JOLTs data

Too dovish

Falling energy prices help softening global inflation expectations and keep the central bank doves in charge of the market, along with sufficiently soft economic data that points at the end of the global monetary policy campaign. This week, the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) and the Bank of Canada (BoC) kept rates unchanged – although the RBA said that they could hike again if home-grown inflation doesn't slow. But overall, the Federal Reserve (Fed) is expected to cut as soon as in May next year, and the European Central Bank (ECB) is expected to announce six 25 basis point cuts next year. If that's the case, the ECB should start cutting before the Fed, sometime in Q1. It sounds overstretched to me.  

Data released earlier this week showed that French industrial production fell unexpectedly for the 3rd straight month in October, Spanish output declined, and German factory orders fell 3.7% in October versus a 0.2% increase penciled in by analysts. The slowing European

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US ADP and JOLTs data in focus as European markets face continued losses

Michael Hewson Michael Hewson 06.07.2023 08:16
US ADP and JOLTs data a key focus today. European markets have fallen every day this week, although yesterday's losses were by far the worst, and look set to continue again today. US markets also struggled yesterday, although their losses have been much more modest. Yesterday's weakness was driven by concerns over softer than expected Chinese as well as European services PMIs, which fed into increased slowdown worries, as well as rising interest rate risk, which fed into weakness in basic resources, energy and financials, and has translated into further weakness in Asia markets.     Today's Germany factory orders numbers for May could signal a brief respite after 2 months of weakness with a rebound of 1%, up from -0.4% in April, although on an annualised basis it is expected to decline by -9.7%, the 15th month in a row it's been in negative territory.       The release of last night's Fed minutes showcased some significant splits amongst policymakers over the decision to signal a rate pause in June, citing "few clear signs" of progress that US inflation was falling quickly enough.     Some officials wanted to carry on with rate hikes of 25bps but given the "uncertainty" about the outlook it was decided a pause would be preferable, just so long as it was made clear that the door to a July hike, as well as further hikes was pushed to the top of the narrative. This helps to explain the very hawkish guidance with no rate cuts expected by Fed officials until 2024.     The publication of the minutes, and the clear willingness amongst many members to do more on rates saw US 2-year yields close higher on the day, wiping out their early declines.     The committee noted the strength of the US labour market saying it "remained very tight" evidence of which is likely to be borne out by today's data from the JOLTS data for May, the latest weekly jobless claims and the June ADP payrolls report, as well as the latest ISM services numbers.     The resilience of the US labour market was no better illustrated than in the April JOLTS report which saw vacancy numbers surge back above 10m from 9.7m in March. Today's May numbers are expected to see this number drop back to 9.9m, still an eye wateringly higher number, and well above the levels we saw pre-pandemic.     Weekly jobless claims also appear to have hit a short-term peak sliding back from 265k to 239k last week and are expected to edge higher to 245k. While weekly claims have been rising in recent weeks continuing claims have been falling, slipping to a 3-month low last week of 1,742k.     Today's ADP payrolls report is expected to see another solid number of 225k, down slightly from 278k.     While the number of job vacancies available remains at current levels it's hard to imagine a scenario where we might see a weak jobs report in the coming months, which means that its unlikely to be the labour market that prompts the Fed to signal a pause in the near term.     Services inflation has been the one area which the Fed has expressed concern that it might be stickier than it needs to be.     Today's ISM services report is expected to see headline activity edge higher to 51.3, while a close eye will be kept on prices paid which slowed to 56.2 in May, and a 3-year low.        EUR/USD – looks set for a test of support around the 1.0830/40 area and 50-day SMA, with resistance remaining at the 1.1000 area. A break below the lows last week opens the way for a potential move towards 1.0780.   GBP/USD – still in a tight range with support above the 50-day SMA at 1.2540, as well as trend line support from the March lows, bias remains higher for a move back to the 1.3000 area. Currently have resistance at 1.2770.     EUR/GBP – looks set to retarget the 0.8515/20 area and June lows, while below resistance at the 0.8570/80 area. Below 0.8510 targets the 0.8480 area. We also have resistance remaining at the 50-day SMA which is now at 0.8655. Behind that we have 0.8720.   USD/JPY – looks set for a test of the 143.80 area, while below the key resistance at 145.20. A break below 143.80 targets a move back to the 142.50 area. Above 145.20 opens up 147.50.    FTSE100 is expected to open 30 points lower at 7,412   DAX is expected to open 84 points lower at 15,853   CAC40 is expected to open 50 points lower at 7,260
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Mixed Economic Signals: ADP Jobs, Revised GDP, and USD Trends

Craig Erlam Craig Erlam 31.08.2023 10:43
ADP posts 177,000 new jobs but traders not convinced US Q2 GDP revised lower to 2.1% (2.4% previously) USD pares six week gains after weaker figures this week   The recovery in equity markets appears to have stalled on Wednesday as traders likely eye the big economic releases later in the week. The ADP and revised GDP numbers may attract some attention but they were never likely to have too great an impact. The ADP report has long been ignored as a reliable precursor to the NFP report on Friday and at times it’s frankly been wildly off. That it’s come in at a reasonable 177,000 doesn’t offer any real insight in terms of Friday’s payrolls, with the focus instead remaining on them in relation to yesterday’s JOLTS data which saw a marked decline. If we see a trend of weaker hiring and fewer job openings then the Fed will be more at ease ending the tightening cycle. Today’s data was never likely to be overly impactful with tomorrow’s inflation, income, and spending figures, prior to Friday’s payrolls, always the primary focus. That could well set the tone for September ahead of some major central bank meetings.   EURUSD has been buoyed by the recent economic data, with the figures indicating that the higher for longer narrative may be less intense than feared.   EURUSD Daily       The pair has now rallied for three days and is closing on an interesting level around 1.10 where it may run into some resistance from the 55/89-day simple moving average band. It’s also a notable psychological level. There are also some interesting Fib levels around here if this is merely a corrective move following the sell-off of the last six weeks.
Uncertain Waters: Saudi's Oil Production Commitment and Global Economic Jitters

Uncertain Waters: Saudi's Oil Production Commitment and Global Economic Jitters

Ipek Ozkardeskaya Ipek Ozkardeskaya 05.10.2023 08:17
Saudi's commitment is not written into a law By Ipek Ozkardeskaya, Senior Analyst | Swissquote Bank   Markets are on an emotional rollercoaster ride this week. The slightest data is capable of moving oceans. Yesterday, the significantly softer-than-expected ADP report, and the announcement that 75'000 healthcare workers at Kaiser went on strike sparked a positive reaction from the market in a typical 'bad news is good news' day. The US economy added only 89K new private jobs in September, much less than 153K penciled in by analysts. It was also the slowest job additions since January 2021. The rest of the data was mixed. US factory orders were better than expected in August, but the services PMI came close to slipping into the contraction zone, and the ISM's non-manufacturing component also hinted at slowing activity. Mortgage activity in the US fell to the lowest levels since 1995, as the 30-year mortgage rates spiked higher toward 8%. Housing and services are among the biggest contributors to high inflation besides energy prices, therefore, seeing these sectors cool down has a meaningful impact on inflation expectations, hence on Federal Reserve (Fed) expectations. As such, yesterday's soft-looking data tempered the Fed hawks, after the stronger-than-expected JOLTs data triggered panic the day before. The US 2-year yield took a dive toward the 5% mark, the 10-year yield bounced lower after flirting with the 4.90% level, while the 30-year hit 5% for the very first time since 2007 before bouncing lower on relieving news of soft job additions. Hallelujah.  The US dollar index retreated across the board, and equities rebounded. The S&P500 jumped from the lowest levels since the beginning of June. The score is now one to one. One good news for the US jobs market, and one bad news. Everyone is now holding his or her breath into Friday's jobs data, which will determine whether we will end this week with a sweet or a sour taste in our mouth. Sweet would be loosening jobs data, sour would be a still-strong jobs data which would fuel the hawkish Fed expectations and further boost US yields while the US yields are at a critical moment.   For the first time since 2002, the US 10-year yield comes at a spitting distance from the S&P500 earnings. The index is just about 60 points above its critical 200-DMA. Looking at the seasonality chart, the S&P500 could dip at about now. In this context, there is a chance that soft jobs data from the US marks a dip in the S&P500 selloff. But one thing is sure: the yields and the US dollar must come down to keep the S&P500 on a rising path. Profits at the S&P500 companies are inversely correlated with the US dollar as their international profits account for about a third of the total. If the yields and the US dollar continue to rise, the S&P500 will face severe headwinds into the year end.    Oil fell nearly 6%!  Rising suspicions that the global economy is headed straight into a wall didn't spare oil bulls yesterday. The barrel of American crude dived almost 6%, slipped below the 50-DMA ($85pb), and below the positive trend base building since the end of June. The 6.5-mio-barrel build in gasoline stockpiles last week helped bring the bears back to the market even though the data also showed a more than 2-mio-barrel draw in crude inventories over the same week.   Yesterday's move shows that what matters the most for intraday moves is the rhetoric. This summer, the market focus was on the tightening global oil supply and how the US will 'soft land' despite the aggressive Fed tightening. Now we start talking about slowing economies and recession worries.   OPEC decided to maintain its oil production strategy unchanged at yesterday's decision. Saudi and Russia repeated that they will keep their production restricted to maintain the positive pressure on oil. But if global demand cools down and volumes fall, both Saudi and Russia will be tempted to increase profits by selling more oil at a cheaper price. Saudi Arabia shouldering all the production cuts for OPEC is not written into a law, it could become uncertain if market conditions turn sour.
Rates Spark: Escalating into a Rout as Bond Bear Steepening Accelerates

Market Jitters: Strong US Jobs Data Sparks Fear of Tightening Labor Market and Rising Yields

Michael Hewson Michael Hewson 05.10.2023 08:54
The fear of strong jobs By Ipek Ozkardeskaya, Senior Analyst | Swissquote Bank   Even a hint of an improving US jobs market sends shivers down investors' spines.  This is why the stronger than expected job openings data from the US spurred panic across the global financial markets yesterday. Although hirings and firings remained stable, the financial world was unhappy to see so many job opportunities offered to Americans as the data hinted that the US jobs market could be going back toward tightening, and not toward loosening. And that means that Americans will keep their jobs, find new ones, asked better pays, and keep spending. That spending will keep US growth above average and continue pushing inflation higher, and the Federal Reserve (Fed) will not only keep interest rates higher for longer but eventually be obliged to hike them more. Alas, a catastrophic scenario for the global financial markets where the rising US yields threaten to destroy value everywhere. PS. JOLTS data is volatile, and one data point is insufficient to point at changing trend. We still believe that the US jobs market will continue to loosen.  But the market reaction to yesterday's JOLTS data was sharp and clear. The US 2-year yield spiked above 5.15% after the stronger than expected JOLTS data, the 10-year yield went through the roof and hit the 4.85% mark. News that the US House Speaker McCarthy lost his position after last week's deal to keep the US government open certainly didn't help attract investors into the US sovereign space. The US blue-chip bond yields on the other hand have advanced to the highest levels since 2009, and the spike in real yields hardly justify buying stocks if earnings expectations remain weak. The S&P500 is now headed towards its 200-DMA, which stands near the 4200 level. The more rate sensitive Nasdaq still has ways to go before reaching its own 200-DMA and critical Fibonacci levels, but the selloff could become harder in technology stocks if things got uglier.  In the FX, the US dollar extended gains across the board. The Reserve Bank of New Zealand (RBNZ) kept the interest rate steady at 5.5% as expected. Due today, the ADP report is expected to show a significant slowdown in US private job additions last month; the expectation is a meagre 153'000 new private job additions in September. Any weakness would be extremely welcome for the rest of the world, while a strong looking data, an - God forbid – a figure above 200K could boost the Federal Reserve (Fed) hawks and bring the discussion of a potential rate hike in November seriously on the table.   The EURUSD consolidates below the 1.05 level, the USDJPY spiked shortly above the 150 mark, and suddenly fell 2% in a matter of minutes, in a move that was thought to be an unconfirmed FX intervention. Gold extended losses to $1815 per ounce as the rising US yields increase the opportunity cost of holding the non-interest-bearing gold.  The barrel of American crude remains under pressure below the $90pb level. US shale producers say that they will keep drilling under wraps even if oil prices surge to $100pb, pointing at Joe Biden's war against fossil fuel. A tighter oil supply is the main market driver for now, but recession fears will likely keep the upside limited, and September high could be a peak. 
The Fear of Strong Jobs: How US Labor Market Resilience Sparks Global Financial Panic

The Fear of Strong Jobs: How US Labor Market Resilience Sparks Global Financial Panic

Ipek Ozkardeskaya Ipek Ozkardeskaya 05.10.2023 08:55
The fear of strong jobs By Ipek Ozkardeskaya, Senior Analyst | Swissquote Bank   Even a hint of an improving US jobs market sends shivers down investors' spines.  This is why the stronger than expected job openings data from the US spurred panic across the global financial markets yesterday. Although hirings and firings remained stable, the financial world was unhappy to see so many job opportunities offered to Americans as the data hinted that the US jobs market could be going back toward tightening, and not toward loosening. And that means that Americans will keep their jobs, find new ones, asked better pays, and keep spending. That spending will keep US growth above average and continue pushing inflation higher, and the Federal Reserve (Fed) will not only keep interest rates higher for longer but eventually be obliged to hike them more. Alas, a catastrophic scenario for the global financial markets where the rising US yields threaten to destroy value everywhere. PS. JOLTS data is volatile, and one data point is insufficient to point at changing trend. We still believe that the US jobs market will continue to loosen.  But the market reaction to yesterday's JOLTS data was sharp and clear. The US 2-year yield spiked above 5.15% after the stronger than expected JOLTS data, the 10-year yield went through the roof and hit the 4.85% mark. News that the US House Speaker McCarthy lost his position after last week's deal to keep the US government open certainly didn't help attract investors into the US sovereign space. The US blue-chip bond yields on the other hand have advanced to the highest levels since 2009, and the spike in real yields hardly justify buying stocks if earnings expectations remain weak. The S&P500 is now headed towards its 200-DMA, which stands near the 4200 level. The more rate sensitive Nasdaq still has ways to go before reaching its own 200-DMA and critical Fibonacci levels, but the selloff could become harder in technology stocks if things got uglier.  In the FX, the US dollar extended gains across the board. The Reserve Bank of New Zealand (RBNZ) kept the interest rate steady at 5.5% as expected. Due today, the ADP report is expected to show a significant slowdown in US private job additions last month; the expectation is a meagre 153'000 new private job additions in September. Any weakness would be extremely welcome for the rest of the world, while a strong looking data, an - God forbid – a figure above 200K could boost the Federal Reserve (Fed) hawks and bring the discussion of a potential rate hike in November seriously on the table.   The EURUSD consolidates below the 1.05 level, the USDJPY spiked shortly above the 150 mark, and suddenly fell 2% in a matter of minutes, in a move that was thought to be an unconfirmed FX intervention. Gold extended losses to $1815 per ounce as the rising US yields increase the opportunity cost of holding the non-interest-bearing gold.  The barrel of American crude remains under pressure below the $90pb level. US shale producers say that they will keep drilling under wraps even if oil prices surge to $100pb, pointing at Joe Biden's war against fossil fuel. A tighter oil supply is the main market driver for now, but recession fears will likely keep the upside limited, and September high could be a peak.   
Rates Spark: Escalating into a Rout as Bond Bear Steepening Accelerates

Rates Spark: Escalating into a Rout as Bond Bear Steepening Accelerates

ING Economics ING Economics 05.10.2023 08:58
Rates Spark: Turning into a rout This bond bear steepening market is being driven by Treasuries, and more specifically by higher longer tenor real rates. This is painful for corporate borrowers, as higher real rates cannot be diversified away through higher prices (as could be the case if driven by inflation expectations). This puts pressure on credit markets as a result.   Too far, too fast? It's messy out there. It's not often you get a 10bp uplift in the 10-year yield in one day. We had one yesterday. And we've had over a 50bp upmove in the past three weeks. It's now at 4.8%, and looking like it's gone too far too fast. But if we don't look down, that 5% level could be with us quite quickly. It's clear also that Treasuries are a dominant driver out there. It's pulling other yields higher, is hurting equities, and is pretty immune to influence from risk off. Typically, a severe enough risk-off event would put some counterflows back into Treasuries. And there have been some. Right through the rise in yields in the past couple of months there have, in fact, been net inflows into Treasuries. But this has not been enough to dominate price action. In fact, prices have moved first, not so much in reaction to flows, but in anticipation of them. And of course in reaction to data that continues to show the US economy continuing to defy recession worries. The JOLTS data are a case in point. This measure of "job openings" had been coming off the pandemic sugar high which saw them peak out in the 12 million area. A huge level. It compares with a long-run average in the 2.5 million area. It had been falling since mid-2022, and got to below nine million last month. But the latest month shows a pop back up towards 10 million (9.6m). That's a remarkable move in light of the inflation/rates/sentiment headwinds that arguably should be impacting the economy more. And the curve continues to pull steeper (dis-inversion). As we ended the summer, the 2/10yr was in the -75bp area. It's now half that, and just 35bp away from breaking back above zero into positive territory. It's been pulled there by higher longer tenor real rates. The 10-year real yield is now knocking on the door of 2.5%, having been below 2% only a few weeks back. And importantly, inflation expectations are broadly steady. This angst mode has been driven entirely by higher real rates, and signs of underlying macro strength. Note, however, that higher real yields are also more painful than ones driven by higher inflation. The latter can be passed on through higher prices at the corporate level. But higher real rates are more difficult to "pass on". They are essentially a tax on the borrower that must be paid to get any type of re-funding done. That is arguably where the next vulnerability lies. Risk assets are reacting to this, but there is the potential for more pain here ahead, especially in the guise of wider credit spreads.   Real rates are pushing higher
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Fed Continues Rate Hikes Amid Strong Growth, Inflation Concerns

ING Economics ING Economics 02.11.2023 12:26
Don't expect the Fed to stop amid strong growth, higher inflation.  By Ipek Ozkardeskaya, Senior Analyst | Swissquote Bank    The US dollar was bid on Tuesday thanks to a rapid selloff in the Japanese yen, after the Bank of Japan (BoJ) announced mini policy loosening steps that didn't find buyers. Loosening the upper limit on the 10-year JGB yield in the context of a YCC policy is not enough when considering that the BoJ should drop it altogether and for good.   But on the contrary, not only that the BoJ is not giving up on its YCC policy, but is on track to match its record annual bond purchases. Almost all the Japanese 10-year bonds are held by the BoJ – which in my opinion will become illegal one day - and the BoJ hasn't yet moved an inch towards normalization of its rate policy whereas the major central bank rate hikes start plateauing after more than a 1.5 year of aggressive rate hikes. So, no wonder the yen got smashed yesterday. The USDJPY spiked past 151, even though the uptick in the US - Japan 10-year yield spread – which also ticked up because of a jump in the Japanese 10-year yield, didn't attract the yen longs. The only thing that holds traders back from more aggressive selling is the fear of a direct FX intervention. If that happens, there is a good reason to buy a dip.   Zooming out of Japan, the US dollar index consolidated a touch below last month peak. The US consumer confidence index dropped to a 5-month low, but the latest wages data continued to give signs of strength. Yes strength – I am sorry. The employment cost index, a top-notch gauge of what employers spend on compensation, rose 1.1% in Q3 – slightly higher than a quarter earlier. Wages and salaries rose 4.6% - above the US headline CPI, and well above 3% as before the pandemic. And that was before the UAW reached a jaw-dropping deal with Detroit's 3 carmakers where they nailed a 25% increase in wages and around 150% increase in compensations for the low-paid tier of temporary workers. The ADP data is expected reveal around 150K new private job additions in October, and JOLTS data is expected to show a drop in job openings. On Friday, we will have a look at the official figures. The latter won't impact the Federal Reserve (Fed) expectations for this week's policy decision. But any further strength in US jobs data will reinforce a potentially hawkish stance from the Fed policymakers this week.   The Fed.  We know that the Fed is not done hiking the interest rates. We know that Jerome Powell won't call the end of the policy tightening after seeing a blowout growth data – which showed that the US GDP grew almost 5% in Q3 (that's more than China!), and inflation ticked higher because Americans kept spending. Duh! And if people kept spending their savings it was because they didn't necessarily feel threatened to lose their jobs, or remain jobless for long. So yes, the jobs market strength is playing tricks on the Fed, and it's clearly not loose enough. The chances are that we won't hear anything soothingly dovish. 'The higher yields help us do the job' is the best it will get.   You know where growth is not strong?  China is not doing brilliant and this week's economic data in China showed that the Chinese factory sector slipped back into contraction and the Eurozone economies announced gloomy GDP updates, as well. The German economy contracted in Q3, the French and Italian economies stagnated, the overall Eurozone growth fell 0.1% on a quarterly basis.   But at least, inflation slowed. As a result of soft growth and inflation data, the EURUSD couldn't extend gains above the 50-DMA and sank below the 1.06 level yesterday. The positive trend is losing momentum, the divergence between the strength of the US economy versus its European counterparts, and the divergence between the Fed and the European Central Bank (ECB) outlooks play in favour of a deeper depreciation in the euro against the greenback.  Crude approaching $80pb crossroads  US crude slipped below its 100-DMA yesterday as buyers became rare on news that Israel's ground offensive is not as violent as expected. A 1.3mio barrel build in US crude inventories may have helped the bears to push the selloff below the $82pb level. Yet, oil bears will certainly hit a decent support near the $80p level because at this level, they know that Saudi has their back. And the risks of geopolitical nature remain clearly tilted to the upside. For those who bet that we will see a dip near the $80pb level, it is soon time to roll up the sleeves.   Worst since the pandemic, and yet...  The S&P500 rose on the last day of October but recorded its longest monthly slide since the pandemic. Still, the index kicks off the new month a touch above the major 38.2% retracement which should distinguish between the continuation of last year's rally, and a slide into the medium-term bearish consolidation zone. The next direction will depend on whether the US yields will consolidate and eventually come lower, or they will continue their journey higher. In the second scenario, we will likely see major US stock indices sink into a bearish trend. 
The December CPI Upside Surprise: Why Markets Remain Skeptical About a Fed Rate Cut in March"   User napisz liste keywords, oddzile je porzecinakmie ChatGPT

BoE Faces Dilemma Amid Hawkish Fed and Economic Challenges: Analyst Insights

ING Economics ING Economics 02.11.2023 12:56
BoE between a rock and a hard place.  By Ipek Ozkardeskaya, Senior Analyst | Swissquote Bank   As widely expected, the Federal Reserve (Fed) maintained its interest rates unchanged at this week's meeting and President Jerome Powell cited that the recent surge – especially in the long end of the US yield curve – helped tightening the financial conditions in the US. Powell repeated that the Fed is proceeding carefully but that they are 'not confident that inflation is on path toward 2%' target'. US policymakers redefined the US economic outlook as being 'strong', from being just 'solid'.  In summary, the latest Fed decision was not dovish, unsurprisingly hawkish, and did not impact appetite in US bonds which got a boost from the Treasury's announcement of a slightly lower-than-expected quarterly refunding auction size for the 3, 10 and 30-year maturity bonds next week. Cherry on top, the US Treasury said that they now expect one more step up in quarterly issuances for the long-term debt, whereas the expectation was multiple more step ups.   The US 10-year yield sank to 4.70% after the Fed decision and Treasury's much-awaited issuance calendar reveal, the 30-year yield fell to 4.90%. The fact that the US will borrow slightly less than previously thought and slightly less on the long-end of the curve doesn't mean that the fiscal outlook improved. Though lower-than-expected, the $776bn that the US Treasury is planning to borrow this quarter is a record for the last 3 months of a year. And the net interest payments on the US federal debt are rising at an eye-watering speed. In numbers, the federal debt rose more than a third since the end of 2019, and the interest expenses on that debt rose by almost 40%. That's a detail for Janet Yellen who thinks that the surge in US yields is explained by the positive economic outlook, but the market won't allow the Treasury to borrow like its pockets have no bottom if the Fed is not part of it.   Bad news, good news the sharp decline in October ISM manufacturing PMI and the softer-than-expected ADP read helped boosting sentiment in US Treasuries, as they somehow softened the otherwise strong US economic outlook. The JOLTS data unexpectedly rose but no one was out looking for reasons to sell Treasuries yesterday, so that basically went unheard. The official US jobs data is due Friday and any strength in NFP, or wages could reverse the optimism that the US economic growth will... slow. And as bad news is sometimes good news for the market, the S&P500 rebounded more than 1% and closed the session at a spitting distance from the all important 200-DMA, while the rate-sensitive Nasdaq jumped almost 1.80%.   AMD, Qualcomm gain, Apple to report On the individual level, AMD jumped almost 10% yesterday. Even though the company gave a soft guidance for Q4, they said that they expect to sell more than $2bn worth of AI chips next year. That's a lot, that's more than a third of the actual revenue they make. Qualcomm jumped nearly 4% in afterhours trading, as the world's largest seller of smartphone chips gave a better-than-expected prediction for this quarter, saying that the inventory glut in mobile-phone industry may be receding.   Today, Apple will post its Q3 earnings, after the bell. We have reservations regarding the results as the iPhone15 sales are not as brilliant as investors hoped they would be, and Huawei is apparently eating Apple's market share in China. Apple's overall revenue is seen down by around 3%. Ouch. The good news is that the morose expectations could be easier to beat. Otherwise, we could see Apple tank below the $170 per share, into the bearish consolidation zone, and become vulnerable to deeper losses.  BoE not to raise rates, but its inflation tolerance The Bank of England (BoE) is the next major central bank to announce its rate decision today, and the Brits are not expected to raise the interest rates at today's MPC meeting, but they are expected to increase their tolerance faced with above 2% inflation, instead. That's not good for central bank credibility, even less so when the BoE's credibility is not at its best since the start of this tightening cycle. If investors sense that the BoE will let inflation run hot, by lack of choice, sterling could take a significant hit.   Gold and oil  Appetite in gold eases as Israelian attacks are perceived as being less aggressive than what they could be. De-pricing of Mid-East risks could send the price of an ounce to, or below the 200-DMA, near the $1933 level. Upside risks prevail, but fresh news should gradually lose their shocker impact and the $2000 per ounce level will likely attract top sellers more than anything else.   US crude rebounded near the $80pb yesterday, as the decline toward the psychological $80pb level brought in dip buyers. We could reasonably expect the US crude to correct toward $85pb as geopolitical tensions loom, and supply remains at jeopardy.    
The December CPI Upside Surprise: Why Markets Remain Skeptical About a Fed Rate Cut in March"   User napisz liste keywords, oddzile je porzecinakmie ChatGPT

Rates Spark: Pressure at the Extremities Signals Market Uncertainty

ING Economics ING Economics 12.12.2023 12:42
Rates Spark: Pressure at the extremities The fair value number for the US 10yr yield is 4%, but we really need to see Friday's payrolls number first. The bond market is screaming at us that it'll be weak. But unless validated, the rally seen of late is vulnerable. Also be aware of front end pressure, although this was calmer yesterday.   Resumed inversion points to overshoot risk in the 10yr yield An interesting aspect of the price action in the past couple of days has been the resumed inversion of the US curve. The front end is participating in the falling yields trend, but the 10yr benchmark is leading it. That can reflect an overshoot tendency in the 10yr. It is true that the JOLTS data showed a surprise drop in job openings, but that should have been just as capable of sparking a larger front end move, helping to dis-invert the curve. At the same time, such price action is consistent with a 2yr yield that does not yet see a rate cut as a front and centre event. Typically, the 2yr really gaps lower about three months before an actual cut. But in the meantime, it should be capable of keeping better pace with the falls in yield being seen in the 10yr. While we are of the opinion that 4% is the structural fair value number for the 10yr (on the assumption that the funds rate targets 3% as the next low), we also feel that this market needs a weak payrolls number on Friday to validate the move seen in the 10yr yield from 5% all to way down to sub-4.2% in a matter of weeks. The fact remains that we have not seen either a labour market recession or a sub-trend jobs growth experience. At least not yet. The market is trading as if the 190k consensus expectation is wrong for Friday and that we’re going to get something considerably weaker. The JOLTS data supports this – as does the latest Fed Beige book. But we do need to see that report before we could even consider hitting 4% on the 10yr.   Repo pressures ease, but still some cross-winds to monitor on money markets At the other extreme of the curve, the elevation in repo rates seen at the end of November that had extended into Monday of this week had begun to ease back through Tuesday. The issue here is ultra front end market rates had come under upward pressure. Extra bills issuance has been a factor, as this has both taken liquidity from the system and placed upward pressure on bills rates generally. Repo is a function of the relatives between available collateral and available liquidity and at month-end, liquidity was tied up, and that pressured repo higher. The resumed build in volumes going back to the Fed on the reverse repo facility on Tuesday proves a reversion towards more normal conditions. That said, SOFR remains elevated, and that will contribute to balances falling in the Fed’s reverse repo facility as we progress through the coming weeks. If the market is showing a better rate than the 5.3% overnight at the Fed, that should take cash from the reverse repo facility. Interestingly there was a surprise jump in usage of the standing repo facility. Not large, but it shows that in some quarters there is at least some demand for liquidity. A bit early for this to become the dominant issue, but worth monitoring all the same.   Today's events and market view The JOLTS data highlighted the markets' sensitivity to any indications of a cooling US labour market. Ahead of Friday's payrolls report, markets will eye the ADP estimate. Given its poor track record of forecasting the official data, it is likely to take a larger surprise to move valuations – the consensus is looking for a 130k reading today after 113k last month. Other data and events to watch are the US trade data and, up north, the rate decision by the Bank of Canada. On this side of the Atlantic, we will get eurozone retail sales and, in the UK, the Bank of England financial stability report. In government bond primary markets, Italy is conducting an exchange auction. The UK sells £3bn in 10Y green gilts. The main focus over the coming days and weeks will be on governments’ announcements regarding their issuance plans for next year.
EUR/USD Analysis: Assessing Potential for Prolonged Decline Amidst Volatility

Dovish Outlook: Global Central Banks Soften Stance Amid Falling Energy Prices

ING Economics ING Economics 12.12.2023 13:11
Too dovish Falling energy prices help softening global inflation expectations and keep the central bank doves in charge of the market, along with sufficiently soft economic data that points at the end of the global monetary policy campaign. This week, the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) and the Bank of Canada (BoC) kept rates unchanged – although the RBA said that they could hike again if home-grown inflation doesn't slow. But overall, the Federal Reserve (Fed) is expected to cut as soon as in May next year, and the European Central Bank (ECB) is expected to announce six 25 basis point cuts next year. If that's the case, the ECB should start cutting before the Fed, sometime in Q1. It sounds overstretched to me.   Data released earlier this week showed that French industrial production fell unexpectedly for the 3rd straight month in October, Spanish output declined, and German factory orders fell 3.7% in October versus a 0.2% increase penciled in by analysts. The slowing European economies and falling inflation help building a case in favour of an ECB rate cut, but I don't see the ECB cutting rates anytime in the H1. Remember, economic slowdown is the natural response that the ECB was looking for to slow inflation. Now that it happens, the bank won't leave the battlefield before making sure that inflation shows no sign of life. But the EURUSD is understandable extending its losses within the bearish consolidation zone, as the German 10-year yield sinks below the 2.20% level. The EURUSD is now testing the 100-DMA to the downside. Trend and momentum indicators are comfortably bearish and the RSI hints that we are not yet dealing with oversold market conditions. Therefore, the selloff could deepen toward the 1.07/1.730 region.  The direction of the EURUSD is of course also dependent on what the USD leg of the pair will do. We see the dollar index recover this week despite the falling yields driven lower by a soft set of US jobs data released so far this week. The JOLTS data showed a significant fall in job openings in October, while yesterday's ADP print revealed around 100K new private job additions last month, much less than 130K penciled in by analysts. There is no apparent correlation between this data and Friday's official NFP read, but the fact that independent data point at further loosening in the US jobs market comforts the Fed doves in the idea that, yes, the US jobs market is finally giving in. On the yields front, the US 2-year yield remains steady near 4.60%/4.65% region, while the 10-year yield fell to 4.10% yesterday, from above 5% by end of October. This is a big, big decline, and it means that investors are now ramping up the US slowdown bets. That's also why we don't see the US stocks react to the further fall in yields. The S&P500 and Nasdaq both fell yesterday, while their European peers extended gains regardless of the overbought conditions. The Stoxx 600 closed yesterday's session above the 470 level. The softening ECB expectations are certainly the major driver of the European stocks toward the ytd highs; German stocks hit an ATH yesterday despite the undoubtedly morose economic outlook. Actual levels scream correction.      

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