A close below here would be the first since March and if accompanied by a new two-month low and break of 1.26, could be a very bearish signal for cable. Of course, with Jackson Hole underway, there’ll be a lot of central bank speak over the next couple of days which could sway this one way or another which is worth bearing in mind. But right now, the pair is looking under some pressure.    
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US ADP Set to Slow in August: Impact on Markets and Economic Outlook

Michael Hewson Michael Hewson 30.08.2023 09:42
06:00BST Wednesday 30th August 2023 US ADP set to slow in August   By Michael Hewson (Chief Market Analyst at CMC Markets UK)     We've seen a strong start to the week for European markets with the FTSE100 outperforming yesterday due to playing catch-up as result of the gains in the rest of Europe on the Monday Bank Holiday. US markets also saw a strong session, led by the Nasdaq 100 as yields retreated on the back of a sharp slowdown in US consumer confidence in August, and a fall in the number of vacancies from 9165k to 8827k in July, and the lowest level since March 2021.     The sharp drop in the number of available vacancies in the US helps to increase the probability that the Federal Reserve will be comfortable keeping rates unchanged next month, if as they claim, they are data dependent, and that rates are now close to restrictive territory.   This belief was reflected in a sharp fall in bond yields, as well as a slide in the US dollar, however one should also remember that the number of vacancies is still well above pre-pandemic levels, so while the US labour market is slowing, it still has some way to go before we can expect to see a significant move higher in the unemployment rate. Today's ADP jobs report is likely to reflect this resilience, ahead of Friday's non-farm payrolls report. The ADP report has been the much more resilient report of the two in recent months, adding 324k in July on top of the 455k in June. This resilience is also coming against a backdrop of sticky wages, which in the private sector are over double headline CPI.   Nonetheless the direction of travel when it comes to the labour market does suggest that jobs growth is slowing, with expectations for that jobs growth will slow to 195k in August. We also have the latest iteration of US Q2 GDP which is expected to underline the outperformance of the US economy in the second quarter with a modest improvement to 2.5% from 2.4%, despite a slowdown in personal consumption from 4.2% in Q1 to 1.6%.     More importantly the core PCE price index saw quarterly prices slow from 4.9% in Q1 to 3.8%. The resilience in the Q2 numbers was driven by a rebuilding of inventory levels which declined in Q1. Private domestic investment also rose 5.7%, while an increase in defence spending saw a rise of 2.5%.     Before the release of today's US numbers, we also have some important numbers out of the UK, with respect to consumer credit and mortgage approvals for July, and Germany flash inflation for August. Mortgage approvals in June saw a surprise pickup to 54.7k, which may well have been down to a rush to lock in fixed rates before they went higher. July may well see a modest slowdown to about 51k.   Net consumer credit was also resilient in June, jumping to £1.7bn and a 5 year high, raising concerns that consumers were going further into debt to fund lifestyles more suited to a low interest rate environment. This level of credit is unlikely to be sustained and is expected to slow to £1.4bn.     As long as unemployment remains close to historically low levels this probably won't be too much of a concern, however if it starts to edge higher, or rates stay higher for an extended period of time, we could start to see slowdown in both, as previous interest rate increases start to bite in earnest.     In comments made at the weekend deputy governor of the Bank of England Ben Broadbent said he that interest rates will need to be higher for longer despite recent declines oil and gas prices as well as producer prices. These comments prompted a sharp rise in UK 2 year and 5-year gilt yields yesterday, even as US yields went in the opposite direction. This rise came against a welcome slowdown in the pace of UK shop price inflation which slowed to 6.9% in August.     Headline inflation in Germany is expected to slow to 6.3% from 6.5% in July, however whether that will be enough for Bundesbank head Joachim Nagel to resile from his recent hawkishness is debatable. As we look towards European session, the continued follow through in the US looks set us up for another positive start for markets in Europe later this morning.     EUR/USD – rebounded off trend line support from the March lows at 1.0780 yesterday. Still feels range bound with resistance at the 1.1030 area, and a break below 1.0750 looking for a move towards the May lows at 1.0630.     GBP/USD – has rebounded from the 1.2545 area, but the rally feels a little half-hearted. We need to push back through the 1.2800 area to diminish downside risk and a move towards 1.2400.         EUR/GBP – the rebound off last week's 11-month low at 0.8490 has seen a retest and break of the 0.8600 area, however we need to push through resistance at the 0.8620/30 area to signal further gains, towards the 50-day SMA resistance.     USD/JPY – wasn't able to push through resistance at 147.50 and has slipped back. This remains the key barrier for a move towards 150.00. Support comes in at last week's lows at 144.50/60.   FTSE100 is expected to open 28 points higher at 7,493     DAX is expected to open 49 points higher at 15,980     CAC40 is expected to open 21 points higher at 7,394
Eurozone PMI Shows Limited Improvement Amid Lingering Contraction Concerns in September

Rates Retreat: Impact of Weaker Data on US Yields and Market Dynamics

ING Economics ING Economics 30.08.2023 09:45
Rates Spark: Losing buoyancy Weaker data is eroding the US narrative that has helped push yields higher over the past week. A lower landing zone for the Fed also means a lower floor to long-end rates. There is still more data and volatility in store this week, with the US jobs data looming large. EUR markets will look to the inflation data key input for the upcoming ECB meeting.   The Fed discount is eroding and so is the floor for the 10Y yield Recent data is eroding the narrative of US resilience that had supported the rise of 10Y yields to above 4.3% over the past weeks. Poor job openings data and dipping consumer confidence yesterday saw the 10y falling through 4.2% and then briefly further towards 4.1% overnight. Interestingly the move was largely in real rates, and it reversed all of the gains that they had managed after dipping on the weaker PMIs last week.   We had suspected that an elevated Fed discount would draw a floor under longer rates. But just as data had shifted this floor higher, data is now hacking away at that discount. The curve bull-steepened with 2Y SOFR swap rates dropping more than 12bp while the 10Y still dropped close to 10bp. Data this week holds more candidates to push yields around, especially with US jobs data out on Friday. The consensus is already looking for further cooling with the payroll increase decelerating to 170K, but the unemployment rate is seen steady at 3.5%. Keep in mind that the Federal Reserve itself – in comments and its June projections – has pointed to an unemployment rate of 4% and above as being necessary to cool inflation towards the target rate. The indications it got yesterday are going in the right direction.   A pause in September is widely seen as the base case, with markets firming their view as the discounted probability of a pause moves towards 90%. One final hike is still possible this year, but the discounted chances for that to happen have slipped from close to 70% to a coin toss. Our economist believes the Fed has already reached its peak.   Assessing the Fed's landing zone remains crucial to overall rates   Aiding the ECB decision process, first August CPI indicators from Spain and Germany European Central Bank President Lagarde did not provide any further guidance in Jackson Hole with regard to the upcoming meeting in September. From recent comments, it is clear that the hawks on the governing council would still like to see higher rates. Austria’s Holzmann had been quite explicit, saying he saw the case for a hike if there were negative surprises until then. Latvia’s Martins Kazaks also wants to err on the side of raising rates, while Bundesbank’s Joachim Nagel also says it is too early to consider a pause. In later comments, he seemed to soften his tone, suggesting to wait for the data. Following the dip in the wake of the PMIs, the market has slowly priced the probability of a hike back into the forwards, but still just below 50%. But further out, markets are back to seeing a 75% chance that a 25bp rate hike comes before the end of the year to take the ECB’s depo rate to 4%. We would focus more on the upcoming meeting, however. We also think a September hike at this stage could be more of a coin toss, but more importantly, we sense that the hawks will see it as a last chance to hike one final time. If there is no hike in September, rates will probably not rise any further. One key input to arrive at a final assessment is the inflation data this week, starting today with the preliminary readings from Spain and Germany.   Today's events and market view It appears that the tide has turned again for rates now that data is eroding the resilience narrative. The latest auction metrics, such as the strong 7Y UST sale last night, also suggest that levels had been pushed sufficiently high to attract demand again. But the key remains in the data, with the US jobs report looming large on Friday. Today, we will get the ADP payrolls estimate, with a consensus for a weaker 195K after 324K last month. The value of the ADP as a predictor for the official data is questionable, however, as was also evidenced early this month – a large upside surprise in the ADP was followed by a disappointing official payrolls figure. But today’s data and anecdotal evidence from the release can still offer insight into the health of the labour market where more signs of cooling have come to light. In other US data today, we will get the pending home sales and the second reading of second-quarter GDP growth. The main highlight for the EUR markets will be Spanish and German regional CPI data. The consensus is for Spanish headline inflation to tick higher from 2.1% to 2.4% year-on-year. For Germany, the headline is seen falling somewhat from 6.5% to 6.3% year-on-year, but the state of NRW numbers already came in slightly hotter this morning. Yesterday, supply had initially helped push yields higher before the US data turned the market. Today, we will see Germany tapping a 4Y green OBL for €1.5bn. Italy’s bond sales today include a new 10Y benchmark and will amount to up to €10bn in total.    
FX Markets React to Rising US Rates: Implications and Outlook

Rates Spark: Different Focus, Different Outcomes

ING Economics ING Economics 31.08.2023 10:29
Rates Spark: Different focus, different outcomes US data disappointments are still putting downward pressure on yields, and a busy calendar suggests more volatility ahead. EUR rates may detach from US dynamics as inflation data and European Central Bank minutes sharpen the focus on the upcoming ECB meeting.   The resilience narrative has driven US rates on the way up, and now down US Treasury yields remain under downward pressure as 10Y yields are trying to get a foothold at around 4.1% – early last week they had hit a high at 4.35%. Bund yields, on the other hand, have managed to bounce off the 2.5% level and as a result, the 10Y UST/Bund spread has tightened to 157bp. The narrative that has driven the wedge between the US and EUR rates is now narrowing it. That is also illustrated when looking at the market moves in real rates. They had been the driver of US rates going up and are now mostly the driver on the way down. 10Y real OIS rates have dropped some 17bp from the recent peak, although inflation swaps also slipped 8bp.       Real rates were the driver the UST/Bund gap, and also the latest retightening   Inflation remains the main preoccupation of EUR rates In Europe, the concerns have been more centred around inflation. Longer real rates never picked up and stuck to a tight range, reflecting the outlook for a longer period of stagnation that was also confirmed by the latest PMIs. Instead we had a slow grind higher in longer-term inflation expectations, picking up pace again with the second quarter. While the often cited 5y5y forward inflation has come off its recent highs, the market remains sensitive to the inflation topic, with the ECB now calibrating the final stage of its tightening cycle. The somewhat slower-than-anticipated decline in German inflation yesterday was important in keeping Bund yields off the 2.5% mark. It provided the ECB’s hawks with arguments for further tightening. Never mind that it could be the last burst of German inflation for a while, as our economist thinks – with the ECB’s current mindset being more focused on actual data than forecasts, that may well be all the more reason for the hawks to push for a hike in September and not wait any longer. It may be the last opportunity. Market pricing now sees the chances for a hike next month a tad above 50%, and 90% that we will see a hike by the end of the year.    Dynamics of inflation expectations played a larger role for EUR rates   Today's events and market view US data disappointments are still putting downward pressure on yields, having stalled any attempt to move these higher over the past sessions. A busy slate of US data featuring Challenger job cuts data, initial jobless claims, personal income and spending data, as well as the Federal Reserve's preferred inflation measure – the PCE deflator, which is seen slightly up this time – means there is plenty in store to push yields around again. EUR rates, however, may manage to detach from the US rates again as the focus turns to the flash eurozone CPI release and the ECB minutes of the July meeting. The latter may provide some more insight into any changes to the balancing of inflation versus macro risks and of course the growing debate between the Council’s hawks and doves. With Isabel Schnabel, there is also a prominent hawk slated to speak in the morning – she gives the opening remarks at a conference titled “Inflation: drivers and dynamics” and may well set the tone for the day. 
FX Markets React to Rising US Rates: Implications and Outlook

Rates Spark: Different Focus, Different Outcomes - 31.08.2023

ING Economics ING Economics 31.08.2023 10:29
Rates Spark: Different focus, different outcomes US data disappointments are still putting downward pressure on yields, and a busy calendar suggests more volatility ahead. EUR rates may detach from US dynamics as inflation data and European Central Bank minutes sharpen the focus on the upcoming ECB meeting.   The resilience narrative has driven US rates on the way up, and now down US Treasury yields remain under downward pressure as 10Y yields are trying to get a foothold at around 4.1% – early last week they had hit a high at 4.35%. Bund yields, on the other hand, have managed to bounce off the 2.5% level and as a result, the 10Y UST/Bund spread has tightened to 157bp. The narrative that has driven the wedge between the US and EUR rates is now narrowing it. That is also illustrated when looking at the market moves in real rates. They had been the driver of US rates going up and are now mostly the driver on the way down. 10Y real OIS rates have dropped some 17bp from the recent peak, although inflation swaps also slipped 8bp.       Real rates were the driver the UST/Bund gap, and also the latest retightening   Inflation remains the main preoccupation of EUR rates In Europe, the concerns have been more centred around inflation. Longer real rates never picked up and stuck to a tight range, reflecting the outlook for a longer period of stagnation that was also confirmed by the latest PMIs. Instead we had a slow grind higher in longer-term inflation expectations, picking up pace again with the second quarter. While the often cited 5y5y forward inflation has come off its recent highs, the market remains sensitive to the inflation topic, with the ECB now calibrating the final stage of its tightening cycle. The somewhat slower-than-anticipated decline in German inflation yesterday was important in keeping Bund yields off the 2.5% mark. It provided the ECB’s hawks with arguments for further tightening. Never mind that it could be the last burst of German inflation for a while, as our economist thinks – with the ECB’s current mindset being more focused on actual data than forecasts, that may well be all the more reason for the hawks to push for a hike in September and not wait any longer. It may be the last opportunity. Market pricing now sees the chances for a hike next month a tad above 50%, and 90% that we will see a hike by the end of the year.    Dynamics of inflation expectations played a larger role for EUR rates   Today's events and market view US data disappointments are still putting downward pressure on yields, having stalled any attempt to move these higher over the past sessions. A busy slate of US data featuring Challenger job cuts data, initial jobless claims, personal income and spending data, as well as the Federal Reserve's preferred inflation measure – the PCE deflator, which is seen slightly up this time – means there is plenty in store to push yields around again. EUR rates, however, may manage to detach from the US rates again as the focus turns to the flash eurozone CPI release and the ECB minutes of the July meeting. The latter may provide some more insight into any changes to the balancing of inflation versus macro risks and of course the growing debate between the Council’s hawks and doves. With Isabel Schnabel, there is also a prominent hawk slated to speak in the morning – she gives the opening remarks at a conference titled “Inflation: drivers and dynamics” and may well set the tone for the day. 
Oil Price Surges Above $91 as Double Bottom Support Holds

Lower Open Expected as European Markets Decline for the Fourth Consecutive Day, China Trade Shows Modest Improvement

Michael Hewson Michael Hewson 08.09.2023 10:22
Lower open expected, China trade sees modest improvement   By Michael Hewson (Chief Market Analyst at CMC Markets UK) European markets declined for the 4th day in a row yesterday with both the DAX and FTSE100 falling to one-week lows on concerns over slowing economic activity, against a backdrop of rapidly rising oil prices which could act as a long-term headwind for central banks. The initial catalyst was a truly dreadful German factory orders number for July which saw output plunge by -11.7%, the biggest fall since April 2020. When combined with the recent manufacturing and services PMI numbers, which showed further deterioration.     The weakness in European markets also weighed on US markets, which came under additional pressure for an entirely different reason after the latest ISM services report saw economic activity rise to its highest level since February, while prices paid jumped to their highest levels since April, pushing both the US dollar and yields higher, on expectations that even if the Fed pauses this month, we could still see another rate hike in November. Last night's Beige Book showed the US economy grew at a modest rate through July and August, with consumer spending stronger than expected, while today's weekly jobless claims are set to remain steady at 230k.     Earlier this morning we got another snapshot of the Chinese economy, with the latest trade numbers for August. Over the past few weeks China has taken several measures to help boost the prospects for its economy and has continued to do so on a piecemeal basis. From easing overseas travel restrictions to modest cuts to lending rates, recent PMIs have shown that these have had limited success. In July, the economy slipped into deflation after headline CPI fell from 0.2% in June to -0.3%. PPI, which has been in deflation since the end of last year improved slightly but still declined by -4.4%, with the latest inflation numbers for August due this weekend.     This morning's trade numbers for August did show an improvement on the July figures but given how poor these were it was a low bar. Imports declined by -8.8%, an improvement on the -12.4% decline in July, while exports fell -7.3%, which was a significant improvement on the -14.5% seen in July. While this is encouraging, demand for Chinese goods was still weak from an international, as well as domestic perspective. The pound was the worst performer yesterday after Bank of England governor Andrew Bailey gave every indication that the Bank of England might have concerns over further tightening measures, given worries about transmission lags. With Deputy Governor Ben Broadbent and Chief economist Huw Pill also indicating that they think monetary policy is already restrictive enough, the markets could be being lined up for a pause later this month.     With Asia markets also slipping back, European markets look set to open lower, with German industrial production data for July set to show similar weakness as factory orders yesterday, albeit with a more modest decline of -0.4%.      EUR/USD – this week's slide below the August lows has seen the euro slip lower with the May lows at 1.0635 the next target. Resistance now comes in at the 1.0780 area, and behind that at the 1.0945/50.     GBP/USD – remains under pressure with the 200-day SMA the next target at the 1.2400 area. Only a move back above the 1.2630/40 area, and behind that the highs last week at 1.2750/60.         EUR/GBP – squeezed back to the 50-day SMA having found a short-term base at 0.8520 area. We have resistance at the 0.8570/80 area, as well as the 0.8620/30 area.     USD/JPY – remains on course for the 150.00 area, despite a brief sell-off to 147.00 yesterday. Only a move below last week's low at 144.50 targets a move back towards 142.00.     FTSE100 is expected to open 18 points lower at 7,408     DAX is expected to open 45 points lower at 15,696     CAC40 is expected to open 19 points lower at 7,175
Soybean and Wheat Markets React to USDA's Latest Crop Projections

Soybean and Wheat Markets React to USDA's Latest Crop Projections

ING Economics ING Economics 13.09.2023 08:51
Lower yields tighten US soybean market For the US, the USDA slashed its 2023/24 soybean production estimates from 4,205 million bushels to 4,146 million bushels on the back of revisions lower in yields, whilst acreage was largely flat. This lower supply was partly offset by downward revisions in demand with export estimates cut by 35 million bushels, whilst domestic demand estimates were lowered by 10m bushels. As a result, 2023/24 US ending stock estimates were reduced from 245 million bushels to 220 million bushels. However, it was still higher than the roughly 213 million bushels the market was expecting. For the global soybean balance, the USDA revised down 2023/24 global ending stocks marginally from 119.4mt to 119.3mt. The market was expecting a number of a little over 118mt.   Soybean supply/demand balance   Unfavourable weather weighs on wheat supply The global wheat balance continues to tighten, with 2023/24 ending stocks lowered by 7mt to 258.6mt, which is quite some distance below just over 264mt as expected by the market. This tightening was driven by revisions lower in supply with 2023/24 global output cut by 6mt. Lower output is largely driven by Australia (-3mt), Canada (-2mt), Argentina (-1mt) and the EU (-1mt), primarily due to unfavourable weather conditions. These reductions were partly offset by expectations for higher Ukrainian output. The main concern for Ukrainian supply is whether it will all be able to make it onto global markets. For the US market, the agency made no changes to the wheat balance.   Wheat supply/demand balance
Euro Plummets After 25bp Rate Hike, Lagarde's Reassurance Falls on Deaf Ears: Market Analysis

Euro Plummets After 25bp Rate Hike, Lagarde's Reassurance Falls on Deaf Ears: Market Analysis

Ipek Ozkardeskaya Ipek Ozkardeskaya 15.09.2023 08:25
Euro tanks after 25bp hike, Lagarde goes unheard By Ipek Ozkardeskaya, Senior Analyst | Swissquote Bank   Investors didn't buy the rumour of a European Central Bank (ECB) rate hike but heavily sold the ECB's intention to stop hiking the rates in the close future. The ECB raised the rates by 25bp yesterday and said that it 'now considers that the key ECB rates reached levels that, maintained for sufficiently long duration, will make a substantial contribution to the timely return of inflation to the target'. And that was it for the euro bears. ECB Chief Christine Lagarde tried to convince investors that the ECB rates are not necessarily at their peak and that the future decisions will depend on the incoming data. But in vain. The EURUSD sank below 1.07 after the decision and the EZ yields melted as many were rubbing their eyes to understand why a 25bp hike didn't even spark a minor rebound given that the decision was not warranted, on the contrary, the expectations were mixed into the meeting!   In fact, many euro bears also jumped on a trade yesterday as Lagarde announced that the ECB significantly pulled its economic projections to the downside. BUT, in the meantime, the ECB revised its inflation expectations higher as well. Therefore, it's naïve to think that the ECB can't continue hiking rates with such a sour economic outlook. They can. They can, because they have a single mandate – price stability. As such, the market certainly remains too enthusiastically, and unrealistically dovish about the ECB. When I hear 'data dependency', I immediately look at energy prices and you know what I see there: further inflation pressures and a real possibility for further rate hikes.   Oil extends gains The barrel of US crude traded past $91 yesterday, and Brent is getting ready to test the $95pb level. The better-than-expected industrial production, retail sales data from China this morning and news that the People's Bank of China (PBoC) cut the required reserves for banks for the second time this year to boost market liquidity are giving a further support to the oil bulls looking for reasons to ignore the overbought market conditions.   But the rising oil prices are not benign, and the hawkish ECB is not necessarily positive for the euro, and here is why: the data released in the US yesterday showed that both retail sales and PPI got a decent boost because of higher gasoline prices in August. But it also showed that spending more on gasoline didn't get Americans to spend less elsewhere. And that's inflationary. Consequently, the latest developments will, at some point, awaken the Federal Reserve (Fed) hawks, and increase the risk of a further selloff for the EURUSD. There is no chance that Jerome Powell will announce the end of the rate hikes next week. He will only say that the trajectory of core inflation is soothing, but rising energy prices is a risk that they must manage. The dollar index could soon take out a major Fibonacci resistance, the 38.2% retracement on last year's meltdown (near 105.40), and step into the medium-term bullish consolidation zone. Hence the EURUSD could well be forced below a critical Fibonacci retracement, its own 38.2% level, near 1.0615.   PS: US government drama and shutdown risk could eventually soften US outlook and temporarily prevent the Fed hawks from forcefully coming back.   ARM gains 25%   In the equity markets, ARM went public yesterday, and nailed its first day on Nasdaq. The share price rose 25% and closed above $63. It wasn't as impressive as Rivian, for example which had jumped more than 50% during its first hours of trading, But hopefully, ARM will have a more stable cruise. Arm currently estimates that '70% of the world's population uses Arm-based products', in their PCs, cars, smartphones and so. And growth is the only possible direction for the chip designer with AI's sudden arrival to our lives. 
Asia Weakness Sets Tone for Lower European Open on 26th September 2023

Asia Weakness Sets Tone for Lower European Open on 26th September 2023

Ipek Ozkardeskaya Ipek Ozkardeskaya 26.09.2023 14:41
05:40BST Tuesday 26th September 2023 Asia weakness set to see lower European open By Michael Hewson (Chief Market Analyst at CMC Markets UK)   European markets got off to a poor start to the week yesterday as concerns around sticky inflation, and low growth (stagflation), or recession served to push yields higher, pushing the DAX to its lowest levels since late March, pushing both it and the CAC 40 below the important technical level of the 200-day SMA. Recent economic data is already flashing warning signs over possible stagnation, especially in Europe while US data is proving to be more resilient.   Worries over the property sector in China didn't help sentiment yesterday after it emerged Chinese property group Evergrande said it was struggling to organise a process to restructure its debt, prompting weakness in basic resources. The increase in yields manifested itself in German and French 10-year yields, both of which rose to their highest levels in 12 years, with the DAX feeling the pressure along with the CAC 40, while the FTSE100 slipped to a one week low.   US markets initially opened lower in the face of a similar rise in yields with the S&P500 opening at a 3-month low, as US 10-year yields continued to push to fresh 16-year highs above 4.5%. These initial losses didn't last as US stocks closed higher for the first time in 5 days. The US dollar also made new highs for the year, rising to its best level since 30th November last year as traders bet that the Federal Reserve will keep rates higher for much longer than its counterparts due to the greater resilience of the US economy. The focus this week is on the latest inflation figures from Australia, as well as the core PCE Deflator from the US, as well as the latest flash CPI numbers for September from France, Germany, Spain as well as the wider EU flash number which is due on Friday. This could show the ECB erred a couple of weeks ago when it tightened the rate hike screw further to a record high.   On the data front today the focus will be on US consumer confidence for September, after the sharp fall from July's 117.00 to August's 106.10. Expectations are for a more modest slowdown to 105.50 on the back of the continued rise in gasoline prices which has taken place since the June lows. The late rebound in US markets doesn't look set to translate into today's European open with Asia markets also sliding back on the same combination of stagflation concerns and reports that Chinese property company Evergrande missed a debt payment.   Another warning from ratings agency Moody's about the impact of another government shutdown on the US economy, and its credit rating, didn't help the overall mood, while Minneapolis Fed President Neel Kashkari said he expects another Fed rate rise before the end of the year helping to further boost the US dollar as well as yields.     EUR/USD – slid below the 1.0600 level yesterday potentially opening the prospect of further losses towards the March lows at 1.0515. Currently have resistance at 1.0740, which we need to get above to stabilise and minimise the risk of further weakness.      GBP/USD – slipped to the 1.2190 area, and has since rebounded, however the bias remains for a retest of the 1.2000 area. Only a move back above the 1.2430 area and 200-day SMA stabilises and argues for a return to the 1.2600 area.       EUR/GBP – currently have resistance at the 200-day SMA at 0.8720, which is capping the upside. A break here targets the 0.8800 area, however while below the bias remains for a pullback. If we slip below the 0.8660 area, we could see a move back to the 0.8620 area.     USD/JPY – has continued to climb higher towards the 150.00 area with support currently at the lows last week at 147.20/30. Major support currently at the 146.00 area.     FTSE100 is expected to open at 7,624     DAX is expected to open at 15,405     CAC40 is expected to open at 7,124  
EUR/USD Faces Ongoing Decline Amid Budget and Market Turbulence

EUR/USD Faces Ongoing Decline Amid Budget and Market Turbulence

InstaForex Analysis InstaForex Analysis 27.09.2023 14:05
EUR/USD A significant decline in stock markets, gold, and several commodities on Tuesday helped boost the counter-dollar currencies as investors await the budget-parliamentary crisis in the United States. Yesterday, the S&P 500 lost 1.47% and gold dropped by 0.88%. Yields on 5-year U.S. government bonds edged up, but this only confirms the investors' bets on a budget "short squeeze." This is particularly noticeable against the backdrop of reduced attention to the "government shutdown." The euro has been declining for the eleventh consecutive week. From a technical perspective, a turbulent correction begins after twelve weeks of either rising or falling. This pattern is rare; the last time it occurred with the euro was in the summer and fall of 2014 during the height of the European crisis, with a caveat related to the candle of the second week of September. Prior to that, with a similar caveat, the pattern occurred in the fall of 2004 when the euro rose for 11 consecutive weeks.     On the daily chart, the price has come very close to the magnetic intersection point of three lines: the Fibonacci ray, the Fibonacci channel line, and the target level of 1.0552. The signal line of the Marlin oscillator is in no hurry to exit the wedge. In the eleventh week, the price may still dip below this support, but in such a situation, time becomes the main factor - Monday of the following week.   On the 4-hour chart, the Marlin oscillator has turned the convergence into a wide range within a downtrend. The price has approached the lower band of the 1.0552 range and may now edge up. One reason for the rise could be a decrease in orders for durable goods in the United States, expected at -0.5% for August.      
GBP: Approaching 1.2000 Level Amid Rate Dynamics

Commodities Under Pressure: Yields and USD Strength Dictate Trends

ING Economics ING Economics 05.10.2023 08:22
The Commodities Feed: It's all about the yields The ‘higher-for-longer’ narrative for rates is pressuring the commodities complex, while the accompanying USD strength is adding further pressure.   Energy - Steady OPEC output The oil market struggled yesterday. ICE Brent settled a little more than 1.6% lower on the day as rising treasury yields and USD strength proved to be too much of an obstacle for the market. Technically, the Brent December contract still needs to fill the gap left following the November contract expiry on Friday. If that happens, it would take the front-month contract back above US$95/bbl. Preliminary OPEC production data for September is starting to come through. The Bloomberg survey showed that output increased by 50Mbbls/d MoM to 27.97MMbbls/d. Nigeria showed the largest increase over the month. Their supply grew by 60Mbbls/d, while Iran saw a marginal pullback in output of 50Mbbls/d. Output is likely to remain relatively steady over October. Further out, the market will be focused on any sign that Saudi Arabia is starting to unwind its voluntary additional supply cuts. There was a bit more noise yesterday around the resumption of Northern Iraqi oil flows through the Ceyhan pipeline. Turkey has said that flows could resume this week. However Iraqi officials have thrown cold water on the idea, saying that there are still some issues that need to be resolved before this can happen. The pipeline can carry almost 500Mbbls/d of crude oil from the Kurdish region to the Ceyhan export terminal. Flows were suspended back in March after the Iraqi government won an international arbitration ruling, stating that these flows were occurring without approval from the Iraqi government Metals - Gold plunges to seven-month low Gold plunged to its lowest level since March yesterday - edging closer to US$1,800/oz, as treasury yields continued to move higher and the USD also strengthened.  The higher-for-longer narrative has been putting significant pressure on gold, which is leading to a significant reduction in investment appetite reflected by the large declines in gold ETF holdings in recent months. Fed policy will remain key to the outlook for gold prices in the months ahead.
Rates Spark: Unbroken Momentum in Bear Steepening as Shutdown Aversion Fuels Yields

Rates Spark: Unbroken Momentum in Bear Steepening as Shutdown Aversion Fuels Yields

ING Economics ING Economics 05.10.2023 08:34
Rates Spark: Bear steepening momentum is unbroken The bear steepening of curves resumed after a US government shutdown was averted and accelerated after better data. Cut discounts are pared as central banks play it safe on inflation. In Europe, Italian spreads recover amid a strong showing on the first day of its retail bond sale.   No excuses to end bear steepening of curves The bear steepening of yield curves has resumed this week. A US government shutdown – which could have provided some excuse for rates to retrace lower – was averted over the weekend. This has meant riskier assets had started off on a firmer footing, but at the same time, higher yields. The 10Y UST rose towards a new cycle high of 4.7% and in Europe, the 10Y Bund yield rose above 2.9%. Obviously, a better-than-anticipated ISM manufacturing as well as some upward revisions in eurozone regional PMIs also helped, but it seems only a matter of time before the 5% and 3% marks respectively are reached. The shutdown story was noise, and though it might still come back to haunt markets later in November, the overarching narrative is that we are still in an environment of elevated inflation. Despite improvements, last week’s core PCE release for September was still close to 4% and the core CPI estimate for the eurozone even a tad higher at 4.5%. With activity not collapsing and labour markets resilient, central banks will try to brush away any hint of rate cuts discussion.     5% UST yield and 3% Bund seem only a matter of time
The EIA Reports Tight Crude Oil Market: Prices Firm on Positive Inventory Data and Middle East Tensions

Asia Morning Bites: Markets React to FOMC, US Treasury Yield Shifts Ahead of Payrolls

ING Economics ING Economics 02.11.2023 12:38
Asia Morning Bites 2 November 2023 Asian markets digest US Treasury yield swing ahead of payrolls release tomorrow.   Global macro and markets Global markets: If last night’s FOMC meeting was supposed to be a “hawkish pause”, then markets weren’t listening. Yields on the 2Y US Treasury note dropped 14.4bp, taking them below 5% (4.944%), and there was an even bigger drop at the longer end. 10Y yields fell 19.7bp to 4.734%, and implied rates now show a 25bp cut priced in at the June meeting in 2024. FX markets are still a bit mixed and may spend today catching up with the implications of the drop in yields. EURUSD is fractionally higher at 1.0582, having drifted lower for most of yesterday. The AUD is looking stronger, probably as markets (and ourselves) are firmly of the view that the RBA actually hikes rates again next week, closing the policy rate gap with the US a bit. AUDUSD is now up to 0.6418. Cable is also a little higher after a choppy session, and is currently trading at 1.2177, while the JPY has edged slightly down from yesterday’s highs to 150.65. Losses from the THB, KRW and IDR yesterday will likely reverse today and follow the AUD and JPY. US stock markets were lifted by the drop in bond yields. The S&P 500 rose 1.05%, while the NASDAQ was up 1.64%. Chinese stocks were broadly flat yesterday. G-7 macro: Here is a link to our US economist, and FX and rates strategists’ note on the FOMC meeting. The twin features of the Fed suggesting that higher yields are doing some of their work for them, plus lower supply issuance pressures at the longer end are probably the main causes of the big drop in yields overnight. Nevertheless, the Fed is still leaning towards higher, not lower rates, so last night’s bond swing may not be the end of the story just yet. Ahead of the non-farm payrolls release tomorrow, yesterday’s ADP print was 113K. That is close to its 89K reading last month, which was hopelessly inaccurate, so it is anyone’s guess if this is a useful, or contrarian steer ahead of payrolls. Perhaps more ominously, the manufacturing ISM slowed sharply. The headline ISM index was already in negative territory in September (49.0), but dropped to a much weaker 46.7 reading in October, with a sub-50 employment index too (46.8). New orders also dropped sharply to 45.5. Today’s US macro data is the final durable goods/factory orders data for September, which won’t have much additional bearing on the market in all likelihood. The Eurozone releases its own manufacturing PMI data today. Korea: Consumer price inflation unexpectedly rose to 3.8% YoY in October (vs 3.7% in September, 3.6% market consensus, 3.9% INGf). Korea’s inflation has been reheating for three months in a row after the recent low of 2.3% in July.  Food and energy was the main reason for the rise; fresh food (12.1%), gasoline (6.9%), public transportation fees (11.3%), taxi (20%), and dairy products (milk 14.3%). Core inflation excluding food and energy edged down to 3.2% YoY, but has stubbornly stayed around that level for four months. Looking ahead, we expect headline inflation to climb even more to touch the 4% level in November but we look for core inflation to ease down into the 2% range, mostly due to base effects. This will make it more likely that the BoK will hold its hawkish stance longer than expected, but another rate hike possibility is still low. Japan: Prime Minister Fumio Kishida is planning to announce an economic stimulus package. The planned size, JPY21.8 trillion, is smaller than in the pandemic era, but still higher than the market expected. But markets seem a little sceptical of the positive impact this stimulus package will have on the economy. A highlight of the stimulus is income and residential tax rebates to aid households (especially low-income households), hit by higher inflation. But the impact of tax rebates is usually smaller than cash transfers or shopping vouchers. Also, the rebates will only be temporary, thus the impact could be limited. Australia: Australia's trade surplus narrowed sharply in September. Exports fell 1.4% MoM, (partly reversing last month's 4.5% gain). But the main damage was done by a solid 7.5% MoM increase in imports, with imports of capital goods rising especially strongly, taking the surplus down from AUD10.2bn to AUD6.8bn.  Malaysia: Bank Negara Malaysia will meet today to discuss policy rates, and is unanimously expected to leave rates unchanged at 3.0%. inflation is currently only 1.9%YoY, so there is no need for them to tighten at this stage. 
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US Payrolls: Key Test in a Strong Week for Stock Markets

Michael Hewson Michael Hewson 03.11.2023 14:08
US payrolls the key test in a strong week for stock markets  By Michael Hewson (Chief Market Analyst at CMC Markets UK)   European markets saw their best one-day session in 3 weeks, with the DAX closing at a two-week high, helped by a combination of some solid earnings reports, and tumbling yields on growing optimism that central banks have hit peak rates, after the Bank of England followed the Fed in holding rates at current levels. US markets saw a similarly strong session, rising for the 4th day in a row, with the S&P500 rising to a 2-week high, while US 10- and 30-year yields falling more than 25bps in the last 2 days, reinforcing the idea that the rate hike narrative of the last 18 months is now in the rear-view mirror.     Of course, this narrative will still need to be supported by the underlying economic data, and in the case of the US is likely to be subject to two-way risks given the continued resilience of the US labour market.   Today's non-farm payrolls report for October will be the first key test of that narrative in the aftermath of Wednesday's decision by the Federal Reserve to pause for the second meeting in succession, with the goldilocks scenario for markets likely to be one of a softish or neutral report.   Having seen such a strong US close, European markets look set to open higher as we look towards this afternoon's US jobs report.     Before that we get the latest PMI snapshot from the services sector for the UK economy ahead of Q3 GDP numbers which are due next week. Recent data has shown the UK economy is slowing significantly compared to the first half and with manufacturing already in contraction, the services sector is now starting to slow as well, slipping slightly into contraction over the last 3-months we can expect to see further stagnation around 49.2.   After the release of those numbers' attention will shift to the US employment report.   Weekly jobless claims fell back below 200k earlier this month for the first time since January in a sign that the US economy remains reasonably resilient, and although they've ticked up to 217k since then there has been little sign of a slowdown.   In September we saw yet another bumper payroll report with another 336k jobs added, while August was revised up to 227k, which pushed US long term yields higher on the day to new 16-year highs, although we've since slipped back sharply, due to a belief that the Federal Reserve is probably done on the rate hike front.   Wage growth was slightly softer than expected at 4.2%. Another notable factoid was a big jump in part-time positions which rose 151k and could also explain why wage growth showed little sign of racing higher. The unemployment rate remained steady at 3.8%.   This weeks ADP payrolls report for October was another weak one, coming in at 113k, only a modest improvement from the 89k in September, however there has been little to any correlation between the two reports for months now, while vacancies in the US economy have remained high, which suggests little sign that the US economy is starting slow significantly.   One thing that has been notable this year is how every single non-farm payroll report has come in above expectations, and by quite some distance. Will today's numbers be any different?  to note is There is scope for that given that the participation rate has been rising, it was at 62.4% at the start of the year and is now at 62.8%, still 0.5% below the level it was pre-pandemic.   Expectations are for today's October payrolls to come in at 185k, which has been the estimate of choice over the last 3 months.   Most of the new jobs being added have been in services over the last few months and today's ISM services data could well offer further insights into that after the payroll's numbers have been released.   ISM services employment was at 53.4 in September and is expected to rise to 53.5, while prices paid is expected to slow to 56.6 from 58.9. This is where the US labour market is most resilient, and will need to remain so in the lead-up to Christmas.   Amazon has already indicated it will be hiring up to 250 seasonal workers in the lead up to the holiday period. Will it be alone in hiring extra people, when retailers like Target are warning that US shoppers are slowing their spending plans?             EUR/USD – pushed up to the top end of its recent range, and the 1.0675 highs of this week. We continue to be range bound between the 1.0700 area and the 50-day SMA. Below 1.0520 targets the 1.0450 level   GBP/USD – pushed above the 1.2200 area yesterday, but has thus far failed to consolidate that move. Major support remains at the October lows just above 1.2030. Below 1.2000 targets the 1.1800 area. Resistance at 1.2300.   EUR/GBP – finding support at the 0.8680 area for now, with a break targeting the 0.8620 area. We have resistance at the recent highs at 0.8740.   USD/JPY – slipped back to the 149.80 area yesterday, we still have resistance just below the highs of last year at 151.95. Still have strong support all the way back at 148.75, with a break above 152.20 targeting a move to 155.00.   FTSE100 is expected to open 33 points higher at 7,479   DAX is expected to open 79 points higher at 15,222   CAC40 is expected to open 36 points higher at 7,096  
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Yield Reversal Amid Supply Pressure: Navigating Market Rates and Central Bank Signals

ING Economics ING Economics 07.11.2023 15:49
Rates Spark: Not called resilient for nothing After a huge fall in yields last week, there has been an attempt to engineer some semblance of a reversal so far this week. We expect to see more of that in the days ahead, with data unlikely to get in the way and supply pressure pushing in the direction of a concessional build in the coming days.   Market rates edging higher from Friday's lows, led by the US Market rates have staged a bit of a fightback having hit post-payroll lows on Friday. The US 10yr Treasury yield managed to bounce off the 4.5% area, which we now regard as a key support. Stay above that level and we are good to gradually re-test higher in yield over the course of this week. It’s a week of supply right along the curve in the guise of 3yr, 10yr and 30yr auctions. It’s also a week that is unlikely to get too rocked by data releases, with Thursday’s jobless claims set to be the highlight of the week. In addition, we note that there remains an underlying supply risk for bonds generally. Even though the US Treasury has taken some pressure off long-dated issuance into year-end, it does not take away the underlying pressure coming from the elevated fiscal deficit. Fiscal pressure results not just in ongoing supply pressure, but also likely ongoing upward pressure on real yields. That in turn implies steepening pressure from the back end. Importantly, we don’t have a green light yet for a complete cycle capitulation towards a structural rate-cutting agenda. That will come, but we need more first.   Yields are slowly starting to revert higher   QT lumped into the ECB's review of the operation framework European rates markets also pared some of the past week’s rally with 10Y Bund yields ending the first session 9bp higher above Friday’s close and thus well above 2.7% again. But it looked more like a general countermove, inspired also by a busy corporate supply slate, rather than being motivated by any single event. There were hawkish comments from the European Central Bank’s Robert Holzmann, who said the central bank should be ready to hike again if needed. But coming from him, such remarks should not surprise and are not new. Rather, his other remarks on quantitative tightening and that there won't be anything forthcoming on that front this year were rather dovish, if anything. The debate about the ECB’s bond portfolios could not be separated from the review of the operational framework, Holzmann said. The forthcoming framework will also determine the level of excess reserves that the ECB will operate with to maintain control over front-end rates – and perhaps even foresee a structural bond portfolio to also provide it with some flexibility to intervene in bond markets. Recall that the ECB’s hawks had also postponed their push for higher minimum reserves until spring next year for a similar reason, according to earlier Reuters reports. The review will give an opportunity to address the wider issue of excess reserves in the system – and also the cost efficiency of implementing monetary policy which could also include, for instance, the remuneration of government deposits. Given the complexity and multitude of possible tweaks, we would expect the review to conclude not with a one-off adjustment but rather a gradual path towards a new framework.     Today's events and market view There are few data points of note over today's session. For the eurozone, PPI is expected to slow to 0.5% month-on-month resulting in a -12.5% year-on-year figure and the US will be reporting its trade balance. The main highlight will be the busy schedule for Federal Reserve speakers, including Neel Kashkari, who last night was not convinced that rate hikes were over. Other Fed speakers are Austan Goolsbee, Christopher Waller and John Williams. Supply also returns to the spotlight. In Europe, Austria will auction 5Y and 10Y lines, but the main focus will be on the UST auctions this week, beginning with the sale of US $48 billion in new 3Y notes tonight
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Asia Morning Bites: Rising US Treasury Yields Impact Asian FX, RBA's Monetary Statement, and India's Industrial Production Report

ING Economics ING Economics 10.11.2023 10:24
Asia Morning Bites Rising US Treasury yields should weigh on Asian FX today. Also, the RBA has released its latest monetary statement and India will report industrial production later.   Global macro and markets: Global markets:  A disappointing auction for 30Y Treasuries yesterday fed through to higher yields across the curve.  The yield on the 30Y bond rose 15bp to 4.765%, and that lifted yields on the 10Y (+14.9bp to 4.624%) and also the 2Y (+8.8bp to 5.02%). Despite nosing below 4.5% the other day, it looks for now as if yields are happier this side of that line, though will get tested again next week as US inflation numbers look set to drop sharply. Our US economist, James Knightley, thinks that US inflation could drop to around the target range by 2Q24.  Jerome Powell took a tough line in his remarks early this morning at the IMF conference, saying that the Fed wouldn’t hesitate to hike if needed and that the inflation fight had a long way to go. These comments may also have helped to lift yields. Powell’s tone makes sense. There is no point in corralling the market into expecting cuts until shortly before they look necessary. However, there will come a point where the rhetoric and the macro diverge to such an extent that either markets call the Fed’s bluff, and start to price in cuts, or the Fed has to do an abrupt turn and throw in the towel. For now, though, further tough talk is likely. Whether this transforms into tough action will depend on the run of the macro data. Higher yields gave the USD another lift, and EURUSD dropped back to 1.0665. The AUD, which has been trading heavily since the RBA hike, dropped to 0.6360.  Cable is down to 1.2216 and the JPY has risen up to 151.35. Asian FX was slightly softer yesterday against the USD, and will likely soften further today in line with the overnight G-10 FX moves. USDCNY is back to 7.2846 and pushing back in the direction of 7.30. US stocks don’t like these higher yields, and the S&P 500 dropped 0.81% yesterday. The NASDAQ was down 0.94%. Chinese stocks were mixed to flattish, with the CSI 300 up just 0.05% and the Hang Seng down 0.33%. G-7 macro:  There was nothing too exciting on the macro calendar yesterday. Even the weekly US jobless claims were close to expectations, with a slight overshoot for the continued claims numbers. There is no US data to speak of today, and UK production and trade figures dominate the G-7 calendar. These won’t have any broader bearing on markets outside the UK. Australia:  The RBA has released its November statement on monetary policy. We did not think that the statement released with the earlier rate hike decision was particularly dovish, though the market certainly seemed to think so. We don't think this longer more detailed statement is particularly dovish either, but the link is included above, so have a read and make up your own mind. Once again, the market seems to have decided that whatever the content of the statement, lower yields are the way to go. We think that a bit of reflection may see that view reverse in time. That said, we do think rates have probably peaked. But there are risks to this view. The first is that inflation may well increase again when October data is released. Secondly, the monthly run rate (MoM% increase in the price level) has been 0.6% for the last two months, and that is way too high to be consistent with the RBA's inflation target. So that needs to drop, or there is still a chance, in our opinion, that rates have to rise again next year.   India:  September production data will be released later this evening, and the consensus forecast is for a drop from the 10.3% YoY rate of growth recorded in August, to just 7.0% in September. This would be consistent with a decline in the level of production, as implied by the sub-50 PMI index in September. We wouldn’t be surprised if the production growth figure came in a fair bit higher than that, as we aren’t convinced that, despite the PMI numbers, we will see an actual contraction in activity in September. What to look out for: India industrial production and Fed speakers India industrial production (10 November) US University of Michigan sentiment (10 November) Fed Bostic and Logan speak (10 November)
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Asia Morning Bites: Focus on China's October Industrial Profits Amid Global Market Dynamics

ING Economics ING Economics 27.11.2023 15:08
Asia Morning Bites China profits data for October to dominate Asian macro releases on an otherwise quiet day.   Global macro and markets Global markets: US Treasuries ended the week with yields rising again. The yield on the 2Y Treasury rose 4.9bp, while the 10Y yield went up 6.2bp to 4.466%, taking it close to the 4.50% line again. The USD was softer again on Friday. EURUSD rose to 1.0943. The AUD has tested the 0.6590 level before settling down to around 0.6584. Sterling has broached 1.26 for the first time since September. But the JPY is still hovering below 1.50 and hasn’t gained as much as its other G-10 peers. Other Asian FX was mostly softer on Friday and will likely catch up with the G-10 moves this morning. The weaker currencies, KRW, THB, and TWD will probably outperform the others. The CNY is little changed at 7.1490. US equities did very little on a low trading volume day as many market participants dragged the Thanksgiving holiday over to the weekend. US equity futures are looking a bit negative today. Chinese markets were down on Friday, possibly reflecting unease after a criminal probe was launched into the financial conglomerate, Zhongzhi, though most of the weakness in the CSI 300 came from the info-tech part of the index, along with consumer discretionary stocks and industrials. Financials were down 0.44% on the day. G-7 macro: Friday’s very meagre offerings on the macro front don’t offer much new insight. The S&P PMI indices for the US rose fractionally for manufacturing but remained just in contraction territory at 49.9. The service sector PMI was stronger at 50.3, but down from the October 50.8 reading, and takes the composite PMI down to just 50.4. There isn’t enough history for this series to draw any meaningful conclusions from this. Today, we just get US new home sales for October. The US housing market has been doing surprisingly well, but the market is looking for a small 4.7% MoM decline this month – mainly a statistical pullback from the very robust September figure. China: Industrial profits data for October come out today. This is expected to show the contraction in earnings abating slightly, in line with some of the slightly stronger PMI and activity figures. The September figure was a -9.0%YoY ytd decline. Figures around the -6.7% mark have been cited as the consensus forecast. What to look out for: China Industrial Profits and US new home sales China industrial profits (27 November) Thailand trade (27 November) US new home sales (27 November) Australia retail sales (28 November) Taiwan GDP (28 November) US Conference board consumer confidence (28 November) South Korea business survey (29 November) US GDP, personal consumption, wholesale inventories (29 November) US Fed Beige book (30 November) South Korea industrial production and BoK meeting (30 November) Japan retail sales and industrial production (30 November) China PMI manufacturing and non-manufacturing (30 November) US initial jobless claims and personal spending (30 November) US pending home sales (30 November) Japan jobless rate and job-applicant ratio (1 December) South Korea trade balance (1 December) Regional PMI (1 December) China Caixin PMI (1 December) Indonesia CPI inflation (1 December) US ISM manufacturing (1 December)
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USD Slips Below 200-DMA Despite Rebound in Yields: A Weekly Market Analysis

Ipek Ozkardeskaya Ipek Ozkardeskaya 27.11.2023 15:10
USD slips below 200-DMA despite rebound in yields  By Ipek Ozkardeskaya, Senior Analyst | Swissquote Bank   Last week ended on a positive note where the US equities advanced to fresh highs since summer on a holiday shortened trading week. The S&P500 gained for the 4th consecutive week and closed the week near 4560, the rate-sensitive and technology heavy Nasdaq 100 extended gains beyond the summer peak, and hit an almost 2-year high, while the VIX index, which is known as Wall Street's fear gauge, or the volatility index, slumped to the lowest levels since January 2020. The belief that the Federal Reserve (Fed) is done hiking the interest rates, and the rapidly falling US long-term yields are at the source of this optimism – especially after the latest CPI update in the US printed a softer-than-expected number, suggesting that inflation in the US fell to 3.2% last month. This week, investors will find out if the Fed's favourite inflation gauge, the PCE index, tells the same story. The PCE index is expected to have fallen from 3.4% to 3.1% in October, and core PCE may have eased from 3.7% to 3.5% during the same month. Anything less than soothing could lead to some more correction in the US long-term yields. The 10-year yield jumped to 4.50% early Monday, though the positive pressure slowed above 4.50%.   News that the Black Friday spending jumped 7.5% this year to hit a record high of $9.8 billion certainly reminds investors that consumer spending in the US remains strong. The latter gives a strong support to the US economy, which in return gives a solid confidence to the Fed that keeping the rates high for long is not necessarily a bad idea. Today, the sales continue with Cyber Monday deals.   Yet the holiday shoppers' enthusiasm is less visible on the financial markets this Monday. The US futures are down, along with their Asian peers on the back of a rebound in US yields, the nearly 8% slump in Chinese industrial profits in October and news that children in China are suffering from respiratory infections – which spurs speculation that it could be a new strain of Covid. Chinese authorities say that it's simply a mix of known respiratory diseases. But you know, once bitten, twice shy.   
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Dovish Outlook: Global Central Banks Soften Stance Amid Falling Energy Prices

ING Economics ING Economics 12.12.2023 13:11
Too dovish Falling energy prices help softening global inflation expectations and keep the central bank doves in charge of the market, along with sufficiently soft economic data that points at the end of the global monetary policy campaign. This week, the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) and the Bank of Canada (BoC) kept rates unchanged – although the RBA said that they could hike again if home-grown inflation doesn't slow. But overall, the Federal Reserve (Fed) is expected to cut as soon as in May next year, and the European Central Bank (ECB) is expected to announce six 25 basis point cuts next year. If that's the case, the ECB should start cutting before the Fed, sometime in Q1. It sounds overstretched to me.   Data released earlier this week showed that French industrial production fell unexpectedly for the 3rd straight month in October, Spanish output declined, and German factory orders fell 3.7% in October versus a 0.2% increase penciled in by analysts. The slowing European economies and falling inflation help building a case in favour of an ECB rate cut, but I don't see the ECB cutting rates anytime in the H1. Remember, economic slowdown is the natural response that the ECB was looking for to slow inflation. Now that it happens, the bank won't leave the battlefield before making sure that inflation shows no sign of life. But the EURUSD is understandable extending its losses within the bearish consolidation zone, as the German 10-year yield sinks below the 2.20% level. The EURUSD is now testing the 100-DMA to the downside. Trend and momentum indicators are comfortably bearish and the RSI hints that we are not yet dealing with oversold market conditions. Therefore, the selloff could deepen toward the 1.07/1.730 region.  The direction of the EURUSD is of course also dependent on what the USD leg of the pair will do. We see the dollar index recover this week despite the falling yields driven lower by a soft set of US jobs data released so far this week. The JOLTS data showed a significant fall in job openings in October, while yesterday's ADP print revealed around 100K new private job additions last month, much less than 130K penciled in by analysts. There is no apparent correlation between this data and Friday's official NFP read, but the fact that independent data point at further loosening in the US jobs market comforts the Fed doves in the idea that, yes, the US jobs market is finally giving in. On the yields front, the US 2-year yield remains steady near 4.60%/4.65% region, while the 10-year yield fell to 4.10% yesterday, from above 5% by end of October. This is a big, big decline, and it means that investors are now ramping up the US slowdown bets. That's also why we don't see the US stocks react to the further fall in yields. The S&P500 and Nasdaq both fell yesterday, while their European peers extended gains regardless of the overbought conditions. The Stoxx 600 closed yesterday's session above the 470 level. The softening ECB expectations are certainly the major driver of the European stocks toward the ytd highs; German stocks hit an ATH yesterday despite the undoubtedly morose economic outlook. Actual levels scream correction.      
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Anticipation Builds: Focus on CPI Data Ahead of Pivotal FED Decision

Walid Koudmani Walid Koudmani 12.12.2023 14:42
Focus on CPI data ahead of crucial FED decision this week While the decision to maintain current interest rates appears highly probable, the primary focus of the market this week will be on Jerome Powell's upcoming speech as the Federal Reserve Chair has a significant opportunity to impact market sentiments by potentially signaling an end to the rate hike cycle. Nevertheless, such a development should not significantly alter investor expectations as it has been a wide topic of discussion for quite some time, however, a significant deviation from those expectations could lead to some noticeable impacts on USD and potentially even on risk assets.   Despite the gradual normalization of macroeconomic data, shifts are aligning favorably for the Fed as the labor market is also exhibiting signs of stabilization while inflation is clearly slowing down which has prompted investors to engage in speculation regarding the timing of potential rate cuts. In this scenario, there is a potential for a boost in bond prices, accompanied by a concurrent reduction in yields as anticipation of a Fed pivot could drive capital accumulation in bonds, taking advantage of the prevailing, albeit high, interest rates. In either case, focus today will be on US CPI data ahead of tomorrow's FED decision and while it is unlikely that the data will change tomorrow's outcome, it could certainly have a short term impact on global markets. 
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USDA's WASDE Update: Bearish Outlook as Corn and Soybean Supplies Exceed Expectations

ING Economics ING Economics 16.01.2024 12:26
WASDE update: Higher US corn and soybean supplies The USDA released a fairly bearish WASDE report on Friday with US ending stocks for both corn and soybeans coming in above expectations.   Record US corn production The USDA revised up its 2023/24 US corn production estimates by 108m bushels to a record 15.34bn bushels due to higher yields. This was above market expectations of around 15.22bn bushels. The yield estimates were increased by 2.4bu/acre to 177.3bu/acre. As a result, US ending stocks for 2023/24 were increased to 2.2bn bushels, up 31m bushels from the previous estimate, and above the roughly 2.1bn bushels the market was expecting. For the global balance, 2023/24 ending stock estimates were revised up from 315.2mt to 325.2mt primarily due to larger supplies. The market was expecting a number closer to 313mt. Global corn production estimates rose by 13.7mt to 1,235.7mt, driven by an increase in the US (+2.7mt), and China (+11.8mt). Revisions to both the US and global balance were bearish, which is well reflected in the price action following the release.       Corn supply/demand balance   US soybean stocks rise The USDA raised 2023/24 US soybean production estimates from 4,129m bushels to 4,165m bushels with yields revised up from 49.9 bushels/acre to 50.6 bushels/acre. As a result, ending stock estimates for 2023/24 were increased by 35m bushels to 280m bushels. This was quite a bit higher than expectations of around 245m bushels. Only marginal changes were seen in the global balance, which meant that global soybean ending stocks for 2023/24 increased by just 0.4mt to 114.6mt. Global production estimates were largely left unchanged at around 399mt as gains in Argentina, the US and Paraguay were offset by revisions lower in Brazilian supply. Overall, larger-than-expected ending stocks in the release were bearish for the soybean market.   Soybeans supply/demand balance   Global wheat stocks edge higher The USDA decreased its US ending stocks estimate for 2023/24 from 659m bushels to 648m bushels following a reduction in beginning stocks. This was lower than market expectations of around 659m bushels. Meanwhile, the agency left production and export estimates unchanged at 1.8bn bushels and 725m bushels, respectively. For the global market, the USDA increased its 2023/24 ending stocks estimate from 258.2mt to 260mt, largely on account of higher stocks at the start of the year. The market had largely expected global ending stocks to remain roughly unchanged. The agency revised up its demand estimates to 796.4mt from 794.7mt, driven by India (+1.3mt), and the EU (+1mt). However, higher demand estimates were offset by an increase in production estimates from 783mt to 784.9mt. This was due to increases from Russia (+1mt), Ukraine (+0.9mt), and Saudi Arabia (+1.5mt).   Wheat supply/demand balance
Asia Morning Bites: South Korea's Inflation Below Expectations, Anticipation for US Non-Farm Payroll Release, and Powell's Weekend Address

Asia Morning Bites: South Korea's Inflation Below Expectations, Anticipation for US Non-Farm Payroll Release, and Powell's Weekend Address

ING Economics ING Economics 02.02.2024 15:12
Asia Morning Bites South Korea's inflation comes in below expectations. US non-farm payroll release later tonight. Powell slated to speak again at the weekend.   Global Macro and Markets Global markets:  Despite some reasonably strong data, US Treasury yields dipped slightly on Thursday. 2Y yields were down less than a basis point, but only after dropping below 4.14% and then recovering later on. 10Y yields followed a similar pattern of decline and recovery taking them down 3.2bp to 3.97%. Jerome Powell has a TV interview scheduled for the weekend, which could be interesting if he deviates from the recent message at the FOMC. Currencies also had a choppy day. EURUSD dropped below 1.08 at one point but is back up to 1.0874 now. Likewise, the AUD came close to dropping through 65 cents but has recovered to 0.6575 now. Cable did even better, finishing up on the day after a less dovish than expected Bank of England meeting. The JPY was roughly unchanged at 146.47. Other Asian FX were evenly split with half making small gains, led by the PHP and THB, and half making small losses. The CNY has drifted up to 7.1805. US equities recovered their losses from the previous day. The S&P 500 rose 1.25%, while the NASDAQ gained 1.3%. Equity futures also look quite positive. Chinese stocks had a slightly more positive day. The Hang Seng rose 0.52%, but the CSI only managed a 0.07% gain. G-7 macro: It was an interesting day for US macro yesterday, delivering support for both hawks and doves on the rates outlook. On the dovish side, non-farm productivity rose, and there was also a slight increase in jobless claims figures. On the other hand, the manufacturing ISM rose strongly, even though it remained below the breakeven 50 level and there was a jump in the prices paid component too which jumped up to 52.9 from 45.2. The new orders index was also strong. Later today, there is the US labour report. Following the soft ADP figure earlier this week, there may be some downside risk to the consensus view of a decline in employment growth from 216K in December to 185K in January.    South Korea:  Consumer inflation eased to 2.8% YoY in January (vs 3.2% in December, 2.9% market consensus), back to the 2% level for the first time in six months. But the decline was mainly due to base effects, caused by a one-off energy bill hike last January. Core inflation, excluding agricultural products and oils, also levelled down to 2.6% (vs 3.1% in December). In a monthly comparison, inflation rose 0.4% MoM nsa in January after staying flat in December. Fresh food, utility, and service prices rose, more than offsetting the decline of manufactured food and gasoline prices. The government has decided to freeze utility fees at least for the first quarter of the year and offered some tax cuts on imported goods. If the conflict in the Red Sea escalates further, the fuel subsidy program could be extended beyond March, so the upside risk is quite limited in the near term. Today’s slower-than-expected inflation probably won’t change the BoK’s hawkish stance any time soon. As mentioned earlier, if there were no government subsidies on energy and public services, CPI inflation would have been higher than it is today, and once these programs end, there may be a price spike later this year. So, choppy inflation ahead is expected. The BoK will likely take a wait-and-see approach to gather more evidence about the continued cooling of inflation.

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