Mary Daly

FX Daily: Cautious BoJ hits the yen

The Bank of Japan did not give in to market pressure and kept its dovish guidance intact. However, the wording on the economic and inflation outlook paves the way for a hike in the second quarter in our view. The yen should revert to being driven mostly by US rates after taking a hit today. Elsewhere, Fedspeak will remain in focus along with some US data.

 

USD: Mixed Fedspeak

The dollar has started the week modestly offered, with Scandinavian currencies performing well and the yen dropping after this morning’s Bank of Japan announcement (more in the JPY section below).

The US calendar was empty yesterday, so the spotlight was on Fedspeak. Loretta Mester said that the markets are “a little bit ahead” on rate cuts, and Mary Daly said that her outlook for rate cuts is very close to the median Dot Plot (75bp of easing next year). Interestingly, Daly said that policy would still be restrictive if three cuts were delivered next year, which w

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UK Q2 GDP Forecast: Potential Stall Amid Economic Outlook Uncertainty - Analysis by Michael Hewson

Michael Hewson Michael Hewson 11.08.2023 08:07
UK economy expected to stall in Q2. By Michael Hewson (Chief Market Analyst at CMC Markets UK)   European markets enjoyed their second successive day of gains yesterday, boosted by the announcement by China to end its ban on overseas travel groups to other countries has also helped boost travel, leisure, and the luxury sector. The gains were also helped by a lower-than-expected rise in US CPI of 3.2%, with core prices slipping back to 4.7%, which increased expectations that we could well have seen the last of the Fed rate hiking cycle, which in turn helped to push the S&P500 to its highest levels this week and on course to post its biggest daily gain since July.     Unfortunately, San Francisco Fed President Mary Daly had other ideas, commenting that the central bank has more work to do when it comes to further rate hikes, which pulled US yields off their lows of the day, pulling stock markets back to break even.   This failure to hang onto the gains of the day speaks to how nervous investors are when it comes to the outlook for inflation at a time, even though Daly isn't a voting member on the FOMC this year, and she's hardly likely to say anything else. Certainty hasn't been helped this week by data out of China which shows the economy there is in deflation, despite recent upward pressure on energy prices.     It also means that we can expect to see a lower open for markets in Europe with the main focus today being on the latest UK Q2 GDP numbers, as well as US PPI for July. Having eked out 0.1% growth in Q1 of this year, today's UK Q2 GDP numbers ought to show an improvement on the previous two quarters for the UK economy, yet for some reason most forecasts are for zero growth. That seems unduly pessimistic to me, although the public sector strike action is likely to have been a drag on economic activity.     Contrary to a lot of expectations economic activity has managed to hold up reasonably well, despite soaring inflation which has weighed on demand, and especially on the more discretionary areas of the UK economy. PMIs have held up well throughout the quarter even as they have weakened into the summer. Retail sales have been positive every month during Q2, rising by 0.5%, 0.1% and 0.7% respectively. Consumer spending has also been helped by lower fuel pump prices, and with unemployment levels still at relatively low levels and wage growth currently above 7%, today's Q2 GDP numbers could be as good as it gets for a while.     Despite the resilience shown by the consumer, expectations for today's Q2 are for a 0% growth which seems rather stingy when we saw 0.1% in Q1. This comes across as surprising given that Q2 has felt better from an economic point of view than the start of the year, with lower petrol prices helping to put more money in people's pockets despite higher bills in April. This raises the prospect of an upside surprise, however that might come with subsequent revisions.       Nonetheless, even as we look back at Q2, the outlook for Q3 is likely to become more challenging even with the benefit of a lower energy price cap, helping to offset interest rates now at their highest levels for over 15 years. With more and more fixed rate mortgages set to get refinanced in the coming months the second half of the year for the UK economy could well be a lot more challenging than the first half.     Yesterday US CPI came in slightly softer than expected even as July CPI edged up to 3.2% from 3% in June. Today's PPI numbers might show a similar story due to higher energy prices, but even here we've seen sharp falls in the last 12 months. A year ago, US PPI was at 11.3%, falling to 0.1% in June, with the move lower being very much one way. We could see a modest rebound to 0.7% in July. Core prices have been stickier, but they are still expected to soften further to 2.3% from 2.4%. 12 months ago, core PPI was at 8.2% and peaked in March last year at 9.6%.       EUR/USD – squeezed above the 1.1050 area yesterday, before failing again, and sliding back below the 1.1000 area. Despite the failure to break higher we are still finding support just above the 50-day SMA. Below 1.0900 targets the 1.0830 area.     GBP/USD – popped above the 1.2800 area yesterday and then slipped back. We need to see a sustained move back above the 1.2800 area to ensure this rally has legs. We have support at the 1.2620 area. Below 1.2600 targets 1.2400. Resistance at the 1.2830 area as well as 1.3000.         EUR/GBP – pushed up to the 100-day SMA with resistance now at the 0.8670/80 area. Support comes in at the 0.8580 area with a break below targeting the 0.8530 area. Above the 100-day SMA targets the 0.8720 area.     USD/JPY – closing in on the June highs at the 145.00 area. This is the key barrier for a move back towards 147.50, on a break above the 145.20 level. Support now comes in at the 143.80 area.     FTSE100 is expected to open 42 points lower at 7,576     DAX is expected to open 70 points lower at 15,926     CAC40 is expected to open 30 points lower at 7,403
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Assessing the Risk of Prolonged Economic Stagnation in China - Insights by Ipek Ozkardeskaya, Senior Analyst | Swissquote Bank

Ipek Ozkardeskaya Ipek Ozkardeskaya 11.08.2023 08:09
Is China on path for longer economic stagnation?  By Ipek Ozkardeskaya, Senior Analyst | Swissquote Bank   Released yesterday, the latest CPI data showed that the headline inflation in the US ticked higher from 3 to 3.2%. That was slightly lower than the 3.3% penciled in by analysts, core inflation eased to 4.7% in July from 4.8% expected by analysts and printed a month earlier.   But the rising energy and crop prices threaten to heat things up in the coming months and inflation's downward trajectory could rapidly be spoiled. That's certainly why an increasing number of investors and the Federal Reserve's (Fed) Mary Daly warned that this was 'not a data point that says victory is ours'.   And indeed, looking into details, the fact that the 20% fall in gasoline prices is what explains the decline in headline number is concerning. The barrel of US crude bounced lower yesterday after a 27% rally since the end of June, and the latest OPEC data indicated that we would see a sharp supply deficit of more than 2mbpd this quarter as Saudi cuts output to push prices higher. And this gap could further widen as global demand continues growing and shift to alternative energy sources is nowhere fast enough to reverse that upside pressure.   On the other hand, we also know that the rising energy prices fuel inflation expectations and further rate hikes expectations around the world. And that means that oil bears are certainly waiting in ambush to start trading the recession narrative and sell the top. The $85pb could be the level that could trigger that downside correction despite the evidence of tightening supply and increasing gap between rising demand and falling supply.   Today, eyes will be on the July PPI figures before the weekly closing bell, where core PPI is seen further easing, but headline PPI may have ticked higher to 0.7% on monthly basis, probably on higher energy, crop and food prices.     In the market  Yesterday's slightly softer-than-expected inflation numbers and the initial jobless claims which printed almost 250K new applications last week - the highest in a month - sent the probability of a September pause to above 90%, though the US 2-year yield advanced past the 4.85% level, and the longer-terms yields rose with a weak 30-year bond action, which saw the highest yield since 2011.   Major stock indices stagnated. The S&P500 was up by only 0.03% yesterday while Nasdaq 100 closed 0.18% higher, as Walt Disney rallied as much as 5% even though Disney+ missed subscription estimates and said that it will increase the price of the streaming service. Disney is considering a crackdown on password sharing, which, combined with higher prices could lead to a Netflix-like profit jump further down the road.     In the FX  The USD index consolidates above the 50 and 100-DMAs and just below a long-term ascending channel base. The EURUSD sees support at the 50-DMA, near the 1.0960 level, and could benefit from further weakness in the US dollar to attempt another rise above the 1.10 mark.   European nat gas futures fell 7% yesterday after a 28% spiked on Wednesday on concerns that strikes at major export facilities in Australia could lead to a 10% decline in global LNG exports. Yet, the European inventories are about 88% full on average and the industrial demand remains weak due to tightening financial conditions imposed by the European Central Bank (ECB) hikes. Therefore this week's massive move seems to be mostly overdone, and we shall see some more downside correction.     Chinese property market is boiling  The property crisis in China is being fueled by a potential default of Country Garden, which is one of the biggest property companies in China and which recently announced that it may have lost up to $7.6bn in the first half of the year as home sales slumped and the government stimulus measures didn't bring buyers back to the market. Equities in China slumped further today, as property crisis is not benign. In fact, China's local governments have plenty of debt, and their major source of income is... land and property sales. Consequently, the property crisis explodes local governments' debt to income ratios- And the debt burden prevents China from rolling out stimulus measures that they would've otherwise, because the government doesn't want to further blast the debt levels.   Shattered investor and consumer confidence, shrinking demographics, property crisis and deflation hints that the Chinese economy could be on path for a longer period of economic stagnation. We could therefore see rapid pullback in investor optimism regarding stimulus measures and their effectiveness. Hang Seng's tech index fell to the lowest levels in two weeks yesterday, as all members fell except for Alibaba which jumped after beating revenue estimates last quarter.   
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US Dollar Rises as Bond Market Ignites: A Look at Dollar's Resurgence

ING Economics ING Economics 10.11.2023 10:03
FX Daily: Bond bears give new energy to the dollar A very soft 30-year Treasury auction and hawkish comments by Powell triggered a rebound in US yields and the dollar yesterday. Dynamics in the rates market will remain key while awaiting market-moving US data. In the UK, growth numbers in line with expectations, while in Norway, inflation surprised to the upside. USD: Auction and Powell trigger dollar rebound The dollar chased the spike in US yields yesterday following a big tailing in the 30-year Treasury auction and hawkish comments by Fed Chair Jerome Powell. Speaking at the IMF conference, Powell warned against reading too much into the softer inflation figures and cautioned that the inflation battle remains long, with another hike still possible. If we look at the Fed Funds future curve, it is clear that markets remain highly doubtful another hike will be delivered at all, but Powell’s remarks probably represent the culmination of a pushback against the recent dovish repricing. Remember that in last week’s FOMC announcement, the admission that financial conditions had tightened came with the caveat that the impact on the economy and inflation would have depended on how long rates would have been kept elevated. The hawkish rhetoric pushed by Powell suggests that the Fed still prefers higher Treasury yields doing the tightening rather than hiking again, and that is exactly what markets are interpreting. The soft auction for long-dated Treasuries also signals the post-NFP correction in rates may well have been overdone and could set a new floor for yields unless data point to a worsening US outlook. Today’s highlights in the US calendar are the University of Michigan surveys. Particular focus will be on the 1-year inflation gauge, which is expected to fall from 4.2% to 4.0%. On the Fed side, we’ll hear from Lorie Logan, Raphael Bostic and Mary Daly. Dynamics across the US yield curve will have a big say in whether the dollar can hold on to its new gains. Anyway, we had called for a recovery in DXY to 106.00 as the Fed would have likely pushed back against the dovish repricing. The rebound in yields should put a floor under the dollar, but we suspect some reassurances from the data side will be needed for another big jump in the greenback.
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BoJ Stands Firm: Yen Rocked, but Is a Second Quarter Hike Looming? 🇯🇵💹 Catch the Pulse of FX Markets: USD Mixed After Cautious Fedspeak!

ING Economics ING Economics 19.12.2023 11:56
FX Daily: Cautious BoJ hits the yen The Bank of Japan did not give in to market pressure and kept its dovish guidance intact. However, the wording on the economic and inflation outlook paves the way for a hike in the second quarter in our view. The yen should revert to being driven mostly by US rates after taking a hit today. Elsewhere, Fedspeak will remain in focus along with some US data.   USD: Mixed Fedspeak The dollar has started the week modestly offered, with Scandinavian currencies performing well and the yen dropping after this morning’s Bank of Japan announcement (more in the JPY section below). The US calendar was empty yesterday, so the spotlight was on Fedspeak. Loretta Mester said that the markets are “a little bit ahead” on rate cuts, and Mary Daly said that her outlook for rate cuts is very close to the median Dot Plot (75bp of easing next year). Interestingly, Daly said that policy would still be restrictive if three cuts were delivered next year, which would probably imply greater room for easing if the economic outlook deteriorates. Chicago Fed President Austan Goolsbee said he is confused by the market reaction to the Dot Plot, but remarks from Daly and Mester instead seemed to endorse investors’ bullish response. We’ll keep monitoring Fed speakers today, with Thomas Barkin and Raphael Bostic (the latter swings more to the dovish side) set to deliver remarks. However, the focus will also be on US data, with housing starts set to have declined along with building permits in November. October TIC data is also due today. Tomorrow’s consumer confidence and Friday’s PCE and personal income numbers will be the last bits of data that can move the market before Christmas. Today, FX markets may stay quiet, and the general mood on the dollar could be modestly bearish unless we hear some more convincing pushback on rate cuts by Fed offici

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