input prices

Eurozone PMI once again signals contraction in activity in September

The PMI ticked up slightly from 46.7 to 47.1 in September. This is better than expected but does not ease concerns about a possible contraction in GDP in the second half of the year.

 

To be fair, the PMIs are getting harder to read at this point. The slight tick-up from last month does end a streak of four consecutive declines in the composite PMI, but it remains firmly in contraction territory. While better than analysts had expected, the overall picture remains rather bleak on economic growth and adds to contraction concerns. Still, at least today’s PMI indicates that the deterioration of conditions has stopped for the moment.

Perhaps that’s the glass-half-full take because the underlying picture that the PMI paints is far from positive. The decline in demand is worsening as new orders fell at the fastest pace since late 2020. Manufacturing has performed poorly for quite some time, but the fact that servi

Examining the Inflation Outlook: Anticipating a Summer Turnaround and its Impact on Bank of England's Monetary Policy

Examining the Inflation Outlook: Anticipating a Summer Turnaround and its Impact on Bank of England's Monetary Policy

ING Economics ING Economics 16.06.2023 15:49
The inflation story should start to turn over the summer Then there’s the inflation data itself. The dividing line on the committee right now seems between those hawks that are seeing persistent ‘second-round effects’ of higher energy/food prices, and the doves that think headline/core CPI is simply just lagging behind the wider fall in input and product price inflation over recent months (see a speech by BoE’s Dhingra). Elements of both are true. April’s CPI figures were undeniably ugly, though some of the drivers – higher vehicle and alcohol prices, for example – are unlikely to form long-lasting trends. We agree with the doves that food inflation should begin to ease back in line with producer prices, while services inflation (particularly hospitality) should come under less pressure now gas prices are so much lower. The BoE’s own Decision Maker Panel survey of chief financial officers suggests pay and price expectations have also eased noticeably over recent months. If nothing else, hefty base effects should ensure that the headline inflation rate comes down over the summer months and fluctuates around 6%, and to a lesser extent the same is true of the core rate. Barring some further unpleasant and consistent surprises in the services inflation figures over the coming months, we think a 5% peak for Bank Rate seems reasonable. That implies rate hikes on Thursday and again in August.  However, as we discussed in more detail in a separate piece, we think the downtrend in wage growth is going to be slow – even if it has probably peaked. Labour market shortages look at least partly structural, and we suspect wage growth could end the year above 5% (7% currently). While that doesn't necessarily require the Bank to take rates much higher, it does suggest rate cuts are unlikely for at least a year, not least given the mortgage market structure discussed earlier.   Sterling trade-weighted index pushes back to early 2022 highs   Sterling can hold onto gains in the near term Sterling continues to ride high. On a trade-weighted basis, it is returning to levels last seen in early 2022 before Russia's invasion of Ukraine. Barring a surprisingly soft May UK CPI on Wednesday, 21 June, it looks like sterling can largely hang onto those gains if the Bank of England does not push back against very aggressive tightening expectations. Our strong preference has been that sterling will enjoy more upside against the dollar than the euro. Currently, we have a 1.33 end-year forecast for GBP/USD and the near-term bias is for 1.30 given what seems to be bearish momentum building against the dollar. EUR/GBP has been weaker than we had expected. And next week's BoE meeting may be too soon to expect a bullish reversal here. Yet, consistent with our house view that the Bank Rate will not be taken as high as the 5.65% level currently priced by investors for the end of this year, we suspect that EUR/GBP ends the year closer to the 0.88 area, meaning that current EUR/GBP levels should make a good opportunity to hedge sterling receivables for euro-based accounts. 
Pound Sterling: Short-Term Repricing Complete, But Further Uncertainty Looms

European Markets React to US Rating Downgrade and Economic Concerns

Michael Hewson Michael Hewson 02.08.2023 08:22
European markets set to open lower after US rating downgrade     We saw a negative start to August for European markets with the DAX leading the way lower, having only put in a new record high the day before, after poor manufacturing PMIs and disappointing earnings prompted profit taking.   Yesterday's weakness appears to have been prompted by concern that the economy is a little bit weaker than perhaps people would like, raising concern for earnings growth heading into the second half of the year. US markets also finished the day lower, although closing well off the lows of the day with the Dow managing to eke out a gain. US yields also finished the day higher, on the rising realisation that rates may well have to stay at current levels for quite a while yet.     This profit taking has continued overnight after Fitch downgraded the US credit rating to AA+ from AAA, while simultaneously boosting demand for haven assets, with Asia markets falling sharply, and which looks set to translate into a sharply lower European open.   The increase in crude oil prices over the past 4 weeks is also raising concern that the falls in input prices that we've seen over the last few months might start to hit a floor and start rising again. Yesterday we got another snapshot of the US labour market as US job openings (JOLTS) fell to their lowest levels since April 2021, although they are still well above the levels, they were pre-pandemic. The latest employment component in the July ISM manufacturing survey also slowed to its lowest level since July 2020.     Today we get the latest insight into private sector hiring with the ADP employment report for July which is unlikely to repeat the bumper 497k seen in the June numbers. We should also be prepared for a downward revision to that report with July expected to see a more moderate 190k, as we look towards Friday's more important non-farm payrolls numbers. While stocks slipped back yesterday the US dollar rose to a 3-week high, gaining ground across the board on the grounds of the broader resilience of the US economy.     EUR/USD – still finding support at the 1.0940 lows from last week with further support at the 50-day SMA as well as the 1.0850 area. Resistance currently at last week's high at 1.1150.     GBP/USD – has continued to slide lower towards trend line support from the March lows at 1.2710, and the 50-day SMA at 1.2700. While above this key support the uptrend from the March lows remains intact. Resistance at the 1.3000 area.         EUR/GBP – popped briefly above the resistance at the 0.8600 area, before slipping back again, with the risk of a return to the recent lows at 0.8500/10. We need to see a concerted move above 0.8620 to target the July highs at 0.8700/10.     USD/JPY – continues to move through the 142.00 area, with the next target at the previous peaks at 145.00. Support comes in at this week's lows at 140.70.     FTSE100 is expected to open 30 points lower at 7,636     DAX is expected to open 88 points lower at 16,152     CAC40 is expected to open 36 points lower at 7,370   By Michael Hewson (Chief Market Analyst at CMC Markets UK)  
Pound Sterling: Short-Term Repricing Complete, But Further Uncertainty Looms

European Markets React to US Rating Downgrade and Economic Concerns - 02.08.2023

Michael Hewson Michael Hewson 02.08.2023 08:22
European markets set to open lower after US rating downgrade     We saw a negative start to August for European markets with the DAX leading the way lower, having only put in a new record high the day before, after poor manufacturing PMIs and disappointing earnings prompted profit taking.   Yesterday's weakness appears to have been prompted by concern that the economy is a little bit weaker than perhaps people would like, raising concern for earnings growth heading into the second half of the year. US markets also finished the day lower, although closing well off the lows of the day with the Dow managing to eke out a gain. US yields also finished the day higher, on the rising realisation that rates may well have to stay at current levels for quite a while yet.     This profit taking has continued overnight after Fitch downgraded the US credit rating to AA+ from AAA, while simultaneously boosting demand for haven assets, with Asia markets falling sharply, and which looks set to translate into a sharply lower European open.   The increase in crude oil prices over the past 4 weeks is also raising concern that the falls in input prices that we've seen over the last few months might start to hit a floor and start rising again. Yesterday we got another snapshot of the US labour market as US job openings (JOLTS) fell to their lowest levels since April 2021, although they are still well above the levels, they were pre-pandemic. The latest employment component in the July ISM manufacturing survey also slowed to its lowest level since July 2020.     Today we get the latest insight into private sector hiring with the ADP employment report for July which is unlikely to repeat the bumper 497k seen in the June numbers. We should also be prepared for a downward revision to that report with July expected to see a more moderate 190k, as we look towards Friday's more important non-farm payrolls numbers. While stocks slipped back yesterday the US dollar rose to a 3-week high, gaining ground across the board on the grounds of the broader resilience of the US economy.     EUR/USD – still finding support at the 1.0940 lows from last week with further support at the 50-day SMA as well as the 1.0850 area. Resistance currently at last week's high at 1.1150.     GBP/USD – has continued to slide lower towards trend line support from the March lows at 1.2710, and the 50-day SMA at 1.2700. While above this key support the uptrend from the March lows remains intact. Resistance at the 1.3000 area.         EUR/GBP – popped briefly above the resistance at the 0.8600 area, before slipping back again, with the risk of a return to the recent lows at 0.8500/10. We need to see a concerted move above 0.8620 to target the July highs at 0.8700/10.     USD/JPY – continues to move through the 142.00 area, with the next target at the previous peaks at 145.00. Support comes in at this week's lows at 140.70.     FTSE100 is expected to open 30 points lower at 7,636     DAX is expected to open 88 points lower at 16,152     CAC40 is expected to open 36 points lower at 7,370   By Michael Hewson (Chief Market Analyst at CMC Markets UK)  
Eurozone PMI Shows Limited Improvement Amid Lingering Contraction Concerns in September

Eurozone PMI Shows Limited Improvement Amid Lingering Contraction Concerns in September

ING Economics ING Economics 25.09.2023 11:14
Eurozone PMI once again signals contraction in activity in September The PMI ticked up slightly from 46.7 to 47.1 in September. This is better than expected but does not ease concerns about a possible contraction in GDP in the second half of the year.   To be fair, the PMIs are getting harder to read at this point. The slight tick-up from last month does end a streak of four consecutive declines in the composite PMI, but it remains firmly in contraction territory. While better than analysts had expected, the overall picture remains rather bleak on economic growth and adds to contraction concerns. Still, at least today’s PMI indicates that the deterioration of conditions has stopped for the moment. Perhaps that’s the glass-half-full take because the underlying picture that the PMI paints is far from positive. The decline in demand is worsening as new orders fell at the fastest pace since late 2020. Manufacturing has performed poorly for quite some time, but the fact that services are the main contributor to the drop in new orders shows that the weakening of demand in the eurozone is becoming more broad-based. Businesses are still working off old orders at the moment, which is keeping output reasonable right now. Still, that suggests a weaker outlook for the months ahead. With hiring slowing to a snail’s pace, concerns about activity in the months ahead remain. Our base case is for a continuation of very slow growth, more or less stagnation, which means that a quarter of negative growth is certainly imaginable. The inflation picture is also getting more complicated. The surge in oil prices and high wage growth have caused input prices to increase again, which is mainly the case for the service sector. In manufacturing, input prices have turned deflationary. Still, the increase in service sector costs has not resulted in accelerated selling price inflation. Weaker demand is resulting in slowing selling prices in services and in outright drops in prices for manufacturing. Music to the ears of the European Central Bank, no doubt.

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