inflation figures

Rates Spark: Feeding the doves

ECB President Lagarde's lack of pushback bull steepened euro curves as markets pencil in a high probability of early rate cuts. There may be less dovish sounds in coming days as other ECB speakers take the stage. Thursday's US data had something for all, but were net bullish for bonds. However, the March cut expectation still has some unwind to get done.

US data on Thursday is bond supportive, but we're still not getting a March rate cut. That still needs to be unwound

The strong US fourth quarter 2023 GDP number makes it more likely that first quarter 2024 will be weaker, according to our economist James Knightley. Inventories are going to be making a negative contribution and trade is likely to also swing back to becoming a headwind while consumer momentum is also slowing somewhat. Early days, but we are pencilling in a 1-1.5% figure for the first quarter – the current consensus is for GDP growth of just 0.6%. Also, the Fed's favoured measure o

Market Skepticism Persists as Hawkish Narrative Faces Challenges: FX Daily Analysis

Market Skepticism Persists as Hawkish Narrative Faces Challenges: FX Daily Analysis

ING Economics ING Economics 15.06.2023 13:13
FX Daily: Hard times to sell a hawkish narrative The Fed paused yesterday but signalled two more hikes in its dot plot. Markets, however, are not trusting the new projections, and barely price in one more 25bp increase to the peak, likely due to recent softish inflation figures. The ECB won’t have an easier task selling such hawkish rhetoric today, and EUR/USD faces some moderate downside risks.   USD: Dollar bulls can cling on to the dot plot The Federal Reserve matched market expectations for a hold yesterday, but definitely surprised on the hawkish side with its messaging. As discussed in our Fed review note, the FOMC retained maximum flexibility as it signalled openness to further rate increases: the updated dot plot rate projections were reviewed considerably higher from March, and the median projection now includes two more rate hikes in 2023, before 100bp of cuts in 2024. Remember that the March dot plot signalled we had reached the end of the tightening cycle, now only two FOMC members see rates being held at 5.25% until year-end.   The dollar had come into the FOMC announcement with a bearish tone, as PPI figures released yesterday morning showed more encouraging signs of a slowdown in inflation and prompted markets to fully price out a rate hike later in the day.   Despite the hawkish surprise contained in the Fed message – primarily in the dot plot – the dollar failed to rebound. That is because there was an evident dislocation between the Fed’s hawkish signals and the market reaction: investors are carefully weighing the evidence of slowing inflation from the CPI and PPI data, and appear – so far – reluctant to align with the Fed’s projections. The Fed funds futures curve prices in 17bp of tightening for July, and 22bp to the peak.   The post-FOMC pricing is telling us that markets accord higher credibility to data than the Fed’s communication, so more evidence of US disinflation/economic slowdown can prompt more dollar weakness moving ahead. However, with markets underpricing rate hikes compared to the dot plot, we’d be cautious before jumping on a bearish dollar trend just yet, given the high risk of market pricing converging to the Fed’s projections and pushing short-term swap rates higher again.   So, dollar bulls can probably cling on to the hawkish dot plot for now, or at least until (and if) data indicates more unequivocally that there is no longer a necessity to raise rates.   This morning, we are seeing the dollar recovering some ground, although that appears to be primarily driven by the weak activity data out of China and fresh rate cuts by the People's Bank of China.    
Understanding the Factors Keeping Market Rates Under Upward Pressure

Navigating the Data: Central Banks and Market Concerns

ING Economics ING Economics 16.06.2023 09:50
In the end it all boils down to data That tension between persistently high inflation and recession fears is of course a wider and ongoing market theme. Indeed, yesterday’s market reaction to the ECB and the quick fade was probably more down to mixed US data releases that came out just when Lagarde was set to speak.   More hints that US pipeline pressures are easing came from import prices falling faster than expected. And we also saw the weekly jobless claims grind higher again suggesting a softening of the jobs market. As our economist notes, probably not enough to deter the Fed from a potential hike in July following the hawkish pause this week, but enough to keep the market concerned about the outlook. As opposed to the bear flattening in EUR, the US curve bull flattened with the 10Y UST yield dipping towards 3.7% Overall, central banks this week have given themselves the flexibility and room to tighten policies further should data warrant it, keeping upward pressure on front-end rates. Yield curves could invert further but given how far they already stretch, long-end rates could still follow higher in the near term. Only the Bank of Japan (BoJ) bucked the hawkish trend set by the Fed and ECB (and likely continued by the BoE next week) today by leaving policy rates unchanged and dismissing calls for an adjustment higher of its yield curve control cap, currently standing at 0.5%. The lack of action today and the view put forward that the current spike in inflation will prove temporary leaves the market guessing about the timing of a potential normalisation of the BoJ's policy setting.   The long-end reflects markets skepticism with 2s10s curves inverting further Today's events and market view Some calm may return to markets after the key events of this week. It probably won't last too long with UK inflation and the Bank of England decision lined up for next week. And in the US we will also see Fed Chair Jerome Powell giving testimony to Congress.  As for today, in the eurozone we will see the release of the final inflation figures for May, but more attention should go to the usual flurry of ECB speakers in the wake of the meeting, though Lagarde pointed out the “broad consensus” around yesterday’s decision. And it seems the ECB has been successful in curbing the market's preoccupation with the terminal rate level and focussing it on a high-for-longer discussion – note the pricing out of future rate cuts as a driver of the front-end move higher since last week. The main US data release today is the University of Michigan consumer confidence survey, which also includes measures of longer-term inflation expectations. The consensus is for a slight downtick in the latter to 4.1% year-on-year for the 1-year horizon and to 3% for the 5 to 10-year inflation. But we will also see a number of Fed speakers for the first time after the FOMC meeting. In the end, the data will remain the key, for central banks to assess whether they have done enough on inflation, or markets to discern whether too much has been done already to hurt the economy.
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Bank of England Keeps Options Open After Smaller Rate Hike on Better Inflation News

ING Economics ING Economics 03.08.2023 15:02
Bank of England opts for smaller rate hike after better inflation news The Bank of England is keeping all its options open on future rate hikes, although another rise in September seems highly likely. Whether that's repeated in November is a more open question, particularly if services inflation starts to fall more noticeably between now an.   Bank of England reverts back to a 25bp hike Better news on inflation has, as expected, enabled the Bank of England to pivot back to a 25 basis-point rate hike this month. That follows a more aggressive 50bp hike back in June. Policymakers clearly don’t want to come across as complacent though, and there are plenty of references to the upside risks associated with inflation, as well as the recent surprises in wage growth. We shouldn’t be too surprised then that the Bank isn’t offering up much on what it intends to do next. The BoE retained its forward guidance that says it could hike again if “evidence of more persistent pressures” shows up in the inflation figures. This is the same phrase it has used all year and is sufficiently vague to keep various options on the table for September and beyond. That said, there are a few hints that we might be nearing the top for policy rates. Interestingly, the Bank now formally says that policy is restrictive, which seems to be a new addition to the statement – as is the line about policy needing to stay “sufficiently restrictive for sufficiently long”. At a pinch, you could argue this is the Bank laying very early groundwork for a pause later in the year, though we’re at risk of overanalysing. Meanwhile the new forecasts, even accounting for the Bank’s upside skew that it applies to what its models are churning out, show inflation at (or even a tad below) target in a couple of years’ time. Curiously, that’s also the case under the assumption that Bank Rate stays unchanged at its new level over the coming months. That said, the Bank’s forecasts have been pointing to sub-target inflation for some time now, and policymakers don’t appear to be putting a lot of faith in what their models are currently predicting.   So what next? Another hike in September seems likely, but by November we think the news on services inflation and wage growth should be looking a little better. The former has risen in no small part because of higher energy bills, and, according to ONS surveys, the pressure on service sector companies to aggressively raise prices is abating. Whether or not we get another 25bp hike in November will therefore largely depend on whether services inflation has failed to slow, but our base case for now is that 5.50% in September will mark the peak for Bank Rate. Market pricing of a peak at 5.65% around the turn of the year therefore seems fair – and certainly much more reasonable than it did just a few weeks ago when investors briefly saw peak Bank Rate near 6.5%.   UK markets read the statement on the less hawkish side Today’s MPC statement and accompanying material have seen sterling sell-off around 0.5% and the UK 2-10 year Gilt curve steepen by around 7-8bps, led by declining yields at the short end of the curve. As above, investors seem to have read something in either the statement or the CPI forecasts suggesting that the Bank Rate may not need to be hiked as high as 5.75% after all. As discussed in our BoE preview, we expect the general direction of travel for EUR/GBP to lie towards the 0.88 area later this year as evidence builds that rates may in fact peak at 5.50%. We still like a higher GBP/USD on the back of the softer dollar story – but that does rely on both US inflation and activity showing a marked deceleration over the coming months. We currently see GBP/USD ending the year just above 1.30. Gilt price action today comes amid unsettled conditions at the long end of the US Treasury market.  A steeper curve does seem to make the most sense, if investors do continue to question whether the Bank Rate makes it to 5.75% and also while the US fiscal situation, plus rising Japanese government bond yields, keep the long end of core bond markets under pressure. Currently, we have a year-end 10-year Gilt target of 3.80% – but that requires a lot of things to go right.
The UK Contracts Faster Than Expected in July, Bank of England Still Expected to Hike Rates

Deciphering the UK Economy: Expert Analysis on Macroeconomic Trends, Challenges, and Prospects

ICM.COM Market Updates ICM.COM Market Updates 12.08.2023 08:32
In this interview, we sit down with Paweł Majtkowski to delve into the intricate web of macroeconomic data shaping the British economy. As a seasoned economic analyst, Mr. Majtkowski provides his expert insights on the latest series of economic indicators from the UK. From GDP growth and inflation figures to employment rates and trade balances, we explore the trends, challenges, and potential opportunities that lie ahead for the UK's economic landscape. Join us as we navigate through the numbers and uncover the narratives behind the data-driven journey of the British economy.   FXMAG.COM: Let me ask you to comment on the whole series of macroeconomic data from the British economy. However, will it enter a recession? What does this data say about further potential rate hikes in the UK? The UK continues to struggle with high inflation. In June, it stood at 7.3 per cent year-on-year. The British economy is therefore experiencing difficult times, not least because of 14 consecutive interest rate rises in a row. Domestically, there is economic stagnation. However, the GDP results - 0.5 % growth last month and 0.2 % in the second quarter - are better than analysts' expectations. With such modest growth, it is the details that count. Economic activity increased in June due to very good weather (the best since 1884), there were more working days in May than in previous years and this helped to offset the effects of ongoing strike action. The services sector, which dominates UK GDP, is benefiting from low (structural) unemployment and rising wages. This, in turn, is a cause for concern for the Bank of England and especially its hawkish representatives. Further rate rises cannot therefore be ruled out. The manufacturing sector and the real estate market, on the other hand, are performing worse. Not insignificant for the UK is the fact that its second largest trading partner, Germany, has already slipped into recession. This is a result of falling manufacturing and a very slow recovery in China.   Paweł Majtkowski, eToro Market Analyst
Detailed Analysis of GBP/USD 5-Minute Chart

EUR Resilience Amidst Chinese Concerns

ING Economics ING Economics 18.08.2023 09:54
EUR: Surprisingly resilient After a week that has brought to the table some serious concerns about China’s near and medium-term outlook, it is quite a success for EUR/USD to be trading around 1.0900. The pair is not just exposed to Chinese sentiment via the risk-environment channel, but more directly given the eurozone’s economic exposure to China. The question now remains: will the Chinese story catch up with the euro? For now, it really appears that markets are welcoming Beijing’s forceful reaction, although much will probably depend on the developments in the distressed shadow bank Zhongzhi and the actual depth of the real estate slump. All in all, it does look like there is a path for the euro and other pro-cyclical currencies to weather this Chinese turmoil without taking much damage, but that also means a delay in any substantial rally against the dollar. Data-wise, we’ll take a look at the final inflation figures in the eurozone today. Markets are currently pricing in a 50% implied probability of a European Central Bank (ECB) rate hike in September, and have marginally scaled back expectations along the curve in the past few days. A full rate hike is not priced before the end of the year, which probably leaves some upside room for short-term rates in the eurozone should ECB officials come back after the summer holidays with some hawkish comments. EUR/USD may keep trading in narrow ranges for now, with a modestly bearish bias to the 1.0850 level.  
Assessing EUR's Approach: Inflation Test and ECB Hawkish Stance - 29.08.2023

Assessing EUR's Approach: Inflation Test and ECB Hawkish Stance

ING Economics ING Economics 29.08.2023 10:18
EUR: Gearing up for the inflation test We aren't surprised to hear the ECB hawks step in with some strong messaging in support of more tightening as the September policy meeting draws closer. Market pricing for the September meeting is probably what has been bothering the hawkish fringes of the Governing Council. Markets have been quite reluctant to fully price in one last ECB hike, and the implied probability of a September move has been stuck below 50%. Governing Council member Robert Holzmann directly pointed out a high chance of raising rates again, but market pricing has not moved significantly. President Christine Lagarde herself held a generally hawkish tone at her Jackson Hole speech last week and seemed to put little emphasis on the mounting evidence that the eurozone’s economy is rapidly slowing, and there is a need to stick with data dependency. It is clear now that markets are – that is admittedly not too common – fully embracing the data-dependent approach of the ECB policymakers, and are awaiting this week’s inflation figures to make their final call on the September hike. It’s important to set a timeline for this week’s inflation releases: German figures are out tomorrow morning (along with Spain’s), while Thursday sees the release of French, Italian, and then eurozone-wide figures. Consensus expectations are for a slowdown from 5.5% to 5.3% in core CPI inflation, while our economists forecast 5.4%. That should, on the margin, be enough to trigger one last 25bp rate hike by the ECB in September, and we see upside risks for the euro in the near term. A return and stabilisation above 1.0950 and even retesting 1.10 is possible should inflation prove resilient, but much will also depend on US payroll numbers not exceeding expectations.
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Eurozone Inflation Trends and ECB Meeting: Assessing Monetary Policy Options

ING Economics ING Economics 31.08.2023 12:12
Eurozone inflation stagnates ahead of ECB September meeting Inflation in the eurozone did not fall in August, which could tip the ECB in favour of a final 25bp hike at the governing council meeting in two weeks' time. Still, overall inflation dynamics remain relatively benign, and we still expect inflation to trend much lower at the end of the year. The eurozone inflation rate was stable at 5.3% in August, with core inflation also dropping to 5.3% (from 5.5% in July). Headline inflation was slightly higher than expectations due to energy price developments which increased by 3.2% month-on-month. This will fuel concern about inflation remaining more stubborn than anticipated. The overall trend in inflation remains cautiously disinflationary though as developments in goods and services inflation were more or less as expected. By country, we see that rising prices mainly came from France and Spain, while drops in the Netherlands and Italy kept inflation broadly in check. Energy effects and how they translate to consumer prices – look at rising regulated prices in France – were important drivers of differences this month. Looking ahead, more declines in inflation are in the making. In Germany, we expect a significant drop next month as base effects from government support drop from the data. Surveys also point to a sizable disinflationary effect for goods prices, while services inflation is set to fall more slowly thanks to higher wage costs. Indeed, wage growth is still trending above a level consistent with 2% inflation. For the European Central Bank, these August inflation data were among the most important data points ahead of the governing council meeting in two weeks’ time. While inflation remains stubborn enough to make ECB hawks uncomfortable, it does look like a further deceleration in inflation is in the making for the months ahead. Given the ECB mantra over recent months that doing too little is worse than doing too much in terms of hikes, we still expect another 25 basis point rate rise, despite this being a close call.
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FX Outlook: EURUSD Below 200-DMA, RBA Holds Steady, and Japanese Bond Market Tests Demand

Ipek Ozkardeskaya Ipek Ozkardeskaya 05.09.2023 11:37
In the FX  The EURUSD remains offered below its 200-DMA today, although the softening Federal Reserve (Fed) expectations make more sense than softening ECB expectations, provided that the ECB is NOT in a comfortable place to call a pause at this month's meeting amid the uptick in latest inflation figures. Therefore, if the ECB expectations, which may have softened unnecessarily are restored into the next ECB meeting, we should see the EURUSD find a solid ground before the critical 1.0615 Fibonacci support.   On the flip side of the world, the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) kept its cash rate unchanged at 4.1% at today's monetary policy meeting. The EURAUD rebounded from a month-dip as investors saw opportunity to trade the soft RBA stance versus a possibly unfunded softness in ECB expectations, which justifies a further upside correction in the EURAUD toward the 1.70 mark – especially when the news from China remains disquieting.  Elsewhere in the Pacific, Japan is testing the market demand for its 10 and 30-year bonds this week, as the finance ministry sells 2.7 trillion-yen worth of 10-year bonds today and 900-billion-yen worth of 30-year bonds on Thursday. Of course, the Bank of Japan (BoJ) is out and buying a massive amount of bonds to make sure that the YCC not too relaxed, and traders are looking for signs of still sluggish demand from local investors that could force the BoJ to act earlier than ... never. The Japanese 10-year yield is currently at a 9-year high, but is still below 65bp, meaning that it has ways to strengthen. However, when the Japanese yields will become interesting enough for domestic Japanese investors - which are also among the biggest buyers of US papers, the returning home will apply a decent pressure on the US long term yields.  
Turbulent Times Ahead: ECB's Tough Decision Amid Soaring Oil Prices

Turbulent Times Ahead: ECB's Tough Decision Amid Soaring Oil Prices

Ipek Ozkardeskaya Ipek Ozkardeskaya 06.09.2023 12:11
Rising oil prices give off a foul smell.  By Ipek Ozkardeskaya, Senior Analyst | Swissquote Bank   Released yesterday, the European services PMI data came in softer than expected in all major euro area locations. The data showed that services sector in Italy and Spain slipped into the contraction zone in August - a month of big summer holidays where people flock to Italian and Spanish cities and beaches. The soft PMI data fueled the European Central Bank (ECB) doves and pushed the EURUSD under a bus yesterday; the pair fell to the lowest levels since the beginning of June and flirted with the 1.07 support on idea that the ECB can't raise interest rates next week when the economic picture is souring at speed. But I believe that it can. The ECB can announce another 25bp hike when it meets next week, or a faster reduction of its balance sheet, or the end of remuneration of banks' minimum reserves to tighten financial conditions, because the latest inflation figures from the Eurozone showed stagnation, instead of further easing, and the ECB will allow economic weakness to some extent to fight inflation. The most recent inflation expectations in the Eurozone showed that the next 12-month expectations remained steady at 3.4%, but the three-year inflation expectations spiked to 3.4%, and there is no reason for inflation expectations to continue easing when energy prices are going up toward the sky.
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GBP Data Check: Evaluating Dovish Trends and Bank of England Expectations

ING Economics ING Economics 11.09.2023 11:03
GBP: Data check this week The pound emerges from a difficult week where the dovish rhetoric ahead of future Bank of England decisions consolidated and markets continued to scale back tightening expectations. It must be noted that the largest contributor to the dovish re-pricing in the GBP curve has been the BoE’s own communication, which seemed to shift more in favour of a higher-for-longer rather than a higher peak. One bit of data that endorsed the dovish narrative came from the BoE’s Decision Maker Panel survey, which showed a widespread decline in inflationary pressure. But the BoE has made clear that it’s hard data that matters, and this week’s UK calendar will be quite helpful in that sense. Wage and jobs data will be the key release tomorrow. Private sector wage growth currently stands at 8.2% and looks likely to remain unchanged, but there’s an outside risk that we see this nudge slightly lower. The unemployment rate may also nudge a bit higher. All that may fail to invert the dovish trend on UK rate expectations ahead of next week’s Bank of England’s policy meeting, although the pricing has already dropped quite substantially (16bp priced in for September, 35bp to a peak). Our economics team still thinks the BoE will go ahead with a hike this month. Inflation figures are out one day before the meeting, so while more GBP weakness is possible around this week’s data releases, next week could see some recovery. EUR/GBP may be trading well above 0.8600 once we get to the BoE meeting.
Asia Weakness Sets Tone for Lower European Open on 26th September 2023

Asia Weakness Sets Tone for Lower European Open on 26th September 2023

Ipek Ozkardeskaya Ipek Ozkardeskaya 26.09.2023 14:41
05:40BST Tuesday 26th September 2023 Asia weakness set to see lower European open By Michael Hewson (Chief Market Analyst at CMC Markets UK)   European markets got off to a poor start to the week yesterday as concerns around sticky inflation, and low growth (stagflation), or recession served to push yields higher, pushing the DAX to its lowest levels since late March, pushing both it and the CAC 40 below the important technical level of the 200-day SMA. Recent economic data is already flashing warning signs over possible stagnation, especially in Europe while US data is proving to be more resilient.   Worries over the property sector in China didn't help sentiment yesterday after it emerged Chinese property group Evergrande said it was struggling to organise a process to restructure its debt, prompting weakness in basic resources. The increase in yields manifested itself in German and French 10-year yields, both of which rose to their highest levels in 12 years, with the DAX feeling the pressure along with the CAC 40, while the FTSE100 slipped to a one week low.   US markets initially opened lower in the face of a similar rise in yields with the S&P500 opening at a 3-month low, as US 10-year yields continued to push to fresh 16-year highs above 4.5%. These initial losses didn't last as US stocks closed higher for the first time in 5 days. The US dollar also made new highs for the year, rising to its best level since 30th November last year as traders bet that the Federal Reserve will keep rates higher for much longer than its counterparts due to the greater resilience of the US economy. The focus this week is on the latest inflation figures from Australia, as well as the core PCE Deflator from the US, as well as the latest flash CPI numbers for September from France, Germany, Spain as well as the wider EU flash number which is due on Friday. This could show the ECB erred a couple of weeks ago when it tightened the rate hike screw further to a record high.   On the data front today the focus will be on US consumer confidence for September, after the sharp fall from July's 117.00 to August's 106.10. Expectations are for a more modest slowdown to 105.50 on the back of the continued rise in gasoline prices which has taken place since the June lows. The late rebound in US markets doesn't look set to translate into today's European open with Asia markets also sliding back on the same combination of stagflation concerns and reports that Chinese property company Evergrande missed a debt payment.   Another warning from ratings agency Moody's about the impact of another government shutdown on the US economy, and its credit rating, didn't help the overall mood, while Minneapolis Fed President Neel Kashkari said he expects another Fed rate rise before the end of the year helping to further boost the US dollar as well as yields.     EUR/USD – slid below the 1.0600 level yesterday potentially opening the prospect of further losses towards the March lows at 1.0515. Currently have resistance at 1.0740, which we need to get above to stabilise and minimise the risk of further weakness.      GBP/USD – slipped to the 1.2190 area, and has since rebounded, however the bias remains for a retest of the 1.2000 area. Only a move back above the 1.2430 area and 200-day SMA stabilises and argues for a return to the 1.2600 area.       EUR/GBP – currently have resistance at the 200-day SMA at 0.8720, which is capping the upside. A break here targets the 0.8800 area, however while below the bias remains for a pullback. If we slip below the 0.8660 area, we could see a move back to the 0.8620 area.     USD/JPY – has continued to climb higher towards the 150.00 area with support currently at the lows last week at 147.20/30. Major support currently at the 146.00 area.     FTSE100 is expected to open at 7,624     DAX is expected to open at 15,405     CAC40 is expected to open at 7,124  
Not much relief, after all: Markets React to Political Uncertainties and Hawkish Fed Rhetoric - 05.10.2023

Not much relief, after all: Markets React to Political Uncertainties and Hawkish Fed Rhetoric

Markus Helsing Markus Helsing 05.10.2023 08:31
Not much relief, after all By Ipek Ozkardeskaya, Senior Analyst | Swissquote Bank   Relief that came with the news of a temporary avoidance of a potential government shutdown remained short lived. Sentiment in stocks markets turned rapidly sour, both in Europe and in the US, while the US treasury yields didn't even react positively to the no shutdown news in the first place. The selloff in the US 10-year bonds accelerated instead; the 10-year yield hit the 4.70% mark, whereas the 2-year yield remained steady-ish at around the 5.10% level, as the Federal Reserve (Fed) Chair Jerome Powell didn't say much regarding the future of the monetary policy yesterday, but his colleagues continued to sound hawkish. Fed's Michelle Bowman said that multiple more interest rate hikes could be needed to tame inflation, while Micheal Barr repeated that the rates are likely restrictive enough, but they should stay higher for longer. Sufficiently hawkish words combined to a set of still-contracting-but-better-than-expected manufacturing PMI data justified the positive pressure on US sovereigns.   The gap between the US 2 and 10-year yields is now closing, but not necessarily for 'good' reasons. Normally, you would've expected the short-term yields to ease more rapidly than the long-term yields when approaching the end of a tightening cycle, with the expectations of future rate cuts kicking in. But what we see today is bear steepening where the 10-year yield accelerates faster than the 2-year yield. The  latter suggests rising inflation expectations where investors prefer to buy short-term papers and to wait for the rate hikes to end before returning to long-term papers. The US political uncertainties and a potential government shutdown before the end of the year, and an eventual US credit downgrade likely add an additional downside pressure in long dated US papers.   The rising yields do no good to stocks. But interestingly, yesterday, the S&P5500 closed flat but the more rate-sensitive Nasdaq stocks were up. The US dollar index extended gains past the 107 level; the index has now recovered half of losses it recorded since a year ago, when the dollar depreciation had started.   The AUDUSD extended losses to the lowest levels since last November as the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) maintained its policy rate unchanged at the first meeting under its new Governor Michelle Bullock. This is the 4th consecutive month pause for the RBA. The bank said that there may be more tightening in the horizon to bring inflation back to the 2-3% range (inflation currently stands at 5.2%). But the fact that Australians biggest trading partner, China, is not doing well, the fact that real estate market in Australia is battered by rising rates and the fact that the Chinese property crisis is now taking a toll on Australia's steel exports toward China are factors that could keep Australian growth below target and prevent the RBA from hiking further. If China doesn't get well soon, Australia will see its iron ore revenues, among others, melt in the next few years, and that's negative for the Aussie in the medium run.  Elsewhere, the EURUSD sank below the 1.05 level on the back of accelerated dollar purchases and softening European Central Bank (ECB) expectations following last week's lower-than-expected inflation figures. Cable slipped below a critical Fibonacci support yesterday, and is headed toward the 1.20 psychological mark. The weakening pound is not bad news for the British FTSE100, as around 80% of the FTSE100 companies' revenues come from abroad, and they are dollar denominated. Plus, cheaper sterling makes the energy-rich FTSE100 more affordable for foreign investors. Even though FTSE100 fell with sliding oil prices yesterday - and this year's performance is less than ideal compared to European and American - London's stock market is closing the gap with Paris, and rising oil prices and waning appetite for luxury stuff could well offer London its status of Europe's biggest stock market, yet again.  Speaking of oil prices, crude oil sank below $90pb level yesterday, partly due to the overbought market conditions that resulted from a more than a 40% rally since end of June, and partly because the 'higher for longer rates' expectations increased odds for recession.    
Not much relief, after all: Markets React to Political Uncertainties and Hawkish Fed Rhetoric - 05.10.2023

Not much relief, after all: Markets React to Political Uncertainties and Hawkish Fed Rhetoric - 05.10.2023

Markus Helsing Markus Helsing 05.10.2023 08:31
Not much relief, after all By Ipek Ozkardeskaya, Senior Analyst | Swissquote Bank   Relief that came with the news of a temporary avoidance of a potential government shutdown remained short lived. Sentiment in stocks markets turned rapidly sour, both in Europe and in the US, while the US treasury yields didn't even react positively to the no shutdown news in the first place. The selloff in the US 10-year bonds accelerated instead; the 10-year yield hit the 4.70% mark, whereas the 2-year yield remained steady-ish at around the 5.10% level, as the Federal Reserve (Fed) Chair Jerome Powell didn't say much regarding the future of the monetary policy yesterday, but his colleagues continued to sound hawkish. Fed's Michelle Bowman said that multiple more interest rate hikes could be needed to tame inflation, while Micheal Barr repeated that the rates are likely restrictive enough, but they should stay higher for longer. Sufficiently hawkish words combined to a set of still-contracting-but-better-than-expected manufacturing PMI data justified the positive pressure on US sovereigns.   The gap between the US 2 and 10-year yields is now closing, but not necessarily for 'good' reasons. Normally, you would've expected the short-term yields to ease more rapidly than the long-term yields when approaching the end of a tightening cycle, with the expectations of future rate cuts kicking in. But what we see today is bear steepening where the 10-year yield accelerates faster than the 2-year yield. The  latter suggests rising inflation expectations where investors prefer to buy short-term papers and to wait for the rate hikes to end before returning to long-term papers. The US political uncertainties and a potential government shutdown before the end of the year, and an eventual US credit downgrade likely add an additional downside pressure in long dated US papers.   The rising yields do no good to stocks. But interestingly, yesterday, the S&P5500 closed flat but the more rate-sensitive Nasdaq stocks were up. The US dollar index extended gains past the 107 level; the index has now recovered half of losses it recorded since a year ago, when the dollar depreciation had started.   The AUDUSD extended losses to the lowest levels since last November as the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) maintained its policy rate unchanged at the first meeting under its new Governor Michelle Bullock. This is the 4th consecutive month pause for the RBA. The bank said that there may be more tightening in the horizon to bring inflation back to the 2-3% range (inflation currently stands at 5.2%). But the fact that Australians biggest trading partner, China, is not doing well, the fact that real estate market in Australia is battered by rising rates and the fact that the Chinese property crisis is now taking a toll on Australia's steel exports toward China are factors that could keep Australian growth below target and prevent the RBA from hiking further. If China doesn't get well soon, Australia will see its iron ore revenues, among others, melt in the next few years, and that's negative for the Aussie in the medium run.  Elsewhere, the EURUSD sank below the 1.05 level on the back of accelerated dollar purchases and softening European Central Bank (ECB) expectations following last week's lower-than-expected inflation figures. Cable slipped below a critical Fibonacci support yesterday, and is headed toward the 1.20 psychological mark. The weakening pound is not bad news for the British FTSE100, as around 80% of the FTSE100 companies' revenues come from abroad, and they are dollar denominated. Plus, cheaper sterling makes the energy-rich FTSE100 more affordable for foreign investors. Even though FTSE100 fell with sliding oil prices yesterday - and this year's performance is less than ideal compared to European and American - London's stock market is closing the gap with Paris, and rising oil prices and waning appetite for luxury stuff could well offer London its status of Europe's biggest stock market, yet again.  Speaking of oil prices, crude oil sank below $90pb level yesterday, partly due to the overbought market conditions that resulted from a more than a 40% rally since end of June, and partly because the 'higher for longer rates' expectations increased odds for recession.    
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US Dollar Rises as Bond Market Ignites: A Look at Dollar's Resurgence

ING Economics ING Economics 10.11.2023 10:03
FX Daily: Bond bears give new energy to the dollar A very soft 30-year Treasury auction and hawkish comments by Powell triggered a rebound in US yields and the dollar yesterday. Dynamics in the rates market will remain key while awaiting market-moving US data. In the UK, growth numbers in line with expectations, while in Norway, inflation surprised to the upside. USD: Auction and Powell trigger dollar rebound The dollar chased the spike in US yields yesterday following a big tailing in the 30-year Treasury auction and hawkish comments by Fed Chair Jerome Powell. Speaking at the IMF conference, Powell warned against reading too much into the softer inflation figures and cautioned that the inflation battle remains long, with another hike still possible. If we look at the Fed Funds future curve, it is clear that markets remain highly doubtful another hike will be delivered at all, but Powell’s remarks probably represent the culmination of a pushback against the recent dovish repricing. Remember that in last week’s FOMC announcement, the admission that financial conditions had tightened came with the caveat that the impact on the economy and inflation would have depended on how long rates would have been kept elevated. The hawkish rhetoric pushed by Powell suggests that the Fed still prefers higher Treasury yields doing the tightening rather than hiking again, and that is exactly what markets are interpreting. The soft auction for long-dated Treasuries also signals the post-NFP correction in rates may well have been overdone and could set a new floor for yields unless data point to a worsening US outlook. Today’s highlights in the US calendar are the University of Michigan surveys. Particular focus will be on the 1-year inflation gauge, which is expected to fall from 4.2% to 4.0%. On the Fed side, we’ll hear from Lorie Logan, Raphael Bostic and Mary Daly. Dynamics across the US yield curve will have a big say in whether the dollar can hold on to its new gains. Anyway, we had called for a recovery in DXY to 106.00 as the Fed would have likely pushed back against the dovish repricing. The rebound in yields should put a floor under the dollar, but we suspect some reassurances from the data side will be needed for another big jump in the greenback.
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EUR: Lagarde's Potential Hawkish Shift in Davos Amidst Market Skepticism

ING Economics ING Economics 16.01.2024 12:20
EUR: Lagarde may sound more hawkish in Davos The data inputs for EUR/USD will mostly come from Germany this week, with 2023 GDP figures today and the ZEW survey tomorrow along with final CPI numbers. We have often discussed how European Central Bank rate cut expectations appear way too aggressive (150bp by year-end), although the dovish members of the bank have failed to deliver a coordinated pushback. Despite ECB hawks' protests against dovish expectations having had little impact on the market, the WEF event in Davos this week – which sees many ECB speakers including President Christine Lagarde – should not be overlooked. Lagarde has a greater potential to influence markets given a clearly divided Governing Council, and we suspect that she will opt for a more hawkish tone compared to last week’s comments. There may be some help for the euro coming from Davos, although we should be wary. Fed expectations have been resistant to data and the same could hold true for the ECB as well. The minutes from the December policy meeting are also released this week. We still think it is premature for EUR/USD to trade sustainably above 1.10. Elsewhere, Sweden published inflation figures today. CPIF declined to 2.3% from 3.6% (consensus 2.2%), although the core measure excluding energy remained high, slowing from 5.4% to 5.3% versus a consensus of 5.2%. Despite this, it remains unlikely that the Riksbank will tighten policy again. If anything, this modestly raises the chances that another round of FX sales will be started after the current reserve hedging programme ends in early February (in our view).
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Rates Spark: Navigating the Dovish Winds and Bull-Steepened Euro Curves

ING Economics ING Economics 26.01.2024 14:12
Rates Spark: Feeding the doves ECB President Lagarde's lack of pushback bull steepened euro curves as markets pencil in a high probability of early rate cuts. There may be less dovish sounds in coming days as other ECB speakers take the stage. Thursday's US data had something for all, but were net bullish for bonds. However, the March cut expectation still has some unwind to get done. US data on Thursday is bond supportive, but we're still not getting a March rate cut. That still needs to be unwound The strong US fourth quarter 2023 GDP number makes it more likely that first quarter 2024 will be weaker, according to our economist James Knightley. Inventories are going to be making a negative contribution and trade is likely to also swing back to becoming a headwind while consumer momentum is also slowing somewhat. Early days, but we are pencilling in a 1-1.5% figure for the first quarter – the current consensus is for GDP growth of just 0.6%. Also, the Fed's favoured measure of inflation – the core personal consumer expenditure deflator – has come in at 2% annualised for the second quarter in a row. Inflation on these measures has tamed, but growth has not, or at least not yet. We saw yery jumpy price action. But there is nothing here to accelerate a rate cut in March in any meaningful way, and that’s been the biggest driver of the 10yr yield since the beginning of the year. So, it does not surprise to see yields tempted lower on a temporary basis as the price data is indeed good. But the activity data is enough to result in the reaction into next week being one of a further edge higher in the 10yr yield. These are fine lines though as we don’t anticipate a big bear market. Far from it, as we see yields lower by mid-year, and well ahead of that. But the stars have not yet aligned to take a second leg lower in yields just yet. Also an interesting side impression can be taken from the Fed’s now likely decision to end the Bank Term Funding Facility when it runs to its natural course in March. We think it’s a mistake to end it just now (better to extend for six months), but ending it exudes a sense of Fed comfort on the system. This is important, as if there is no stress to the system, there is no mad need to get a cut in early and run the risk that it's too early. Remember we still have both headline and core CPI rate running with an uncomfortable 3% + handle. The job is almost done, but still not done yet on those measures. So we see the 10yr yield edging net lower, and we’re not surprised by it. But we’d fade the move on a one week view.   Curves bull steepen as markets expected more pushback from the ECB Thursday’s highlight in Europe was the European Central Bank’s monetary policy meeting. The main message was as predicted: unchanged. But an immediate 10bp drop of the 2-year Bund yield suggests that markets expected more pushback between the lines against an early rate cut. Lagarde explicitly standing by her December comments about the possibility of summer cuts was probably enough to feed the doves. And while reiterating the importance of wage growth data, she continued by stating that a rate cut decision would be based on a range of data inputs, including the inflation figures from January and February and the March projections. This comment could have had the dovish interpretation that the ECB can start cutting without April’s wage data if the other price data comes in low enough. Despite the dovish interpretation by markets, our economist maintains the view that rate cuts will have to wait until June. Inflation remains closer to 3% than 2% and geopolitical risks have also become more apparent in the ECB’s assessment. Only a severe recession scenario would warrant earlier cuts. The bull steepening on the back of the press conference could unwind again in coming days as the more hawkish voices of the Governing Council return to the public.   Friday's events and market view Friday’s main data release is the US PCE deflator for December, although the quarterly data provided alongside the GDP release confirmed expectations of a reading in line with the Fed’s 2% target. In the eurozone we will get M3 data as well as the Survey of Professional Forecasters, but the main attention will fall on ECB speakers given the markets' dovish reaction to the press conference. Next to a dovish Panetta, there will also be appearances of the hawks Vujcic and Kazaks.

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