intel

Market echoes

The US dollar index ticked higher yesterday, as the euro fell across board during ECB Lagarde's presser. But any further weakness in today's PCE numbers could limit the upside move in the dollar index and throw a floor under the EURUSD's weakness around the 200-DMA.

It would sure be absurd if the Fed started cutting the rates with such a strong underlying US economy before the ECB, which, in opposition, deals with a serious economic slowdown across the euro area. But the Fed doesn't (need to) decide based on other central banks' actions. As such, a possible earlier Fed cut could slow down the euro depreciation but should not stop it.

Two Gold Reversals and what they Imply...

Intel: Earnings Preview

Kseniya Medik Kseniya Medik 19.10.2021 19:48
Intel is going to unveil Q3 earnings results at the midnight from October 21 to 22 after the stock market closes. The market expects Intel to deliver earnings per share of $1.11 and revenue of $18.24B. Last time, it was expected that Intel would post earnings of $1.06 per share when it produced earnings of $1.28. In general, the stock price should rise after upbeat results, but that situation was different. The report was better than expected but traders priced in the good outcome before (look at the series of green candles before the vertical line). Thus, when the actual numbers were out, the sell-off occurred. This time may happen the same. It’s so good that FBS traders can open both buy and sell trades while trading stocks.    Forecast Intel faces strong competition from AMD. Thus, Intel has to show really strong earnings results to signal investors that it can reduce the technology gap with AMD. For now, most forecasts are bearish for Intel. However, Intel’s processor chips are components in the vast majority of laptops and desktops. Intel’s chips are in high demand especially now amid the global semiconductor shortage. Thus, we can see a reverse up in the long term. Tech outlook The stock price moves sideways between $52.00 and $55.00 inside the horizontal channel. If it manages to break above the 100-day moving average of $55.00, the doors will be open to the 200-day moving average of $57.25. On the other hand, if Intel breaks below $53.00 – the lows of late September/early October, the way to the bottom of the channel at $52.00 will be open. Download the FBS Trader app to trade anytime anywhere! For personal computer or laptop, use MetaTrader 5!  
The more environmentally friendly, the more comfortable to work in

The more environmentally friendly, the more comfortable to work in

Finance Press Release Finance Press Release 08.11.2021 13:03
Office buildings that have solutions to limit the negative impact on the environment and reduce operating costs, at the same time provide a friendlier, safer and better organized work space. What do they offer? The change in the way of thinking about the work environment that has taken place since last spring did not ultimately affect the status of offices. On the contrary, after several months of hibernation, offices experience a renaissance. They are still a strong support in building the organizational culture of companies and a base for the development and cooperation of teams, training new employees, and a meeting place with clients. However, the expectations of the users of office buildings have changed. In addition, issues concerning the way buildings affect the natural environment and the people working in them have come to the fore. - Decision-making processes aimed at environmental protection are gaining momentum, which more and more often carry specific declarations of investors and developers, in which they undertake to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by buildings to zero in a specific time perspective - says Bartłomiej Zagrodnik, Managing Partner/CEO of Walter Herz. It became necessary to reevaluate the previously adopted standards and expand the scale of pro-ecological solutions, especially in the context of the climate change, which brings unexpected and dangerous weather phenomena. - The development of the market is focused on the implementation of intelligent, environmentally neutral buildings and the creation of innovative solutions that support the decarbonisation of the existing resources and adapting them to the current requirements in the field of sustainable development - explains Bartłomiej Zagrodnik. - The changes are also stimulated by such factors as rising electricity prices, costs of water consumption, heating and waste disposal. Office buildings are switching to green energy derived only from renewable sources, which not only has positive environmental effects, but also reduces operating costs. Hence, we also see the growing interest of tenants in real estate equipped with environmentally friendly solutions - says Bartłomiej Zagrodnik. Green energy and water saving The most modern buildings not only draw energy from renewable sources, but also use technologies that reduce its consumption by automating space management. There are also more and more common solutions enabling water retention, which is of key importance in the face of the water crisis. Facility owners are serious about the problem of shrinking water resources. They invest in gray water filtering and reuse systems and rainwater management, fittings and showers based on motion sensors to reduce network water consumption, as well as various types of water retention solutions. They create green roofs, terraces and rain gardens. Companies are also more likely to choose buildings that meet certain standards in this area, in order to take advantage of the possibility of reducing costs. In Poland, proper management of water resources is particularly important because in terms of our resources, we are on one of the last places in Europe, ahead of the Czech Republic, Cyprus and Malta. Unfortunately, the level of water consumption in the world is constantly increasing. Over the last century, it has increased sixfold. Crystal clear air, green enclaves and ecological crops There are many more factors that influence the efficiency of the office buildings. There are, among others, ventilation and air circulation systems that control and supply air of better quality than specified in the standards in high-class facilities, specialized filters and humidifiers, as well as carbon free finishing materials and solutions optimizing acoustics. Modern buildings expand the spectrum of solutions to become more work-friendly and environmentally friendly. Here, green also plays one of the main roles. We observe the creation of green enclaves around the buildings, the arrangement of courtyards, squares and recreation areas immersed in greenery, also with green concrete pavements that purify the air. Vegetation is usually selected in terms of low water demand and the possibility of producing a large amount of oxygen and absorbing toxins, and vines in the context of protecting the walls of the building from heating up. The complexes include refuges for birds and insects, as well as city apiaries and gardens for organic farming. Specially designed blocks, facades and roofs of buildings with elements reflecting sunlight are used to reduce the effect of the so-called urban heat islands. The interiors of office buildings are arranged in such a way as to activate users. For example, the central location of the stairs is to encourage the movement of pedestrians between the floors, which reduces the use of elevators. The promotion of infrastructure for cyclists in the office buildings is also conducive to the pro-health activity of employees and reducing the burden on the environment. Technologies that facilitate work organization The well-being of employees, so widely discussed today, is supported by the use of hybrid office management platforms in the most modern buildings, thanks to which the facilities can offer the so-called smart office. Applications available on smartphones improve the daily work organization. With their use, one can, among others, book an office arrival time or a parking space, enter the garage and take a lift to the selected floor avoiding contact with the other office users, book a conference room for a team or client meeting, and even report a printer issue. The key challenge was to provide people in the office environment with the greatest possible comfort and safety. It is to be guaranteed not only by generally available basic disinfectants, masks and gloves, but also by changes in the arrangement of offices. Such arrangement of office spaces, so that they are comfortable for everyone and provide various types of zones adapted to the new work profile. Therefore, companies most often decide to increase the distance between work stations, limit the number of large conference rooms that replace dedicated smaller rooms, boxes and booths for talks, as well as stands for creative team work. There are social zones, chill out rooms to rest, green terraces and winter gardens. The ambition of the office environment is also to create ecological spaces. Using as many recycled or reusable office supplies as possible, such as filter bottles instead of disposable plastic packaging. Undoubtedly, the reduction of the carbon footprint is also facilitated by the popularization of videoconferences, which significantly reduced business trips. Just as the already sanctioned electronic document flow previously contributed to minimizing the use of paper. Good service in the buildings is also increasingly important. The offer of additional services, similar to those provided by hotels, for example concierge service, is gaining in importance. The key condition is also direct access to the gastronomic offer, basic services and shops, preferably on the premises of the building. The changes taking place in the office market are generally aimed at perceiving space as a service. About Walter Herz Walter Herz company is a leading Polish entity which has been operating in the commercial real estate sector across the country. For nine years, the company has been providing comprehensive and strategic investment consulting services for tenants, investors and real estate owners. It provides extensive support for both public and private sector. Walter Herz experts assist clients in finding and leasing space, and give advice when it comes to investment and hotel projects. In addition to its headquarters in Warsaw, the company operates in Cracow and the Tri-City. Walter Herz has created Tenant Academy, first project in the country, supporting and educating commercial real estate tenants across Poland, with on-site courses held in the largest cities in the country. In order to ensure the highest ethical level of services provided, the agency introduced the Code of Good Practice.
Biden Signs a Bill to Revive Infrastructure… and Gold!

Biden Signs a Bill to Revive Infrastructure… and Gold!

Arkadiusz Sieron Arkadiusz Sieron 16.11.2021 14:13
Gold rallied thanks to the changed narrative on inflation, and Biden’s infrastructure plan can only add to the inflationary pressure. Huge price moves ahead? I have a short quiz for you! What the government should do to decrease inflation that reached the highest level in 30 years? A) Decrease its expenditure to make room for the Fed to hike the federal funds rate. B) Press the US central bank to tighten its monetary policy. C) Deregulate the markets and lower taxes to boost the supply side of the economy. D) Introduce a huge infrastructure plan that will multiply spending on energy, raw materials, and inputs in general. Please guess which option the US government chose. Yes, the worst possible. Exam failed! At the beginning of November, Congress passed a bipartisan infrastructure bill. And President Biden signed it on Monday (November 15, 2021). To be clear, I’m not claiming that America doesn’t need any investment in infrastructure. Perhaps it needs it, and perhaps it’s a better idea than social spending on unemployment benefits that discourage work. I don’t want to argue about the adequacy of large government infrastructure projects, although government spending generally fails to stimulate genuine economic growth and governments rarely outperform the private sector in effectiveness. My point is that $1.2 trillion infrastructure spending is coming at the worst possible moment. The US economy is facing supply shortages and high inflation caused by surging demand, which choked the ports and factories. In short, too much money is chasing too few goods, and policymakers decided to add additional money into the already blocked supply chains! I have no words of admiration for the intellectual abilities of the members of Congress and the White House! Indeed, the spending plan does not have to be inflationary if financed purely by taxes and borrowing. However, the Fed will likely monetize at least part of the newly issued federal debt, and you know, to build or repair infrastructure, workers are needed, and steel, and concrete, and energy. The infrastructure spending, thus, will add pressure to the ongoing energy crisis and high producer price inflation, not to mention the shortage of workers. Implications for Gold What does the passing of the infrastructure bill imply for the gold market? Well, it should be supportive of the yellow metal. First, it will increase the fiscal deficits by additional billions of dollars (the Congressional Budget Office estimates that the bill will enlarge the deficits by $256 billion). Second, government spending will add to the inflationary pressure, which gold should also welcome. After all, gold recalled last week that it is a hedge against high and accelerating inflation. As the chart below shows, gold not only jumped above the key level of $1,800, but it even managed to cross $1,850 on renewed inflation worries. The infrastructure bill was probably discounted by the traders, so its impact on the precious metals market should be limited. However, generally, all news that could intensify inflationary fears should be supportive of the yellow metal. You see, the narrative has changed. So far, the thinking was that higher inflation implies faster tapering and interest rates hikes and, thus, lower gold prices. This is why gold was waiting on the sidelines for the past several months despite high inflation. Investors also believed that inflation would be transitory. However, the recent CPI report forced the markets to embrace the fact that inflation could be more persistent. What’s more, tapering of quantitative easing started, which erased some downward pressure on gold. Moreover, despite the slowdown in the pace of asset purchases, the Fed will maintain its accommodative stance and stay behind the curve. So, at the moment, the reasoning is that high inflation implies elevated fears, which is good for gold. I have always believed that gold’s more bullish reaction to accelerating inflation was a matter of time. It’s possible that this time has just come. Having said that, investors should remember that market narratives can change quickly. At some point, the Fed will probably step in and send some hawkish signals, which could calm investors and pull some of them out of the gold market. My second concern is that gold could have reacted not to accelerating inflation, but rather to the plunge in the real interest rates. As the chart below shows, the yields on 10-year TIPS have dropped to -1.17, a level very close to the August bottom. When something reaches the bottom, it should rebound later. And if real interest rates start to rally, then gold could struggle again. However, I’ll stop complaining now and allow the bulls to celebrate the long-awaited breakout. It’s an interesting development compared to the last months, that’s for sure! If you enjoyed today’s free gold report, we invite you to check out our premium services. We provide much more detailed fundamental analyses of the gold market in our monthly Gold Market Overview reports and we provide daily Gold & Silver Trading Alerts with clear buy and sell signals. In order to enjoy our gold analyses in their full scope, we invite you to subscribe today. If you’re not ready to subscribe yet though and are not on our gold mailing list yet, we urge you to sign up. It’s free and if you don’t like it, you can easily unsubscribe. Sign up today! Arkadiusz Sieron, PhDSunshine Profits: Effective Investment through Diligence & Care
Market Quick Take - November 22, 2021

Market Quick Take - November 22, 2021

Saxo Bank Saxo Bank 22.11.2021 10:04
Summary:  Equity markets closed last week somewhat mixed, but the Asian session was mostly strong on indications that the Chinese PBOC is shifting its attitude on monetary policy toward easing. Elsewhere, the difficult wait for the Fed Chair nomination news continues this week ahead of the US Thanksgiving holiday on Thursday. Crude oil bounced after finding support overnight, but the risk of SPR release and Covid demand worries still linger. What is our trading focus? Nasdaq 100 (USNAS100.I) and S&P 500 (US500.I) - a new week following a new all-time high in US equities on the close on Friday, which is starting with Nasdaq 100 futures opening up higher trading around the 16,610 level in early European trading. Last week showed that investors and traders are utilizing the Covid-19 lockdown playbook selling off physical companies while buying online companies that are better equipped to navigate new lockdowns in Europe. With the US 10-year yield remaining in a range around the 1.55% there is nothing from preventing equities from extending recent gains. EURUSD and EURGBP – new Covid restrictions across Europe, which has become the center of the latest Covid wave, have crimped sentiment for the euro, as has the still very elevated power and natural gas prices. EURUSD has traded back down toward the lows of the cycle near 1.1265 overnight, with the next psychological magnet lower likely the 1.1000 area as long as the big 1.1500 break level continues to provide resistance. In EURGBP, last week saw the break of the prior major pivot low near 0.8400, with the next objective the post-Brexit vote low near 0.8275. USDJPY – threatened support on Friday on a spike lower in long US treasury, but a reversal of much of that action by this morning in late Asian trading is likewise seeing USDJPY trying to recover back into the higher range, with a focus on the recent top just short of 115.00. We likely need for long US treasury yields to sustain a move higher to support a major foray above this huge 114.5-115.00 chart area, which has topped the market action since early 2017. Meanwhile, if risk sentiment worsens further in EM and darkens the outlook for JPY carry trades there, while US treasuries remains rangebound or head lower, the JPY could squeeze higher as the speculative interest is tilted heavily short. Gold (XAUUSD) extended Friday’s drop below $1850 overnight, before bouncing ahead of key support in the $1830-35 area. The risk of a quicker withdrawal of Fed stimulus supporting real yields and the dollar has for now reduced gold's ability to build on the technical breakout. However, the price softness on Friday helped attract ETF buying with Bloomberg reporting a 10 tons increase, the biggest one-day jump since January 15. Gold’s biggest short-term threat remains the tripling of futures long held by funds during the past seven weeks to a 14-month. Most of that buying being technical driven with the risk of long liquidation now looming on a break below the mentioned support level.   Crude oil (OILUKJAN22 & OILUSDEC21) opened softer in Asia after Friday’s big drop but has so far managed to find support at $77.85, the previous top from July. The market focus has during the past few weeks shifted from the current tight supply to the risk of a coordinated reserve release, a renewed Covid-driven slowdown in demand and recent oil market reports from the EIA and IEA pointing to a balanced market in early 2022. Speculators who for the last six weeks have been net sellers of crude oil futures cut their combined WTI and Brent long to a three-month low in the week to November 16. Focus on SPR and Covid risks this week US treasuries (SHY, IEF, TLT). Government bond yields worldwide dropped as new lockdown measures were imposed in Austria on Friday. Ten-year yields tumbled to 1.55%, and they are likely to continue to trade range-bound as the debt ceiling issue will continue to compress long-term yields as volatility peaks in money markets. Investors will focus on this week’s PCE index, FOMC minutes and any news regarding a change of leadership of the Federal Reserve. If Brainard is appointed as Fed chair, the market will expect low rates for longer, thus inflation expectations will advance putting upward pressure on yields. Thus, it is unavoidable to continue to see the 5s30s continue to flatten. German Bunds (IS0L). We expect European sovereigns, in general, to continue to benefit from news related to a surge of Covid cases and lack of collateral as the year ends. Yet, the perception of inflation is changing among ECB members with Isabel Schnabel last week saying that the central bank will need to be ready to act if inflation proves more durable. Therefore, as we enter in the new year, and collateral shortages will be eased, we anticipate spreads to resume their widening. What is going on? Fed Vice Chair Clarida suggests faster Fed taper - in comments on Friday, suggesting that the December FOMC meeting could speed the pace at which the Fed will reduce its asset purchases. “I’ll be looking closely at the data that we get between now and the December meeting...It may well be appropriate at that meeting to have a discussion about increasing the pace at which we are reducing our asset purchases.” China’s central bank signals that it may ease policy. In a monetary policy report from Friday, the PBOC dropped language from prior reports, including phrase suggesting that the bank will maintain “normal monetary policy” and a promise not to “flood the economy with stimulus”. This comes in the wake of considerable disruption in the property sector as the government cracks down on an overleveraged property sector. Asian equities were mostly higher on the news, especially in Korea, although the Hang Seng index was slightly in the red as of this writing. Ericsson to acquire cloud provider Vonage in $6.2bn deal. This pushes the Swedish telecommunication company into the cloud communication industry seeking to add more growth to the overall business. Vonage has delivered 11% revenue growth in the past 12 months hitting $1.4bn with an operating margin of 10.4%. Global proceeds from IPOs hit $600bn in record year. This is the biggest amount since 2007 and almost 200% above the level in 2019 highlighting the excessive risk sentiment in equities. More confusing signals from Bank of England. Governor Bailey said in an interview for the Sunday Times that risks to the country are “two-sided” at the moment as growth slows and inflation rises, and that the cause of inflation problems is supply side constraints and that “monetary policy isn’t going to solve those directly.” Similarly, BoE Chief Economist Huw Pill said on Friday that the Bank of England said that the weight of evidence was shifting in favour of rate hikes but that he has not yet made a decision, encouraging observers to focus on the longer term rather than meeting-to-meeting decision. US shared intelligence with allies suggesting potential for Russia to invade Ukraine - according to Bloomberg sources. The intelligence noted up to 100,000 soldiers could be deployed in such a scenario, and that some half of that number are already in position.  Russian president Vladimir Putin denied Russia intends to invade, but seemed to pat himself on the back for “having gotten the attention of the US and is allies, which he accused of failing to take Russia’s ‘red lines’ over Ukraine seriously”, as the article puts it. What are we watching next? Who will US President Biden nominate to head the Fed next February? Powell is still seen as more likely to get the nod that Brainard by roughly two to one, and this Fed Chair nomination issue is hanging over the markets, as the current Fed chair term ends in early February and from comments made last week by President Biden, an announcement could come any day. One uncertainty that would come with a Brainard nomination is the potential difficulty of having her nomination approved by the Senate. The nomination news could generate significant short-term volatility on the choice of the nominally more dovish Lael Brainard over current Fed Chair Powell, though we see little difference in the medium-longer term implications for monetary policy, and the Fed is likely to get a prominent new regulatory role either way (under Brainard or someone else if she is nominated to replace Powell). Will Germany announce a Covid lockdown? - Friday saw some volatility on Austria’s announcement of a full Covid lockdown, with Germany’s health minister saying that a similar move in Germany could not be ruled out. Later that day, that was contradicted by comments from another minister. Meanwhile, resistance against Covid restrictions has turned violent in Netherlands. Earnings Watch – the number of important earnings is falling rapidly, but this week Tuesday is the most important day with key earnings from Xiaomi, XPeng and Kuaishou, both important Chinese technology companies. Also on Tuesday, US companies such as Medtronic, Autodesk and Dell Technologies are worth watching. Monday: Sino Pharmaceutical, Prosus, Zoom Video, Agilent Technologies Tuesday: Xiaomi, Kuaishou Technology, Compass Group, Medtronic, Analog Devices, Autodesk, VMWare, Dell Technologies, XPeng, HP, Best Buy, Dollar Tree Wednesday: Deere, Thursday: Adevinta Friday: Meituan, Pinduoduo Economic calendar highlights for today (times GMT) 0900 - Switzerland SNB weekly sight deposit data1330 – US Chicago Fed Oct. National Activity Index1500 – US Oct. Existing Home Sales1730 – ECB's Guindos to speak2145 – New Zealand Q3 Retail Sales2200 – Australia Nov. Flash Services & Manufacturing PMI0105 – Australia RBA’s Kohler to speak Follow SaxoStrats on the daily Saxo Markets Call on your favorite podcast app: Apple Spotify Soundcloud Sticher
Gold's 1780s Are Driving Us Crazy!

Gold's 1780s Are Driving Us Crazy!

Mark Mead Baillie Mark Mead Baillie 06.12.2021 08:31
The Gold Update by Mark Mead Baillie --- 629th Edition --- Monte-Carlo --- 04 December 2021 (published each Saturday) --- www.deMeadville.com In completing its 48th trading week of 2021, Gold settled yesterday (Friday) at 1784. 'Twas the eighth week this year that Gold has settled in the 1780s (the first occurrence being on 19 February). Indeed, Gold's median weekly settle price year-to-date is 1788. Yet as anybody engaged in the Gold Story knows, Gold first traded in the 1780s a decade ago on 09 August 2011, the U.S "M2" money supply that day at $9.5 trillion; (today 'tis $21.5 trillion). So to reprise that from the "You Cannot Be Wrong Dept.": should anyone ask you "off the cuff" what is the price of Gold, your instantaneous response of "1780" shall (so 'twould seem for the foreseeable future) not only be correct, but enhance your dazzling intellectual image. To reprise as well "The M Word" crowd, clearly their parking place of preference is Gold's 1780s. Of the 233 trading days year to date, 27 of Gold's closures exceeding 1800 have -- within the five ensuing trading days -- found price settle in the 1780s, or lower. "1800? SELL!" Sheesh... Gold's 1780s are driving us crazy! Regardless, Gold -- and moreover Silver -- are doing what markets do when their technicals turn negative: price goes down. Per our Market Magnets page, Gold from 1861 on 18 November found price then pierce down through its Magnet: "SELL!" From our Market Trends page, Gold from 1847 on 19 November found the "Baby Blues" of trend consistency begin to plummet: "SELL!" From our Market Values page, Gold from 1805 on 22 November crossed below its smooth valuation line: "SELL!" More mainstream technical signals have since followed to "SELL!" And recall -- just prior to it all in our anticipating near-term selling -- we nonetheless deemed the 1800s as "safe": "WRONG!" Having thus now driven you crazy, we obviously deem holding and buying Gold as "RIGHT!" especially as the stock market -- be this another false signal or otherwise -- finds the S&P 500 doing its dance of a snake in death throes. To be sure we've seen such before, only to see the Index magically survive, indeed thrive. You veteran readers of The Gold Update may recall some six years ago (on 23 January 2016) our characterizing the S&P as being in such "death throes", the ensuing three weeks then finding the Index fall 5% from a "live" price/earnings ratio of 43x; (today 'tis 47x). "But don't forget it's now time for the Santa Claus Rally, mmb..." Yet another conventional wisdom notion there, Squire, via your appreciated "leading comment". Irrespective of what "everybody says" and expects, Santa Claus doesn't always come to Wall Street. Since 1980, as measured yearly from 01-to-24 December, Santa has skipped gifting the stock market 11 times. "WHAT?" 'Tis true. For those of you scoring at home, the S&P recorded net losses across that festive stint in '80, '81, '83, '86, '96, '97, '00, '02, '08, '15 and '18, the latter being a 409-point (-14.8%) loss. (Advice to the stocking stuffer: buy coal ... nudge-nudge, wink-wink, elbow-elbow). Moreover, have you been monitoring the major market dislocations of late? Talk about the maligning of conventional wisdom! In yesterday's session, the €uro, Swiss Franc, ¥en -- and yes the Dollar Index too -- all closed higher. "WHAT?" 'Tis true. Still, even as there is Dollar demand given the prospect of it paying a positive interest rate, the yield on the U.S. Treasury Bond continues to fall: 'twas 2.177% on 08 October, but is down now to 1.678%. In fact across our BEGOS Markets (Bond, Euro/Swiss, Gold/Silver/Copper, Oil, S&P 500), the price of the Bond is the only component with a positive 21-day linear regression trend. "WHAT?" 'Tis true. And then there's Oil: by our Market Values page, Black Gold settled yesterday 15 points below its smooth valuation line (66.22 vs. 81.51), even as Oil Inventories fell. "WHAT?" 'Tis true, (albeit OPEC is gonna keep a-pumpin'). Still, by that measure, Oil's price is massively, -- indeed deflationarily -- dislocated near-term from value. Too as noted, the Price of the S&P continues to be ridicously dislocated from the support of its Earnings; but if you get your dumbed-down P/E of 28.1x from the media, when 'tis honestly 47.4x, go ahead and say it: "WHAT?" 'Tis true. 'Course, the ongoing and most overwhelming dislocation is the price of Gold vis-à-vis our Scoreboard Dollar-debasement valuation (1784 vs. 4008). Say no more, Igor. A December to remember? Early on, 'tis the season to be dislocated. To which naturally (as subtly stated) we find Gold located in the 1780s. Why expect it to be anywhere else? So spot-on is Gold in the 1780s that per the following graphic of weekly price, the rightmost close is right on the dashed regression trendline. So are the 1780s driving you crazy, too? At least Gold's parabolic trend still is Long, although the aforementioned negative technicals have kept on the lid, (to say nothing of "The M Word" crowd?). Note as well the 79.1x reading of the Gold/Silver, ratio, essentially at a two-month high, the white metal having been terribly on the skids of late: Anything but skidding these last couple of months has been our Economic Barometer, it now having reached its highest oscillative level in better than three years. Whilst nominally last week's 13 incoming metrics were quite mixed, their overall effect net of prior period revisions and consensus expectations was to launch the Baro higher still as we here see: Amongst the improvers were November's Unemployment Rate and Average Workweek, plus both the Manufacturing and Services readings from the Institute for Supply Management, along with October's Construction Spending, Factory Orders and Pending Home Sales. However: November's ADP Employment data, Labor's Non-farm Payrolls and Hourly Earnings, the Chicago Purchasing Managers' Index and the Conference Board's read on Consumer Confidence were all weaker. Therein, too, is the red line of the S&P 500, its aforementioned snaky death throes throwing the Index all over the place this past week. The S&P's intra-day runs were as follows: Mon +48, Tue -86, Wed -143, Thu +91, Fri -113. Want some perspective for that? The entire trading range of the S&P 500 for the year 2004 was less than this past Wednesday's session alone. "WHAT?" 'Tis true. 'Course, back in 2004, 'twas a greater percentage range, but at least the average P/E for that year was a "reasonable" (vs. today) 26.4x. Thus again is begged the question: "Has the S&P crashed yet?" Obviously not, but we're feelin' very leery 'bout January. "As goes January..."(although you regular readers know we've demonstrably debunked that conventional notion as well). BUT... As for the Federal Reserve's removing of the punch bowl, Atlanta FedPrez Raphael "Ready to Raise" Bostic again says its time to step up the Taper of Paper Caper, whilst FedGov Randal "Have No" Quarles says 'tis time for The Bank to prepare to raise. And as noted in last week's missive: were it not for the "Oh my! Omicron!" scare, we could well see a FedFunds rate hike in the FOMC's 26 January Policy Statement. So just keep wearing your masque such that everything's great, and in turn let the Fed increase its rate! Here's another positive from the "Good Is Bad Dept.": the StateSide government shan't run out of money this time 'round until 18 February. Low on dough? To Congress you go! Just ask TreaSec Yellen, for she's in the know! Ho-ho-ho... Either way, west of The Pond "inflation" remains the watchword -- or if you prefer the real word -- as the word "transitory" is being transited away. East of The Pond, the EuroZone (just 23 years young) sees its inflation level hitting record high levels; but should it be peaking, 'tis thought any European Central Bank rate rise shan't next year materialize. And lacking any upside mobility of late (duh) are our precious metals, the following two-panel graphic bearing along as butt ugly. On the left we've Gold's daily bars from three months ago-to-date, their cascading "Baby Blues" reinforcing price's downtrend, (although price never really departs the 1780s, right?). On the right similarly is the same story for Sister Silver, who clearly is suffering the ravages of DDS ("Dangerfield Disrespect Syndrome"), by which she's none too happy. For from the precious metals' respective highs of just three weeks back, Gold has dropped as much as -5.8% ... but Silver more than double that at -12.6%! "WHAT?" 'Tis true: Meanwhile, still dwellers in their Profile cellars are Gold (below left) and Silver (below right). Here is the entirety of their trading across the last two weeks, the high volume price apices as labeled. And that is a lot of overhead work to do: So after all of that, are you ready to tune out? You can't be so blamed. Gold's 1780s have got us all crazy! Puts us in mind of that iconic glamour rock hit by Sparks from back in '83 -- supportive of the film by the same name -- "Get Crazy"Tune it in on your radio dial: sure to bring a you a Golden Smile! Cheers! ...m... www.deMeadville.com
Semblance of Stability Returns though Geopolitical Tensions Rise

Semblance of Stability Returns though Geopolitical Tensions Rise

Marc Chandler Marc Chandler 06.12.2021 12:39
December 06, 2021  $USD, China, Currency Movement, EU, Hungary, Italy, Russia Overview:  The absence of negative developments surrounding Omicron over the weekend appears to be helping markets stabilize today after the dramatic moves at the end of last week.  Asia Pacific equities traded heavily, and among the large markets, only South Korea and Australia escaped unscathed today.  Europe's Stoxx 600 is trading higher, led by energy, financials, and materials.  US futures are narrowly mixed.  Similarly, Asia Pacific bonds played a little catch-up with the large Treasury rally ahead of the weekend.  The US 10-year had approached 1.30% but is now up almost four basis points to almost 1.39%.  European yields are also a little firmer, though Italian bonds are outperforming after the pre-weekend credit upgrade by Fitch. The dollar is mixed.  The yen and Swiss franc are the heaviest, while the Scandis lead the advancers.  Among the emerging market currencies, most liquid and freely accessible currencies are higher, while India, Indonesia, and Turkey are trading lower.  The JP Morgan Emerging Market Currency Index has a four-week drop in tow and is starting the new week with a small gain.  Gold initially moved higher but is now little changed.  Iron ore and copper remain firm.  January WTI is trading firmly within the pre-weekend range, while natural gas, which collapsed by 24% in the US last week, extended its sell-off today.  European natural gas (Dutch benchmark) is trading lower after rising for the past five weeks.   Asia Pacific As tipped by Chinese Premier Li last week, the PBOC cut reserve requirement by 0.5%.  This frees up an estimated CNY1.2 trillion.  Many market participants had anticipated the timing to help banks pay back borrowing from the Medium-Term Lending Facility.  Banks owe about CNY950 bln on December 15 and another CNY500 bln on January 15.   Separately, several property developers have debt serving payments due and Evergrande is at the end of a grace period today.  Lastly, the US and a few other countries are expected to announce a diplomatic boycott of the Winter Olympics.  This is seen as largely symbolic as few diplomats were going to attend due to the severe quarantine imposed by Chinese officials.   China needs bargaining leverage if it is going to influence US policy.  It might come from an unexpected source.   While recent press reports focused on China's attempt to project its power into Africa, they have missed a potentially more impactful development.  Consider the Caribbean, which the US often acts as if it is theirs.  Barbados became a constitutional republic last week, though it is still a member of the UK Commonwealth.  The left-of-center government is friendly toward Beijing.  Under the Belt Road Initiative, Barbados and Jamaica have received several billion dollars from China.  Moreover, a recent US State Department report found that the two countries have voted against the US around 75% of the time at the UN last year.   This week, the regional highlights include the Reserve Bank of Australia (outcome first thing tomorrow in Wellington) and the Reserve Bank of India (December 8).  The RBA may revise up its economic outlook, yet, it is likely to continue to push against market expectations for an early hike.  The derivatives market appears to have the first hike priced in for late next summer.    India is expected to be on hold until early next year but could surprise with a hike.  China is expected to report trade figures tomorrow and the November CPI and PPI on Wednesday.  Lending figures may be released before the weekend.  Japan's highlights include October labor earnings and household spending tomorrow, the current account, and the final Q3 GDP on Wednesday.   The dollar's range against the yen on November 30 (~JPY112.55-JPY113.90) remains dominant.  It has not traded outside of that range since then.  The rise in US yields and equities has helped the dollar regain a toehold above JPY113.00.  The pre-weekend high was near JPY113.60, which might be too far today.  The Australian dollar traded below $0.7000 before the weekend and again today, but the selling pressure abated, and the Aussie has traded to about $0.7040. A band of resistance from $0.7040 to $0.7060 may be sufficient to cap it today.   The dollar has been in essentially the same range against the Chinese yuan for three sessions (~CNY6.3670-CNY6.3770).  If the dollar cannot get back above CNY6.38, a new and lower range will appear to be established.  The PBOC set the dollar's reference rate at CNY6.3702.  The market (Bloomberg median) had projected CNY6.3690.   Europe Germany's new government will take office in the middle of the week.  It has three pressing challenges.  First is the surge in Covid, even before the Omicron variant was detected.  Second, the economy is weak.  Last week's final PMI reading picked up some deterioration since the flash report and the 0.2 gain in the composite PMI more than 10.0 point fall in the previous three months. Third, today Germany reported dreadful factory orders.  The market had expected a slight pullback after the 1.3% gain in September.  The good news is that the September series was revised to a 1.8% gain.  However, this is more than offset by the 6.9% plummet in October orders.  If there is a silver lining here, it is that domestic orders rose 3.4% after falling in August and September.  Foreign orders plunged 13.1%, and orders from the eurozone fell by 3.2% (after falling 6.6% in September).  Orders outside the euro area collapsed by 18.1%.  The sharp drop in factory orders warns of downside risk to tomorrow's industrial production report.  Industrial output fell by 3.5% in August and 1.1% in September. Before today's report, economists were looking for a 1% gain.  Germany also reports the December ZEW survey tomorrow. Again, sentiment is expected to have deteriorated.  The third issue is Russia.  Reports suggest the US has persuaded Europe that Russia is positioned to invade Ukraine early next year.  US intelligence assessment sees Russia planning a multifront offensive.  Putin and Biden are to talk tomorrow.  Meanwhile, Putin makes his first foreign visit today in six months.  He is in India.  India is buying an estimated $5 bln of Russian weapons, including the S-400 anti-aircraft system that Turkey purchased to the dismay of Washington, which banned it from the F-35 fighter jet program.  India is a member of the Quad (with the US, Japan, and Australia), a bulwark against China.  A Russian official was quoted in the press claiming India sent a strong message to the US that it would not tolerate sanctions against it.  The regional alliances are blurry, to say the least. The US maintains ties with Pakistan.  India has had border skirmishes with China.  Russia and China have joint military exercises.   Before the weekend, Fitch upgraded Itay's credit rating one notch to BBB.  It cited the high vaccination rate, increased public and private spending, and confidence in the Draghi-led government's ability to spend the 200 bln euro funds from the EC prudently.  Recall that last week's composite PMI rose to 57.6 to snap a two-month decline.  The market (Bloomberg median) sees the Italian economy as one of the strongest in Europe this year, expanding around 6.3%.  The IMF sees it at 5.8%. The euro has been confined to about a quarter-cent range on both sides of $1.1300.  It is within the pre-weekend range (~$1.1265-$1.1335).  It was offered in Asia and turned better bid in the European morning.  Still, the consolidative tone is likely to continue through the North American session.  A move above the 20-day moving average (~$1.1335), which has not occurred for over a month, would help lift the technical tone.  Sterling tested $1.3200 before the weekend, and it held.  The steadier tone today saw it test the $1.3265 area.  It will likely remain in its trough today, though a move above the $1.3280-$1.3300 area would be constructive.   America Today's US data includes the "final" look at Q3 productivity and unit labor costs.  These are derived from the GDP and are typically not market-movers.  The US also reported that the October trade balance and improvement have been tipped by the advance merchandise trade report.  October consumer credit is due late in the session, and another hefty rise is expected ($25 bln after nearly $30 bln in September.  Consumer credit has risen by an average of $20.3 bln this year.  It fell last year and averaged $15.3 bln in the first nine months of 2019.  No Fed officials speak this week, and the economic highlight is the November CPI report at the end of the week.   Canada reports October trade figures and IVEY survey tomorrow.  The highlight of the week is the Bank of Canada decision on Wednesday.  It is not expected to do anything, but officials will likely be more confident in the economic recovery, especially after the very strong jobs report before the weekend.  The Canadian dollar's challenge is that the market has five hikes already discounted for the next 12 months.  Mexico reports November vehicle production and exports today.  The economic highlights come in the second half of the week.  November CPI on Thursday is expected to see the headline rate rise above 7%.  Last month alone, consumer prices are projected to have risen by 1%.  On Friday, Mexico is expected to report that industrial output rose by 0.9% in October after falling 1.4% in September.  Brazil reports its vehicle production and exports today and October retail sales on Thursday before the central bank meeting.  A 150 bp increase in the Selic rate, the second such move in a row, has been tipped and will put the key rate at 9.25%.  Ahead of the weekend, the IPCA measure of inflation is due.  It is expected to have ticked up closer to 11% (from 10.67%).  Lastly, we note that Peru is expected to deliver another 50 bp increase to its reference rate on Thursday, which would lift it to 2.5%.   The US dollar posted an outside up day against the Canadian dollar ahead of the weekend.  The risk-off mood overwhelmed the positive implications of the strong jobs data.  There has been no follow-through selling of the Canadian dollar today.  The pre-weekend US dollar low near CAD1.2745 is key.  Last Wednesday's range remains intact for the greenback against the Mexican peso (~MXN21.1180-MXN21.5150).  So far today, it has been confined to the pre-weekend range.   Initial support is seen near MXN21.16.  The cap around MXN21.50 looks solid.  Meanwhile, the US dollar closed above BRL5.60 for six consecutive sessions coming into today.   Disclaimer
Animal Spirits Roar Back

Animal Spirits Roar Back

Marc Chandler Marc Chandler 07.12.2021 16:47
December 07, 2021  $USD, Canada, China, Currency Movement, Germany, Hungary, Japan, Mexico, RBA, Russia, US Overview:  A return of risk appetites can be seen through the capital markets today, arguably encouraged by ideas that Omicron is manageable and China's stimulus.  Led by Hong Kong and Japan, the MSCI Asia Pacific rose by the most in three months, while Europe's Stoxx 600 gapped higher, leaving a potentially bullish island bottom in its wake.  US futures point to a gap higher opening when the local session begins.  The bond market is taking it in stride.  The US 10-year Treasury is slightly firmer at 1.44%, while European yields are 1-3 bp higher.  The dollar-bloc currencies and Norway are leading the move higher among most major currencies.  The yen and euro are softer.  Sterling struggles to sustain upticks. Among emerging markets currencies, the Turkish lira is bouncing, while most central European currencies are being dragged lower by the weaker euros.  The JP Morgan Emerging Market Currency Index is slightly higher after four consecutive losses.  Gold is trading within yesterday's narrow range.  Oil continues to recover, and the January WTI contract is up around 2.5% (after yesterday's 4.9% advance) and is above $71.50 a barrel.  US natgas prices dropped 11.5% yesterday and have come back firmer today, while the European benchmark (Dutch) is up 7% today (~+0.5% yesterday) to near last week's highs.  Iron ore prices jumped 7.7% today after 2.5% yesterday, perhaps encouraged by strong Chinese import figures.  Copper prices are also firm.    Asia Pacific The Reserve Bank of Australia stuck to its stance. It may take two years to reach the 2-3% inflation target, and the uncertainties surrounding the Omicron variant also favor a cautious approach. This was in line with expectations.  The swaps market still has about 75 bp of higher rates discounted next year.   The Australian dollar's gains reflect the risk-on mood.   Japan's economy is on the mend.  Household spending rose 3.4% month-over-month in October.  Paradoxically, outlays on medical care actually fell (-5.7%) year-over-year in October.  Meanwhile, Labor cash earnings rose by 0.2% year-over-year, the same as in September, but less than expected.  Households headed by a worker rose 0.5% year-over-year.   China's trade surplus fell to $71.7 bln in November from $84.5 bln in October.  The US accounted for a little more than 50% of the surplus (~$37 bln).  Exports rose by 22% year-over-year, less than the 27.1% increase in October.  But, what really stood out were China's imports.  They surged, jumping 31.7% from a year ago after a 20.6% increase in October.  Commodity imports were robust.  The 35 mln tons of coal imported was the most this year. Oil imports were at three-month highs.  Iron ore imports reached a 13-month high,  Gas purchases were the highest since January.  Copper imports appear to be a record.  Separately, China reported that the value of its foreign exchange reserves rose by a minor $4.7 bln to $3.222 trillion.  Economists (Bloomberg survey median) had expected around an $11 bln decline.   The dollar has forged what appears to be a solid base now around JPY112.55.  So far, today is the first session since November 26 that the greenback has held above JPY113.00.  It has been confined to a narrow range between JPY113.40 and JPY113.75.  The dollar looks poised to move higher but may stall around JPY114.00, where an option for around $865 mln expires today.  The Australian dollar rose about half of a cent yesterday and is up around another half-cent today to test $0.7100.  An option for A$1.04 bln expires today there ($0.7100).  It is also the (61.8%) retracement objective of last week's drop.  A move above there would target the $0.7130 area and possibly $0.7200.  The reduction in Chinese banks' reserve requirements and the divergence with the direction the Fed appears headed did not deter the yuan from strengthening.  The dollar held CNY6.38 yesterday and is near CNY6.3660 now.  The low for the year was set at the end of May near CNY6.3570.  The dollar's reference rate was set at CNY6.3738, a touch higher than the models (Bloomberg survey) projected of CNY6.3734.   Europe According to the proverb, for want of a nail, a kingdom was lost.  US intelligence warns that Russia is poised to invade Ukraine.  Beijing continues to act as a bully in the South China Sea.  US President Biden is hosting a "Summit for Democracy" December 9-10.   Reportedly 110 countries will be represented, even Taiwan, which the US officially does not recognize as a country.  All of the EU members have been invited but Hungary.  Hungary, like Poland, is in a serious fight with the EC over the rule of law.  It is being fined for failing to comply with the European Court of Justice over its harsh treatment of asylum seekers.  Poland, which is invited to the summit, is also being fined a record 1 mln euros a day for deviations from the EU standards of the rule of law.   Yet Hungary's exclusion is needlessly antagonistic.  Hungary will hold parliamentary elections in April (though possibly May), and the opposition is united behind the center-right Marki-Zay.  Most polls show him ahead of Orban.   It is an insult to the EU, and Orban used his veto to block the EU from formally participating and prevented it from submitting a position paper.  It is a vulnerable position for the US to be the judge and jury about democracy and the rule of law.   Laura Thorton, director of the Alliance for Securing Democracy of the German Marshall Fund of the United States, expressed shock and dismay in a recent Washington Post op-ed over developments in Wisconsin. She wrote, "If this [where the GOP is seeking to replace the bipartisan oversight of elections with just its party's control] occurred in any of the countries where the US provides aid, it would immediately be called out as a threat to democracy.  US diplomats would be writing furious cables, and decision-makers would be threatening to cut off the flow of assistance."  Separately, the US embassy in Tokyo warned Japan about "racially profiling incidents" following the closure of its borders to new foreign entries into the country.   The US response to the Russian aggression in Georgia in 2008 and the annexation of Crimea in 2014 was soft.  Despite bringing NATO to Russia's door in the Baltics, the US recognized by its actions that it is difficult to defend what Russia calls its near-abroad. Ukraine is different.  When Ukraine gave up its nuclear weapons, the Budapest Memorandum  (1994), Russia, the US, and the UK committed to respecting its independence and territorial integrity.  Russia clearly violated the agreement, but the US says it is not legally binding.  Nevertheless, reports indicate that the Biden administration is contemplating new sanctions against Russia and Putin's inner circle.  Reportedly under consideration is removing Russia from the SWIFT payment system and new sanctions of Russia's energy companies, banks, and sovereign debt.  In late April, the European Parliament approved a non-binding resolution to exclude Russia from the SWIFT if it attacked Ukraine.  Russia is a heavy user of SWIFT, as few foreign banks, including the Chinese, are willing to use Russia's own payment system.  After a dismal factory orders report, the market had been prepared for a poor industrial output report today.  Instead, Germany surprised with its strongest gain for the year.  Industrial output surged 2.8% in October.   It is only the third monthly gain this year.  Moreover, September's decline of 1.1% was halved to 0.5%.  It appears auto production (capital goods) may be behind the improvement in activity.  Separately, the ZEW survey was mixed.  The expectations component was stronger than expected, but still, at 29.9, lower than November's 31.7 reading.  The assessment of the current situation deteriorated sharply to -7.4 from 12.5.  It has been declining since September, but this is the lowest since June.  On November 30, the euro spiked higher and has subsequently worked its way lower.  Today, it reached almost $1.1250, its lowest level since November 30, low near $1.1235. The 20-day moving average (~$1.1320) continues to block the upside.  It has not closed above it for a little more than a month.  The low for the year so far was recorded on November 24 near $1.1185.  For its part, sterling remains in its trough. The low for the year was set on November 30, slightly below $1.32.  Before the weekend, it was in a roughly $1.3210-$1.3310 range and remains well within that range yesterday and today.  It has been blocked ahead of $1.3300.  There is an option for about GBP450 mln at $1.3250 that expires today.   America The US is expected to report that productivity fell in Q3 by 4.9% rather than the 5% that was initially reported.  Productivity increased by 2.4% in Q2 and 4.3% in Q1.  It averaged 2.6% last year and 2.3% in 2019.  Unit labor costs are the most holistic measure, including wages, benefits, and output.  Looking at a four-quarter moving average, unit labor costs rose 1.6% in 2018 and 1.45% in 2019.  They jumped to 6.25% last year and fell by an average of 0.85% in H1 21.  The initial estimate for Q3 was an 8.3% surge.   The US also reports the October trade balance.  The preliminary goods balance signaled a likely improvement from the $80.9 bln deficit in September.  The median forecast (Bloomberg) sees a deficit of slightly less than $67 bln.  Through September, the monthly average was nearly $71 bln, up from $53.3 bln in the same period last year and less than a $50 bln average in the first nine months of 2019. Late in the session, the US reports October consumer credit, and another substantial increase is expected.  It jumped almost $30 bln in September.  It has averaged $20.275 bln a month through September.  Last year was too distorted, but in the first three quarters of 2019, consumer credit rose by an average of $15.3 bln a month.    Canada reports its October merchandise trade figures today, ahead of the Bank of Canada meeting tomorrow  The median forecast in Bloomberg's survey call for a C$2.08 bln surplus, which, if accurate, would the be third largest surplus since 2008.  The June surplus was larger at C$2.26, as was the December 2011 surplus of C$2.12 bln.   Canada's goods trade balance through September swung into surplus with an average of C$703 mln.  In the same period in 2020, the monthly deficit averaged C$3.1 bln and  C$1.4 bln in 2019.  The merchandise surplus may be sufficient to lift the current account too.  Canada has been running a current account deficit since 2009.   The OECD forecasts a surplus this year of 0.3% of GDP and projects it to be in balance next year.  Canada and Mexico have expressed concerns about the credits for electric vehicles in the Build Back Better US initiative.  They claim it violates the USMCA.  Europe has expressed similar problems, and the EU Trade Commissioner Dombrovskis has reportedly sent a formal letter warning that the Biden administration's efforts may also violate WTO rules.  Meanwhile, there is talk that the initiative may be blocked this year.  If this is the case, the odds of passage next year seem even slimmer.  On a different front, Mexico's controversial energy reforms, which expand the state sector, over some objections by US energy companies, look to be delayed due to lack of support.  The US dollar posted an outside up day against the Canadian dollar before the weekend, despite Canada's strong employment report.  There was no follow-through yesterday, and the greenback recorded an inside day and settled on its lows.  The US dollar has been sold to around CAD1.2700 today.  Initial support is around CAD1.2675, but the more significant test is near CAD1.2640.  A break would strengthen the conviction that a high is in place.  Meanwhile, the greenback continues to consolidate against the Mexican peso.  It remains within the range set last Wednesday (~MXN21.1180-MXN21.5150).  Thus far today, it is holding above yesterday's low (~MXN21.1720), which was- above the pre-weekend low (~MXN21.1625).            Disclaimer
Bitcoin Weekly Forecast: BTC to provide the biggest buying opportunity before $100,000

Bitcoin Weekly Forecast: BTC to provide the biggest buying opportunity before $100,000

FXStreet News FXStreet News 17.12.2021 14:41
Bitcoin price is in a massive accumulation phase before it explodes to $100,000 or more. The bull run is likely to begin after a deep correction to MicroStrategy’s average buy price at $29,860. On-chain metrics suggest that long-term holders are booking profit, adding a tailwind to the bearish thesis. Bitcoin price has been hanging around the $50,000 psychological level for quite some time. A breakdown of one crucial support barrier is likely to trigger a steep crash for BTC. On-chain metrics are also suggesting that long-term holders are booking profits, anticipating a nosedive. Bitcoin price and MicroStrategy’s accumulation Bitcoin price has been stuck between the 21-week Simple Moving Average (SMA) at $51,782 and the 50-week SMA at $44,730 for roughly two weeks. Although BTC pierced through the 50-week SMA on December 4 crash, it recovered quickly. As the sell-off continues, the big crypto is slowly slithering its way to retest the vital support level. A weekly close below the 50-week SMA at $44,730 will indicate a major shift in trend from bullish to bearish. This development would also signal that Bitcoin price is due to collect liquidity resting below the $40,596 support level. While this liquidity run might knock BTC below $40,000, it is a temporary move. In the long run, investors can expect the pioneer crypto to consolidate here before heading to $30,000 or the liquidity resting below it. Interestingly this downswing is necessary to trigger the stop-losses resting below a critical $29,860 level, which is the average buy-in price of MicroStrategy. To date, the business intelligence software company has purchased 122,477 BTC, which is 0.53% of the total BTC in existence. The total value of Bitcoins held by MicroStrategy is worth $5.76 billion, which indicates a profit of roughly 56%. It is fair to assume that many whales or long-term holders that are betting on BTC have an average price at roughly the same level as MicroStrategy or a bit lower. Therefore, a dip below the average price of MicroStrategy at $29,860 will indicate a ‘max pain’ scenario and is likely to be where many investors may panic and sell to prevent losses. Market makers are likely to drive Bitcoin price to retest this barrier, therefore, or just below it. While this outlook is speculative, it would make sense for BTC, especially from a market makers’ perspective due to the supply resting below the multiple wicks present around the $30,000 psychological level. In total, this move would represent a 36% crash from the current position. Although unlikely, a worst-case scenario would be for BTC to fall by 48%, allowing it to retest the 200-week SMA at $23,935. BTC/USD 1-week chart IntoTheBlock’s Global In/Out of the Money (GIOM) model reflects the levels mentioned above. This on-chain index shows that the immediate cluster of investors that are “In the Money,” extends from $28,350 to $46,636. Roughly 5.23 million addresses purchased 3.13 million BTC at an average price of $38,283. Therefore, a weekly close below this level will cause panic selling among investors that could drag the big crypto down to sub-$30,000 levels. Moreover, any short-term buying pressure is likely to face massive headwinds as a massive cluster of underwater investors are present from $55,302 to $67,413. In this range, roughly 6.65 million addresses that purchased 3.37 million BTC are “Out of the Money.” Only a massive spike in buying pressure will be able to overcome the selling pressure from investors in this cluster trying to break even. Hence, the logical conclusion is that the outlook for BTC favors the bears. BTC GIOM The supply shock chart supports the bearish outlook for Bitcoin. It shows that the long-term holders are booking profits. Willy Woo, a popular analyst stated, long term holders have been selling down and taking profits, but as a cohort they continue to be in a region of peak accumulation. Bear markets coincide when these holders have divested of their coins, despite the fear in the market, structurally we are not setup for a bear market. BTC supply shock chart Further supporting a sell-off is the 0.83% decline in the number of whales holding between 100 to 100,000 BTC. Roughly 136 whales have offloaded their positions as seen in the supply shock chart above. BTC whale distribution chart The only chart that shows hope and presents the possibility of a short-term bullish outlook is the Market Value to Realized Value (MVRV) model, hovering around -1.8%. This on-chain metric is used to determine the average profit/loss of investors that purchased BTC over the past year. A negative value represents that short-term holders are selling and is often referred to as the “opportunity zone.” This is where mid-to-long-term holders accumulate. So, there is a chance that BTC might see a potential buying spree that pushes it to retest the 21-week SMA at $51,776 or reach for the $57,845 resistance barrier, in a highly bullish case. BTC 365-day MVRV While the scenario outlined above is undoubtedly bearish for short-term holders, it will provide long-term investors with a perfect buying opportunity. A retest of MicroStrategy’s average buy price at $29,860 will be where investors can expect a reversal of the downswing. The resulting uptrend will likely propel Bitcoin price to a new all-time high at $100,000. However, if Bitcoin price decides to skip the crash and produces a weekly close above the current all-time high at $69,000, then it will invalidate the bullish thesis. In such a case, investors can expect BTC to head to other psychological barriers like $70,000 or $80,000.
Is the End of Transitory Inflation the End of Gold Bulls?

Is the End of Transitory Inflation the End of Gold Bulls?

Arkadiusz Sieron Arkadiusz Sieron 24.12.2021 11:18
The debate about the nature of inflation is over. Now the question is what the end of transitory inflation implies for gold. I offer two perspectives. Welcome, my son. Welcome to the inflationary machine. Welcome to the new economic regime of elevated inflation. That’s official because even central bankers have finally admitted what I’ve been saying for a long time: the current high inflation is not merely a transitory one-off price shock. In a testimony before Congress, Jerome Powell agreed that “it’s probably a good time to retire” the word “transitory” in relation to inflation. Bravo, Jay! It took you only several months longer than my freshmen students to figure it out, but better late than never. Actually, even a moderately intelligent chimpanzee would notice that inflation is not merely temporary just by looking at the graph below. To be clear, I’m not predicting hyperinflation or even galloping inflation. Nor do I claim that at least some of the current inflationary pressures won’t subside next year. No, some supply-side factors behind recent price surges are likely to abate in 2022. However, other drivers will persist, or even intensify (think about housing inflation or energy crisis). Let’s be honest: we are facing a global inflation shock right now. In many countries, inflation has reached its highest rate in decades. In the United States, the annual CPI rate is 6.2%, while it reached 5.2% in Germany, 4.9% in the Eurozone, and 3.8% in the United Kingdom. The shameful secret is that central banks and governments played a key role in fueling this inflation. As the famous Austrian economist Ludwig von Mises noticed once, The most important thing to remember is that inflation is not an act of God; inflation is not a catastrophe of the elements or a disease that comes like the plague. Inflation is a policy — a deliberate policy of people who resort to inflation because they consider it to be a lesser evil than unemployment. But the fact is that, in the not very long run, inflation does not cure unemployment. Indeed, the Fed and the banking system injected a lot of money into the economy and also created room for the government to boost its spending and send checks to Americans. The resulting consumer spending boom clogged the supply chains and caused a jump in inflation. Obviously, the policymakers don’t want to admit their guilt and that they have anything to do with inflation. At the beginning, they claim that there is no inflation at all. Next, they say that inflation may exist after all, but is only caused by the “base effect”, so it will be a short-lived phenomenon that results solely from the nature of the yearly comparison. Lastly, they admit that there is something beyond the “base effect” but inflation will be transitory because it’s caused only by a few exceptional components of the overall index, the outliers like used cars this year. Nothing to worry about, then. Higher prices are a result of bottlenecks that will abate very soon on their own. Later, inflation is admitted to be more broad-based and persistent, but it is said to be caused by greedy businesses and speculators who raise prices maliciously. Finally, the policymakers present themselves as the salvation from the inflation problem(that was caused by them in the first place). Such brilliant “solutions” as subsidies to consumers and price controls are introduced and further disrupt the economy. The Fed has recently admitted that inflation is not merely transitory, so if the abovementioned scheme is adequate, we should expect to look for scapegoats and possibly also interventions in the economy to heroically fight inflation. Gold could benefit from such rhetoric, as it could increase demand for safe-haven assets and inflation hedges. However, the Fed’s capitulation also implies a hawkish shift. If inflation is more persistent, the US central bank will have to act in a more decisive way, as inflation won’t subside on its own. The faster pace of quantitative easing tapering and the sooner interest rate hikes imply higher bond yields and a stronger greenback, so they are clearly negative for gold prices. Having said that, the Fed stays and is likely to stay woefully behind the curve. The real federal funds rate (i.e., adjusted by the CPI annual rate) is currently at -6.1%, which is the deepest level in history, as the chart below shows. It is much deeper than it was at the lows of stagflation in the 1970s, which may create certain problems in the future. What is important here is that even when the Fed raises the federal funds rate by one percentage point next year, and even when inflation declines by another two percentage points, the real federal funds rate will increase to only -3%, so it will stay deeply in negative territory. Surely, the upward direction should be negative for gold prices, and the bottom in real interest rates would be a strong bearish signal for gold. However, rates remaining well below zero should provide some support or at least a decent floor for gold prices (i.e., higher than the levels touched by gold in the mid-2010s). Thank you for reading today’s free analysis. We hope you enjoyed it. If so, we would like to invite you to sign up for our free gold newsletter. Once you sign up, you’ll also get 7-day no-obligation trial of all our premium gold services, including our Gold & Silver Trading Alerts. Sign up today! Arkadiusz Sieron, PhDSunshine Profits: Effective Investment through Diligence & Care.
Gold Wars: Revenge of Supply and Inflation

Gold Wars: Revenge of Supply and Inflation

Arkadiusz Sieron Arkadiusz Sieron 14.01.2022 16:53
  Inflation! The Republic is crumbling under attacks by the ruthless Supply Lord, Count Shortage. Dearness is everywhere. Will gold save the galaxy? If George Lucas were to make a movie about 2021 instead of Jedi knights, he would probably call it Revenge of the Supply. After all, last year will be remembered as the period of semiconductor shortages, production bottlenecks, disrupted value chains, delayed deliveries, surging job vacancies, rising inflation, and skyrocketing energy prices. It could be a shocking discovery for Keynesian economists, who focus on aggregate demand and believe that there is always slack in the economy, but it turned out that supply matters too! As a reminder, state governments couldn’t deal with the pandemic more smartly and introduced lockdowns. Then, it turned out – what a surprise! – that the shutdown of the economy, well, shut down the economy, so the Fed and the banking system boosted the money supply, while Congress passed a mammoth fiscal stimulus, including sending checks to just about every American. In other words, 2021 showed us that one cannot close and reopen the economy without any negative consequences, as the economy doesn’t simply return to the status quo. After the reopening of the economy, people started to spend all the money that was “printed” and given to them. Hence, demand increased sharply, and supply couldn’t keep up with the boosted spending. It turned out that economic problems are not always related to the demand side that has to be “stimulated”. We’ve also learned that there are supply constraints and that production and delivery don’t always go smoothly. The contemporary economy is truly global, complex, and interconnected – and the proper working of this mechanism depends on the adequate functioning of its zillion elements. Thus, shit happens from time to time. This is why it’s smart to have some gold as a portfolio insurance against tail risks. Evergiven, the ship that blocked the Suez Canal, disrupting international trade, was the perfect illustration. However, the importance of supply factors goes beyond logistics and is related to regulations, taxes, incentives, etc. Instead of calls for injecting liquidity during each crisis, efficiency, reducing the disincentives to work and invest, and unlocking the supply shackles imposed by the government should become the top economic priority. Another negative surprise for mainstream economists in 2021 was the revenge of inflation. For years, central bankers and analysts have dismissed the threat of inflation, considering it a phenomenon of the past. In the 1970s, the Fed was still learning how to conduct monetary policy. It made a few mistakes, but is much smarter today, so stagflation won’t repeat. Additionally, we live in a globalized economy with strong product competition and weak labor unions, so inflation won’t get out of control. Indeed, inflation was stubbornly low for years, despite all the easy monetary policy, and didn’t want to reach the Fed’s target of 2%, so the US central bank changed its regime to be more flexible and tolerant of inflation. It was in 2020, just one year before the outbreak of inflation. The Fed completely didn’t expect that – which shows the intellectual poverty of this institution – and called it “transitory”. Initially, inflation was supposed to be short-lived because of the “base effects”, then because of the “supply bottlenecks”. Only in November, the Fed admitted that inflation was more broad-based and would be more persistent than it previously thought. Well, better late than never! What does the revenge of supply and inflation imply for the gold market? One could expect that gold would perform better last year amid all the supply problems and a surge in inflation. We’ve learned that gold doesn’t always shine during inflationary times. The reason was that supply shortages didn’t translate into a full-blown economic crisis. On the contrary, they were caused by a strong rebound in demand; and they contributed mainly to higher inflation, which strengthened the Fed’s hawkish rhetoric and expectations of higher interest rates, creating downward pressure on gold prices. On the other hand, we could say as well that gold prices were supported by elevated inflation and didn’t drop more thanks to all the supply disruptions and inflationary threats. After all, during the economic expansion of 2011-2015 that followed the Great Recession, gold plunged about 45%, while between the 2020 peak and the end of 2021, the yellow metal lost only about 13%, as the chart below shows. Hence, the worst might be yet to come. I don’t expect a similarly deep decline as in the past, especially given that the Fed’s tightening cycle seems to be mostly priced in, but the real interest rates could normalize somewhat. Thus, I have bad news for the gold bulls. The supply crunch is expected to moderate in the second half of 2022, which would also ease inflationary pressure. To be clear, inflation won’t disappear, but it may reach a peak this year. The combination of improvement on the supply side of the economy, with inflation reaching its peak, and with a more hawkish Fed doesn’t bode well for gold. Thank you for reading today’s free analysis. We hope you enjoyed it. If so, we would like to invite you to sign up for our free gold newsletter. Once you sign up, you’ll also get 7-day no-obligation trial of all our premium gold services, including our Gold & Silver Trading Alerts. Sign up today! Arkadiusz Sieron, PhDSunshine Profits: Effective Investment through Diligence & Care.
Crypto as a trading vehicle

Crypto as a trading vehicle

Chris Weston Chris Weston 17.11.2021 09:40
Traders continue to be drawn to crypto as a trading vehicle. Not just because of its ability to trend for a prolonged period, or due to the nature of impulsive momentum that traders can identify and jump on. But also, as we’re seeing now with increased two-way opportunities, and for those that will trade the flow long or short.  For those who see crypto as a vehicle to trade and not just for the long-term adoption story that investors tend to want to be involved with, then from a spread/movement (or volatility) basis crypto is one of the best vehicles out there. We’ve seen that case-in-point over the past 24 hours - A rapid flush out of longs in the market has seen $866m liquidated across exchanges - 31% of that in Bitcoin alone. Again, we look to China where authorities are warning SOEs about cryptocurrency mining, broadly detailing they would increase electricity rates and levies for companies still involved here. While China going after the crypto market is obviously not new, it reminds us that increasing the costs associated with crypto is one of the key influence’s governments can utilise to impact the crypto market, as they can with potentially influencing the fiat-to-stable coin transfer.  There has been some focus on the passing of the US infrastructure bill where a provision has been set for the exchange (or “Broker”) to report customer intel to the IRS – clearly not a popular move for those in the US participating in the crypto market, although it won’t kick in until 2024. This becomes somewhat political, given 1 in 10 Americans have bought and sold crypto in the past 12 months. It perhaps doesn’t shock then that a group of US senators are looking at exempting participants who are involved in the development and innovation of the crypto ecosystem. Either way, crypto will react just like any other asset class to news around regulation, and just as investors are inspired by news of innovation, adoption, or efficiencies - regulation will promote short sharp moves lower, as we have seen periodically.  As a trader, these headlines need to be incorporated fully into one’s risk management. Price moves are the immediate red flag, and a sudden move needs to put us on notice. Personally, when I see a move of 3% in Bitcoin or Ethereum within a 30-minute window, I will assess the headlines and the severity of the issue, as we often see a far slower burn to fully discount news than say spot FX. First movers’ advantage in crypto can therefore be genuinely beneficial and while hedge fund algorithmic activity has dramatically increased in this space over the years, with the technology to react to news far quicker than retail traders, it is still as not as efficient as other asset classes.  This can help level the playing field. The cost to movement trade-off  Our flow is predominantly always seen in Bitcoin and Ethereum – and, while we offer 16 coins in total, these two have the best liquidity, and for an average spread of $33 (on Bitcoin), $5.4 (Ethereum) we see the 12-month average high-to-low percentage range at 6.8% and 8.6% respectively over the past 12 months.  Another popular way to see this is the 5-day Average True Range (ATR). In pips, the 5-day ATR in Bitcoin is 3453 – so this is a spread as a percentage of the daily trading range of 0.96%. On our standard account (comm is incorporated into the spread) this same dynamic in EURUSD sits at 0.97%.  So, in essence, on a spread-per-movement basis Bitcoin is comparable to EURUSD and even gold.  The current set-up Bitcoin daily After a move into 58,621 in Bitcoin, we’ve seen the 50-day MA act as support and buyers stepping in. The 28 Oct swing low of 57,762 is also one to consider, and if we were to see a breakdown through the 50 day and the 28 Oct low and Bitcoin could stage a rapid move into 54,000. As it is, this has the feel that we could see some messy two-way action, and it wouldn’t surprise to see 68,000 capping the upside, 57,000 the downside.  Ethereum daily Ethereum has found support into the lower Bollinger band (20-day MA, 2.5 standard deviations) but has broken the channel support it held since late Sept. That doesn’t mean it will collapse, but the markets propensity to follow the trend is over given price is no longer making higher highs. Another where the near-term price action could get messy and chop around with better two-way price moves.  DOT is one that has seen some good volatility of late and another that is holding the 50-day MA for dear life. A close below 39.66 and this could open a deeper move – a factor which could be appealing as we pay 7.5% on shorts.  As always in trading keeping an open mind is key and for those who want to trade crypto rather than HODL, it feels like the stage is set for two-way opportunity.
In The Beginning Of This Week, The Eastern Tensions Is The #1 Topic

In The Beginning Of This Week, The Eastern Tensions Is The #1 Topic

Walid Koudmani Walid Koudmani 14.02.2022 14:09
The news from US intelligence that the Russian aggression on Ukraine was a done deal spooked markets on Friday. While Russia denied it, the situation doesn't seem to be getting any better. How will markets react to further developments? Prepare for various options Markets are reacting and investors should prepare for potentially turbulent times. This is why we present 3 potential scenarios of the Ukrainian conflict and highlight key markets that may be affected. Watch these markets: Stocks – Russian banks, RTS and… Nasdaq VTB and Sberbank – the names of these institutions are nearly synonymous with sanctions on Russia. Little wonder these stocks are among top choices on the equity side. Investors may also focus on the diversified RTS Index where Sberbank has 14% share – the index has plenty of energy stocks as well and is down 30% from late 2021 highs. A less obvious choice is Nasdaq (US100). Why would US tech stocks react to the conflict in Europe? Well, since this market has its own share of problems (mainly Fed tightening), other bad news could impact investor sentiment even further. Commodities – Oil, Gold, Platinum, Palladium and Wheat Russia is the second largest exporter of Oil and the commodity is also a substitute for natural gas which has already been in tight supply in Europe. Gold has traditionally been a "top pick”for times of geopolitical uncertainty but we'd like to turn your attention to Palladium and Platinum – these are also precious metals but Russia is way more important here being the number 1 and 2 exporter respectively. Finally, both Russia and Ukraine are important producers of Wheat. FX – focus on USDRUB FX is fairly obvious – any conflict is detrimental for the Russian ruble even despite high oil prices and significant interest rate increases in Russia. On the other hand, USD attracts liquidity in times of distress so USDRUB could be the choice for investors here. 3 scenarios – invasion, tension and compromise The worst case scenario is the one of invasion – the one already hinted at by the US intelligence. Invasion means sanctions but actually the lack of sanctions is the key to reactions here (as the largest guns – like cutting off Russia from SWIFT – are supposedly off the table). Markets know that if Russia invades, forcing it to withdraw will be costly and that will feed uncertainty and fear. Critically negative for Russian stocks, negative for global stocks, positive for oil and precious metals and USDRUB. The most likely scenario could be the one of prolonged tension – Moscow can pose threats for as long as it achieves certain results (there’s a talk of autonomy or even referendums in Eastern parts of Ukraine). While politically complicated, this scenario can actually be a relief for the markets. For as long as invasion risk declines, this scenario is positive for stocks while being negative for oil, precious metals and USDRUB. Finally a scenario most would prefer – there's a sound compromise and Russian troops are ordered away from the Ukrainian border. This would be extremely positive for stocks (especially Russian banks and the Russian index) while negative for oil, precious metals and USDRUB. Unfortunately, this scenario also seems to be the least likely. XTB Research
Price Of Gold (XAUUSD) Will Be Supported, But Probable Massive Sale Of Russian Gold Can Hinder The Rise

Price Of Gold (XAUUSD) Will Be Supported, But Probable Massive Sale Of Russian Gold Can Hinder The Rise

Arkadiusz Sieron Arkadiusz Sieron 01.03.2022 16:01
  Russia underestimated Ukraine’s fierce defense. Instead of quick conquest, the war is still going on. The same applies to pulling the rope between gold bulls and bears. It was supposed to be a blitzkrieg. The plan was simple: within 72 hours Russian troops were to take control of Kyiv, stage a coup, overthrow the democratically elected Ukrainian authorities, and install a pro-Russian puppet government. Well, the blitzkrieg clearly failed. The war has been going on for five days already, and Kyiv (and other major cities) remains in Ukrainian hands, while the Russians suffer great losses. Indeed, the Ukrainians are fighting valiantly. The Kremlin apparently did not expect such high morale among the troops and civilians, as well as such excellent organization and preparation. Meanwhile, the morale among Russian soldiers is reported to be pathetically low, as they have no motivation to fight with culturally close Ukrainians (many of whom speak perfect Russian). The invaders are also poorly equipped, and the whole operation was logistically unprepared (as the assumption was a quick capitulation by Ukrainian forces and a speedy collapse of the government in Kyiv). Well, pride comes before a fall. What’s more, the West is united as never before (Germany did a historic U-turn in its foreign and energy policies) and has already imposed relatively heavy economic sanctions on Russia (including cutting off some of the country’s banks from SWIFT), and donated weapons to Ukraine. However – and unfortunately – the war is far from being ended. Military analysts expect a second wave of Russian troops that can break the resistance of the Ukrainians, who have fewer forces and cannot relieve the soldiers just like the other side. Indeed, satellite pictures show a large convoy of Russian forces near Kyiv. Russia is also gathering troops in Belarus and – sadly – started shelling residential quarters in Ukrainian cities. According to US intelligence, Belarusian soldiers could join Russian forces. The coming days will be crucial for the fate of the conflict.   Implications for Gold What does the war between Russia and Ukraine imply for the gold market? Well, initially, the conflict was supportive of gold prices. As the chart below shows, the price of gold (London Fix) soared to $1,936 on Thursday. However, the rally was very short-lived, as the very next day, gold prices fell to $1,885. Thus, gold’s performance looked like “buy the rumor, sell the news.” However, yesterday, the price of the yellow metal returned above $1,900, so some geopolitical risk premium may still be present in the gold market. Anyway, it seems that I was right in urging investors to focus on fundamentals and to not make long-term investments merely based on geopolitical risks, the impact of which is often only temporary. Having said that, gold may continue its bullish trend, at least for a while. After all, the war not only increases risk aversion, but it also improves gold’s fundamental outlook. First of all, the Fed is now less likely to raise the federal funds rate in March. It will probably still tighten its monetary policy, but in a less aggressive way. For example, the market odds of a 50-basis point hike decreased from 41.4% one week ago to 12.4% now. What’s more, we are observing increasing energy prices, which could increase inflation further. The combination of higher inflation and a less hawkish Fed should be fundamentally positive for gold prices, as it implies low real interest rates. On the other hand, gold may find itself under downward pressure from selling reserves to raise liquidity. I'm referring to the fact that the West has cut Russia off from the SWIFT system in part. In such a situation, Russia would have to sell part of its massive gold reserves, which could exert downward pressure on prices. Hence, the upcoming days may be quite volatile for the gold market. At the end of my article, I would like to point out that although the war in Ukraine entails implications for the precious metals market, it is mostly a humanitarian tragedy. My thoughts and prayers are with all the casualties of the conflict and their families. I hope that Ukraine will withstand the invasion and peace will return soon! If you enjoyed today’s free gold report, we invite you to check out our premium services. We provide much more detailed fundamental analyses of the gold market in our monthly Gold Market Overview reports and we provide daily Gold & Silver Trading Alerts with clear buy and sell signals. In order to enjoy our gold analyses in their full scope, we invite you to subscribe today. If you’re not ready to subscribe yet though and are not on our gold mailing list yet, we urge you to sign up. It’s free and if you don’t like it, you can easily unsubscribe. Sign up today! Arkadiusz Sieron, PhDSunshine Profits: Effective Investment through Diligence & Care
Nvidia Stock News and Forecast: NVDA shares up after unveiling $1 trillion market opportunity

Nvidia Stock News and Forecast: NVDA shares up after unveiling $1 trillion market opportunity

FXStreet News FXStreet News 24.03.2022 16:22
NVDA stock dropped 3.4% on Wednesday trading.Nvidia CEO says focus on software gives chipmaker $1 trillion market.Nvidia could reshore chip fabrication using Intel.Nvidia stock (NVDA) is up 3.2% to $264.42 on Wednesday after management announced a broader focus on software that could give Nvidia a total addressable market of $1 trillion. Additionally, Nvidia CEO Jensen Huang told Reuters on Wednesday that he was in discussion with Intel to use the legacy chipmaker's semiconductor foundries to produce Nvidia's chips in the United States.Nvidia Stock News: $1 trillion opportunityAt an investor day presentation earlier this week, Nvidia executives walked analysts through a much larger strategy that entailed a total addressable market (TAM) for Nvidia's various business segments of $1 trillion per year. The larger market for Nvidia products than earlier estimates stems from Nvidia's new focus on software platform offerings. The bigger TAM breaks down to $150 billion from omniverse enterprise software, $150 billion from artificial intelligence software, $100 billion from gaming, $300 billion from the existing semiconductor chip business, and $300 billion from the automotive segment. A solid section of the automotive opportunity also comes from software.Evercore ISI's C.J. Muse found the large figures hard to fathom but said his investment colleagues are, “firm believers in the company’s hardware and software strategies that should deliver world-class organic growth for years to come.”Evercore and Bernstein both have recently reiterated outperform ratings for Nvidia stock. Evercore has a $375 price target on NVDA shares, a solid 44% upside, while Bernstein has a price target of $350. Bernstein pointed out in a letter to clients that Nvidia only makes a few hundred million dollars in annual revenue now from software but sees well over $300 billion in opportunity for that segment.In separate news, CEO Jensen Huang said he was quite willing to work with Intel to produce Nvidia chips onshore in the US. Currently, the company has Taiwan Semiconductor (TSM) producing much of its catalog. He told reporters that it could take years of discussions to finalize a fabrication deal, however, as it is an extremely detailed process. Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger was on Capitol Hill on Wednesday to brief the US Senate's Commerce Committee on his company's plans to utilize funding from the $52 billion CHIPS Act to reshore and expand US semiconductor fabrication.Nvidia Stock Forecast: NVDA bulls hope for $284Monday and Tuesday of this week both saw Nvidia stock break above the February 10 swing high at $269.25. Right now in the $264s, Nvidia is at support. If it falls below $255.50, volume pressure may push NVDA down to $240, where there is support from both February and the 50-day moving average. To keep the rally going, bulls will try to make a play for $284.22. This level acted as resistance in early to mid-January.Back on March 16, Nvidia shares broke out of a descending trend that began on November 22, 2021. For the rally to continue, the 20-day moving average needs to break above the 50-day moving average fairly soon, possibly by the end of next week at the latest. Long-term support continues to sit at $208.90.NVDA 1-day chart
Crypto trading volume exceeds $100 billion in 24 hours as bulls flock to the market

Crypto trading volume exceeds $100 billion in 24 hours as bulls flock to the market

FXStreet News FXStreet News 28.03.2022 16:34
Proponents noted a 63.07% spike in the total transaction volume of cryptocurrencies across exchanges. Coinmarketcap data reveals a month-on-month increase of 4.75% in crypto trading volume. Bitcoin price crossed $47,000, fueled by $200 million shorts liquidated across exchanges. Bitcoin price is rallying, fueled by a frenzy of massive short liquidations on crypto exchanges. Proponents believe bulls have flocked to the market, as transaction volume exceeded $100 billion. Bitcoin price pushes past $47,000 in recent rally Bitcoin price crossed key resistance to hit a high above $47,000 in a rally fueled by the liquidation of millions of short positions. Analysts at the crypto intelligence platform Santiment observed a massive liquidation of shorts across exchanges at 1 pm and 6 pm UTC across crypto exchanges on March 27, 2022. Analysts argue that Bitcoin’s recent price rally to $47,000 was a response to liquidation in large quantities over the weekend. The average funding rate entered the long zone, where uncertainty among market participants increased. Therefore, analysts conclude that Bitcoin shorts have fueled the asset’s ongoing rally. Bitcoin and altcoin shorts liquidatedColin Wu, a Chinese journalist, reported a spike in the total transaction volume of cryptocurrencies, exceeding $100 billion over the past 24 hours. Wu referred to data from Coinmarketcap and observed a 63.07% increase in crypto transaction volume compared to March 26, 2022. The total crypto market value now exceeds $2.12 trillion. Historically, analysts have witnessed high transaction activity when large wallet investors flock to the market or scoop up crypto. Bloomberg analysts argue that Bitcoin looks overbought, compared to its 50-day Moving Average. Bitcoin price crossed key resistance at $45,000 in the current rally, erasing its losses for the year. FXStreet analysts have evaluated Bitcoin price and predicted the start of a new uptrend in the asset, as it crossed the $45,000 level.
Taming the Dollar: Assessing Powell's Hawkish Tone Amidst BRICS Expansion

USA: The weakest year since 1990 - IPO market acquired "only" $7bn

Pawel Zapolski Pawel Zapolski 27.12.2022 14:02
Debuts for a cure, IPO quotes down. This is what 2022 looked like on the US stock market, and all because of the Fed 's hawkish policy. There hasn't been a year as weak as 2022 on the IPO market in the US since... 1990! Only 37 companies conducted IPOs, raising only USD 7 billion. A very weak year on the US IPO market Only 37 companies conducted an initial public offering (IPO) on Wall Street in 2022, raising a total of $7 billion from the market. This is the lowest amount raised annually in the US as part of an IPO since 1990, when debutants raised USD 4.3 billion - points out prof. Jay Ritter from the University of Florida. The data provided by Ritter does not include SPACs, REITs and various types of funds. The year 2022 was poor in terms of IPOs on the American stock exchange, not only in terms of quantity or value, but also in terms of quality. The most famous and significant company that carried out an IPO in the past year was Mobileye Global. It is a producer of software for autonomous cars, which has been controlled by Intel since 2017. Read next: I expect consumer spending to remain strong for most of 2023 with savings not running out until near the end of the year says Ivan Brian, Chief Equity Analyst at FXStreet | FXMAG.COM Mobileye Global quotes against the Nasdaq 100 Source: TradingView The behavior of the listings of companies that debuted in 2022, against the background of the S&P500, also looks tragic. This is shown by the Renaissance IPO Index, which until December 23 this year. since the beginning of the year has fallen by almost -60%, while the S&P500 index has fallen by -20%. Renaissance IPO Index against the S&P500 in 2022 Source: Renaissance Capital The queue to the floor will move after rate cuts Why was 2022 so weak for IPOs? Because the US Federal Reserve began to pursue a rather hawkish monetary policy in the fight against rising inflation. It started to raise rates, so the cost of money started to go up, which reduces the value of future cash flows, pushing capital out of the stock market. As long as interest rates in the US continue to rise, IPOs will be fragile. Some experts already see various interesting businesses on the horizon that can and want to enter the American stock market in 2023. Such a list was recently prepared by the Kiplinger portal. The list includes i.a.: TripActions platform (business travel service, value of USD 12 billion), Databricks platform enabling easy commercialization of software projects, company Versa Networks, online payment giant Stripe (valued at around $74 billion).
The Current War Between China And The United States Over Semiconductor Chips Is Gaining Momentum

The Current War Between China And The United States Over Semiconductor Chips Is Gaining Momentum

Saxo Bank Saxo Bank 09.01.2023 13:19
Summary:  The semiconductor industry was negatively impacted last year by rising interest rates pushing down equity valuation and pricing pressures in certain segments such as memory chips. In the first week of trading the industry is off to a better start and Taiwan has just passed a law that will allow local semiconductor companies to get tax credits up to 25% of their R&D spending in an attempt to increase the industry's competitiveness against the US and European measures to set up their own supply chains. The Chip War is on and we expect more policy headwinds with tax incentives as the key driver which will end up being positive for shareholders. Semiconductors are off to a good start The recent book Chip War: The Fight for the World’s Most Critical Technology by Chris Miller is a great historical journey and perspective on the current semiconductor chip war between China and the US. The book is highly recommended and one can get a taste for the content in Chris Miller’s interview on the Top Traders Unplugged podcast. We have written extensively on semiconductors last year and highlighted that the US CHIPS Act is the biggest industrial policy since WWII paving the way for creating a domestic supply chain of semiconductors with tax credits provided to foreign chip companies if they stop engaging with Chinese firms on the most advanced chips. Europe is also building out its semiconductor supply chains. It is all about controlling the key ingredients in military equipment and all other important applications in a modern society from computers, smartphones, cars etc. Read next: Incorporating Slack And Other Apps Into The Salesforce Platform Can Actually Put Buyers Off| FXMAG.COM At the centre of this conflict sits Taiwan which is key nexus in the global supply chain of semiconductors and with China openly aiming to integrate Taiwan into China, the risks are too high for the US and Europe because China is becoming a strategic competitor that does not share the same values hence the US CHIPS Act. Taiwan is feeling the pressure and has just passed a new law that will allow local semiconductor companies to get tax credits for up to 25% of their R&D expenses in a bid to remain competitive and offset the subsidies in the US and Europe. It will boost earnings of Taiwanese semiconductor companies but also increase the competition further. Since an integrated domestic supply chain of semiconductors is existential for Europe and the US the two regions will continue to add incentives to accelerate the reconfiguration of this supply chain. If Taiwan provides incentives and subsidies, the US and Europe will just top it. There is no alternative. This has ramifications for the industry as it means a more attractive investment and tax setup which will be positive for shareholders longer term. Semiconductors are off to a good start this year up 3.7% after being down 27% last year. Taking a closer look at our theme basket we can see that the best performing stocks have been Samsung Electronics, ASML, Intel, Micron Technology, and STMicroelectronics.   Source: The Chip War kicks into gear | Saxo Group (home.saxo)
Intel's Cost Reduction Also Includes Executive Compensation

Intel's Cost Reduction Also Includes Executive Compensation

Kamila Szypuła Kamila Szypuła 01.02.2023 11:17
The largest U.S. chip maker by revenue is facing a major industry downturn, fierce competition and an expensive recovery plan. Salary reduction Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger and other executives are cutting salaries days after the company released quarterly results that disappointed Wall Street. Gelsinger, in the top job for two years, will see his base pay cut by 25%, Intel said. The company said other cuts would be staggered, with base salaries set at 15% for executives, 10% for senior managers and 5% for middle managers. Intel said hourly workers and junior workers would not be affected. The Losses The PC market is in a sharp downturn, with device shipments down 28.5% in the last quarter of 2022. Semiconductor companies are now oversupplied with chips as a result of a shortage caused by the pandemic, which has been driven by both supply chain constraints and high product demand digital. Intel is also feeling the pain of belt-tightening by wider corporations, which is affecting sales in its lucrative server business. Revenue from data center customers fell by a third in the fourth quarter. On Thursday, the board said softness is expected to hold for the first half of the year, followed by a slight rebound in the second half as China's enterprise market recovers faster than the cloud computing industry. Intel last week posted a loss for the last quarter and said it expects to stay in the red for three months through March. The company has not suffered consecutive quarterly losses in more than three decades. Intel expects another loss in March quarter. Read next: AUD/USD Pair Remains Under Strong Selling Pressure, The EUR/USD Pair Has Been Falling But Remains Above 1.08$| FXMAG.COM Intel continues to lose market share to rivals such as Advanced Micro Devices Inc. and companies that have adopted semiconductors based on technology from British company Arm Ltd., analysts said on Friday. Intel said development of the new processors is proceeding as planned. Intel's financial turmoil comes at a critical time. The company is investing heavily in chip manufacturing to regain a foothold lost to Asian rivals who are now leading the industry in producing the most advanced chips. Intel CFO David Zinsner said the company's adjusted free cash flow for the first half of the year will be below last year's expectations before improving. Gelsinger’s plan Intel has fallen behind its chip-making competitors in Asia in the race to produce the fastest chips with the smallest transistors, although Gelsinger has outlined plans to return to the lead within a few years. Even as Intel cuts spending, it continues with an unprecedented plan to expand its chip manufacturing plant. Gelsinger has presented an ambitious plan to Intel to reclaim the lead in chip manufacturing that it has ceded to Asian rivals in recent years through multi-billion-dollar investments in factories. The company's capital expenditures rose to a record $24.8 billion last year, up 33% over the previous year. Gelsinger has committed to investing more than $100 billion in new U.S. chip fabs. The company relies on grants from the U.S. government and other countries to help defray the cost of these efforts. Intel executives said they were still committed to major projects, although the company delayed the start of construction of its facilities in Germany amid deteriorating market prospects and took other steps to save money. Intel share prices The troubles in the industry are perfectly illustrated by the movement of ren stocks. Last year, Intel's share price dropped significantly from above 50.00 to below 30.00. Intel shares fell more than 9% in trading on Thursday. But today, prices have gained 3% and are trading at 28.26. Source: wsj.com, finance.yahoo.com
Navigating Uncertainties: RBNZ's Inflation Gamble, Election Dynamics, and Kiwi Dollar's Path Ahead

Travel Stocks Are Continuing To Gain Attention

Saxo Bank Saxo Bank 23.02.2023 09:10
Summary:  The Nasdaq 100, and S&P 500 fall for the second session with bond yields remaining at three-month highs as the FOMC meeting minutes show more tightening is on the horizon. CPI is ahead. Australian equities fall for third day on bond yields remaining at January highs. Reopening bellwethers in logistics, car dealership and air travel guide for stronger earnings ahead. Qube and APE shares lift, while Qantas needs to splurge on more aircraft to keep up with demand. Plus what to know about Rio's results and why to watch the AUDNZD. What’s happening in markets?   The Nasdaq 100 (NAS100.I) and S&P 500 (US500.I) fall for the second session with bond yields remaining at three-month highs    US equity markets remain pressured as the US 10-year yields trades in the neighborhood of three-month highs at ~3.92% with the FOMC meeting minutes showing more tightening is on the horizon. The Nasdaq 100 fell for the second day, closing at its lowest level since February 1. The S&P500 also fell the second session - moving under the key 4,000 level, at 3,991, bringing the 200-day moving average just ~1% away - at the 3,941 mark - which will quickly be tested.  Intel shares were a laggard down 2.2% after the computer processor giant cut its dividend 66% - declaring a quarterly payout of 12.5 cents a share. This followed on from Intel reporting one of its weakest quarterly earnings forecasts in its history. All in all, this highlights that companies are trying to preserve capital amid margin compression – and that’s been a major theme of earnings seasons and we think it will continue to play out in Q1 earnings reports.   Australian equities (ASXSP200.I) fall for third day -  but reopening stocks in logistics and car dealing seem supported on stronger earnings The Australian share market is being pressured by Australian bond yields rising, with the 10-year yield at its highest levels since January 4 - after the RBA affirmed it will continue to hike rates in the months ahead. The ASX200 fell briefly under its 50-day moving average with mining giants BHP and Rio trading lower after Rio reported weaker than expected numbers after the market close yesterday – but guided for a stronger 2023.    Travel stocks are continuing to gain attention on the revival of the travel sector – with a lack of fleet becoming an issue to keep up with strong demand. Qantas posted a record profit of A$1 billion in the six months to Dec 31, and announced A$500 million share buy back – as its sees relentless flight demand in 2023 - underscoring the surge in travel, post the pandemic. In fact, Qantas’ flagged higher than expected spending being needed to buy an extra aircraft, including nine Airbus A220s to keep up with surging passenger demand. Capital expenditure in the financial year ending June will rise by as much as A$400 million to between A$2.6-A$2.7 billion and will get as high as A$3.2 billion in the following 12 months. Despite guiding for strong demand, shareholders didn’t like hearing costs will need to rise – which send Qantas shares down 6% to $6.02, below its 100-day moving average. Qantas’ outlook underscores the pace and intensify of the travel industry’s recovery. Logistics giant, Qube is trading up 10% after its half year profit rose 41% to $125 million and it also noted it sees stronger growth ahead in 2023 – supported by China’s reopening. Car dealership giant, APE is up by about 7% after its results beat expectations, and it guides for a stronger year ahead with demand for new vehicles continuing to outstrip supply. Today’s earnings highlight the reopening trade is gaining pace and also growing beyond market expectations – this could be a driver of the Australian equity market in the half year, while commodity companies continue to guide for a stronger year ahead – backing our bullish commodity outlook. FX: A stronger US dollar – pressures the Australian dollar lower  With ‘a few’ FOMC members supporting a larger hike to curb inflation - with James Bullard still favouring hiking rates to 5.375% as fast of possible, the US dollar gained the upper hand, pressuring most G10 currencies lower including the Aussie dollar. The AUD/USD pair closed below trend support, which opens up for a move lower to 0.6629, being the December low.The AUD/NZD pair however made a cleaner break down lower - with the Aussie against the Kiwi falling below its 50-day moving average. Weight on the pair also came after Australian wage growth data and construction work done were softer than expected, meaning the path of RBA hikes could slow after the RBA makes its tabled hikes in the ‘months’ ahead, versus the RNBZ, that just hiked by 50bps yesterday but gave a hawkish guidance.   What to consider with Rio Tinto's results?  Rio Tinto’s profits and dividend slide in 2022, but Rio guides for a stronger 2023 - underpinned by ‘climate change scenarios’  Shares of Rio Tinto in NY fell 3.3% overnight and are down 3% on the ASX today after the world’s second largest miner reported underlying profit fell 38% to $13.28 billion in 2022 - vs the expected $13.96 billion consensus forecast. Rio’s profit fell after realised commodity prices fell from their records in the second half of 2022 – while earnings were also impacted by higher energy, raw materials prices and wages. Rio’s free cash flows fell 49% Y/Y in 2022 to $9.01 billion, resulting in Rio cutting its final (HY) dividend to $2.25 a share (down from $4.17), taking its total 2022 dividend to $4.92 - that’s a 60% pay-out ratio.Similar to BHP, Rio’s output looks stronger in 2023 with Rio guiding for higher copper, alumina, aluminium and iron ore production (but lower diamond production). It sees commodity prices being underpinned by ‘climate change scenarios’ which drive demand. Also note - in recent weeks - signs of a recovery in China have fuelled iron ore and copper prices up -with iron ore prices up 15% year to date. Rio is expanding its copper-gold presence, with the purchase of Turquoise Hill Resources- that will see Rio double its stake in the Oyu Tolgoi copper-gold project in Mongolia. Rio is also progressing the Rincon Lithium Project in Argentina – cementing itself in lithium. And despite the Serbian Government quashing its lithium mine Rio is ‘continuing to explore possibilities   To listen to our global team's take on markets - tune into our Podcast.   Source: Financial Insights: S&P500 and ASX200 pressured. But Travel, Logistics & Car dealerships see stronger earnings ahead | Saxo Group (home.saxo)
European Markets Face Headwinds Amid Rising Yields and Inflation Concerns

Demand For Automotive Chips Will Continue To Grow As The Outlook For The Electric Vehicle Market Looks Solid

Kamila Szypuła Kamila Szypuła 06.03.2023 10:43
Growing sales of electric vehicles — which typically use more semiconductors than their gas-powered counterparts — coupled with greater automation of all vehicles have kept car chip makers busy. Car chip boom Chip executives say the increase in the number of chips going into cars is staggering. As of 2021, the average car had about 1,200 chips, twice as many as in 2010, and that number is only likely to increase. Companies including Dutch automotive chip company NXP Semiconductors, German Infineon Technologies AG , Japanese Renesas Electronics Corp., an American company Analog Devices Inc. and Texas Instruments Inc. recently reported growing sales in its automotive divisions and made good forecasts for this year. NXP's automotive chip sales grew 25% last year, and the company expects about 15% growth in the first quarter of this year. Renesas' automotive business grew nearly 40% last year, and analysts expect more growth this quarter. Analog Devices, which accounts for nearly a quarter of its sales in the automotive industry, posted 29% growth in this segment last year. It's not just the cars themselves that are using more and more chips; as will vehicle manufacturing as manufacturers introduce more automation to deal with labor shortages and try to cut costs, semiconductor executives said. Car chip resilience comes despite a historic drop in car sales last year, which was the lowest in more than a decade in the US. Sales have been hampered by supply chain issues, including a lack of chips necessary for a new generation of cars with a range of digitally enhanced features, from driver assistance technology to automatic windshield wiper control. The increased digitization of cars means that even lower vehicle sales do not reduce the demand for car chips. Prospects of EV market Long-term EV market outlook looks solid, Tesla Inc. hinted last week as chief executive Elon Musk detailed plans for his car company to increase sales to 20 million vehicles a year by 2030, up from around 1.3 million in 2022. Electric vehicle sales surpassed a global milestone last year, reaching around 10% market share for the first time. While EVs still represent a fraction of U.S. car sales, their share of the overall market is becoming significant in Europe and China. Tesla is still the dominant manufacturer of electric cars in the world, but conventional carmakers are reducing their lead with new electric models. European carmakers have focused their production and sales of electric vehicles on domestic markets in an effort to meet EU emissions regulations. They also began a more aggressive expansion of their electric vehicle business in other major markets last year, especially China and the US. Declines in other sectors of chipmakers The boom in automotive chips contrasts with sharp declines in other sectors of chipmakers whose products end up in electronics closely tied to consumer appetites. Intel Corp. , the largest U.S. chip maker by revenue, reported a loss in the fourth quarter and expects another loss this quarter, hit by a weakening demand for personal computers that house its chips. Rival Advanced Micro Devices Inc. is also battling a volatile PC market where industry-wide shipments are expected to fall by 12.5% this year, according to recent Morgan Stanley estimates. Qualcomm Inc., known for its mobile phone chips, illustrates how some chip vendors feel both sides of market dynamics. The company saw an 18% drop in mobile phone revenue in the last fiscal quarter. NXP Semiconductors N.V. share prices NXP shares have been up since Feb 24. from 176.86 to 182.96. By comparison, Renesas shares also rose to 6.72, a record high in more than 10 years. Infineon Technologies shares also rose to 36.63 after falling to 35.43. Source: wsj.com, finance.yahoo.com
EUR: Testing 1.0700 Support Ahead of ECB Meeting

A Week of Earnings and Central Bank Decisions: Fed, ECB, and BoJ Meetings in Focus

Ipek Ozkardeskaya Ipek Ozkardeskaya 24.07.2023 10:20
A week packed with earnings and central bank decisions Last week ended on a caution note after the first earnings from Big Tech companies were not bad, but not good enough to further boost an already impressive rally so far this year. The S&P500 closed the week just 0.7% higher, Nasdaq slipped 0.6%, while Dow Jones recorded its 10th straight week of gains, the longest in six years, hinting that the tech rally could be rotating toward other and more cyclical parts of the economy as well.   This week, the earnings season continues in full swing. 150 S&P500 companies are due to announce their second quarter earnings throughout this week. Among them we have Microsoft, which is pretty much the main responsible of this year's tech rally thanks to its ChatGPT, Meta, Alphabet, Visa, GM, Ford, Intel, Coca-Cola and some energy giants including Exxon Mobil and Chevron.   On the economic calendar, we have a busy agenda this week as well. Today, we will be watching a series of flash PMI figures to get a sense of how economies around the world felt so far in July, then important central bank meetings will hit the fan from tomorrow. The early data shows that both manufacturing and services in Australia remained in the contraction zone, as Japan's manufacturing PMI dropped to a 4-month low in July. German figures could also disappoint those watching the EZ numbers.   On the central banks front, the Federal Reserve (Fed), the European Central Bank (ECB) and the Bank of Japan (BoJ) will meet this week, and the first two are expected to announce 25bp hike each to further tighten monetary conditions on both sides of the Atlantic.     Zooming into the Fed, activity on Fed funds futures gives almost 100% chance for this week's 25bp hike. But many think that this week's rate hike could be the last of this tightening cycle, as inflation is cooling. But the resilience of the US labour market, and household consumption will likely keep the Fed cautiously hawkish, and not announce the end of the tightening cycle this Wednesday. There is, on the contrary, a greater chance that we will hear Fed Chair Jerome Powell rectify the market expectations and talk about another rate hike in September or in November. Therefore, the risks tied to this week's FOMC meeting are tilted to the hawkish side, and we have more chance of hearing a hawkish surprise rather than a dovish one. Regarding the market reaction, as this week's Fed meetings falls in the middle of a jungle of earnings, stock investors will have a lot to price on their plate, so a hawkish statement from the Fed may not directly impact stock prices if earnings are good enough. Bond markets, however, will clearly be more vulnerable to another delay of the end of the tightening cycle. The US 2-year yield consolidates near the 4.85% level this morning, and risks are tilted to the upside. For the dollar, there is room for further recovery as the bearish dollar bets stand at the highest levels on record and a sufficiently hawkish Fed announcement could lead to correction and repositioning.  Elsewhere, another 25bp hike from the ECB is also seen as a done deal by most investors. What investors want to know is what will happen beyond this week's meeting. So far, at least 2 more 25bp hikes were seen as almost certain by investors. Then last week, some ECB officials cast doubt on that expectation. Now, a September rate hike in the EZ is all but certain. The EURUSD remains under selling pressure near the 1.1120 this morning, the inconclusive Spanish election is adding an extra pressure to the downside.   Finally, the BoJ is expected to do nothing, again, this week. Japanese policymakers will likely keep the policy rate steady in the negative territory and the YCC policy unchanged. The recent U-turn in BoJ expectations, and the broad-based rebound in the US dollar pushed the USDJPY above the 140 again last Friday, and there is nothing to prevent the pair from re-testing the 145 resistance if the Fed is sufficiently hawkish and the BoJ is sufficiently dovish.     By Ipek Ozkardeskaya, Senior Analyst | Swissquote Bank  
China Continues to Increase Gold Reserves, While Base Metals Face Mixed Fortunes

US Fed Set to Resume Rate Hikes Amidst Mixed Economic Data: A Look at Key Indicators and Earnings Ahead

Ed Moya Ed Moya 24.07.2023 10:57
US The Fed is expected to resume raising rates at the July 26th FOMC meeting.  Fed funds futures see a 96% chance that the central bank will deliver a quarter-point rate rise, bringin the  target range to between 5.25% and 5.50%, almost a 22-year high. The Fed delivered 10 straight rate increases and then paused at the June FOMC meeting.  The Fed is going to raise rates on Wednesday and seems poised to be noncommittal with what they will do in September.  The economic data has been mixed (strong labor data/cooling pricing pressures) and that should support Powell’s case that they still could deliver a soft landing, a slowdown that avoids a recession.  This seems like it will be the last rate hike in the Fed’s tightening cycle, but we will have two more inflation reports before the Fed will need to commit that more rate hikes are no longer necessary. The Fed will steal the spotlight but there are several other important economic indicators and earnings that could move markets.  Monday’s flash PMI report should show both the manufacturing and service sectors continue to soften, with services still remaining in expansion territory. Tuesday’s Conference Board’s consumer confidence report could fuel expectations of a soft landing. Thursday’s first look at Q2 GDP is expected to show growth cooled from 2.0% to 1.8% (0.9%-2.1% consensus range) as consumer spending moderated.  Friday contains the release of personal income and spending data alongside the Fed’s preferred inflation and wage gauges. The Q2 Employment Cost Index (ECI) is expected to dip from 1.2% to 1.1%. The personal consumption expenditures price index is expected to cool both on a monthly and annual basis (M/M: 0.2%e v 0.3% prior;Y/Y: 4.2%e v 4.6% prior). Earnings will be massive this week as we get updates from 3M, AbbVie, Alphabet, Airbus, AstraZeneca, AT&T, Barclays, BASF, Biogen, BNP Paribas, Boeing, Boston Scientific, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Chevron, Chipotle Mexican Grill, Comcast, Exxon, Ford Motor, General Electric, General Motors, GSK, Hermes International, Honeywell International, Intel, Mastercard, McDonald’s, Meta Platforms, Microsoft, Nestle, PG&E, Procter & Gamble, Raytheon Technologies, Samsung Electronics, STMicroelectronics, Texas Instruments, Thermo Fisher Scientific, UniCredit, Unilever, Union Pacific, Verizon Communications, Visa, and Volkswagen
The Commodities Feed: Oil trades softer

When Fantastic Falls Short: Fed Minutes and Nvidia Earnings Analysis

Ipek Ozkardeskaya Ipek Ozkardeskaya 22.11.2023 14:50
When fantastic falls short...  By Ipek Ozkardeskaya, Senior Analyst | Swissquote Bank   The minutes from the Federal Reserve's (Fed) latest monetary policy meeting showed that the Fed members agreed to 'proceed carefully' with their future rate decisions. Carefully doesn't mean that the Fed is done tightening, it means that it will 'proceed carefully' in the light of the economic data and the market conditions to decide whether it should hike, pause, or cut the interest rates. Note that 'most' members 'continued to see upside risks to inflation'.   Alas, the cautious tone in Fed minutes went completely unheard as the latest CPI data acted as a shield against the Fed hawks. As such, the market reaction to the Fed minutes was muted. The US 2-year yield remained little changed near the 4.90% level, the 10-year yield rebounded past 4.40%, and is still around 60bp lower than the October levels. The S&P500, which is now trading in the overbought market, retreated 0.20% and Nasdaq 100 fell 0.60% from an almost 2-year high, as investors didn't want to do much before seeing the Nvidia's results.   When fantastic falls short...  Nvidia's Q3 results were strong. The company exceeded the $16bn revenue forecast by $2bn. They earned more than $18bn, made more than $4 profit per share and said that they will be earning around $20bn this quarter. But the latter forecast couldn't meet the top forecast ($21bn) and the share price fell in the afterhours trading, though by less than 2%; investors couldn't decide whether they should buy the fact that the company exceeded the sky-high expectations, or they should sell the reality that the chip sales to China will slow this quarter and that would weigh on revenue – although Nvidia stated that the 'decline will be more than offset by strong growth in other regions' and that they are working to comply with regulations to sell to China, anyway.   Taking a step back: Nvidia is growing, it is growing fast, it has potential to grow further, but the valuation of the company is also sky-high, its price got multiplied by almost five since October 2022. Its PE ratio stands around 120 versus a PE ratio of around 25 in average for S&P500 companies. And its market capitalization is more than $1 trillion more than Intel's, which used to be the world's biggest chipmaker. In summary, the company is growing but that strong growth is already priced in and out. Therefore, we will probably not see a big profit taking post-earnings, we will likely see correction and consolidation instead below the $500 psychological hurdle.   And with that – the Nvidia earnings – out of the way, the S&P500 and Nasdaq futures are slightly in the negative at the time of writing. The market will likely digest the Fed minutes and the Nvidia results in a calm mood before the Thanksgiving holiday.   
Shift in Central Bank Sentiment: Czech National Bank Hints at a 50bp Rate Cut, Impact on CZK Expected

When do you start to worry about Chinese stimulus? - Market Analysis by Ipek Ozkardeskaya, Senior Analyst at Swissquote Bank

Ipek Ozkardeskaya Ipek Ozkardeskaya 25.01.2024 16:00
  When do you start to worry about Chinese stimulus?  By Ipek Ozkardeskaya, Senior Analyst | Swissquote Bank  The stock rally continued on both sides of the Atlantic on Wednesday; the technology and chip stocks remained in the driver seat. Sentiment in Europe was bolstered by an almost 9% rally in ASML on news that their orders more than tripled last quarter. Now, there is a catch. A third of the $10 billion dollar worth of orders came from China as Chinese companies rushed to buy these machines by the end of last year before the US and Dutch chip ban came into effect. But even if the Chinese demand will fade away, ASML says that it expects its sales to remain steady thanks to AI demand..  As such, the ASML news also boosted the stock prices of our favourite AI plays. Nvidia hit another record yesterday, TSM extended gains, Microsoft was worth $3 trillion for some time. The S&P500 and Nasdaq 100 hit a fresh record, and Netflix – which has nothing to do with AI, but which was just cheering its 13-mio new subscribers for the latest quarter - jumped 10%.   In summary, all goes well for those who are in the technology boat sailing north. For the rest, skepticism best describes how they feel about an unsustainable rise in valuations.   Tesla misses, Intel next.  Tesla missed estimates in its latest quarterly earnings report and warned that its EV sales growth will be 'notably lower' and that the numbers will suffer until the company comes up with a cheaper model. The series of price cuts weren't enough to bolster demand in a way to keep the company smiling and profits rising – sufficiently. As such, Tesla refused to offer a specific growth target and its share price took a 6% hit in the afterhours trading. Intel is due to report its earnings today.   Connecting the dots  The Chinese are serious about bolstering their economy and they look like they are getting to a place where they are ready to do whatever it takes to reverse the slowing trend.  In addition to a series of market stimulus news, the People' Bank of China (PBoC) announced yesterday that it will cut the reserve ratio for the banks by 50bp from February to release more liquidity to bolster stock valuations The latter will free up to an additional trillion yuan, which equals $139bn US dollars.  Will it help? Well, we will see. The good news is, if it doesn't, the Chinese will continue until it does.   The CSI 300 finally sees some positive reaction, stocks in Hong Kong are up 10% since Monday, American crude is drilling above the $75pb per barrel and copper futures – which are a gauge of global growth – also seem gently convinced that the Chinese will put all their weight – all they need to – to make things better.   But note that China's supportive policies may not echo well across the developed markets' central banks, because the Chinese stimulus – if successful – should boost global inflation and interfere with DM central banks' plans to loosen policies.   BoC calls the end of tightening, ECB next to speak.  But until we see concrete results from Chinese measures, softer policies remain the base-case scenario for the Federal Reserve (Fed) and the other major central banks (except Japan). In this context, the Bank of Canada (BoC) kept its rates unchanged at yesterday's meeting and called the end of rate hikes. The European Central Bank (ECB) will meet today and will certainly vehicle the same message - that policy tightening is over. But that's not enough.  When it comes to the ECB, what investors want to know is WHEN the ECB will start cutting the inteerest rates. If we had this conversation two weeks ago, I would say that the ECB would push back on expectations of premature rate cuts. But after having heard Christine Lagarde say that the first rate cut could come in summer, I am more balanced going into the meeting. Inflation has come lower – but we saw an uptick in the latest figures. The rising shipping costs and the positive pressure in oil prices mean that upside risks prevail. Yet the slowdown in European economies calls for lower rates. Released yesterday, the Eurozone PMI figures showed that aggregate activity remained in the contraction zone for the 8th straight month and slow down accelerated in January – except for manufacturing.   A hedge fund called Qube apparently built a $1 bn short position against German stocks, and Goldman Sachs says that a Trump presidency would increase risks for European businesses, and economically sensitive pockets of the market, like the German industries, would be the most exposed.  

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