euro

  • EUR/JPY extends the sharp bounce beyond the 143.00 mark.
  • The breakout of 144.04 should open the door to the YTD high.

EUR/JPY remains well bid and trades in multi-session peaks above the 143.00 yardstick on Tuesday.

The continuation of the rebound from last week’s lows remains well in place for the time being. That said, if the cross breaks above the weekly top at 144.04 (September 20), it could then challenge the 2022 peak at 145.63 (September 12).

In the meantime, while above the key 200-day SMA at 135.97, the constructive outlook for the cross should remain unchanged.

EUR/JPY daily chart

 

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Intraday Market Analysis – USD Struggles For Support

Jing Ren Jing Ren 18.10.2021 12:08
EURUSD attempts a bullish breakout The US dollar retreated after retail sales fell below 1% in September. The euro’s rally above 1.1570 has led some short interests to close their positions. The pair is testing the key resistance at 1.1640, which coincides with the 20-day moving average and the first resistance on the daily chart. A bullish breakout could pave the way for recovery to 1.1750. However, buyers could be hesitant to commit after an overbought RSI caused profit-taking. In case of a pullback, 1.1540 is fresh support to keep the current rebound relevant. NZDUSD tests key resistance The New Zealand dollar rallies as Q3 inflation beats estimates. After a few days of sideways action, the indecision ended with a break above 0.7020, the origin of the last sell-off. In turn, this set the kiwi on a bullish course. Sellers would scramble to get out after their failed attempts to push lower. An overbought RSI may cause a temporary pullback. 0.7040 is the immediate support, then 0.6980 is the second line of defense in case of a deeper correction. A close above 0.7110 would lift the pair towards the previous peak at 0.7170. GER 40 heads towards major hurdle The Dax 40 bounces higher as the market bets on a prolonged low-interest environment. The major floor at 14800 has seen strong buying interest as traders bought the dip. A bullish close above 15200 has put the short side under pressure. Then a rally above the 30-day moving average indicates further commitment from the buy-side. The momentum could slow down momentarily as the RSI shows an overbought situation. 15300 would be the first support. A break above the daily resistance at 15700 may resume the uptrend.
Sideways drifts and targets hit

Sideways drifts and targets hit

Jason Sen Jason Sen 28.10.2021 12:21
AUDUSD trades sideways after we warned last week that the rally has ended with Thursday's bearish engulfing candle. We keep holding good support at 7465/55 & held just below strong resistance at 7555/65. We can trade the range while we wait for a breakout. NZDUSD longs at 7140/30 work perfectly again yesterday hitting the target of 7180/90 for profit taking as we remain in the sideways trend. This could be the case for an extended period after Thursday's bearish engulfing candle. AUDJPY also likely to trade sideways for a while after Thursday's bearish engulfing candle for a sell signal. Today's Analysis. AUDUSD longs at good support at 7465/55 work again on the bounce to 7500/05 for profit taking before a high for the day yesterday exactly at the next target of 7530/35. Strong resistance at 7555/65 should be a big challenge. Try shorts with stops above 7580, looking for a double top sell signal. Longs at 7465/55 again today stop below 7445 (so the risk is very small). A break lower is a sell signal targeting 7410/7390, perhaps as far as 7360/50. NZDUSD longs at first support at 7140/30 could work again re-targeting 7180/90 for profit taking & as expected this was a high for the day. If we retest 7200/7220, try shorts with stops above 7240, looking for a double top sell signal. BUT be ready to sell again at very strong resistance at 7255/75. Stop above 7300. Longs at first support at 7140/30 must stop below 7120 so the risk is very small. A break lower is a sell signal targeting 7090/80 probably as far as 7040/30. AUDJPY I would sell at 8620/40 (unfortunately yesterday's high was 8605) with stops above 8660 looking for a double top sell signal. A break higher kills the bearish engulfing candle for a buy signal. First support at 8460/40 in the sideways trend. A bounce targets 8500 perhaps as far as 8540/50. A break below 8420 however is the next sell signal targeting 8370 & 8345/35. To subscribe to this daily report please visit daytradeideas.co.uk or email jason@daytradeideas.co.uk USDJPY longs at support at 113.40/30 were offered 50 pips yesterday. as we topped exactly at first resistance at 113.80/95. EURJPY buying opportunity at at 131.60/40, stop below 131.30. CADJPY shorts at first resistance at 9240/60 keep working this week. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wASlHvMEN6g Update daily at 06:30 GMT Today's Analysis. USDJPY meets minor resistance at 113.85/95. Strong resistance at last week's high at 114.50/70. Shorts need stops above 114.80. A break higher is a medium term buy signal. Good support again at 113.40/30. Longs need stops below 113.20 so the risk is very small. A break lower target 113.00/112.90 & 112.60/50. EURJPY buy at 131.60/40, stop below 131.30. A break lower is a sell signal targeting 130.90 then an important buying opportunity at 130.40/20 with stops below 130.00 Longs at 131.60/40 target 131.90 & 132.10 for profit taking. Strong resistance at 132.20/40. Shorts need stops above 132.60. CADJPY shorts at first resistance at 9240/60 work again as we target 9200 & 9175, hit as I write this morning. A buying opportunity at 9120/00 with stops below 9090. Gains are likely to be limited with first resistance at 9240/60. However on a break higher sell at 9280/9300 with stops above 9320. To subscribe to this daily report please visit daytradeideas.co.uk or email jason@daytradeideas.co.uk EURUSD breaks support at 1.1620/00 so this is now working as resistance. It is difficult to trade the pair as the daily ranges are small & we are mostly trading sideways. USDCAD shorts at first resistance at 1.2420/40 this trade worked perfectly on the collapse to 1.2370  & as far as first support at 1.2300/1.2280. Longs here also this trade worked perfectly on the bounce to 1.2370 for an easy 120 pip profit on the day. GBPCAD shorts at first resistance at 1.7050/70 handed a quick & easy 150 pip profit yesterday. Update daily at 06:30  GMT Today's Analysis. EURUSD holding below first resistance at 1.1610/20 targets 1.1580 & 1.1540/30. A break below 1.1520 is an important medium term sell signal. A break above 1.1620 however can target resistance at 1.1665/75.  Next we look for a test of minor resistance at 1.1690/99. Exit longs & try shorts with stops above 1.1720. USDCAD same levels apply for today with first resistance at 1.2420/40. Shorts here stop above 1.2450. Be ready to buy a break above 1.2450 targeting 1.2510/30. Shorts at 1.2420/40 target 1.2370 then support at 1.2300/1.2280. Longs here need stops below 1.2270 for a sell signal. GBPCAD shorts at first resistance at 1.7050/70 worked perfectly on the collapsed to our targets of 1.6950/40 & 1.6910/1.6890 for an easy 150 pip profit yesterday. Ultimately we are looking for the target of 1.6870/60, perhaps as far as support at 1.6800/1.6780. We can try shorts again at first resistance at 1.7050/70 but must stop above 1.7090. A break higher is a buy signal targeting a selling opportunity at 1.7155/75 with stops above 1.7195. To subscribe to this daily report please visit daytradeideas.co.uk or email jason@daytradeideas.co.uk GBPUSD high for the day exactly at resistance at 1.3835/55 so far this week followed by a test of support at 1.3740/30, but we over ran to 1.3707. EURGBP longs at important 200 week moving average support at 8405/8395 worked perfectly on the bounce to first resistance at 8455/65 for profit taking. Shorts here are also working as I write. GBPNZD breaks important support at 1.9180/70 for a sell signal. Update daily at 07:00 GMT Today's Analysis. GBPUSD first support at 1.3740/20 but be ready to sell a break below 1.3700 targeting 1.3670/60, perhaps as far as strong support at 1.3600/1.3580. Any longs at support at 1.3740/20 target 1.3770/80, perhaps as far as strong resistance at 1.3835/55. This remains key to direction in severely overbought conditions. Try shorts again with stops above 1.3875. A break above here is a medium term buy signal. EURGBP longs at important 200 week moving average support at 8405/8395 work on the bounce to first resistance at 8455/65 for profit taking. Shorts need stops above 8475. A break higher targets 8500. Shorts at first resistance at 8455/65 are working as we target 8440 before a retest of important 200 week moving average support at 8405/8395. Longs need stops below 8380. A break lower is a medium term sell signal. GBPNZD break below support at 1.9180/70 is a sell signal targeting 1.9110/00. First resistance at 1.9170/90. Shorts need stops above 1.9210.
Intraday Market Analysis – EUR Builds Up Bullish Reveal

Intraday Market Analysis – EUR Builds Up Bullish Reveal

John Benjamin John Benjamin 29.10.2021 08:55
EURUSD cuts through resistanceThe euro surges as the market prices in inflation pressure despite the ECB’s dovish message.Bullish candles have pushed the single currency above the triple top (1.1665) which sits on the 30-day moving average, paving the way for a reversal. Strong momentum is a sign of short-covering from those caught on the wrong side of the market.An overbought RSI could temporarily limit the range of the rally. However, renewed optimism may send the pair to the daily resistance at 1.1750. 1.1620 is the support in case of a pullback.USDJPY tests demand zoneThe Japanese yen recouped losses after the BOJ sees a weak yen as positive for Japan’s economy. And the US dollar has come under pressure near a four-year high.An overbought RSI on the daily chart points to an overextension. On the hourly level, the pair has found bids around 113.30 near a previous consolidation range.A bearish breakout would test the round number at 113.00, which lies on the 20-day moving average and is critical in safeguarding the uptrend. The bulls need to lift 114.30 before they may resume the rally.US 30 pulls backs for supportThe Dow Jones consolidates as investors digest earnings near the all-time high.A breakout above the August peak at 35600 and a bullish MA cross from the daily timeframe indicate an acceleration on the upside as the rally continues.Pullbacks could be an opportunity to buy low. An overbought RSI has triggered a minor sell-off below 35600, shaking out weaker hands in the process. A drop below 35450 would lead to the psychological level of 35000. 35830 is now a fresh resistance.
Intraday Market Analysis – USD Grinds Key Resistance

Intraday Market Analysis – USD Grinds Key Resistance

John Benjamin John Benjamin 01.11.2021 09:31
USDCHF bounces off demand zoneThe US dollar inched higher after a solid core PCE reading in September. The pair is testing the major demand area from last August’s lows (0.9100).A bearish MA cross on the daily chart has dented buyers’ optimism. An oversold RSI may attract a ‘buying-the-dips’ crowd while short-term sellers take some chips off the table.However, 0.9190 could be a challenging hurdle to lift as the bears would be eager to fade the rebound. A new round of sell-off would send the greenback to the daily support at 0.9020.EURGBP attempts to reboundThe euro found support from better-than-expected growth and inflation data. A bullish RSI divergence suggests that the downtrend may have lost its momentum.A break above 0.8470 has prompted sellers to cover some of their bets. But the RSI’s overbought situation has so far tempered the optimism.The bulls will need to lift offers around 0.8485 which sits on the 30-day moving average before they could turn the tables. Failing that, a drop below the demand zone between 0.8400 and 0.8420 would deepen the correction.GER 40 finds supportThe Dax 40 bounces back thanks to upbeat European stock earnings.A bullish MA cross on the daily chart is a sign of recovery. Though the index has hit a speed bump at 15775 which is a major resistance from last September’s sell-off.The drop below 15630 has led intraday buyers to bail out, driving short-term price action downward. As the RSI ventured into the oversold zone, the pullback attracted dip-buying interest at the lower range of the previous consolidation (15400). This is a congestion area along the MA cross.
Intraday Market Analysis – USD Hits Resistance - 02.11.2021

Intraday Market Analysis – USD Hits Resistance - 02.11.2021

John Benjamin John Benjamin 02.11.2021 08:42
USDCAD consolidates at 4-month lowThe US dollar retreats ahead of this week’s FOMC as traders await further catalysts. Price action has stabilized above 1.2300, a major demand zone from last summer.1.2430 from the latest sell-off is a key resistance as it coincides with the 20-day moving average. The current consolidation suggests the market’s indecision, though overall sentiment remains bearish.A deeper correction would send the greenback to 1.2150. A bullish breakout on the other hand may challenge the supply area around 1.2550.EURJPY tests key supportThe euro struggles to bounce higher after Germany’s lackluster retail sales in September.The pair has come under pressure at 133.45 near June’s peak. The subsequent retracement has met some bids at 131.60 when the RSI dipped into the oversold territory.The triple test of the support level indicates solid buying interest. However, the bulls will need to push above 132.80 before the uptrend could resume.On the downside, a bearish breakout would extend the sideways action towards 130.80 which sits on the 30-day moving average.US 100 falls back for supportThe Nasdaq 100 surges to a new all-time high as investors expect the strong growth trend to continue. The break above the previous peak at 15700 has put the index back on an upward trajectory.A bullish MA cross on the daily chart is a confirmation of the market’s optimism. However, a brief pullback is necessary to let the bulls catch their breath.15620 is the immediate support. Further down, 15280 is key daily support on the 20-day moving average. The psychological level of 16000 would be the next target rebound.
The US dollar retreats ahead of this week’s FOMC as traders await further catalysts

The US dollar retreats ahead of this week’s FOMC as traders await further catalysts

FXMAG Team FXMAG Team 02.11.2021 10:19
EURJPY tests key support. USDCAD consolidates at 4-month low 1.2430 from the latest sell-off is a key resistance as it coincides with the 20-day moving average. The current consolidation suggests the market’s indecision, though overall sentiment remains bearish. A deeper correction would send the greenback to 1.2150. A bullish breakout on the other hand may challenge the supply area around 1.2550. EURJPY tests key support The euro struggles to bounce higher after Germany’s lackluster retail sales in September. The pair has come under pressure at 133.45 near June’s peak. The subsequent retracement has met some bids at 131.60 when the RSI dipped into the oversold territory. The triple test of the support level indicates solid buying interest. However, the bulls will need to push above 132.80 before the uptrend could resume. On the downside, a bearish breakout would extend the sideways action towards 130.80 which sits on the 30-day moving average. US 100 falls back for support The Nasdaq 100 surges to a new all-time high as investors expect the strong growth trend to continue. The break above the previous peak at 15700 has put the index back on an upward trajectory. A bullish MA cross on the daily chart is a confirmation of the market’s optimism. However, a brief pullback is necessary to let the bulls catch their breath. 15620 is the immediate support. Further down, 15280 is key daily support on the 20-day moving average. The psychological level of 16000 would be the next target rebound.
Fed Game Plan

Fed Game Plan

Monica Kingsley Monica Kingsley 02.11.2021 14:54
S&P 500 hesitation against weakening bonds – what gives? The yield curve keeps flattening, but long-dated Treasury yields seem again on the verge of another upswing, which hasn‘t propped up the dollar yesterday much. The only fly in the ointment of a risk-off atmosphere, was value outperforming tech. Overall, stocks haven‘t made much progress, and are vulnerable to a quick downswing attempt, which probably though wouldn‘t come today as the VIX doesn‘t look to favor it. Wednesday, that could be another matter entirely. Still, there is no imminent change to the stock bull run on the horizon – the focus remains on ongoing Fed accomodations, which s why: (…) The bears haven‘t thus far made any serious appearance, and 4,550s held with ease in spite of the dollar reversing Thursday‘s losses. All the more encouraging is the relative strength of both gold and silver when faced with one more daily decline in inflation expectations – as if balancing before the Fed act changes anything. I ask, how serious can they be about delivering on taper promises when prices increase relentlessly (look at Europe too), these are being blamed on supply chain bottlenecks without acknowledging their persistent and not transitory nature, and the real economy is markedly slowing down (not in a recession territory, but still)? Tomorrow‘s Fed taper announcement wouldn‘t change a lot – so much can (and will) happen in the meantime, allowing them to backpedal on the projections, making rate hikes even more of a pipe dream. The Fed isn‘t taking inflation seriously, hiding behind the transitory sophistry, and that‘s one of the key drivers of rates marching up, rising commodities, and surging cryptos. Look for more oil and natgas appreciation while copper goes up again too. Precious metals are still waiting for a catalyst (think dollar weakening when even rising rates won‘t provide much support, and inflation expectations trending up faster than yields) – a paradigm shift in broader recognition of Fed obfuscation and monetary policy being behind the curve. Let‘s move right into the charts (all courtesy of www.stockcharts.com). S&P 500 and Nasdaq Outlook S&P 500 is entering a brief consolidation, with 4,590s being first support, followed by the high 4,550s (if the bears can make it there). Given though yesterday‘s sectoral rotation, that‘s not likely happening today. Credit Markets HYG keeps acting really weak, volume is picking up, and buyers aren‘t able to force at least a lower knot. Rising yields aren‘t reflecting confidence in the economic recovery, but arrival of stagflation bets. Gold, Silver and Miners Gold indeed swung higher, but needs more follow through including volume, otherwise we‘re still waiting for the catalysts mentioned at the opening part of today‘s analysis, which would also help the silver to gold ratio move higher. Crude Oil Crude oil keeps going up again,and is likely to extend gains above $84 even as this level presents a short-term resistance. Copper Copper buying opportunity is still here, and the red metal is primed to play catch up to the CRB Index again. Probably not so vigorous as before, and taking more time to unfold, but still. Bitcoin and Ethereum The Bitcoin and Ethereum upswings can and do go on – as stated yesterday, it was a question of a relatively short time when cryptos are done with the sideways correction. Summary S&P 500 is likely to pause today, and the bond market performance would be illuminating. Ideally for the bulls, some semblance of stabilization would occur, tipping the (bullish) hand for tomorrow. That‘s the big picture view - the very initial reaction to taper announcement would likely be disappointing, and eventually reversed. Cryptos, commodities (first oil, then copper) would react best, with precious metals figuring it out only later. Thank you for having read today‘s free analysis, which is available in full at my homesite. There, you can subscribe to the free Monica‘s Insider Club, which features real-time trade calls and intraday updates for all the five publications: Stock Trading Signals, Gold Trading Signals, Oil Trading Signals, Copper Trading Signals and Bitcoin Trading Signals.
What Might it Take for the Fed to Deliver a Hawkish Tapering Announcement?

What Might it Take for the Fed to Deliver a Hawkish Tapering Announcement?

Marc Chandler Marc Chandler 03.11.2021 14:43
Overview: With the FOMC's decision several hours away, the dollar is trading lower against nearly all the major currencies.  The Antipodeans and Norwegian krone are leading.  The euro, yen, and sterling are posting minor gains (less than 0.1%).  Most of the freely liquid and accessible emerging market currencies are also firmer.  The Turkish lira is a notable exception.  The decline in the core inflation and a smaller than expected rise in the headline pace embolden officials for another rate cut when the central bank meets on November 18.  The JP Morgan Emerging Market Currency Index is rising for the second consecutive session after falling in the previous four sessions.  Equities are lower.  The MSCI Asia Pacific Index fell for the fifth session in the past six.  Among the large markets, Taiwan and Australia bucked the trend.  The four-day advance of the Stoxx 600 in Europe is at risk, and US futures are weaker.   Benchmark 10 year yields are mostly two-four basis points lower across most high-income countries today.  That puts the US 10-year Treasury yield near 1.52%.  Australia's two-year yield fell almost 10 bp to 0.55%.  It had peaked above 0.71% last week.   The three-year yield is off nearly 30 bp in recent days.  Gold continues to chop within the range set last Friday (~$1772-$1801).  Ahead of the OPEC+ meeting tomorrow amid talk that the US may seek to coordinate sales for a coalition of strategic reserves and a build of US inventories reported by API weigh on oil prices.  December WTI has approached the 20-day moving average (~$82), which has not closed below since late August. Base metals are higher as iron ore snapped a five-day slide during which it lost over 20%.  Copper is also recovering after forging a base in the $432-$433 area.  It is up around 1.5% today.  If sustained, it would be the largest gain in three weeks.   Asia Pacific China's Caixin services unexpectedly rose to 53.8 from 53.4 in September.  Recall that the manufacturing reading had improved to 50.6 from 50.0.  The net effect was that the composite edged up to 51.5 from 51.4.  The composite has converged with the "official" PMI, which stands at 50.8.  Separately, note that China is experiencing a broad spread of the virus into a dozen provinces, and the number of new cases is the highest in a couple of months. Inter-provincial travel has been restricted, and new social protocols are being introduced.  According to reports, the government advised households to stock up in necessities and ensure adequate food supplies for local authorities.  Australia's service and composite PMI shows the recovery was not quite as strong as the preliminary data suggested.  The service PMI rose to 51.8, not 52.0  from 45.5.  The composite stands at 52.1 rather than 52.2.  It was at 46 in September.   Tomorrow Australia reports Q3 real retail sales, but it will still be picking up the weakness of the lockdown.  September trade figures will also be reported.  Weaker exports and stronger imports are expected to have narrowed the trade surplus by almost 20% to A$12.4 bln. Ahead of the weekend, the central bank will make its Monetary Policy Statement.  The swaps market is pricing in 70 bp, down from 80 bp, of tightening over the next 12 months.  The dollar has been confined to a narrow quarter yen range through the Asian session and most of the European morning.  Softer yields and equities would be expected to give the yen a bit of support.  The 20-day moving average is near JPY113.65, and the greenback has not closed below it since the September FOMC meeting.  In the bigger picture, we have suggested the dollar-yen rally from mid-September through mid-October puts the dollar in a new range.  We suspected JPY114.50-JPY115.00 marks the upper end and JPY113.00 may be the lower end.  The Australian dollar fell almost 1.4% yesterday, its largest decline since May.  It reached $0.7420 yesterday, just above the $0.7410 (38.2% retracement objective of last month's rally).  It has stabilized today and has (so far) been capped near $0.7450.  Resistance is seen in the $0.7460-$0.7470 area.   For two weeks, the Chinese yuan has been alternating between advances and declines, and net-net little changed over the period.  Yesterday, the yuan slipped (0.04%), and today it is firmer (0.06%).  The PBOC has consistently set the dollar's reference rate above model projections, and today's fix was at CNY6.4079 compared with median expectations (Bloomberg) for CNY6.4068.  The PBOC was unexpectedly generous in its open market operations, injecting CNY50 bln. As a result, the overnight repo rate fell 12 bp to 1.99%.   Europe Norway's central bank meets tomorrow.  It was the first of the high-income countries to raise rates this year, so far, followed only by New Zealand.  We overstated the case for Norway to hike rates at the meeting, but don't be mistaken. The case for a rate hike exists, but the pattern is not to move at these "off-meetings" (without updated formal policy path guidance).  Instead, officials will likely confirm their intentions to raise rates in December. The swaps market is pricing in almost three hikes next year.   The dollar trended lower against the Nokkie since August 20. The downward momentum stalled in late October.  Yesterday it rose above NOK8.50 for the first time since mid-October.  The momentum indicators have turned up.  The 200-day moving average is slightly below NOK8.55 and near NOK8.60 is the (38.2%) retracement of the down move.  The UK is emerging from the economic soft patch in the June-August period.  The final service and composite PMI report today showed stronger activity than the preliminary estimates.  The service PMI rose to 59.1 from 55.4 in September.  The flash estimate had put it at 58.0.  The composite stands at 57.8, up from the preliminary projection of 56.8 and September 54.9.    The Bank of England meets tomorrow.  There does not seem to be much conviction, and the market appears divided. In the Bloomberg survey, 22 out of 45 economists expect a hike that seems to have been largely discounted by the markets (15 bp).  Three of the largest UK banks do not expect a hike.  Some observers argue that what is the point of stopping now when it would end next month. We often think the signaling channel of QE is under-appreciated.  Stopping the bond-buying now adds to the seriousness of the moment if it does not lift rates. Sterling has retreated by 2.3 cents since last week's high to approach $1.36 yesterday in the US. The euro reached its lowest level against sterling since March 2020 in late October near GBP0.8400, and yesterday rose to above GBP0.8500 for the first time since October 12.   Poland's central bank is expected to hike the base rate 25 bp today to 0.75%.  Recall that it hiked 40 bp last month to begin the cycle.  It started later than Czech and Hungary.  Preliminary October CPI rose 1% on the month, accelerating the year-over-year pace to 6.8% (from 5.9% in September.  It was at 5% as recently as July.  The Czech central bank meets Friday and is expected to hike the repo rate 75 bp to 2.25%.  After two quarter-point hikes (June and August), it hiked by 75 bp in September. Inflation (CPI) rose to 4.9% in September from 4.1% in August.  It is the highest since 2008.  Turkey's CPI rose by 2.39% last month to bring the year-over-year rate to 19.89% (19.58% in September), slightly lower than expected.  The core rate slipped slightly to 16.82% from 16.98%.   The euro has been confined to about a quarter of a cent range above $1.1575 so far.  It stalled yesterday near $1.1615, the (50%) retracement of the pre-weekend slide from almost $1.1700 to $1.1535.  It is making session highs in the European morning, but we look for a less friendly North American session.  There are options for about 530 mln euros at $1.16 that expire today.  A hawkish Fed (see below) could bring option expirations tomorrow at $1.1525 (~825 mln euros ) and $1.1550 (~900 mln euros) into play.  Sterling tested $1.36 yesterday, the lowest level since October 13.  It has hardly managed to distance itself from the lows.  It found new offers near $1.3635.   There is a GBP675 mln option expiring today at $1.3650.  A larger one (~GBP820) is at $1.3615 also expires but has liked been neutralized.   America It seems well appreciated that the Federal Reserve will announce it will begin slowing the bond purchases. Most expect a reduction of $10 bln of Treasuries and $5 bln of Agency MBS.  Investors appear to be anticipating the monthly reduction of these amounts through June 2022.  Even with yesterday's upticks, the June Fed funds futures contract continues to discount a rate hike then.  If the effective Fed funds rate is steady in the first half of June at eight basis points and then rises to 33 bp for the second half of the month (25 bp rate hike on June 15), the average effective rate is about 20.5 bp.  The contract settled at an implied rate of 20 bp yesterday.   Since this is already in the market, the tapering announcement itself may not be hawkish.  There are two steps the Fed could take if it wanted to drive home the point.  First, the FOMC statement has been referring to inflation as largely "transitory."  It could simply drop this qualifier or modify it.  The Chair has already acknowledged that it will likely persist longer than initially anticipated.  Indeed, next week's CPI report is expected (Bloomberg survey median) is expected to have risen by 0.5%, which, given the 0.1% increase in October 2020, means the 12-month rate will accelerate to around 5.8%.   Second, after the last press conference, Powell was asked about needing to reduce monetary stimulus while the Fed was still engaged in QE.  The Bank of England said it would hike if necessary while it was still buying bonds.  Powell said in that situation, the Fed would not send contradictory signals but accelerate the tapering process.  Quicker tapering would be a hawkish signal, and reaction by the market would likely bring forward the first hike.   The Democratic Party lost the Virginia gubernatorial context.  Biden had carried the state by 10 percentage points last year, and the preliminary results suggest a loss of suburban voters, a key part of the new Democratic coalition.  New Jersey's governor contest is very close, and the Democratic incumbent is trailing. The results play on ideas that the Democrats are likely to lose both houses of Congress in next year's mid-term election, in which it is common for the party in the White House to lose seats.  Some in the press have been critical that Xi and Putin are not attending COP-26, but their leadership was always in doubt.  The election results may undermine US leadership because Biden's commitments may not get legislative support, and executive decisions could be reversed in 2024.   Today could be the first day since October 13 that the US dollar does not trade below CAD1.2400.  Still, note that the greenback remains in the CAD1.2300-CAD1.2435 range set last Wednesday when the Bank of Canada turned more hawkish.  Yesterday, the US dollar closed above its 20-day moving average for the first time since late September.  We suspect corrective forces could lift the exchange rate toward CAD1.2475, where the (38.2%) retracement of last month's decline is found, and the 200-day moving average (~CAD1.2485).  However, in its way stands the $920 mln option at CAD1.2450 that expires today.  The greenback reached almost MXN20.92120 yesterday, a new eight-month high. Sellers emerged, and the dollar closed lower to snap a five-day advance.  It is softer today but holding above yesterday's low (~MXN20.71).  Ahead of the FOMC outcome, the market may be cautious about taking the dollar below the MXN20.66-MXN20.70 area.   Disclaimer
Lip Service to Inflation, Again

Lip Service to Inflation, Again

Monica Kingsley Monica Kingsley 03.11.2021 14:54
S&P 500 quick downswing attempt indeed didn‘t come – fresh highs were confirmed by bonds. Even if just on a daily basis, that‘s where the bias is – long stocks still, but with a wary eye as Treasuries and corporate bonds need to kick in on a more than daily basis. I‘m taking it as that the bullish expectations for today are really high – so much so that better than expected non-farm employment change resulted in a sell the news reaction. So, how does that line up with today‘s FOMC? Dovish undertones are obviously expected – at least in attempting to sweep the hot inflation under the rug, spinning it somehow else than with the tired transitory horse. Discredited one too. So, how would the taper message be delivered, and could it go as far as $15bn a month asset purchase reduction while avoiding rate hike mentions as much as possible? Even if $15bn is indeed the announced figure, I‘m looking for the Fed to soften it before it can run its course, i.e. before 2H 2022 arrives – the economy isn‘t in such a great shape to take it, and the fresh spending bill (whatever the price tag), needs central bank‘s support too. Let‘s recall my yesterday‘s words about how that‘s likely to translate into market moves: (…) Overall, stocks haven‘t made much progress, and are vulnerable to a quick downswing attempt, which probably though wouldn‘t come today as the VIX doesn‘t look to favor it. Wednesday, that could be another matter entirely. Still, there is no imminent change to the stock bull run on the horizon – the focus remains on ongoing Fed accomodations. Tomorrow‘s Fed taper announcement wouldn‘t change a lot – so much can (and will) happen in the meantime, allowing them to backpedal on the projections, making rate hikes even more of a pipe dream. The Fed isn‘t taking inflation seriously, hiding behind the transitory sophistry, and that‘s one of the key drivers of rates marching up, rising commodities, and surging cryptos. Look for more oil and natgas appreciation while copper goes up again too. Precious metals are still waiting for a catalyst (think dollar weakening when even rising rates won‘t provide much support, and inflation expectations trending up faster than yields) – a paradigm shift in broader recognition of Fed obfuscation and monetary policy being behind the curve. The Fed turning even more dovish than expected, would light the fireworks – they‘re likely to pay lip service to inflation similarly to Jun, but it won‘t pack the same punch. Inflation expectations haven‘t peaked, and the yield curve is about to steepen again as rates would mostly be moving higher. Let‘s move right into the charts (all courtesy of www.stockcharts.com). S&P 500 and Nasdaq Outlook S&P 500 keeps rising, and is setting itself up for a brief disappointment. We aren‘t though making a top with capital t. Credit Markets Universal risk-on move in the credit market, on volume that didn‘t disappoint, which just confirms the bulls‘ overall technical advantage. Gold, Silver and Miners Gold downswing left a lot to be desired – we aren‘t likely staring at a true slide next. I actually look for silver (and the cyclically sensitive commodities such as copper, and also oil) to outperform gold in the wake of the Fed move. Crude Oil Crude oil didn‘t move much on a closing basis, but the bulls need more time to retake the reins. Copper Copper really doesn‘t want to decline, and remains slated to play catch up to the CRB Index again. The improving bullish outlook requires just time now – selling volume is drying up, tellingly... Bitcoin and Ethereum Bitcoin and Ethereum bulls haven‘t yielded, and keep the overall technical advantage. Should prices dip below $58K in BTC without solid buying materializing, now that would make me wary. But the Fed won‘t be hawkish., no. Summary Potential S&P 500 bear raid is approaching, and the more dovish the Fed would be, the shallower dip in stocks can be expected. Yes, the bulls keep having the upper hand – credit markets have behaved. As mentioned yesterday, that‘s the big picture view - the very initial reaction to taper announcement would likely be reversed higher. Cryptos, oil, copper would react best, with precious metals figuring it out only later – unless the Fed negatively surprises, in which case cryptos would be prone to wilder swings (but not downside reversal in earnest). Thank you for having read today‘s free analysis, which is available in full at my homesite. There, you can subscribe to the free Monica‘s Insider Club, which features real-time trade calls and intraday updates for all the five publications: Stock Trading Signals, Gold Trading Signals, Oil Trading Signals, Copper Trading Signals and Bitcoin Trading Signals.
November Monthly

November Monthly

Marc Chandler Marc Chandler 03.11.2021 15:17
Three main forces are shaping the business and investment climate:  Surging energy prices, a dramatic backing up of short-term interest rates in Anglo-American countries, and the persistence of supply chain disruptions.  The US and Europe have likely passed peak growth.  Fiscal policy will be less accommodative, and financial conditions have tightened. Japan appears to be getting a handle on Covid and after a slow start.  Its vaccination rate has surpassed the US.  The lifting of the formal state of emergency and a hefty dose of fiscal stimulus is expected to be delivered in the coming months. Many developing economies have already lifted rates, some like Brazil and Russia, aggressively so.  They will likely finish earlier too.      US light sweet crude oil rose nearly 12% last month, even though US inventories rose last month for the first time since April.   The price of WTI rose almost 10% in September.  Statistically, the rise in oil prices is strongly correlated with the increase in inflation expectations.  OPEC+ will boost supplies by another 400k barrels a day at the start of November and is committed to the same monthly increase well into 2022.   At the same time, new Covid infections in several Asia-Pacific countries, including China, Singapore, and Australia, warn of the risk of continued supply-chain disruptions.  In Europe, Germany and the UK recently reported the most cases since the spring. Belgium is tightening curbs.  Bulgaria is seeing a rise in infections, and Romania was at full capacity in its intensive care facilities.  The fact that Latvia lags the EU in vaccination at about 50% leaves it vulnerable.  The US may be lagging behind Europe, and the next four-six weeks will be critical.  Roughly 40% of Americans are not fully vaccinated.   The rise in price pressures and the gradual acknowledgment by many central bankers that inflation may be more persistent have helped spur a significant backing up of short-term rates in the Anglo-American economies. The ultimately deflationary implications of the surge in energy prices through demand destruction and the implications for less monetary and fiscal support still seem under-appreciated. Yet, the market has priced in aggressive tightening of monetary policy over the next 12 months.   The focus of the foreign exchange market seems squarely on monetary policy.  From a high level, the central banks perceived to be ahead in the monetary cycle have seen stronger currencies. The likely laggards, like the Bank of Japan, the Swiss National Bank, and the ECB, have currencies that underperformed.  Norway and New Zealand have already raised rates and are expected to do so again in November.    Of course, as you drill down, discrepancies appear.  In October, the Australian dollar was the top performer among the major currencies with a 4% gain.  It edged out the New Zealand dollar and the Norwegian krone, whose central banks are ahead of the Reserve Bank of Australia.  The RBA has pushed against market speculation that has 90 bp of tightening priced into 12-month swaps.  The Australian dollar outperformed sterling by about 2.5% in October even though the Bank of England has been so hawkish with its comments that the market had little choice but to price in a high probability of a hike as early as the November meeting.  In fact, the market has the UK's base rate above 50 bp by the end of Q1 22.  This is important because in its forward guidance that BOE has identified that as the threshold for it to begin unwinding QE by stopping reinvesting maturing issues.  Interestingly enough, when the BOE meets on March 17 next year, it will have a sizeable GBP28 bln maturity in its portfolio.   In an unusual quirk of the calendar, the Federal Reserve meets before the release of the October jobs report.  All indications point to the start of the tapering process.  It is currently buying $120 bln a month of Treasuries ($80 bln) and Agency Mortgage-Backed Securities.  The pace of the reduction of purchases is a function of the duration, and the Fed has clearly indicated the tapering will be complete around mid-year. That suggests reducing the purchases by about $15 bln a month.  Chair Powell indicated that unlike the Bank of England, the Fed will stop its bond purchases before raising rates. A faster pace of tapering would be a hawkish signal as it would allow for an earlier rate hike.  The gap between when the tapering ends and the first rate hike does not appear predetermined. Powell has talked about the economic prerequisites, which emphasize a full and inclusive labor market in the current context. The Fed funds futures entirely discount a 25 hike in July, with the risk of a move in June.  Comments by several officials hint that the Fed may drop its characterization of inflation as transitory, which would also be understood as a hawkish development.   Partly owing to the extended emergency in Japan, it is marching to the beat of a different drummer than the other high-income countries. Inflation is not a problem.  In September, the headline rate rose to 0.2% year-over-year, the highest since August 2020.  However, this is a function of fresh food and energy prices, without which the consumer inflation stuck below zero (-0.5%).  In December 2019, it stood at 0.9%.  In addition, while fiscal policy will be less accommodative in Europe and the US, a sizeable supplemental budget (~JPY30 trillion) is expected to be unveiled later this year.   After expanding by 1.3% quarter-over-quarter in Q2, the Chinese economy slowed to a crawl of 0.2% in Q3, which was half the pace expected by economists. Some of the decline in economic activity resulted from the virus and natural disasters (floods). Still, some of it stemmed from an effort to cut emissions in steel and other sectors.  The problems in China's property development space, accounting for a large part of its high-yield bond market,  unsettled global markets briefly.  Talk of a Lehman-like event seems a gross exaggeration. Still, given the sector's importance to China's economy (30% broadly measured) and the use of real estate as an investment vehicle, it may precipitate a structural shift in the economy.   The Communist Party and the state are reasserting control over the economy's private sector and the internet and social network.  It has also weighed in on family decisions, like the number of children one has, how long a minor should play video games, the length of men's hair, what kind of attributes entertainers should have, and appropriate songs to be played with karaoke.   It seems to be reminiscent of part of the Cultural Revolution and a broader economic reform agenda like Deng Xiaoping did in the late 1970s and Zhu Rongji in the 1990s.  At the same time, Beijing is wrestling with reducing emissions and soaring energy prices, which also dampen growth. Even though consumer inflation is not a problem in China (0.7% year-over-year in September), Chinese officials still seem reluctant to launch new stimulative fiscal or monetary initiatives. Moreover, new outbreaks of the virus could exacerbate the supply chain disruptions and delays fuel inflation in many countries.  The aggressiveness in which investors are pricing G10 tightening weighed on emerging market currencies in October.  The JP Morgan Emerging Market Currency Index fell by almost 0.8% last month after falling 2.9% in September, the largest decline since March 2020.  The continued politicization of Turkey's monetary policy and the aggressive easing saw the lira tumble nearly 7.5% last month, which brings the year-to-date depreciation to 22.5%.   On the other hand, Brazil's central bank has aggressively hiked rates, and the 150 bp increase in late October brought this year's tightening to 575 bp and lifting the Selic to 7.75%.  Yet, it is still below the inflation rate (10.34% October), and the government has lost the confidence of domestic and international business.  The Brazilian real fell nearly 3.5% last month to bring the year-to-date loss to almost 7.8%.   Our GDP-weighted currency basket, the Bannockburn World Currency Index, snapped a two-month decline and rose by 0.35%.  The rise in the index reflects the outperformance of the currencies against the dollar.  The currencies from the G10 countries, including the dollar, account for about two-thirds of the index, and emerging markets, including China, the other third.  The yen was the weakest of the majors, falling 2.3%.  It has a weighting of 7.5% in the BWCI.   Among the emerging market currencies in our GDP-weighted currency index, the Brazilian real's 3.4% decline was the largest, but its 2.1% weighting minimizes the drag.  It was nearly offset by the Russian rouble's 2.5% advance.  It has a 2.2% weighting in our basket.  The Chinese yuan, which has a 21.8% share, rose by 0.6%.      Dollar:   The market is pricing in very aggressive tightening by the Federal Reserve.  As recently as late September, only half of the Fed officials anticipated a hike in 2022.  The December 2022 Fed funds futures are pricing in a little more than two hikes next year. More than that, the market is discounting the first hike in June next year, implying a transition from completing the bond-buying to raising rates with no time gap.  The disappointing 2% Q3 GDP exaggerated the slowing of the world's largest economy.  We note that the supply-side challenges in vehicle production halved the growth rate.  Growth is likely to re-accelerate in Q4, but we continue to believe that the peak has passed.  While inflation is elevated, the pace of increase slowed in Q3.  Consider that the PCE deflator that the Fed targets rose at an annualized rate of 4.0% in Q3 after a 5.6% pace in Q2.  The core rate slowed to an annualized pace of 3.3% last quarter, half of the speed in the previous three months.  The infrastructure spending plans have been reduced, and some of the proposed tax hikes, including on corporations, appear to be dropped as part of the compromise among the Democratic Party.   Euro:  For most of Q3, the euro has been in a $1.17-$1.19 trading range.  It broke down in late September, and was unable to recapture it in October.  Instead, it recorded a new low for the year near $1.1525.  A convincing break of the $1.1500 area could signal a move toward $1.1300. The single currency drew little support because growth differentials swung in its favor in Q3:  the Eurozone expanded by 2.2% quarter-over-quarter while the US grew 2% at an annualized pace.  The ECB is sticking to its analysis that the rise in inflation is due to transitory factors while recognizing that energy prices may prove more sticky.  That said, news that Gazprom may boost gas sales to Europe after it finishes replenishing Russian inventories after the first week in November, natural gas prices fall at the end of October.  After the Pandemic Emergency Purchase Program ends next March, decisions about the asset purchases next year will be announced at the December ECB meeting along with updated forecasts.   (October indicative closing prices, previous in parentheses)   Spot: $1.1560 ($1.1580) Median Bloomberg One-month Forecast $1.1579 ($1.1660)  One-month forward  $1.1568 ($1.1585)    One-month implied vol  5.1%  (5.1%)         Japanese Yen:  The dollar rose 2.3% against the yen in October to bring the year-to-date gain to nearly 9.5%.  The Bank of Japan will lag behind most high-income countries in the tightening cycle, and the higher US yields are a crucial driver of the greenback's gains against the yen.  Japan's headline inflation and core measure, which only excludes fresh food, may be rising, but they are barely above zero and, in any event, are due to the surge in energy prices. In response to the weakening yen, Japanese investors appear to have boosted their investment in foreign bonds, while foreign investors increased their holdings of Japanese stocks.  The LDP and Komeito maintained a majority in the lower chamber of the Diet. A sizeable stimulus supplemental budget is expected to help strengthen the economic recovery now that the formal emergencies have been lifted.  In Q3, the dollar traded mainly between JPY109 and JPY111.  It traded higher in the second half of September rising to nearly JPY112.00.  The dollar-yen exchange rate often seems to be rangebound, and when it looks like it is trending, it is frequently moving to a new range.  We have suggested the upper end of the new range may initially be the JPY114.50-JPY115.00.  The four-year high set last month was about JPY114.70.  A move above JPY115.60 could target the JPY118.50 area.     Spot: JPY113.95 (JPY111.30)       Median Bloomberg One-month Forecast JPY112.98 (JPY111.00)      One-month forward JPY113.90 (JPY111.25)    One-month implied vol  6.4% (5.6%)   British Pound:  Sterling rallied around 4 1/3 cents from the late September low near $1.34.  The momentum stalled in front of the 200-day moving average (~$1.3850).  After several attempts, the market appeared to give up.  We anticipate a move into the $1.3575-$1.3625 initially, and possibly a return toward the September low. The implied yield of the December 2021 short-sterling interest rate futures rose from 22 bp at the end of September to 47 bp at the end of October as the market.  It was encouraged by Bank of England officials to prepare for a hike at the meeting on November 4, ostensibly while it is still providing support via Gilt purchases.  If there is a surprise here, it could be that, given the unexpected softening of September CPI and the fifth consecutive monthly decline in retail sales, rising Covid cases, that the BOE chooses to take the more orthodox route.  This would entail ending its bond purchases, as two MPC members argued (dissented) at the previous meeting and holding off lifting rates a little longer.        Spot: $1.3682 ($1.3475)    Median Bloomberg One-month Forecast $1.3691 ($1.3630)  One-month forward $1.3680 ($1.3480)   One-month implied vol 6.8% (7.1%)      Canadian Dollar:  The three drivers for the exchange rate moved in the Canadian dollar's favor in October and helped it snap a four-month slide against the US dollar.  First, the general appetite for risk was strong, as illustrated by the strength of global stocks and the record highs in the US.  Second, the premium Canada pays on two-year money more than doubled last month to almost 60 bp from 25 bp at the end of September.  Third, commodity prices in general and oil, in particular, extended their recent gains.  The CRB Index rose 3.8% last month, the 11th monthly increase in the past 12, to reach seven-year highs.  The Bank of Canada unexpectedly stopped its new bond purchases and appeared to signal it would likely raise rates earlier than it had previously indicated.  The swaps market is pricing 125 bp of rate hikes over the next 12 months, with the first move next March or April.  Still, the US dollar's downside momentum stalled near CAD1.2300.  There is scope for a corrective phase that could carry the greenback into the CAD1.2475-CAD1.2500 area.     Spot: CAD1.2388 (CAD 1.2680)  Median Bloomberg One-month Forecast CAD1.2395 (CAD1.2580) One-month forward CAD1.2389 (CAD1.2685)    One-month implied vol 6.2% (6.9%)      Australian Dollar:  The Aussie's 4% gain last month snapped a four-month, roughly 6.5% downdraft.  Despite RBA Governor Lowe's guidance that the central bank does not anticipate that the condition to hike rates will exist before 2024 is being challenged by the market.  Underlying inflation rose above 2% in Q3. The central bank's failure to continue defending the 10 bp target of the April 2024 bond spurred speculation that it would be formally abandoned at the November 2 policy meeting.  The RBA's inaction unsettled the debt market.  The two-year yield soared almost 70 bp last month, and the 10-year yield rose nearly 60 bp.  Although the RBA could have handled the situation better, New Zealand rates jumped even more.  Its two-year yield jumped 80 bp while the 10-year yield surged by 58 bp.  Last month, the Australian dollar's rally took it from around $0.7200 to slightly more than $0.7550, where it seemed to stall, just in front of the 200-day moving average.  We suspect the October rally has run its course and see the Aussie vulnerable to a corrective phase that could push it back toward $0.7370-$0.7400.  The New Zealand dollar has also stalled ($0.7220), and we see potential toward $0.7050.       Spot:  $0.7518 ($0.7230)        Median Bloomberg One-Month Forecast $0.7409 ($0.7290)      One-month forward  $0.7525 ($0.7235)     One-month implied vol 9.1  (9.0%)        Mexican Peso:  The peso eked out a minor gain against the dollar last month.  However, the nearly 0.4% gain understated the swings in the exchange rate last month.  The dollar's recovery seen in the second half of September from almost MXN19.85 to nearly MXN20.40 at the end of the month was extended to a seven-month high around MXN20.90 on October 12.  It then proceeded to fall to almost MXN20.12 before the greenback was bought again.  A move above the MXN20.60 area now would likely signal a test on last month's high and possibly higher. Recall that the dollar peaked this year's peak set in March was near MXN21.6350. The economy unexpectedly contracted in Q3  by 0.2% (quarter-over-quarter).  Nevertheless, with the year-over-year CPI at 6% in September, Banxico will see little choice but to hike rates at the November 11 meeting. The market expects a 25 bp increase.  A 50 bp hike is more likely than standing pat.       Spot: MXN20.56 (MXN20.64)   Median Bloomberg One-Month Forecast  MXN20.42 (MXN20.41)   One-month forward  MXN20.65 (MXN20.74)     One-month implied vol 9.6% (11.0%)      Chinese Yuan: Our starting point is the yuan's exchange rate is closely managed.  The fact that the yuan rose to four-month highs against the dollar and a five-year high against the currency basket (CFETS) that the PBOC tracks imply a tacit acceptance.  While it is tempting for observers to link the appreciation to securing an advantage as it secures energy supplies and other commodities, we note that the yuan's gains are too small (0.6% last month and less than 2% year-to-date) to be impactful.  We suspect that the dollar's recent weakness against the yuan will be unwound shortly.  The US government continues to press its concerns about the risk for investors in Chinese companies listed in the US and American companies operating in China. At the same time, the FTSE Russell flagship benchmark began including mainland bonds for the first time.  China's 10-year government bond is the only one among the large bond markets where the yield has declined so far this year (~16 bp).  On the other hand, Chinese stocks have underperformed.  That said, some investors see this underperformance as a new buying opportunity.  The NASDAQ Golden Dragon Index that tracks Chinese companies listed in the US fell by 30% in Q3 and gained 5% in October, its best month since February.  Lastly, the Central Committee of the Chinese Communist Party meets November 8-11 this year, a prelude to the important National Party Congress in 2022 that is expected to formally signal the third term for President Xi.     Spot: CNY6.4055 (CNY6.4450) Median Bloomberg One-month Forecast  CNY6.4430 (CNY6.4470)  One-month forward CNY6.4230 (CNY6.4725)    One-month implied vol  3.5% (3.4%)    Disclaimer
Intraday Market Analysis – USD Struggles To Bounce Back

Intraday Market Analysis – USD Struggles To Bounce Back

John Benjamin John Benjamin 04.11.2021 08:38
EURUSD claws back lossesThe US dollar fell after the Federal Reserve called for patience on raising interest rates.The pair has met strong resistance at 1.1690, a previous demand zone on the daily chart that has turned into a supply one. The latest sell-off has been contained by 1.1535, near the base of the recent rebound as an oversold RSI attracted some bargain hunters.A surge above the intermediate resistance of 1.1620 would bring in more momentum traders. Then a break above 1.1690 could kickstart a bullish reversal in favor of the euro.XAUUSD tests resistanceGold recovers as the US dollar softens across the board following a neutral FOMC.Price action had previously struggled to clear the supply area around 1810, the origin of the September correction. The subsequent fall below the support at 1785 has prompted buyers to take profit.However, the RSI’s repeated oversold situation has caught buyers’ attention at the daily support at 1760. 1785 is the hurdle ahead and a bullish breakout would resume the recovery. Failing that, the bears may push towards 1740.USOIL falls back for supportWTI crude slipped after the EIA reported a larger increase in US inventories. The psychological level of 85.00 has been an effective hurdle so far.The previous fall below 81.00 has put the bulls on the defensive, especially after their failure to achieve a new high above 84.70. This is a confirmation that sentiment has grown cautious after the price’s recent vertical ascent.The RSI’s overbought situation on the daily chart could call for a pullback. 79.50 is the closest support. Its breach may send the price to 76.50.
Inflation Is Not The Only Consequence Of The Russian Invasion

And the Dollar Bounces Back, While BOE is in Focus

Marc Chandler Marc Chandler 04.11.2021 11:30
Overview:  The Federal Reserve announced tapering and, like the Reserve Bank of Australia earlier in the week, did not validate expectations for an aggressive rate hike.  Now the focus is on the Bank of England, where several officials seemed to goad the market into lifting short-term rates. The S&P 500 and NASDAQ rallied to new record highs yesterday and helped raise global shares today.  Among the large markets in the Asia Pacific region, only Taiwan and India did not participate in today's dance.  In Europe, the Stoxx 600 is extending its advance for the sixth consecutive session and nine of the past ten.  US futures are trading firmer.  The market is trimming yesterday's 5.5 bp rise in the US 10-year yield. It is about 3 bp lower near 1.57%.  European yields are 1-3 bp lower. The dollar, which slipped lower after the FOMC meeting, is back with a vengeance today.  It is gaining against all the majors, with the euro bearing the brunt, off about 0.5% to return toward the week's lows below $1.1550.  The yen is the most resilient and is flattish.  Emerging market currencies are also mostly lower.  The Chinese yuan is the strongest emerging market currencies today with about a 0.15% gain, recouping its losses of the past two sessions.  The Polish zloty is the weakest, off 0.6%, despite the larger than expected 75 bp hike yesterday.  Gold was tarnished by 1% yesterday, its biggest loss since mid-October, but is steadied today, up around 0.4% near $1777.  December WTI extended its pullback from $85 seen at the start of the week to dip briefly below $80.  It has firmed back above $81 in the European morning ahead of the OPEC+ meeting outcome.  Cooper prices have stabilized after tumbling 1% yesterday.   Asia Pacific  The final reading of Japan's service and composite PMI was unchanged from the preliminary estimate, with both at 50.7. The services component was the first above the 50 boom/bust level since January 2020.  The composite is at the highest since April.  The virus and formal emergency hobbled the economy, but the economy is on the mend, though out of sync with the other major economies.  Japan intends to use fiscal policy in a pro-cyclical fashion.  Prime Minister Kishida is preparing a large stimulus budget, and it is expected to be unveiled around the middle of the month.  Australia is also emerging from a soft economic period.  Real retail sales fell 4.4% in Q3, faring a little better than economists expected.  Separately, it reported its September trade surplus in line with expectations of about A$12.2 bln.  However, how it got, there was a bit different than anticipated.  First, the August trade surplus was shaved to A$14.7 bln from A$15.1 bln as imports were revised to show a 2% gain instead of a 1% loss. Second, exports fell 6% in September, twice the decline expected, but this was offset by a 2% decline in imports, rather than a 1% gain.  First thing tomorrow, the central bank issues its monetary policy statement, which is hoped to shed more light on the RBA's intent.  The US dollar is straddling the JPY114.00 area.  It reached a three-day high slightly below JPY114.30 and has held above JPY113.90.  Two large options expire today, but they have likely been neutralized.  The first is for nearly $2 bln at JPY114.00, and the other is for $1.8 bln at JPY114.30.  The Australian dollar extended yesterday's recovery to reach $0.7470 before meeting a wall of sellers, which drove it back to almost $0.7425.  Yesterday's low was set near $0.7410.  A break of $0.7400 could signal a test on the $0.7365 area.  The greenback finished yesterday at its best level against the Chinese yuan in almost three weeks, but it continues to be sold on moves above CNY6.40.  Today's yuan gain has nearly recouped the past two session's decline.  Meanwhile, the PBOC continues to set the dollar's reference rate slightly above where bank models project.  Today's fix was at CNY6.3943, while the median (Bloomberg) had it at CNY6.3926.  The PBOC has been relatively generous with its money market provisions.  New fiscal spending this month and next is expected to provide more liquidity.   Europe Before the Bank of England's last meeting (September 23), the December short-sterling interest rate futures implied a yield of 13 bp.  It is now yielding 46 bp.  The market appears to have a 15 bp hike discounted, but economists are split.  A hawkish hold could be delivered if the BOE signaled its intention to raise rates shortly while ending its bond-buying operations early.  With weak retail sales (down five months in a row through September), softer than expected September CPI, and no employment data since the furlough program, is the urgency exaggerated?   The eurozone flash services PMI was shaved lower to 54.6 from 54.7, and this led to the paring of the composite reading to 54.2 from 54.3.  It was the third consecutive decline in the composite PMI.  German and French preliminary estimates were confirmed.  Spain surprised on the upside with a service reading of 56.6.  Economists had expected a 55.8 report after 56.9 in September.  The smaller than expected decline saw a 56.2 composite, down from 57.0, but not as soft as expected.  Italy disappointed.  The services PMI fell to 52.4 from 55.5.  The median forecast was 54.5.  The composite stands at 54.2, down from 56.8.   Germany's September factory orders showed a muted response after August's revised 8.8% drop (initially reported as a 7.7% decline).  The 1.3% gain was less than expected and solely a function of foreign orders (6.3%).  Moreover, the foreign orders were from outside the euro area.  They rose by 14.9%, offsetting August's 14.7% fall.  Domestic orders fell by 5.9%.  It is the third consecutive month domestic orders declined.   The euro has been pushed below $1.1550, where a 1.1 bln euro option expires today.  It initially tried extending yesterday's post-Fed gains but stalled a little above $1.1615.  That area now looks like formidable resistance.  Support is seen in the $1.1525-$1.535 area, but note that the $1.1490 level corresponds to the (50%) retracement objective of the euro's rally from March 2020 lows.  A break of that targets the $1.13 area.  Similarly, sterling's advance yesterday was marginally extended but stopped in front of $1.3700, which is also below the 20-day moving average.  It has been sold in the European morning ahead of the BOE outcome. It has found support in front of $1.3600. Below there, the $1.3575 area marks the (61.8%) retracement target of the rally from the late September low near $1.3410.  Sterling's retreat has left the intraday momentum indicators stretched, warning of the risk of a bounce after the BOE.   America By announcing it would reduce its bond-buying starting this month by $15 bln (a month), the Federal Reserve delivered as expected. The Fed's statement was modified slightly, saying that the elevated prices are "expected" to be transitory.  There was no hawkish surprise, and Chair Powell's tried to thread the proverbial needle by acknowledging that price pressures are likely to continue well into next year.  Treasury Secretary Yellen suggested a similar scenario recently.  The dollar softened, and stocks rallied on the news.   Separately, we note that recently President Biden said he would soon make an announcement about the Fed Chair, whose term expires next February.  Yellen has defended Powell on two issues--financial market regulation and the officials trading/investing--suggests that if Biden does not re-nominate Powell, he would likely have to overrule his Treasury Secretary.   Powell cited the dramatic rise in the Employment Cost Index at yesterday's press conference.  Today, the US reports a more holistic measure of labor costs:  unit labor costs, which incorporates productivity.  The fact of the matter is that unit labor costs fell in H1. However, they are volatile quarter-to-quarter, and unit labor costs likely rise sharply in Q3.  It appears that many employers thought to get by over the summer, waiting for the end of the extra federal unemployment compensation and the re-opening of schools to free up labor without having to pay up for it.  Indeed, Q3 non-farm payroll growth averaged 488k a month, the lowest three-month average since February. This is because the employers preferred to have the existing workers do more overtime than hire.  However, the end of the benefits and re-opening of schools so far proved insufficient.  Another factor that Powell could have cited was the loss of immigrant workers. Pre-pandemic immigrants accounted for one-in-five manufacturing workers and closer to one-in-four in some industries like semiconductors, medical equipment, and food processing.  This squeeze end around November 8 as the border will be re-opened with work visas.  The US has lobbied OPEC+ to boost output faster.  Part of the problem is that some OPEC+ members, like Nigeria and Angola, have been unable to increase production, leaving OPEC+ short of the 400k barrels a day they were going to add last month.  Separately, the US reportedly will join new talks with Iran later this month.  The prospect of Iranian oil also weighed on prices.  In addition, some of the large shale producers have indicated plans to boost output. The US also reports the September trade balance.  A record shortfall is expected of a little more than $80 bln.  Weekly jobless claims pale in comparison to tomorrow's national employment report.  Canada reports September's merchandise trade balance.  Through August, Canada has reported an average monthly surplus of $700 mln.  In the first eight months of 2020, the average deficit was a little more than C$3 bln and in the same period, in 2019 recorded an average deficit of C$1.5 bln. The US dollar spiked to almost CAD1.2460 yesterday but reversed lower and settled on its lows near CAD1.2390.  It is consolidating and straddling CAD1.2400 today.  There is an option for nearly $800 at CAD1.2420 that expires today and one for $515 mln at CAD1.2375 that expires tomorrow.  The intraday momentum indicator suggests limited upside in early North America.  The greenback posted a potential key reversal against the Mexican peso yesterday by first making a new high for the move (~MXN20.98) and then selling off to close below the previous session's low.  Yesterday's low (~MXN20.5150) has held so far today as the dollar consolidates mostly below MXN20.60.  An option for $430 mln at MXN20.55 expires today.  A break of MXN20.50 sees nearby support around MXN20.47 (the 20-day moving average ) and MXN20.44 (the 6.18% retracement objective of the dollar's rally from late last month).  Disclaimer
Meaning Of The Bull Market - The Opposition To The Bear One

Where‘s the Beef?

Monica Kingsley Monica Kingsley 04.11.2021 15:18
S&P 500 embraced the dovish taper - $10bn a month pace gives the Fed quite a breathing room without having to revisit the decision unless markets force it to. The taper is as dovish as can be, with rate raising escaping attention. Talk of no rocking the boat, for the markets, economy and fiscal policy initiatives just can‘t do without. The more dovish scenario of my yesterday‘s presentation came true: (…) So, how would the taper message be delivered, and could it go as far as $15bn a month asset purchase reduction while avoiding rate hike mentions as much as possible? Even if $15bn is indeed the announced figure, I‘m looking for the Fed to soften it before it can run its course, i.e. before 2H 2022 arrives – the economy isn‘t in such a great shape to take it, and the fresh spending bill (whatever the price tag), needs central bank‘s support too. The initial reaction has been very positive in stocks, and overly weak in precious metals and commodities. The real assets downswings are though being reversed in line with my Tuesday‘s expectations – and in today‘s premarket tweets on the unfolding price moves. Let‘s move right into the charts (all courtesy of www.stockcharts.com). S&P 500 and Nasdaq Outlook S&P 500 rose without any brief disappointment – the top with capital t clearly isn‘t in, so don‘t think about standing in the bulls‘ way much. Credit Markets Universal risk-on move in the credit market continues, and the sectoral reaction to rising Treassury yields is a very positive one. Bonds and stocks are obviously seeing through the taper fog. Gold, Silver and Miners Gold was afraid of the hawkish outcome, which had zero real chance of happening – and miners spurted higher decisively first. Let‘s see the initial and misleading weakness in real assets being reversed, one by one – and silver do great again. Crude Oil Crude oil has likewise flashed extraordinary weakness – one to be reversed with vengeance. The Fed can‘t print oil, and the energy crunch goes on as nothing has changed yesterday for black gold. Copper Copper gyrations don‘t change the fact the red metal is ready to swing higher next. Just wait for its reaction when broader strength returns to the CRB Index – we won‘t have to wait too long. Bitcoin and Ethereum Bitcoin and Ethereum haven‘t been jubilant about the dovish news, but haven‘t come down beforehand either. Stabilization followed by slow grind higher is what‘s most likely next. Summary S&P 500 benefited the most from the taper message delivery, and the bulls keep having the upper hand – with increasing confirmation from the credit markets. The very initial reaction to taper announcement – namely its bearish anticipation – is indeed being reversed higher within commodities and precious metals. No tantrum, no rocking the boat – and asset prices are going to love that. Get ready for rising yields that would gradually stop underpinning the dollar – patience with the latter. Thank you for having read today‘s free analysis, which is available in full at my homesite. There, you can subscribe to the free Monica‘s Insider Club, which features real-time trade calls and intraday updates for all the five publications: Stock Trading Signals, Gold Trading Signals, Oil Trading Signals, Copper Trading Signals and Bitcoin Trading Signals.
Here We Go Again - Gold Simply Can’t Stand $1,800!

Here We Go Again - Gold Simply Can’t Stand $1,800!

Arkadiusz Sieron Arkadiusz Sieron 02.11.2021 15:05
  The yellow metal couldn’t face the downward pressure and declined abruptly on Friday. What happened, and why did it fail? Friday was a brutal time for gold. The price of the yellow metal dropped sharply from around $1,795 to $1,775 in the early morning hours in the US. Am I surprised? Not at all. In Thursday’s edition of the Fundamental Gold Report, I wrote that “gold may struggle until the Fed’s tightening cycle starts. You have been warned!”, and, as if on cue, gold wasn’t able to maintain its position around $1,800 and declined. Actually, gold prices have been testing and failing to hold this key psychological level for the last three weeks. What exactly happened on Friday? Well, the Bureau of Economic Analysis published the report on personal income and outlays in September 2021. The publication shows that U.S. nominal consumer spending increased 0.6%, while the disposable personal income declined 1.3%, reflecting a decrease in government social benefits. Additionally, the annual rate of change in personal consumption expenditures price index accelerated from 4.2% in August to 4.4% in September (see the chart below), the highest pace since January 1991. Wait. Inflation rose, but gold prices declined? Exactly. Inflation is fundamentally positive for gold in the long run, but so far – as I explained last week – “inflationary worries have been counterweighted by the expectations of the Fed’s tightening cycle”. The relationship is simple: higher inflation translates into higher expectations of a more hawkish Fed. The odds of an interest rate hike in June 2022 increased from 23.1% - recorded at the end of September - to 61.6% on October 22 and 65.7% on October 29, 2021. As a result, the bond yields increased, while the greenback strengthened. There is also another possible driver of rising interest rates and an appreciating US dollar. CPI inflation in the euro area accelerated to 4.1% in October from 3.4% in September, reaching the highest value since July 2008. However, the ECB kept its monetary policy unchanged last week despite quickly rising prices. Moreover, it’s not signaling any tightening of its stance, maintaining that high inflation is transitory even though Christine Lagarde acknowledged that the decline in inflation would take longer than the central bank had initially expected. The point here is that the ECB remains an outlier among central banks, which either have already tightened or signaled tightening of their monetary policy. This means that the US dollar is likely to appreciate against the euro, which should be another headwind for gold. Having said that, this scenario will occur if the markets believe in a dovish stance of the EBC. The rising yields on German bonds indicate that the markets don’t entirely trust Lagarde’s rhetoric and expect a more hawkish stance of the ECB, which would be fortunate for gold.   Implications for Gold What does higher US inflation imply for the gold market? Well, not so much in the short run. Even though I’ve seen some signs of a bullish revival in the gold market, the bulls remain too weak to challenge the $1,800 level. That’s too much, man! Luckily, better times are coming for gold. Have you seen the advance estimates of the durable goods orders (0.4% decline in September) or of the GDP in the third quarter of this year? According to the BEA, real GDP increased at an annual rate of 2.0% (annualized quarterly growth), much below the 6.7% reported in Q2 and much below the expectations of 2.8% growth. When it comes to the annual percentage growth year-over-year, real GDP rose 4.9% compared to 12.2% in Q2, as the chart below shows. So, the pace of growth remains historically fast, but it’s decelerating quickly. Given that the economy has already reopened and energy and transportation crises are hurting growth (not to mention inflation wreaking havoc), we should expect a further slowdown on the way. And this brings us closer to… yes, you guessed it, stagflation. To be clear: we are still far from stagnation, but the economic slowdown after a spectacular post-pandemic recovery is already unfolding. When we add it to high inflation, we should get an environment supportive of gold prices. However, supportive factors won’t be able to fully operate until the Fed starts hiking interest rates and gold prices bottom out. Sometimes one needs to hit rock bottom to succeed later; perhaps that’s also the case with gold. Time will tell. If you enjoyed today’s free gold report, we invite you to check out our premium services. We provide much more detailed fundamental analyses of the gold market in our monthly Gold Market Overview reports and we provide daily Gold & Silver Trading Alerts with clear buy and sell signals. In order to enjoy our gold analyses in their full scope, we invite you to subscribe today. If you’re not ready to subscribe yet though and are not on our gold mailing list yet, we urge you to sign up. It’s free and if you don’t like it, you can easily unsubscribe. Sign up today! Arkadiusz Sieron, PhDSunshine Profits: Effective Investment through Diligence & Care
USD Index: Are New Milestones in the Cards?

USD Index: Are New Milestones in the Cards?

Przemysław Radomski Przemysław Radomski 08.11.2021 16:54
While the greenback's failed breakout on Nov. 4th may seem bearish, it faced a similar situation in August and October, only to recover and achieve new highs. After the USD Index’s negative response to the ECB’s monetary policy meeting on Oct. 28, I warned on Oct. 29 that dollar bears were unlikely to celebrate for much longer. I wrote: Based on the rather random comment during the conference, the traders panicked and bought the EUR/USD, which triggered declines in the USD Index (after all, the EUR/USD is the largest component of the USDX). Was the breakout to new 2021 lows invalidated? No. The true breakout was above the late-March highs (the August highs also served as a support level, but the March high is more important here) and it wasn’t invalidated. What was the follow-up action? At the moment of writing these words, the USDX is up and trading at about 93.52, which is just 0.07 below the August high in terms of the closing prices. Consequently, it could easily be the case that the USD Index ends today’s session (and the week) back above this level. You’ve probably heard the saying that time is more important than price. It’s the end of the month, so let’s check what happened in the case of previous turns of the month; that’s where we usually see major price turnarounds. I marked the short-term turnarounds close to the turns of the month with horizontal dashed blue lines, and it appears that, in the recent past, there was practically always some sort of a turnaround close to the end of the month. Consequently, seeing a turnaround (and a bottom) in the USD index now would be perfectly normal. And after the forecast turned into reality, the USD Index surged above 94 and remains poised to resume its uptrend over the medium term. To explain, if we zoom in on the four-hour chart, it highlights the importance of the price action on Nov. 5. During the session, the USD Index hit a new 2021 intraday high before a small reversal occurred. This might seem bearish at the first sight (it’s a failed breakout, after all)… However, similar developments were also present in August and October. After the dollar basket attempted to make new highs and failed, the greenback eventually regained its composure and achieved the milestones. As a result, another 2021 high should occur sooner rather than later. Please see below: The first failed attempt to break above the previous highs triggered sizable short-term declines. This happened in August (marked with red). The second – September – attempt triggered only a small correction (marked with green) that was then followed by a bigger rally. Similarly, the – marked with red – October invalidation was followed by a sizable decline, and the current one (marked with green), is relatively small. And it’s likely to be followed by a short-term rally, just like the September correction was. On top of that, as you can see on the below chart, the current setup for the USD Index and gold mirrors what we witnessed in early August. Following its sharp summertime rally, the USD Index moved close to its 50-day moving average without reaching it. And after buyers stepped in, the USD Index resumed its uptrend and made a new 2021 high. Moreover, with a similar pattern and a similar reading on the USD Index’s RSI (Relative Strength Index) present today, the greenback’s outlook remains robust. I marked both cases with red, vertical, dashed lines below. More importantly, though gold, silver, and mining stocks’ upswings concluded once the USD Index bottomed close to its 50-day moving average in August and sharp drawdowns followed. Moreover, while gold, silver, and mining stocks’ recent rallies were likely underwritten by expectations of a weaker USD Index (it did fail to move to new highs, right?) , technical (as described above and below) and fundamental realities contrast this thesis. As a result, the 2021 theme of ‘USD Index up, PMs down’ will likely resume over the medium term. Please see below: Equally bullish for the greenback, the Euro Index remains overvalued and should suffer a material drawdown over the medium term. For example, the index’s previous lows, its 50-day moving average, and its declining resistance line combined to create major resistance and the Euro Index is now retesting its 2021 lows. As a result, the next temporary stop could be ~1.1500 (the March 2020 highs, then likely lower). For context, the EUR/USD accounts for nearly 58% of the movement of the USD Index, and that’s why the euro’s behavior is so important. Please see below: Adding to our confidence (don’t get me wrong, there are no certainties in any market; it’s just that the bullish narrative for the USDX is even more bullish in my view), the USD Index often sizzles in the summer sun and major USDX rallies often start during the middle of the year. Summertime spikes have been mainstays on the USD Index’s historical record and in 2004, 2005, 2008, 2011, 2014 and 2018 a retest of the lows (or close to them) occurred before the USD Index began its upward flights (which is exactly what’s happened this time around). Furthermore, profound rallies (marked by the red vertical dashed lines below) followed in 2008, 2011 and 2014. With the current situation mirroring the latter, a small consolidation on the long-term chart is exactly what occurred before the USD Index surged in 2014. Likewise, the USD Index recently bottomed near its 50-week moving average; an identical development occurred in 2014. More importantly, though, with bottoms in the precious metals market often occurring when gold trades in unison with the USD Index (after ceasing to respond to the USD’s rallies with declines), we’re still far away from that milestone in terms of both price and duration. Moreover, as the journey unfolds, the bullish signals from 2014 have resurfaced once again. For example, the USD Index’s RSI is hovering near a similar level (marked with red ellipses), and back then, a corrective downswing also occurred at the previous highs. More importantly, though, the short-term weakness was followed by a profound rally in 2014, and many technical and fundamental indicators signal that another reenactment could be forthcoming. Please see below: Just as the USD Index took a breather before its massive rally in 2014, it seems that we saw the same recently. This means that predicting higher gold prices (or the ones of silver) here is likely not a good idea. Continuing the theme, the eye in the sky doesn’t lie. And with the USDX’s long-term breakout clearly visible, the wind still remains at the dollar’s back. Please see below: The bottom line? With my initial 2021 target of 94.5 already hit, the ~98 target is likely to be reached over the medium term, and the USDX will likely exceed 100 at some point over the medium or long term. Keep in mind though: we’re not bullish on the greenback because of the U.S.’ absolute outperformance. It’s because the region is fundamentally outperforming the Eurozone, the EUR/USD accounts for nearly 58% of the movement of the USD Index, and the relative performance is what really matters. In conclusion, the USD Index remains in the driver’s seat and new highs should materialize over the medium term. And while gold, silver and mining stocks have rode the S&P 500 higher recently, history has been unkind when the precious metals ignore technical and fundamental realities. Moreover, with gold, silver, and mining stocks’ strong negative correlations with the U.S. dollar standing the test of time, it’s likely only a matter of time before investors realize this as well. Thank you for reading our free analysis today. Please note that the above is just a small fraction of today’s all-encompassing Gold & Silver Trading Alert. The latter includes multiple premium details such as the targets for gold and mining stocks that could be reached in the next few weeks. If you’d like to read those premium details, we have good news for you. As soon as you sign up for our free gold newsletter, you’ll get a free 7-day no-obligation trial access to our premium Gold & Silver Trading Alerts. It’s really free – sign up today. Przemyslaw Radomski, CFAFounder, Editor-in-chiefSunshine Profits: Effective Investment through Diligence & Care * * * * * All essays, research and information found above represent analyses and opinions of Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA and Sunshine Profits' associates only. As such, it may prove wrong and be subject to change without notice. Opinions and analyses are based on data available to authors of respective essays at the time of writing. Although the information provided above is based on careful research and sources that are deemed to be accurate, Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA and his associates do not guarantee the accuracy or thoroughness of the data or information reported. The opinions published above are neither an offer nor a recommendation to purchase or sell any securities. Mr. Radomski is not a Registered Securities Advisor. By reading Przemyslaw Radomski's, CFA reports you fully agree that he will not be held responsible or liable for any decisions you make regarding any information provided in these reports. Investing, trading and speculation in any financial markets may involve high risk of loss. Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA, Sunshine Profits' employees and affiliates as well as members of their families may have a short or long position in any securities, including those mentioned in any of the reports or essays, and may make additional purchases and/or sales of those securities without notice.
Intraday Market Analysis – GBP Seeks Support

Intraday Market Analysis – GBP Seeks Support

John Benjamin John Benjamin 09.11.2021 09:01
EURGBP sees a temporary pullback The sterling inched higher as traders took profit after the BOE’s dovish shift last week. The rally above the supply area of 0.8570 is a sign of commitment from the buy-side. Strong momentum has forced the bears to rush for the exit door. 0.8620 is now the next resistance. Its break would bring the euro to September’s high at 0.8660, where a breakout may lead to a bullish reversal in the medium-term. In the meantime, an overbought RSI is causing a pullback. The base of the latest surge at 0.8465 is an important support. NZDUSD tests key resistance The New Zealand dollar recoups losses as risk appetite recovers. The pair has met buying interest at 0.7070 along the 20-day moving average. A bullish RSI divergence is a sign that the bearish momentum has waned. When this happens in a demand zone, it makes a rebound of greater significance. 0.7180 is a major hurdle ahead following a previously botched bounce. Its breach may resume the kiwi’s uptrend above 0.7220. The RSI’s double top in the overbought area may briefly limit the bullish impetus. GER 40 consolidates gains The Dax 40 continues to rally in hopes of a prolonged low-rate environment. The bulls are pushing towards 16200 after the index reached the milestone at 16000. However, the RSI’s multiple ventures into the overbought area and a bearish divergence indicate that the rally may have overextended. A temporary pullback would be necessary to let the bulls catch their breath. 15920 is the immediate support. Further down, 15730 on the 20-day moving average would be an area of interest.
Intraday Market Analysis – Euro Attempts To Bounce

Intraday Market Analysis – Euro Attempts To Bounce

John Benjamin John Benjamin 10.11.2021 08:58
EURUSD meets resistance The euro finds support from an upbeat economic sentiment from across the block. The pair has met buying interest in the demand zone around 1.1520. A bullish RSI divergence suggests that sellers may have taken their feet off the pedal. Subsequently, a break above 1.1560 prompted the short side to cover. 1.1615 is a key supply zone from last week’s sell-off, after which the bulls need to lift offers near 1.1690 before a reversal could gain traction. On the downside, a fall below 1.1550 may call the rebound into question. XAGUSD awaits breakout Bullions rise as the US dollar retreats ahead of the release of inflation data. A bullish MA cross on the daily chart is a sign that sentiment could be turning around. Silver is testing the September high of 24.80. A bullish breakout would trigger an extended rally towards 26.00. However, the RSI’s double top in the overbought area has held buyers back as the market awaits new catalysts. A combination of profit-taking and fresh selling could drive the price lower. The base of a previous breakout at 23.70 would be a support. US 500 seeks support The S&P 500 consolidates gains over strong corporate earnings and improved economic outlook. The divergence between the 20 and 30-day moving averages indicates an acceleration in the rally. Though there is a chance of a pullback after the RSI shot into the overbought area. The bullish bias means that buyers may be eager to jump in during a correction. The index is hovering above 4660. 4625 on the 20-day moving average would be the second line of defense. On the upside, a rebound would lead to 4750.
Profiting on Hot Inflation

Profiting on Hot Inflation

Monica Kingsley Monica Kingsley 10.11.2021 16:08
S&P 500 pause finally went from sideways to down, and might not be over yet. Credit markets aren‘t nearly totally weak – tech simply had to pause, so did semiconductors, and the Tesla downswing took its toll. Value though recovered the intraday downside, and VIX retreated from its daily highs – that may be all it can muster. I‘m looking primarily at bond markets for clues, and these reacted to the PPI figures with further decline in yields.At the same, inflation expectations are moving higher – the more you shorten the maturity, the higher they go, let alone RINF, their key ETF. Markets will be proven very wrong about the transitory inflation complacency – inflation rates aren‘t going to decline if you just leave them alone. And taper coupled with rate hikes hesitancy won‘t do the trick either.S&P 500 is still primed to go higher – the only question is the shape of the current consolidation. Liquidity is still ample, the banking sector is strong, and the Russell 2000 isn‘t really retreating. As stated yesterday:(…) The correct view of the stock market action is one of microrotations unfolding in a weakening environment – one increasingly fraught with downside risks. To be clear, I‘m not looking for a sizable correction, but a very modest one both in time and price. It‘s a question of time, and I think it would be driven by tech weakness as the sector has reached lofty levels. It‘ll go higher over time still, but this is the time for value and smallcaps in the medium term.Precious metals are consolidating – it‘s almost a pre-CPI ritual, but under the surface, the pressure to go higher keeps building. I‘m looking for a strong Dec in gold and silver, with unyielding oil and copper gradually waking up. Cryptos aren‘t taking prisoners either.Let‘s move right into the charts (all courtesy of www.stockcharts.com).S&P 500 and Nasdaq OutlookS&P 500 finally declined, and the very short-term picture is unclear – is the dip about to continue, or more sideways trading before taking on prior highs? It‘s a coin toss.Credit MarketsHYG recouped some of the prior downside, but the LQD and TLT upswings give an impression of risk-off environment. Sharply declining yields aren‘t necessarily positive for stocks, and such is the case today.Gold, Silver and MinersGold and silver look like briefly pausing before the upswing continues – miners are pulling ahead, and the ever more negative real rates are powering it all.Crude OilCrude oil bulls continue having the upper hand, and oil sector is also pointing at higher black gold prices to come. Energy hasn‘t peaked by a long shot.CopperCopper went at odds with the CRB Index, but that‘s not a cause for concern. It‘ll take a while, but the red metal would swing upwards again.Bitcoin and EthereumBitcoin and Ethereum are briefly consolidating, and a fresh upswing is a question of shortening time. SummaryS&P 500 remains momentarily undecided, but the pullback shouldn‘t reach far on the downside – the bears are having an opportunity to strike on yet another hot inflation numbers. This isn‘t transitory really as I‘ve been telling you for almost 3 quarters already. Needless to say, the fire under real assets is being increasingly lit – more gains in commodities, precious metals and cryptos are ahead as inflations runs rampant on the Fed‘s watch.Thank you for having read today‘s free analysis, which is available in full at my homesite. There, you can subscribe to the free Monica‘s Insider Club, which features real-time trade calls and intraday updates for all the five publications: Stock Trading Signals, Gold Trading Signals, Oil Trading Signals, Copper Trading Signals and Bitcoin Trading Signals.
Half a Dozen Things You Should Know about FX

Half a Dozen Things You Should Know about FX

Marc Chandler Marc Chandler 12.11.2021 13:11
1.  The market is still digesting the implications of Wednesday's CPI shock. The dollar has strengthened, yields have risen, the stock market wobbled after a long advancing streak, and in any event, stabilized in light trading during the US and Canadian holidays. However, given the low year-ago reading, there is a significant risk that inflation (including the core rate) will accelerate over the next few months. As a result, the Federal Reserve needs greater flexibility to raise rates sooner than it has envisioned.   The main restraint now is the pace of tapering.  The FOMC committed to reducing its bond-buying by $15 bln in November and December.  Its statement indicated that it anticipated maintaining the rate afterward, but the FOMC also reserved the right to adjust the pace if necessary. Thus, accelerating the tapering is the most likely course of action.  Bullard had suggested completing the tapering by the end of Q1.  If this is to become the majority view, there may be some effort to prepare the market.   Recently a rally in US bonds was attributed to talk that Governor Brainard could replace Powell as Fed chair.  The argument was that Brainard was more dovish.  Is this really relevant now?  Does it count as a strike against her?  With Yellen's apparent support, Powell is most likely to get re-appointed, and given that CPI is at 30-year highs, conventional thinking favors maintaining a stable hand at the helm. 2.    The dollar's gains accelerated since the higher than expected CPI report.  The euro was in a $1.15-$1.17 range last month and broke out on Wednesday.  Follow-through selling Thursday brought to about $1.1445.  We have suggested the next target is a little below $1.1300.   The jump in yields helped lift the greenback from below JPY112.80 above JPY114.00.  The five-year high set on October 20 was around JPY114.70, while we project the upper end of the likely range closer to JPY115.00. 3.  Disappointing economic data contributed to the losses of sterling and the Australian dollar.   Economists (Bloomberg survey) expected Australia to have created 50k jobs in October, but, instead, it lost 46.3k jobs for the third consecutive monthly decline.  The bulk of the loss (40.4k) were full-time positions, which reversed the 26.7k increase reported in September.  The unemployment rate jumped to 5.2% from 4.6%, the highest since April.  The Australian dollar peaked near $0.7550 in late October and fell below $0.7300 on Thursday, for the first time in a month.  The next target is around $0.7240-$0.7260.   The UK reported a significant slow down in Q3 GDP to 1.3% from 5.5% in Q2. Expectations for a 1.5% quarter-over-quarter expansion  (Bloomberg survey) seemed on the high side.  However, the September monthly GDP rose 0.6%, and the better than expected rise was offset but a reduction in the August GDP to 0.2% from 0.4%. The industrial output contracted in September. The trade deficit deteriorated after a dramatic revision in the August balance (to -GBP1.880 bln from -GBP3.716 bln, while services accelerated (0.7% from a revised 0.1% gain that had initially reported at 0.3%).  Sterling, which had been pushing near $1.36 before the Bank of England's meeting and slipped to a marginal new low for the year on Wednesday but still held above $1.34 (barely).  It fell to $1.3360 on Thursday. The next chart support area is seen around $1.3165-$1.3185. 4.  The joint US-China statement at COP-26 is promising.  It was the key to the Paris Agreement in 2015.  There was a commitment to boost efforts to cut emissions and illegal deforestation.  The gap between current policies and what is necessary was acknowledged, and there appeared to be an agreement in principle to reach an agreement on climate finances and rules for a carbon market.  The joint statement must have been in the works even as Biden criticized Xi for the lack of commitment for not attending COP-26.  There is still much speculation about a "virtual summit," which is supposed to signal something more than two phone calls the leaders have held this year.  The environment was also recognized where cooperation was possible.  Still, Beijing refused to join the US-EU commitment to cut methane admissions and opted for its own plan.   The geopolitical competition is unaffected by the joint statement. Meanwhile, the more pressing geopolitical threat is coming from the movement of Russian forces to the Ukraine border.  Reports suggest the US has briefed Europe on a possible Russian invasion of Ukraine.  Hostilities are said to have escalated recently.  Recall that Russia had amassed forces (~100k soldiers, tanks, and aircraft) in the Spring too.  It triggered a flurry of talks, and Moscow removed (redeployed) its forces.  Russia defended the troop movement within the country as an internal affair but has accused the US of provocation for sailing warships into the Black Sea, close to its territory last week.  Putin also reportedly was critical of Ukraine's alleged use of drones, which violated a previous agreement.  Meanwhile, tensions on the Polish-Belarus border remain tense.  Merkel sought Putin's help recently to defuse the situation, but he refused.   Belarus is thought to be instigating a migration crisis and has threatened to shut down a critical gas pipeline to the EU if Poland keeps its border closed.  These developments may have contributed to some pressure on the euro.   5.  The Mexican peso fell by around 0.5% after the central bank lifted the overnight rate to 5.00%. It is the third quarter-point move in the cycle that began in June.   The swaps market has nearly 90 bp of tightening discounted over the next three months and almost 220 bp in the next 12 months.  Banxico lifted its Q4 inflation forecast to 6.8% from 6.2%.  The one dissent (Esquivel, again) was to stand pat.  There was no vote for a 50 bp move, which contributed to the dovish read of the rate hike.  October CPI, reported earlier this week, is at 6.24% year-over-year,  6.   Friday's economic calendar is light.  Little new data from the large Asia Pacific and European countries.  The North American calendar is minimal.  The US JOLTS report on job openings and the University of Michigan's preliminary estimate of November sentiment and inflation expectations.   NY Fed's Williams is the lone speaker from the central bank and may not address monetary policy directly.  There are three sets of chunky options that expire tomorrow that may be relevant:  1.23 bln euros at $1.1460, $1.75 bln at JPY114.00, and GBP690 mln at $1.3320.   Disclaimer
Intraday Market Analysis – USD Seeks Consolidation

Intraday Market Analysis – USD Seeks Consolidation

John Benjamin John Benjamin 15.11.2021 08:53
USDJPY hits temporary resistance The Japanese yen pulled back after a larger-than-expected GDP contraction in Q3. The US dollar is looking to hold onto its gains after a rally above 114.00. Sentiment has recovered and a surge above 114.45 around the October peak would resume the uptrend. However, the current rebound may lack the strength to clear the supply zone right away. An overbought RSI has held the bullish fever back. A breach below 113.70 would lead to a deeper correction towards 112.80, which is a key level to keep the rebound relevant. EURCHF struggles for support The euro bounced higher after the bloc’s industrial production beat expectations in September. The RSI’s oversold situation on the daily chart has attracted bargain hunters’ attention around 1.0530, a demand area from May 2020. Price action had three failed attempts to lift offers at 1.0600, a sign of strong selling pressure to keep the downtrend going. A bullish breakout may trigger a runaway rally as sellers seek to exit a crowded short bet. A bearish one would send the single currency to 1.0490. UK 100 tests support The FTSE 100 edged lower after active job postings in the UK hit a record high. The index came under pressure at the psychological level of 7400. A combination of an overbought RSI and its bearish divergence suggests that the rally was losing momentum. Sentiment remains upbeat and a pullback could be an opportunity to get filled at a better price. Trend followers may be waiting to buy the dip near the first support at 7315. A deeper correction would send the price to 7255 along the 30-day moving average.
CPI Shocker Lifted the Greenback, which now needs to Take a Breath

CPI Shocker Lifted the Greenback, which now needs to Take a Breath

Marc Chandler Marc Chandler 15.11.2021 10:14
The jump in US headline CPI above 6% crossed some Rubicon and injected dynamic into the process.  The dollar rallied, and new highs for the year were recorded against the euro and sterling.  The dovish tapering announcement by the Fed on November 3 was completely unwound as the December 2022 Fed funds futures returned to the high-yield mark of 66 bp ahead of the weekend.   The two-year yield rose from about 39 bp at the start of the last week to almost 55 bp.  The volatility of the bond market (the equivalent of the VIX for the S&P 500) surged back to the year's high (above 78%).   Ultimately, the idea that R-star, the real short-term interest rate when the US economy is at full capacity and inflation stable, has continued to trend lower will likely cap nominal rates.  Equities wobbled, and the S&P 500 snapped an eight-day advance, and the NASDAQ's 11-day rally stalled.  US equities stabilized and posted modest gains in the past two sessions.   The rise in price pressures requires the Federal Reserve to be more flexible to address a range of possible outcomes.  The pace of the tapering is the main constraint on policy.  The FOMC statement committed the Fed to reduce the bond-buying by $15 bln in November and December.  While it anticipated that the pace would continue, it reserved the right to adjust the rate.  This is likely to be the focus in the run-up to the mid-December meeting.  To finish QE in March, as St. Louis Fed's Bullard, a noted hawk, has argued, the Fed would need to double its pace of tapering to $30 bln a month starting in January.  What is at stake is when the Fed's rate hike cycle can begin, not the terminal rate, which is expected to be below 2%.   Dollar Index:  The CPI saw the Dollar Index surge to convincingly surpass the (38.2%) retracement target of the decline from the March 2020 high (~103) to the January 6 low (~89.20).  That retracement (~94.55) had been penetrated briefly before, but it did not stick.  This time, the Dollar Index rose to new highs for the year, slightly above 95.25.  The next retracement (50%) is found a little above 96.00, and the (61.8%) objective is almost 97.75.   The momentum indicators suggest a high is not yet in place, but the move since the mid-week CPI shocker, above the upper Bollinger Band (~95.00) warns against chasing it.  That said, initial support is likely in the 94.60-94.75 area.   Euro:  The euro was driven below $1.15 after the US CPI report and failed to resurface above this previous floor, which now acts as resistance.  A low near $1.1435 was recorded ahead of the weekend.  Neither the MACD nor Slow Stochastic is over-extended, but, as we saw with the Dollar Index, the exchange rate is outside the Bollinger Band (slightly below $1.1465) and settled below it for the third consecutive session ahead of the weekend. There is little chart support until the $1.1290-$1.1300 area is approached.  Moreover, if the euro has carved out some kind of topping pattern, the risk may extend toward $1.10.   Japanese Yen:  From around mid-September through mid-October, the dollar broke out of the old JPY109-JPY111 range to reach JPY114.70 on October 20.  It consolidated at lower levels and approached JPY112.70 on November 9.  The jump in the US CPI reported the following day lifted the greenback to JPY114.00, and it reached JPY114.30 before the weekend.  We often experience the dollar-yen exchange rate as a pair often rangebound.  We had anticipated a JPY113-JPY115 range and would allow about a half a yen range or so violation. The MACD has flatlined, while the Slow Stochastic has turned higher.  Although the fit is not perfect, we still look at US yields for directional cues.   British Pound:  Sterling had been turned lower on November 4 from $1.37 by the BOE, who caught the market leaning too far over its skis, arguably encouraged to do so by official rhetoric.  Its attempt to recover was stalled near $1.36, and the US inflation jump set it to new lows for the year.  The low ahead of the weekend was slightly below $1.3355.  The MACD is entering oversold territory, while the Slow Stochastic, which leveled off, seems to be slipping into over-extended territory as well.  After closing for two sessions below the lower Bollinger Band, it finished the week back above it (~$1.3355).  A close above $1.3400 would suggest a consolidative phase lies ahead.  Last December, sterling recorded lows $1.3135-$1.3185, and the risk is for this area to be tested.   Canadian Dollar:  Since the US CPI surprise, the Canadian dollar has been the weakest of the major currencies, falling around 0.75% against the greenback.  It was the third consecutive weekly decline for the Loonie, which was preceded by a five-week advance.  The US dollar posted an outside up day in the middle of last week on the back of the CPI news.  It rallied from slightly below CAD1.2390 to a little above CAD1.25.  On Thursday, when US and Canadian banks were closed for holidays, the dollar rose to almost CAD1.2600 and made a marginal new high ahead of the weekend.  This met the (50%) retracement of the US dollar's decline since the CAD1.29 level was approached a couple of days before the September 22 FOMC meeting.  The Slow Stochastic is over-extended, though the MACD has more scope to run.  Here too, the market moved quickly, and the greenback settled the past two sessions above the Bollinger Band (~CAD1.2555). The CAD1.2480 area may offer initial support.   Australian Dollar:  The Australian dollar recorded the low for the year on August 20, near $0.7100.  It recovered into early September (~$0.7480) before being turned back to $0.7170 by the end of the month. The Aussie launched another advance last month that carried to around $0.7555 and the 200-day moving average.  It has come under new pressure this month and fell to nearly $0.7275 ahead of the weekend, meeting the (61.8%) retracement target of the overall rally since August 20.  It closed on a firm note above $0.7300.  The Slow Stochastic is over-extended and could turn up next week.  The MACD is still pointing lower.  After settling out the Bollinger Band on Wednesday and Thursday, the Aussie moved back into it (~$0.7300) ahead of the weekend.  Initial resistance is seen in the $0.7335-$0.7355 band.   Mexican Peso:  The US CPI boosted the dollar by nearly 1.6% against the peso, the most in five months.  It was the only advance of the week, but it was sufficient for the greenback to close around 0.6% stronger.  The high for the week (~MXN20.7225) was recorded in the hours after the central bank delivered its fourth quarter-point rate hike.  Banxico showed no appetite to increase the pace, unlike other regional central banks, even though CPI is still accelerating.  Still, the greenback slightly exceeded the (61.8%) retracement target (~MXN20.70) of its decline from the November 3 high (~MXN20.98) to the November 9 low (~MXN20.2515) before retreating ahead of the weekend.  Support is seen around the 20-day moving average (~MXN20.42).  Among emerging market currencies, the Brazilian real (~2.3%) and the Chilean peso (1.6%) fared best.  The Hungarian forint (~-2.9%) and the Turkish lira (-2.75) saw the largest losses.  The JP Morgan Emerging Market Currency Index fell by about 0.40% last week, the eighth weekly decline in the past ten.   Chinese Yuan:  One would not know it by reading much of the free financial press, but the Chinese yuan is the strongest currency in the world this year.  Its 2.3% advance eclipses the Canadian dollar, the only major currency stronger against the US dollar on the year (~1.3%).  The tensions in Europe and the pullback in oil prices saw the Russian rouble tumble almost 2.3% last week.  It was knocked from its perch as the top performer, allowing the yuan to pull ahead.  The dollar settled last week, slightly under CNY6.38, its lowest close since May 31, when it recorded a three-year low (~CNY6.3570).  The trend line connecting the 2014 dollar-low and 2018 low is frayed in May and June but essentially held.  It is now being violated more convincingly.   Sentiment toward investment in China has become in fashion again.  The NASDAQ Golden Dragon Index that tracks Chinese companies that trade in the US rallied nearly 7% last week.  China's 10-year yield of 2.80% may not sound particularly exciting, but it is the only benchmark that has not sold off this year.  The yield has fallen 20 bp.    Disclaimer
The Greenback Slips at the Start the New Week

The Greenback Slips at the Start the New Week

Marc Chandler Marc Chandler 15.11.2021 12:19
Overview:  While the Belarus-Poland border remains an intense standoff, there have been a couple other diplomatic developments that may be exciting risk appetites today.  First, Biden and Xi will talk by phone later today.  Second, reports suggest the UK has toned down its rhetoric making progress on talks on the implementation of the Northern Ireland Protocol.  Equities in the Asia Pacific region were mostly firmer, with China a notable exception among the large markets, even though the October data was generally stronger than expected.  Europe's Stoxx 600, which has fallen only once this month, is edging higher to new records, while US futures are enjoying a firmer bias.  Benchmark 10-year yields are 1-2 bp lower, which puts the Treasury yield near 1.55%.  The European periphery is outperforming the core.  The dollar is soft.  The Scandis and Antipodeans lead the move, while the euro, yen, and British pound are little changed.  Emerging market currencies are also mostly stronger.  Here the Philippine peso is notable as it falls the most in seven weeks as corporates bought dollars.  After falling by 0.65% last week, the JP Morgan Emerging Market Currency Index is edging higher today.  Gold is snapping a seven-day rally, stalling near $1868.  Support is seen in the $1842-$1845 area.  January WTI  was sold again as it poked above $80.  It is pinned near last week's lows (~$78.65) as the US response is awaited.  European natural gas futures are firm as the capacity auction results are awaited, and Europe faces its first cold snap of the season.  Iron ore and copper prices are posting small losses.   Asia Pacific Japan's Q3 GDP disappointed, but it is old news and will likely spur Prime Minister Kishida to support a large supplemental budget, which could be unveiled by the end of the week.  Economic growth in the world's third-largest economy contracted for the fifth quarter in the past eight.  The 0.8% loss of output in Q3 was more than the 0.2% expected by the median forecast in Bloomberg's survey.  Consumption (-1.1%), business spending (-3.8%), and public investment (-1.5%) did the most damage.  The GDP deflator was unchanged from Q2 at -1.1%.  The Japanese economy is recovering here in Q4.  Talk of the size of the supplemental budget has increased to around JPY40 trillion (~$350 bln) from JPY30 trillion.  It is expected to include a cash payment for 18-year olds and younger, a tax break for companies that boost wages, a new subsidy for domestic travel, snd pay hikes for caregivers. China's October data was stronger than expected but does not shake off concern that the world's second-largest economy is struggling.  The year-over-year pace of retail sales rose for the second consecutive month in the face of expectations for a decline.  The 4.9% increase follows the 4.4% gain in September and 2.5% in August. In October 2020, it rose 4.3% year-over-year.  Industrial output rose 3.5% from a year ago. It was the first increase since March. Last October, it had increased by 6.9%. The surveyed joblessness was steady at 4.9%.  Fixed asset investment and property investment slowed.  Chinese officials have not addressed the economic slowdown with large-scale fiscal or monetary initiatives.   We have suggested that the dollar-yen exchange rate has entered a new range after trending higher from mid-September through mid-October.  That new range is likely JPY113-JPY115, and to find the floor, the dollar briefly traded below JPY112.80 last week. After spiking back to JPY114.00 on the US CPI surprise, the greenback continues to hover around there, the middle of the range.  Tomorrow's expiring options ($830 mln at JPY113.40 and $1.6 bln at JPY114.30) may mark the near-term range.  The Australian dollar is building on its pre-weekend recovery.  It saw a low slightly above $0.7275 on Friday and settled on its highs (a little above $0.7330).  It has risen to $0.7365, and the intraday momentum is getting stretched.  Look for resistance near $0.7375.  The greenback edged slightly lower against the Chinese yuan to record a new six-month low (~CNY6.3785) before recovering within a narrow range.  It is trading slightly above CNY6.3830 in late dealings. The PBOC set the dollar's reference rate at CNY6.3896, a little below the median forecast of CNY6.3896 (Bloomberg survey).  The PBOC rolled over in full the policy loans (CNY1 trillion) coming due this month, and the overnight repo rate fell by seven basis points to 1.78%, the lowest in three weeks.   Europe Tensions between the UK and EU appear to have taken a step away from the brink.  A deal on medicine supplies from other parts of Great Britain to Northern Ireland may have been the critical catalyst.  Reports suggest a de-escalation of UK rhetoric threatening to invoke Article 16, which allows for unilateral over-riding of the Northern Ireland Protocol under certain circumstances of serious economic, environmental, or societal risks.  Separately, two polls have begun showing Labour is edging ahead of the Tories. The Opinium poll (published in the Guardian) gave Labour a one percentage point lead, the first since January.  The Savanta Com Res poll (for the Daily Mail) put Labour ahead by six percentage points at 40%.  The main issue appears to be Prime Minister Johnson's handling of several ethics issues.  His personal support has also waned.    The US was warning at the end of last week that Russian may be preparing to invade Ukraine. Moscow seems to be acting out of fear, fear of the US and Europe creeping presence in Ukraine.  If Ukraine is going to remain independent, Russia insists it can only be a (weak) buffer state.  US rhetoric seemed aggressive in Moscow.  Last month US Defense Secretary Austin argued that no third country [i.e., Russia] has a veto over NATO membership decision[i.e., Ukraine].    Poland, Lithuania, and Latvia are considering formally requesting NATO consultations, while the EU is expected to announce new sanctions on Belarus later today.  Separately, we note reports that India has begun taking delivery of the S-400 air defense missile system from Russia (part of a $5.5 bln deal), which is the same that earned Turkey American sanctions.   The euro edged above the pre-weekend high, but the tone remains fragile, and for the third consecutive session has been unable to resurface above old support at $1.1500.  Since the US CPI report in the middle of last week, it has fallen, and the sideways movement could alleviate the overextended technical condition.  Sterling extended its pre-weekend recovery to reach $1.3440 before sellers reemerged to knock it to the session low of almost $1.3400.  We suspect it can move higher in North America today and target the $1.3480 area.   America The US seems more eager for the Biden-Xi call than Beijing  Expectations should be low, and with no actionable outcome likely (not even a statement), there appears to be little reason to spin it as a virtual summit. The top officials and the senior staff of the two largest economies should talk.  Previously, there were high-level meetings regularly.  Since their last call, a new US-UK-Australian alliance was announced that will result in Australia acquiring nuclear-powered submarines, and it was confirmed that the US has had military personnel in Taiwan since last November.  China continues with its intimidation campaign of repeatedly entering Taiwan's air-identification zone. China's assessment of the US is unlikely to have changed.  Beijing sees the same thing many others do.  Biden's approval rating has fallen to near 41%, and less than that has a favorable view of his handling of the economy.  At the end of last week, the Univerity of Michigan's consumer sentiment measure (preliminary November) fell to its lowest in a decade.  Surveys continue to point to the likelihood that the Democratic Party will lose both houses of Congress in next year's mid-term.  And to underscore the pressure on Biden, the US Court of Appeals (5th Circuit) sustained a block on OSHA's ordered vaccine mandate (or weekly test).  With the sixth plenum over,  Xi has, by all accounts, confirmed his ascendancy and domination of Chinese politics for years to come.   The week's economic calendar for the US begins off slowly.  The November Empire State manufacturing survey is on tap.  It has been in a sawtooth pattern, alternating between gains and losses for the past five months.  It fell sharply (19.8 from 34.3) in October and is expected to have turned up in November.  The US reports October retail sales and industrial production figures tomorrow. Fed officials begin taking to the public stage starting tomorrow.  Over the course of the week, around 11 officials are scheduled to speak.  In addition to US bills, the Treasury Dept sells 20-year bonds, whose auctions have been among the most challenging for coupons, and 10-year TIPS at the end of the week.   Canada reports September manufacturing and wholesale sales today, but the October existing home sales may be more important.  Tomorrow Canada reports housing starts, but the highlight of the week is Wednesday's October CPI.  Price pressures are accelerating in Canada, and the headline CPI is likely to move toward 5% (4.4% in September).  The swaps market is pricing in about 65 bp of tightening in six months.  This week, Mexico has a light economic diary after last week's higher than expected CPI (6.24%) and Banxcio's 25 bp rate hike (to 5%).  Brazil also has a light economic calendar this week.  Last week featured a further rise in (IPCA) CPI (10.67% vs. 10.25%) and weak September retail sales (-1.3% vs. -0.6% median forecast in Bloomberg's survey after a revised -4.3% fall in August). Last week's US CPI shocker saw the greenback jump from around CAD1.24 to slightly above CAD1.26, roughly the 50% retracement of the slump from CAD1.2900 on September 20.  It settled last week on a soft note, and some follow-through selling has seen the US dollar eased to about CAD1.2525.  A break here sees CAD1.2500 and then possibly CAD1.2470.  Since last September, the greenback has moved into a new and higher range against the Mexican peso.  It has not traded much below MN20.12.  Nor has it spent much time above MXN20.90.  It is in the pre-weekend range (~MXN20.45-MXN20.72).  Look for the consolidative day to continue through the local session.  The Brazil real was the strongest emerging market currency last week, rising almost 1.6% against the US dollar.  The US dollar found support around BRK5.40. Trendline support (from June, August, and September lows) and the 200-day moving average are near BRL5.36.   Disclaimer
Getting Real on PMs and Inflation

Getting Real on PMs and Inflation

Monica Kingsley Monica Kingsley 15.11.2021 15:47
S&P 500 indeed rose but bond markets couldn‘t keep the encouraging opening gains. Can stocks still continue rallying? They look to be setting up for one more downleg of maximum the immediately predecing magnitude, which means not a huge setback. The medium-term path of least resistance remains up – the Fed is still printing a huge amount of money on a monthly basis, and it remains questionable how far in tapering plans execution they would actually get – I see the risks to the real economy coupled with persistently high inflation as rising since the 2Q 2022 (if not since Mar already, but most pronounced in 2H 2022).Stocks are still set for a good Dec and beyond performance – just look at VIX calming down again. It‘s that the debt ceiling drama resolution would allow the Treasury to start issuing fresh debt, and that would weigh heavily on the dollar. That‘s a good part of what gold and silver are sniffing out, and if you look at the great white metal‘s performance, it‘s the result of inflation coming back to the fore as the Fed itself is now admitting to high inflation rates through the mid-2022, putting blame on supply chain bottlenecks. Oh, sure. The real trouble is that inflation expectations are starting to get anchored – people are expecting these rates to be not going away any time soon.Precious metals are going to do great, and keep scoring excellent gains. Surpassing $1,950 isn‘t out of the realm of possibilities, but I prefer to be possitioned aggressively while having more conservative expectations. Not missing a dime this way. Copper is awakening too, and commodities including oil would be doing marvels. If in doubt, look at cryptos, how shallow the corrections there are.A few more words on yields – as more fresh Treasury issued debt enters the markets, look for yields to rise. Coming full circle to stocks and my Friday‘s expectations:(…) TLT though is having trouble declining further, and that means a brief upswing carrying over into stocks, is likely.TLT downswings would be less and less conducive to growth, so if you‘re still heavily in tech, I would start eyeing more value.Let‘s move right into the charts (all courtesy of www.stockcharts.com).S&P 500 and Nasdaq OutlookS&P 500 bulls are on the move, and let‘s see how far they make it before running into another (mild, again I say) setback.Credit MarketsCredit markets opening strength fizzled out, but the weakness is getting long in the tooth kind of. I view it as a short-term non-confirmation of the S&P 500 upswing only.Gold, Silver and MinersGold and silver are on a tear, and rightfully so – I am looking for further gains as both gold and silver miners confirm, and the macroeconomic environment is superb for PMs.Crude OilCrude oil bulls keep defending the $80 level, with $78 serving as the next stop if need be – after Friday, its test is looking as an increasingly remote possibility – the two lower knots in a series say. Anyway, black gold will overcome $85 before too long.CopperCopper ran while commodities paused – that‘s a very bullish sign, for both base and precious metals. The lower volume isn‘t necessarily a warning sign.Bitcoin and EthereumBitcoin and Ethereum are still consolidating, and the relatively tight price range keeps favoring the bulls – and they‘re peeking higher already.SummaryS&P 500 bulls are holding the short-term upper hand, but the rally may run into headwinds shortly. Still, we‘re looking at a trading range followed by fresh highs as a worst case scenario. Yes, I remain a stock market bull, not expecting a serious setback till probably the third month of 2022. Precious metals are my top pick, followed by copper – and I am definitely not writing off oil, let alone cryptos. Inflation trades are simply back!Thank you for having read today‘s free analysis, which is available in full at my homesite. There, you can subscribe to the free Monica‘s Insider Club, which features real-time trade calls and intraday updates for all the five publications: Stock Trading Signals, Gold Trading Signals, Oil Trading Signals, Copper Trading Signals and Bitcoin Trading Signals.
Biden-Xi "Summit" Leaves Markets Unmolested, While Bailey Continues to Blame Investors for Misunderstanding Him

Biden-Xi "Summit" Leaves Markets Unmolested, While Bailey Continues to Blame Investors for Misunderstanding Him

Marc Chandler Marc Chandler 16.11.2021 14:03
Overview: The much-heralded Biden-Xi meeting left little impression on the capital markets.  Equities in the region were mixed, and China's main markets fell, alongside Australia, South Korea, and India.  European equities continue their upward market, with the Stoxx 600 gaining for a fifth consecutive session. US futures are softer.  The bond market is quiet, with the US 10-year yield softer slightly below 1.60%.  European benchmark yields are 1-2 bp lower and the periphery is outperforming the core.  Encouraged by a strong employment report, sterling is the strongest of the majors, gaining about a third of one percent.  Most major currencies are trading with a heavier bias, and the euro is pinned near 19-month lows.  The dollar is gaining against most emerging market currencies.  The Turkish lira is off more than 1.5% as the market prices in a 100 bp cut on Thursday.   Hungary's disappointing Q3 GDP (0.7% vs. 1.0% forecasts) may limit the aggressiveness of the central bank today.  A 30 bp hike after two 15 bp moves was expected.  Gold is extending its rally and has taken out the downtrend drawn off the January and June highs (found ~$1872 today).  The next target is around $1900.  Oil is firm, and the January WTI contract is straddling the $80-level.  European natural gas is rising as new supplies are low, and there is a further delay in the certification process of the Nord Stream 2 pipeline.   Yesterday's 9% advance has been extended by another 8% today.  Iron ore has steadied, while copper is struggling after falling 1% yesterday.   Asia Pacific There is not much to say about the Xi-Biden "virtual summit."  The call reportedly lasted three hours.  The one concrete thing to emerge is that US business executives will have an easier/quicker time entering China.  Separately, Hong Kong's Chief Executive used her regular briefing to justify the decision to allow JP Morgan's CEO to skip the city's 21-day hotel quarantine because of the size of the bank's operations.  This speaks to the difference between the rule of law and the rule by law that some observers make.  Returning to regular meetings between the senior officials from both countries seems to be the logical way forward, but both sides appear to draw domestic benefits from demonizing the other.  In the US, the Biden administration uses the threat of China to justify building a 21st-century infrastructure. At the same time, Beijing plays the nationalistic chords to strengthen the loyalty to the Communist Party even as its delivery of improved living standards slows or stalls.   The minutes from the recent Reserve Bank of Australia meeting contained no surprises.  The exit from the yield curve control policy seems clumsy, but the RBA seems adamant that a rate hike next year is unwarranted.  The market remains convinced officials are wrong.  The swaps market has about 75 bp discounted over the next 12 months, with the hikes and risks increasing beginning in late H1 22. In a speech after the minutes were released, Governor Lowe referred to a hike in 2024 as "still plausible," but this seemed like a slight climb down from it being the "central case."  On the other hand, elevated price pressures and border controls have driven the unemployment rate to 3.4%, its lowest level since 2008, and lifted the participating rate to match record highs. The Reserve Bank of New Zealand will likely hike rates again next week.  The swaps market is pricing in nearly 50 bp of tightening by the RBNZ over the next three months and almost 140 bp in the following nine months.  It is difficult to see a more hawkish outlook.  The five basis point jump in the US 10-year yield helped lift the greenback to JPY114.30, matching its best level since November 1 (JPY114.45).  There is an option for $1.6 bln at JPY114.30 that expires today.   The four-year high was set on October 20 near JPY114.70.  The Japanese economy is recovering after a larger than expected contraction in Q3.  A large supplemental budget is expected as early as the end of the week but before month-end in any event.  As if confirming the lack of new insight from the RBA minutes, the Australian dollar is trading within yesterday's range (~$0.7320-$0.7370).  A break of the $0.7300 area would weaken the technical tone, while a move above $0.7380 signals a stronger recovery after finishing last month near $0.7550.  The Chinese yuan rose to new five-month highs today before pulling back.  The dollar fell to CNY6.3670 and rebounded to a new session high slightly above yesterday's high near CNY6.3850.  The PBOC set the dollar's reference rate at CNY6.3924, a little above the (Bloomberg survey) median projection of CNY6.3920. Ironically, the yuan's high was recorded as the Biden-Xi call got underway.  It trended lower through the rest of the session.   Separately, the PBOC boosted its liquidity injection via seven-day repos to CNY50 bln from CNY10 bln on Monday and rolled off its full medium-term lending yesterday, easing technical pressure in the money market.   Europe The UK's employment data is especially important in light of the BOE concerns about the labor market now that the furlough program has ended.  Around one million workers were on the program when it ended. The BOE surprised the market by not raising rates at the meeting earlier this month. Governor Bailey continues to blame the market for misconstruing his remarks and expressing his unease with the "inflation situation."  He said he wanted to see what happens now that the furlough program ended before hiking, but it is not clear that today's data is sufficient.  However, the preliminary indications suggest the UK labor market is normalizing quickly.  October payrolls rose by 160k. Jobless claims fell by nearly 15k after a revised decline of almost 86k in September (initially estimated at -51.1k).  In the three months through September, the UK employment rose by 247k, and the ILO measure of unemployment fell to 4.3% from 4.5%.  Of note, the next employment report will be issued two days before the next MPC meeting (December 16).     Governor Bailey acknowledged that his decision not to hike rates earlier this month was close.  The swaps market has a little more than a 55% chance of a hike in December and has it fully priced it in for the first meeting next year (February 3). The central bank's chief economist, Pill, said there was no evidence yet that higher inflation was seeping into general pay levels.  Starting salaries appear to be increasing, but it may not be lifting the pay for existing workers.  Separately, a technical glitch with an internet-based order system caused the BOE to postpone a bond purchases operation until Thursday.  The QE operations take place three times a week at a pace of slightly more than GBP3 bln a week, with an eye toward finishing them by year-end.   There is another twist to the saga of the controversial Nord Stream 2 pipeline.  Hopes that the completed pipeline could become operational soon were dealt a fresh blow by the German regulator, who suspended the certification process.  The technical issue was a change in the legal form of the operating company.  Nord Stream 2 AG established a subsidiary that would own and operator the German section of the pipeline.  There is some thought that after this delay, the corporate reorganization could expedite the eventual approval.   Coronavirus deaths spiked in Germany to the six-month highs, and the government is debating how to control the fourth pandemic wave. Ironically, Japan now has the highest inoculation rates among the G7. It reported the lowest number of new infections in 18 months. The euro was sold below $1.1400 yesterday and has been unable to resurface above there.  Since the $1.15 level broke, we have suggested the next target is near $1.1290-$1.1300. The ECB's dovish rhetoric contrasts with the prospect of a more hawkish posture by the Federal Reserve.   We continue to see an acceleration of the Fed's tapering as the most likely outcome of the December FOMC meeting, while next month's ECB meeting is more about extending the bond-buying after the Pandemic Emergency Purchases Program ends next March.  The prospects of a rate hike next month lifted sterling to four-day highs near $1.3475, but there does not look like there is the interest to test the $1.35 area, which holds a GBP407 mln option that expires today.  Initial support is now seen in the $1.3400-$1.3420 area. The euro is sliding for the third consecutive session against steering and looks poised to test the year's low near GBP0.8400 in the coming days. The UK reports October CPI figures tomorrow, and they are expected to have accelerated.    America The US economic growth is improving this quarter after the disappointing 2% annualized pace in Q3.  It will be reflected in the consumption and production data.  Today sees October retail sales, a little more than 40% of overall consumption, and industrial production, including factories and utilities, mining, and drilling.  Headline retail sales will likely be lifted by the first increase in auto sales in six months.  The core components, which exclude autos, gasoline, building materials, and food services, are forecast (Bloomberg, median) to rise a solid 0.9%.  It would be the third consecutive monthly gain, the first since Q3 20.  Consumer spending rose 2% at an annualized rate in Q3 and is expected to grow closer to 5% this year, having peaked in Q2 at 6.7%.  Industrial production fell in August and September but is expected to have snapped back in October as the recovery from Hurricane Ida took hold.  The median forecast (Bloomberg survey) is for a 0.8% gain.  The rig count rose by 23, matching the most since January.  According to the recent jobs report, manufacturing employment rose by 60k in October.  Few have noted it, but if confirmed, it would be the largest monthly increase since August 1998.  That said, the Markit manufacturing PMI and ISM manufacturing index fell.   The Biden administration's $1.75 trillion "Build Back Better" bill is in the balance.  Some argue that the surge in inflation has been spurred by the government's spending and transfer payments and are opposed to new large-scale spending.  However, the bill's defenders argue that it has been scaled back, and much of the expenditures will be covered by new revenue.  The non-partisan Congressional Budget Office, the arbiter of such scoring, will publish its full cost estimate on Friday.  Meanwhile, expectations that an announcement will be made shortly on the Fed's leadership were fanned by comments from the Senate Banking Chairman (Brown), who said he was told a decision was "imminent."  It was widely expected before the end of next week.  Reports suggest that Treasury Secretary Yellen has opined that Brainard would be a credible pick, but she is recommending Powell, emphasizing continuity and avoiding the politicization of the post.   Meanwhile, the Fed's Bullard, Barkin, and Daly speak today.  Note that Daly was interviewed for a Board of Governor slot but appears to have turned it down. Canada reports October housing starts today ahead of the October CPI figures tomorrow.  The headline rate is expected to approach 5% though the underlying measures are lower.  The market is positioned for a hike in the March-April period next year.  Recall that the jump in US CPI sent the greenback up from just below CAD1.2400 to slightly above CAD1.2600 at the end of last week.  It reversed lower before the weekend and slipped briefly below CAD1.2500 today, roughly the (50%) retracement of the CPI-inspired gains, before rebounding. Initial resistance is seen in the CAD1.2535-CAD1.2560 area.  Mexico's economic diary is light, and the movement of the peso may reflect broader forces.  For the past three sessions, the dollar has been consolidating in a broad range against the peso (~MXN20.45-MXN20.72). Within that range, initial support may be in the MXN20.55 area.   Disclaimer
The Elephant in the Room

The Elephant in the Room

Monica Kingsley Monica Kingsley 16.11.2021 15:42
S&P 500 is starting to run into a setback even if VIX doesn‘t reveal that fully. Credit markets going from weakness to weakness spells more short-term woes for stocks – a shallow downswing that feels (and is) a trading range before the surge to new ATHs continues, is likely to materialize in the second half of Nov. We may be in its opening stages – as written yesterday: (…) Can stocks still continue rallying? They look to be setting up for one more downleg of the immediately predecing magnitude, which means not a huge setback. The medium-term path of least resistance remains up – the Fed is still printing a huge amount of money on a monthly basis, and it remains questionable how far in tapering plans execution they would actually get – I see the risks to the real economy coupled with persistently high inflation as rising since the 2Q 2022 (if not since Mar already, but most pronounced in 2H 2022). Stocks are still set for a good Dec and beyond performance. The elephant in the room is (the absence of) fresh debt issuance lifting up the dollar, making it like rising yields more. Not only that these are failing to push value higher, but the tech resilience highlights the defensive nature of S&P 500 performance. Crucially though, precious metals are seeing through the (misleading dollar strength) fog, and are sharply rising regardless. Make no mistake, with the taper reaction, we have seen what I had been expecting (or even better given that I prefer reasonably conservative stance without drumming up expectations either way) – I had been telling you that the hardest times for the metals are before taper. And the magnitude and pace of their upswing casts a verdict on the Fed‘s (likely in)ability to follow through with the taper execution, let alone initiate the rate raising cycle without being laughed off the stage as markets force these regardless of the central planners. The galloping inflation expectations are sending a very clear message: (…) if you look at the great white metal‘s performance, it‘s the result of inflation coming back to the fore as the Fed itself is now admitting to high inflation rates through the mid-2022, putting blame on supply chain bottlenecks. Oh, sure. The real trouble is that inflation expectations are starting to get anchored – people are expecting these rates to be not going away any time soon. Precious metals are going to do great… Copper is awakening too, and commodities including oil would be doing marvels. TLT downswings would be less and less conducive to growth, so if you‘re still heavily in tech, I would start eyeing more value. Let me add the Russell 2000 and emerging markets to the well performing medium-term mix. Let‘s move right into the charts (all courtesy of www.stockcharts.com). S&P 500 and Nasdaq Outlook S&P 500 bulls didn‘t make it too far before running into another (mild, again I say) setback – so far, a sideways one. Credit Markets Credit markets renewed their march lower, and unless they turn, the S&P 500 upswings would remain on shaky ground (if and when they materialize). Gold, Silver and Miners Gold and silver remain on a tear, and even for the breather to unfold, it takes quite an effort. The bears clearly can‘t hope for a trend change. Crude Oil Crude oil bulls keep defending the $80 level, with $78 serving as the next stop if need be – these consecutive lower knots keep favoring the bulls, just when the right catalyst arrives. Whether that takes one or two days or more, is irrelevant – it will happen. Copper Copper ran into an unexpected setback, which however doesn‘t change the outlook thanks to its relatively low volume. I‘m still looking for much higher red metal‘s prices. Bitcoin and Ethereum Bitcoin and Ethereum are seeing an emerging crack in the dam that doesn‘t tie too well to developments elsewhere. The bulls should step in, otherwise this yellow flag risks turning into a red one. Summary S&P 500 bulls are now holding only the medium-term upper hand as the rally is entering a consolidation phase. Anyway, this trading range would be followed by fresh ATHs, which would power stocks even higher in early 2022. Precious metals have quite some catching up to do, and the long post Aug 2020 consolidation is over. Copper, base metals, oil and agrifoods are likely to keep doing great as inflation expectations show that inflation truly hasn‘t been tamed in the least. Thank you for having read today‘s free analysis, which is available in full at my homesite. There, you can subscribe to the free Monica‘s Insider Club, which features real-time trade calls and intraday updates for all the five publications: Stock Trading Signals, Gold Trading Signals, Oil Trading Signals, Copper Trading Signals and Bitcoin Trading Signals.
Gold – USD Relationship Status: It’s Complicated

Gold – USD Relationship Status: It’s Complicated

Przemysław Radomski Przemysław Radomski 17.11.2021 13:27
  If the dollar goes through a corrective downswing, it’s more bullish for gold? Not if a decline in the euro caused gold to rise in the first place. Another day, another new yearly high for the USD Index. The U.S. currency soars just like it has since the beginning of the year, in tune with what I said at that time, (and against what almost everyone else said about its outlook). The rally accelerated recently, with the USD Index soaring by 0.78 this week – and it’s only Wednesday today. So, surely that’s bullish for the USD Index? - one might ask. No. “Bullish” or “bearish” relates to the future, not to the past. In fact, the rally in the USD Index might need a breather as all markets – no matter how bullish or bearish the situation is in them – can’t rally or decline in a straight line, without periodic corrections. The USD Index, gold, silver, mining stocks, and practically all the other markets are no exception from this rule. Even the real estate prices don’t increase over the long run without periodic downturns. As you can see on the above chart, the U.S currency index soared to almost 96 yesterday and it’s after an almost straight-up rally. This rally caused the RSI indicator to move above 70, and this has been a quite precise short-term sell signal this year. In fact, in all cases when we saw it, some kind of short-term correction followed. Based on the size of the current rally, it seems that the current situation is most similar to what we saw in early March and in late June. That’s when we saw short-term declines that took the USDX approximately a full index point lower. In the current case, it could mean a decline back to 95. This would be a perfectly natural thing for the USD Index to do right now, given that the previous resistance (which now serves as support) is located slightly below 95. The support is provided by the late-2020 high and the March 2020 low (not visible on the above chart). So, surely this corrective downswing in the USD Index would cause an even bigger rally in the precious metals sector, right? That’s where things get complicated. You see, the biggest (over 50%) part of the USD Index (which is a weighted average) is the EUR/USD currency pair. Let’s take a look at it. The Euro Index moved sharply lower last week and just like the RSI based on the USD Index flashed a sell signal, the RSI based on the Euro Index flashed a buy signal. Also, the Euro Index just moved to the lower border of its declining trade channel, which is likely to indicate some kind of rebound. Why am I discussing the euro here? Because that’s what’s complicated about the current USD-gold link. The euro recently declined and the prices of silver and gold recently rallied shortly after dovish comments from the eurozone. Namely, while the expansionary nature of fiscal and monetary decisions in the U.S. might be after its peak (with the infrastructure bill signed even despite high inflation numbers), the eurozone is far from limiting its expansionary (i.e., inflationary) policies, and it was just made clear recently. That was bearish for the euro and bullish for the gold price – as more money (euros in this case) would be chasing the same amount of physical gold bars. The point here is that it might have been the decline in the value of the European currency that caused gold to rally, and it had little to do with what happened in the USD Index. Don’t get me wrong, most of the time, the gold-USD link is stable and negative. In some cases, gold shows strength or weakness by refusing to move in tune (and precisely: again) with the U.S. dollar’s movement. But in this case, it seems that it’s not about the U.S. dollar at all (or mostly), but rather about what happened in the Eurozone and euro recently. I marked the recent decline in the euro and the rally in gold with a golden rectangle. The usual link between gold-USD would have one assume that lower USD Index values (due to higher EUR/USD values) would trigger a rally in gold. However, given how things worked and the fact that we saw/heard the news coming from the Eurozone, it seems like this “temporary” and “bearish for the PMs” interpretation would actually prevail. It could also be the case that we see some kind of mixed reply from the precious metals sector when the USD Index and the Euro Index correct. The PMs could for example fall only after the situation regarding the gold-USD link gets back to normal – that is perhaps after both currencies correct. Thank you for reading our free analysis today. Please note that the above is just a small fraction of today’s all-encompassing Gold & Silver Trading Alert. The latter includes multiple premium details such as the targets for gold and mining stocks that could be reached in the next few weeks. If you’d like to read those premium details, we have good news for you. As soon as you sign up for our free gold newsletter, you’ll get a free 7-day no-obligation trial access to our premium Gold & Silver Trading Alerts. It’s really free – sign up today. Przemyslaw Radomski, CFAFounder, Editor-in-chiefSunshine Profits: Effective Investment through Diligence & Care * * * * * All essays, research and information found above represent analyses and opinions of Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA and Sunshine Profits' associates only. As such, it may prove wrong and be subject to change without notice. Opinions and analyses are based on data available to authors of respective essays at the time of writing. Although the information provided above is based on careful research and sources that are deemed to be accurate, Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA and his associates do not guarantee the accuracy or thoroughness of the data or information reported. The opinions published above are neither an offer nor a recommendation to purchase or sell any securities. Mr. Radomski is not a Registered Securities Advisor. By reading Przemyslaw Radomski's, CFA reports you fully agree that he will not be held responsible or liable for any decisions you make regarding any information provided in these reports. Investing, trading and speculation in any financial markets may involve high risk of loss. Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA, Sunshine Profits' employees and affiliates as well as members of their families may have a short or long position in any securities, including those mentioned in any of the reports or essays, and may make additional purchases and/or sales of those securities without notice.
European Gas Jumps, while the Euro and Yen Slump

European Gas Jumps, while the Euro and Yen Slump

Marc Chandler Marc Chandler 17.11.2021 15:31
Overview: The prospects that the 6.2% CPI will prompt the Fed to move quicker continue to underpin the dollar.  The euro fell to about $1.1265, its lowest level since last September, and the Japanese yen slumped to a fresh four-year low.  The JP Morgan Emerging Market Currency Index tumbled 1% yesterday, the largest decline since February.  A more stable tone is evident in Europe, as the euro has recovered above $1.13, and the JP Morgan Index is paring yesterday's losses.  The dollar is holding just below JPY115.00.  Asia Pacific equities did not fare well.  Only China and Taiwan markets, among the large regional markets, managed to rise.  Europe's Stoxx 600 is edging higher for the sixth consecutive session.  Recall it has fallen only once since October 27.  US futures are narrowly mixed. The bond market is quiet, with the US 10-year hovering around 1.62%.  European yields are a little softer.  Gold slid below $1850 yesterday but has snapped back today to test the $1860 area.  Crude oil is heavy, with the January WTI contract around $78.80, unable to resurface above $80 amid talk that the US and China may coordinate the release of strategic holdings.  Gas prices are up another 7% in Europe today after surging 16% yesterday and 9% on Monday. Due to "unplanned maintenance," a Belarus pipeline to Poland has been shut down, which may last three days.  Iron ore prices are giving back around half of yesterday's 1.2% gain, for the third loss in four sessions.  Copper is off for a third session, losing after dropping 2.2% in the past two sessions.   Asia Pacific Japan's October trade data disappointed.  Exports and imports were weaker than expected, and this resulted in a smaller deficit. Exports slowed to 9.4% year-over-year, down from 13% in September, defying expectations for a small double-digit increase.  Imports were up 26.7% from a year ago, off the heady 38.2% pace seen in September and below the 31.8% projected.  The resulting trade deficit of JPY67.4 bln was about a fifth of what economists anticipated (Bloomberg survey).  It is the third consecutive monthly deficit.  In the first seven months of the year, Japan recorded two deficits.  A year ago, Japan recorded a JPY840 bln surplus.   Reports suggesting that the possibility that the US and China coordinate the drawdown of strategic oil reserves are light on details, but the suggestion itself is enough to weigh on prices.  Still, the International Energy Agency yesterday echoed the broad assessment of America's EIA in anticipating that the tightness of the oil market could ease shortly.   Increased output in the US, Saudi Arabia, and Russia may account for half of the 1.5 mln barrel a day anticipated increase in supply. Nevertheless, the acting head of the EIA warned tapping the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve would have a short-term impact, for which other dynamics would quickly overshadow it.  Separately, note that the API estimated a slight build of 655k barrels in US stocks this past week, while gasoline inventories fell.   In other regional developments, Australia's wage price index rose a modest 0.6% in Q3 for a year-over-year pace of 2.2%.  This was in line with expectations.  It would seem to support the RBA's argument that it need not be in a hurry to raise rates.  The June 2022 T-bill yield settled last month at 69 bp and is now near 40 bp.  Separately, China appears to be allowing "high quality" property developments to return to the asset-backed securities market to raise capital after a three-month hiatus. Lastly, reports suggest Beijing is moving ahead with its import substitution plans to reduce dependency on foreign technology.    The dollar approached JPY115.00, where an option for almost $610 mln expires today.  The dollar has not traded above there since March 2017.  Since the dollar broke above JPY112.00, we have suggested that JPY114.50-JPY115.00 may mark the top of the new range.  While this has worked for the past month, the risk is on the upside.  A convincing break of around JPY115.50 would target the JPY118.00 area.  Initial support is now seen near JPY114.70.  Note that the upper Bollinger Band is slightly below JPY114.80.  The Australian dollar is trading near its lowest level since October 6, near $0.7265.  It is holding above a trendline connecting the August and September lows, which is found near $0.7250 today, but little stands in the way of a test on the $0.7200 in the coming days.  An option for a little more than A$800 mln at $0.7300 is set to expire today.  After posting a key upside reversal yesterday, the US dollar consolidated against the Chinese yuan today, and no follow-through buying materialized.  Instead, it seemed that the local market took advantage of the pop above CNY6.39 to sell the greenback, which is straddling CNY6.38 in late dealings.  The reference rate was set at CNY6.3935, just below the bank projections (CNY6.3936, according to the median in the Bloomberg survey).  We note that the yuan is also at its best level since 2015 against the trade-weighted CFETS basket the PBOC uses.   Europe On the heels of a strong employment report, the UK reported a larger than expected increase in the October CPI.  The preferred measure, which includes owner-equivalent housing costs, jumped to 3.8% from 2.9%.  The older measure rose to 4.2% from 3.1%.  On the month, consumer prices rose 1.1% rather than the 0.8% economists forecast (Bloomberg median). Flattered by increasing gas and electricity prices.  Core prices rose 3.4% year-over-year, accelerating from 2.9% in September and defying forecasts for a 3.1% pace.  Separately, producer prices, both input and output, also rose more than expected.  Lastly, UK house prices rose 11.8% year-over-year in September, up from a revised 10.2% in August.  The recent peak was 12.6% in June, which was the highest since 2004.    European gas prices are at one-month highs.  Belarus has stopped its pipeline to Poland, claiming unplanned maintenance issues, while the border tensions and earlier threats raise suspicions of a political move.  Separately, the German regulator suspended the certification process of the controversial Nord Stream 2 pipeline as corporate assets are rearranged.  Separately, a German court yesterday dismissed an environmental challenge to the pipeline.  Lastly, we note that the virus flare-up continues in Europe, and Germany and the Czech Republic reported a record number of cases. The euro surpassed our $1.1290 Fibonacci target and did not find bids until the $1.1265 area in Asian turnover.  The single currency has been in a tight range in Europe, holding above $1.1300.  Initial resistance is seen around $1.1330 now.  A move above yesterday's high, near $1.1385, is needed to lift the tone. We suspect the near big target is closer to $1.10.  Sterling slipped to a three-day low, slightly below $1.34, but shot up to the session high near $1.3375 on the inflation news. However, the momentum was not sustained, and sterling is little changed in late morning European turnover near $1.3430. The euro briefly traded below GBP0.8400 for the first time since March 2020 but snapped back.  An 840 mln euro option at GBP0.8445 expires today and another for about 620 mln euros at GBP0.8450 expires tomorrow.   America US retail sales surged last month, and the 1.7% rise was the best since March.  After slowing in Q3, consumption is off to a strong start in Q4.  Industrial production was also much stronger than expected, rising 1.6% compared with the 0.9% gain anticipated by economists (median, Bloomberg survey).  The US reports October housing starts today, and they are expected to have recovered from the 1.6% decline seen in September. Housing starts fell in Q3 but are seen rising in Q4, encouraged by an easing of some supply chain issues.   In fact, on several fronts, there are preliminary signs that the disruptions are dissipating.  Some reports suggest that the shortage of semiconductor chips may be passed, and US auto sales rose in October for the first time in six months.  Both the EIA and IEA have forecast a more balanced oil market, and some measures of shipping costs have moderated. The Los Angeles port has reportedly reduced the number of empty containers by around a quarter this month as six new sweeper ships have been brought into operation.  In addition, we note that the re-opening of US borders means immigrant workers may begin returning.  There is still much debate, of course, on the extent that the elevated price pressures are the result of supply chain disruptions.  A report by the Bank for International Settlements estimates that without the supply problems, US inflation would be closer to 2.5% and eurozone inflation near 1.5%. President Biden is expected to make his Fed announcements in the next few days, according to reports, but it could slip into early next week.  Powell is still the favorite, and he has Treasury Secretary Yellen's in support.  Yellen warns that action is needed soon on the debt ceiling.  Her efforts may be exhausted early next month.  Lastly, San Francisco Fed President Daly opined she was more bullish on the economy than a year ago.  This seems backward to us.  A year ago, the vaccine was announced, and fiscal stimulus was anticipated after the US election. Going forward, there will be less monetary and fiscal stimulus.  The pent-up demand ("excess savings") is projected to be exhausted by early next year, and, as we have noted, the doubling of the price of oil has preceded the last three recessions in the US. We suspect that there is sufficient stimulus and need to rebuild inventories to sustain reasonably strong growth for the next few quarters, but by the second half of next year, sub-3% growth will return as the norm.  Canada reports October CPI figures today.  The headline is likely to rise to 4.7% from 4.4% in September (Bloomberg median).  However, the base effect points to a further rise this month and December, when in 2020, the CPI rose 0.1% and fell 0.2%, respectively.   The underlying core rates are also increasing.  The Deputy Governor of the Bank of Canada cautioned about the high degree of uncertainty around potential structural shifts in the labor market that make it challenging to gauge full employment with any degree of confidence.  He pointed to economic areas that still show slack.  The market is expecting the first hike next March/April.  Note that tomorrow, the "Three Amigos" (Biden, Trudeau, and AMLO) meet in the US amid concern that the US "Build Back Better" has strong nationalistic elements, including for electric vehicles.     The US dollar posted an outside up day against the Canadian dollar yesterday, and follow-through buying has lifted it to around CAD1.2585.  At the end of last week, the high set was slightly above CAD1.2600, which close approximates the (50%) retracement of the greenback's decline since the September 20 high near CAD1.29.  The next retracement (61.8%) is found by CAD1.2665.  Still, we expect that a firm CPI report will lend the Loonie some support.  The session low, set in late Asia, near CAD1.2540, may be protected a CAD1.2545 option for $600 mln that expires today.  The greenback is consolidating against the Mexican peso today after rallying yesterday from about MXN20.56 to nearly MXN20.85.  The high from earlier this month was near MXN20.98.  It has not been above MXN21.00 since March.  Initial support is seen around MXN20.60.   Disclaimer
COT Currency Speculator Sentiment rising for Euro & British Pound Sterling

Forex: US dollar takes the lead after the jump in inflation

Capital Capital 17.11.2021 16:01
Forex: US dollar takes the lead after the jump in inflation The US dollar rallied against all other currencies on Thursday, after US Consumer Price Index (CPI) rose more than expected in October, reviving speculations about faster interest rate hikes next year.  The US Dollar index (DXY) hovers around new 52-week highs at 95.00 level, gaining 0.8% since the CPI release. US Treasury yields also rose after the inflation surprise, with a 7 basis points (bps) increase in the 2-year yield and 9 bps on the 10-year benchmark.   EUR/USD and GBP/USD both slipped by nearly 0.7% from yesterday’s midday London trading, while they edged down around 0.1% from previous close.   The Swiss franc (CHF) and the Japanese yen (JPY) have lost 0.7% of their value against the greenback since the CPI was out, while the Aussie (AUD) and the Kiwi (NZD) weakened 1.2% and 1.9% respectively.  Elsewhere, emerging market currencies sold-off after the inflation print, with the South African rand (ZAR) and the Mexican peso (MXN) both down 1.4% against the dollar, while the Turkish lira (TRY)  hit new all-time lows by weakening 1% versus the greenback.  US dollar As of writing, the US Dollar index (DXY) was last at 94.98 level, up 0.21% on the day. In October, US inflation was substantially higher than market forecasts and not only confined to COVID-related items but broad based across the main items in the index, as the cost of services is also rising. Core CPI inflation, which excludes food and energy prices, increased by 0.6% points to 4.6% on the year, well above consensus (4.3%). Core inflation in the US reached the highest level since 1991. Headline inflation rose by 0.8% points to 6.2% on the year, hitting the highest level since 1990 and again above expectations of a 5.8% year-on-year rise. Markets are now pricing in a 71% probability, up from 56.5% yesterday, Fed starts hiking interest rate in June next year. DXY technical levels: 52-week high: 95.03 52-week low: 89.212 50-day moving average: 93.59 200-day moving average: 92.08 14-day Relative Strength Index (RSI): 64.83 Euro As of writing, the euro is down 0.15% from previous close versus the US dollar (EUR/USD) and flat against the British pound (EUR/GBP). Yesterday, ECB Governing Council member Robert Holzmann said that asset purchases (QE) could end next in September or December next year, depending on the inflation dynamics. Today, ECB Chief Economist Philip Lane will speak at the 2nd joint ECB-FED New York conference, while ECB executive board member Isabel Schnabel will take part at a Q&A organized by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität. EUR/USD technical levels: 52-week high: 1.2349 52-week low: 1.1455 50-day moving average: 1.1662 200-day moving average: 1.1882 14-day Relative Strength Index (RSI): 35.72 British pound GBP/USD is down 0.15% to 1.3532 as of writing. On the data front, UK gross domestic product (GDP) preliminary figure came in at 6.6% year-on-year in Q3 (1.3% quarter-over-quarter), disappointing market expectations by 0.2%. Manufacturing production increased 2.8% year-on-year in September, missing market forecast of 3.1%, while business investment was up 0.8% quarter-over-market in Q3, disappointing market expectations of a 2.6% increase. GBP/USD technical levels. 52-week high: 1.4248 52-week low: 1.3091 50-day moving average: 1.3684 200-day moving average: 1.3845 14-day Relative Strength Index (RSI): 33.39
Euro Bounces Back, but The Turkish Lira Remains Unloved

Euro Bounces Back, but The Turkish Lira Remains Unloved

Marc Chandler Marc Chandler 18.11.2021 15:17
Overview:  The US dollar's sharp upside momentum stalled yesterday near JPY115 and after the euro met (and surpassed) a key retracement level slightly below $1.1300.  Led by the Antipodean currencies today, the greenback is mostly trading with a heavier bias.  Among the majors, helped by a steadying of US yields, the yen is soft.  In the emerging market space, the Turkish lira continues its headlong plunge while the yuan softened and the Mexican peso is off.  Hungary's central bank surprised with a 70 bp hike in the one-week deposit rate.  The JP Morgan Emerging Market Currency Index is posting a small gain through the European morning.  Disappointing tech results in China (Baidu and Bilibili) weighed on Chinese shares, but most markets in the region fell but Australia and Taiwan.  Europe's Stoxx 600 is struggling to extend the six-day advance.  US futures are also a little firmer.  After yesterday's four basis point pullback, the US 10-year yield is little changed near 1.58%.  European yields are 1-2 bp lower.  Gold remains within Tuesday's range (~$1850-$1877), but the moment seen earlier last week has faded, and the yellow metal is trading choppily in a consolidative phase.  The prospect of a coordinated sale of oil after China's announced it would tap its reserves for the second time saw the January WTI contract fall to $76.45, its lowest level since early October. Still, the price has stabilized in the European morning around $77 a barrel.  The benchmark European natural gas contract (Netherlands) has extended yesterday's pullback.  It settled a little below 75 euros last week, and after two days of declines, it is above 92 euros.  Iron ore is also falling for a second session and is now lower on the week.  Note that it settled October a little above $104 and is now around $86.40. Copper is lower for the fourth consecutive session.  It is trading around $424, off $20.5 this week.   Asia Pacific  Japan is expected to unveil the much-awaited supplemental budget tomorrow.  Prime Minister Kishida will get one bite of the proverbial apple, and he is expected to go big.  Talk of the size of the overall package has risen in recent days.  The Nikkei seemed to suggest a JPY79 trillion (~$690 bln) effort, while others report something on the magnitude of JPY56 trillion.  Still, it is recognized that part of the budget will include funds that were earmarked under previous budgets, which have not been spent.  The clear water is seen around JPY32 trillion.  Japan is one of the few countries that will provide new fiscal support.   New Zealand's central bank meets next week.  It is widely expected to hike rates for the second time in the cycle.   The swaps market has 200 bp of tightening priced in for the next 12 months.  The cash rate stands at 50 bp.  Earlier today, the central bank reported that the two-year inflation expectations (business survey)  rose to 2.96% in Q4 from 2.27% in Q3.  It is the highest in a decade.  The one-year expectation rose to 3.7% from 3.02%.  Still, with other countries slower to raise rates, a 50 bp move may not be necessary.  The Kiwi rose almost 4% last month and has given back nearly half so far in November.  Separately, the Philippines and Indonesia central banks met and left rates steady as expected.   The dollar posted a key reversal against the yen yesterday.  It made a new high for the move, a few pips below JPY115.00, and proceeded to sell-off and close (slightly) below Tuesday's low.  However, follow-through selling has been limited, and the greenback is trading firmly but may be absorbing sales related to the $1.34 bln in options in the JPY114.20-JPY114.25 area that expire today.  The Australian dollar initially extended its losses to almost $0.7250, where a A$575 mln option expires today. However, since early in the Asian session, it has posted corrective upticks and looks set to challenge yesterday's high and five-day moving average a little above $0.7300.   The Chinese yuan appears to have begun consolidating.  It remains in the range set on Tuesday that saw the dollar trade roughly between CNY6.3670 and CNY6.3965.  The small gain is the third this week.  The PBOC fix was at CNY6.3803, a bit firmer compared with expectations (CNY6.3786 in the Bloomberg survey) than seen recently.  Note that there is a $1 bln option at CNY6.3830 that expires today.   Europe The auto industry in Europe remained under pressure last month, though the US reported its first increase in sales in six months.  New car registration in Europe, including the UK, is a proxy for sales.  They tumbled by slightly more than 30% year-over-year in October.  This is considerably weaker than expected and is the poorest since May 2020.  The shortage of semiconductors is the likely culprit, and there are some signs of improvement.  The EC will propose modest tweaks in rules about how funds outside of its borders (UK) can be managed while avoiding more dramatic changes.   Draft proposals call for at least two full-time senior managers in the EU and for regulators to be notified when most of their assets are managed outside the EU.  These seem quite minor and unlikely to disrupt the UK fund business.  Earlier this month, the EU Commissioner for Financial Services indicated that temporary waivers would be granted to allow EU banks and money managers to clear trades in the UK. Meanwhile, the dispute over fishing appears to be worsening (Denmark complaining, not just France), and the UK continues to threaten to invoke Article 16.  Former Prime Minister Blair says he will propose a solution to the dispute over the Northern Ireland Protocol in the coming days.  Hungary delivered a 30 bp hike in the base rate earlier this week, which now stands at 2.10%.  It warned that it could make a separate decision on its one-week deposit rate.  It did so today, hiking it 70 bp to 2.50%.  It is a hawkish move that sent the forint higher.  Separately, as widely expected, the Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey cut the one-week repo rate 100 bps to 15%. As a result, the lira is weaker for the eighth consecutive session.  The lira's weakness not only fuels inflation but also will challenge companies and banks with foreign exchange exposure.  The dollar finished last month near TRY9.60 and after the rate hike, pushed above TRY10.97 before stabilizing.   The euro overshot the (61.8%) retracement target of the rally that took it from near $1.0640 in March 2020 to high on January 6, around $1.2350.  That retracement target was about $1.1290, and the euro fell to around $1.1265 yesterday. It recovered to new session highs early in North America yesterday (~$1.1330), leaving bullish hammer candlestick, and follow-through buying lifted it to $1.1345 today.  The combination of higher inflation and stronger retail sales this week have helped sterling to recover.  It had traded near $1.3350 at the end of last week and has barely traded below $1.34 this week.  Indeed, sterling is rising today for the fifth consecutive session, the longest advance in nearly seven months.  It poked above $1.35, where an option for about GBP345 mln will expire today.  A convincing move above $1.3515 could signal another cent advance.  The euro slipped to below GBP0.8385 today before recovering.  It is testing the GBP0.8400, which holds options for 1.1 bln euros that also expires today.   America Leave aside the gaffes by President Biden over Taiwan.  Bloomberg counts four such verbal blunders that have required official walk back or explanation or clarification.  Reports indicate that Biden probed Xi about oil sales.  China has intervened in the commodities (industrial metals) and crude oil market recently.  Today it indicated it will provide more oil from its strategic reserves.  The September is action 7.1 mln barrels, according to reports, and privately sold more.  It is unclear whether today's sales were planned or grew out of the "virtual summit."  Still, it puts the ball back into the US court.  If the US does not sell or lend oil from its strategic reserves, it will look bad after China's move.  On the other hand, its own agency (EIA) projects that it may not be needed as oil will be in oversupply shortly.  Moreover, the pain for consumers is coming from gasoline prices, not oil per se.  Drawing down strategic reserves may not help the gasoline market.  Apparently, Japan has been approached by the US about coordinating the release of oil, though Europe was not.  The US reports weekly initial jobless claims today.  They have fallen for six consecutive weeks, and at 267k, it is the lowest since the pandemic struck.   That said, at the end of 2019, there were below 220k.  The Philadelphia and Kansas City Feds publish their November survey results.  Both surprised last month, with the former on the downside and the latter on the upside.  This time it may be the other way around, with the Philly survey showing strength and the KC survey softer.  Canada reports its monthly portfolio flow data ahead of tomorrow's retail sales report.  Mexico and Brazil have light economic calendars.   Canada's Prime Minister Trudeau and Mexico's President AMLO visit Washington today for the North America's Leaders Summit.  There is tension among the "three amigos."  The Build Back Better US initiative contains several elements that favor American producers. A key one is that substantial tax break for Americans buying electric vehicles if they are made in the US.  This would seem to put Canada and Mexico at a disadvantage, given the integration of the auto sector on a continental basis. Mexico and Canada are also concerned that the Biden Administration's interpretation of the domestic content requirement in the USMCA treaty is also narrow and puts them at a disadvantage.   Canada is also concerned about the pipelines after Biden nixed the Keystone Pipeline in one of his first acts in office, and the Line 5 pipeline is being challenged by Michigan.  The US, and to a less extent, Canada, is worried about the efforts by AMLO to increase the power of the state sector energy companies (oil and electricity), deterring private sector efforts.  The US may try pressing against this on environmental grounds.  Climate and immigration are reportedly on the top of today's agenda.  The US dollar reversed higher against the Canadian dollar on Tuesday, posting an outside up day.  Follow-through buying yesterday lifted the greenback a little above CAD1.2620.  It ticked ever so slightly higher today but has come back offered.  Support is seen in the CAD1.2555-CAD1.2575 area.  The $1.04 bln option at CAD1.25 that expires today is too far away to be impactful. Meanwhile, the US dollar remains within Tuesday's range against the Mexican peso (~MXN20.56-MXN20.85).  This range looks set to hold today.   Disclaimer
Monthly Macro Outlook: The transitory narrative continues to fall apart

Monthly Macro Outlook: The transitory narrative continues to fall apart

Christopher Dembik Christopher Dembik 19.11.2021 09:25
Summary:  The economist consensus anticipates inflation will start falling from early next year. We disagree. We consider the market to be too complacent regarding upside risks to the inflation outlook. The great awakening of workers and the steady rent increase (for the United States) are two of the factors which are likely to maintain inflation uncomfortably high into 2022, in our view. October CPI figures released earlier this week confirm that inflationary pressures may last longer than initially expected. Inflation reached levels which have not been seen for decades in the United Kingdom (+4.2% YoY), in the eurozone (+4.1% YoY) and in Canada (+4.7% YoY). In Canada, the jump in inflation is the strongest recorded in 18 years. For now, investors are confident. They believe the U.S. Federal Reserve and European Central Bank’s narrative that inflation will start to fall from early next year. This is far from certain, in our view. From supply chain bottlenecks to energy prices, everything suggests that inflationary pressures are far from over. Expect energy prices to continue increasing as temperatures will drop in Europe from next week onwards. This will weigh on November CPI data which will be released next month. The peak in inflation has not been reached. We fear investors are too complacent regarding upside risks to the inflation outlook. Every economic theory says inflation will be above 2% next year : ·         The Phillips curve is alive and well : workers are demanding higher salaries, amongst other advantages and their expectations are rising. ·         Monetarism : the global economy is characterized by large deposits, desire to spend and to convert cash into real assets. ·         Commitment approach : the U.S. Federal Reserve (Fed) and the European Central bank (ECB) have a dovish bias. This is confirmed by their new inflation strategy (symmetric 2% inflation target over the medium term for the ECB and inflation of 2% over the longer run for the Fed). ·         Fiscal approach : high public debt and fiscal dominance (central banks need to remain dominant market players in the bond market to avoid a sharp increase in interest rates). ·         Supply-side approach : supply bottlenecks due to the zero Covid policy in China and central banks’ trade off higher inflation for a speedier economic recovery (the ECB especially). ·         Green transition : this is basically a tax on consumers. What has changed ? The wage-price spiral has started. In countries where the labor market is tight, workers are asking for higher salaries. In the United States, the manufacturer John Deere increased salaries significantly : +10% this year and +5% in 2023 and in 2025. It also agreed to a 3% bonus on even years to all employees, for instance. But this is happening in countries where the unemployment rate is high too. In France, the unemployment rate is falling. But it remains comparatively elevated at 7.6% in the third quarter. Earlier this week, the French Minister of Economy, Bruno Le Maire, called for higher salaries in the hospitality industry. A survey by the public investment bank BPI and the pro-business institute Rexecode show that 26% of small and medium companies are forced to propose higher salaries to find employees. Those which are reluctant choose to reduce business activity. The pandemic has fueled a great awakening of workers, in our view. They are demanding more : better job conditions, higher wages, more flexibility and purpose from work. This is more noticeable in countries facing labor shortage. But it is also visible in all the other developed economies to a variable extent.   U.S. steady rent increase is a game-changer. Until now, supply bottlenecks were the main driver behind the jump in prices. Now, housing costs (which represent about a third of living cost) and prices in the service sector are accelerating too. The rental market is tight, with low vacancy rates and a limited stock of available rentals. Expect rents to move upward in the coming months. According to official figures, owner’s equivalent rent, a measure of what homeowners believe their properties would rent for, rose 3.1% YoY in October. This certainly underestimates the real evolution of rents. Based on data reported by real estate agents at national level, the increase is between 7% and 15% YoY. All in all, this reinforces the view that inflationary pressures are proving more persistent than expected. The moment of truth : Expect investors not to question much the official narrative that inflation is transitory, for now. But if inflation does not decrease from 2022 onwards, investors will have to adjust their portfolio to an environment of more persistent inflation than initially anticipated. This may lead to market turmoil. In the interim, enjoy the Santa Claus rally which has started very early this year. The new inflation regime in the United States
Covid Wave Knocks Euro Down and to new 6-year Lows Against the Swiss Franc

Covid Wave Knocks Euro Down and to new 6-year Lows Against the Swiss Franc

Marc Chandler Marc Chandler 19.11.2021 13:58
Overview:  Concerns about the virus surge in Europe cut short the euro's bounce and sent it back below $1.1300 and are also weighing on central European currencies, including the Hungarian forint, despite yesterday's aggressive hike of the one-week deposit rate.  Austria has reintroduced a hard 20-day lockdown.  Germany's health minister warned that the situation deteriorated and vaccines were not enough to break the wave.  He was explicit that a lockdown cannot be ruled out.  The US dollar is trading broadly higher.  Only the yen is resilient on the day, but sterling is the only major currency that has edged higher this week.  The Scandis and euro are off more than 1%.  Speculation that Turkey may announce measures over the weekend to stabilize the lira may be helping to deter new sales today after yesterday's rout.  In the nine-day drop through today, it is depreciated by almost 15%.  The JP Morgan Emerging Market Currency Index is off for the fourth consecutive session to bring this week's loss to more than 2%, the most in five months.  Equities do not know of the consternation in the foreign exchange market.  Disappointing Alibaba results weighed on the Hang Seng (~-1%), while most other large regional bourses but Taiwan and India closed the week on an up note.   Europe's Stoxx 600 snapped a six-day advance yesterday. It was only the second loss since October.  It began firmer today but has reversed lower, putting at risk the six-week rally.   US futures are mixed, with the NASDAQ outperforming.  Bond markets are in rally mode as well.   The US 10-year yield is off three basis points to approach the week's low near 1.53%.  European bonds are off mostly 3-5 basis points, even in the UK, where retail sales surprised on the upside.  Gold is steady, finding support near $1850.  Oil initially extended yesterday's recovery but is reversing lower, leaving the January WTI contract set to test yesterday's low near $76.45.  This is the fourth consecutive weekly fall in crude oil.  European natural gas (Netherlands benchmark) is off 4.4% today, the third drop in a row, and pares the week's gain to almost 19%.  In Singapore, iron ore prices jumped 5.7% to break a five-week slide that saw prices tumble by about 28%.   Copper is firmer and paring this week's loss to around 2%.   Asia Pacific There were two developments in Japan to note.  First, October CPI was largely in line with expectations.  Surging gasoline prices (seven-year highs) helped keep the headline rate positive for the second month (0.1% year-over-year).  Excluding fresh food, the core rate was steady at 0.1%.  However, the deflationary forces are evident when fresh food and energy are removed.  The measure deteriorated to -0.7% from -0.5%, the most since June (-0.9%).    Second, Prime Minister Kishida unveiled an overall package of JPY78.9 trillion (~$690 bln). It is larger than the previous two pandemic packages. "Fiscal measures" refer to spending, investment, and loans, and this is seen worth about JPY55.7 trillion.  It is not clear yet, how much represents new spending as opposed to the reallocation of funds from earlier budgets that were not used. However, it appears to be about JPY32 trillion of new spending.   The Chinese yuan, up a modest 2.1% for the year, is the strongest currency.   Against a trade-weighted basket (CFETS), the yuan is pulling back from a six-year high set earlier this week as the euro recovers a cent.  Consider that the yuan has appreciated by more than 9% against the euro and 11.5% against the yen this year.  That means that investment in China has the same tailwind as the dollar and is compensated a bit for the relative lack of transparency and liquidity.  The Financial Times estimates that foreign holdings of Chinese bonds and stocks rose to around $1.1 trillion at the end of September, about a 13% increase this year.  China's stock market has underperformed this year, and the CSI 300 is off around 7% this year.  On the other hand, China's bonds have fared well.  It is the only 10-year bond that has not weakened this year.  China's figures show foreign direct investment has risen by almost 18% this year through October to nearly $142 bln.   The dollar is posting an outside down day against the Japanese yen by first rising above yesterday's high before reversing and taking out yesterday's low. It is approaching the week's low near JPY113.75 in the European morning.  Below there, support is seen around JPY113.60.  A break would warn of a return to JPY113.00.  The Australian dollar has been sold to its lowest level since October 6, when it recorded a low of almost $0.7225.   It has broken the trendline that connected the August and September lows (~$0.7250).  The September low was around $0.7170 and maybe the next important technical target.  The dollar is trading with a firmer bias against the Chinese yuan, but the greenback remains in the range set on Tuesday (~CNY6.3670-CNY6.3965).  The dollar gained on the yuan four sessions this week, the most since July, but the net gain of less than 0.2% still shows an extraordinarily steady exchange rate.   With the yuan near six-year highs against its trade-weighted basket (CFETS), the PBOC warned against one-way moves and encouraged financial institutions to bolster fx risk management.  It set the dollar's reference rate at CNY6.3825, slightly above expectations (Bloomberg survey) for CNY6.3822.   Europe The stronger than expected October retail sales capped the week's data that points to a rebounding economy and boosts the chances of a rate hike next month.  A strong jobs report was followed by a larger than expected rise in CPI and PPI.  Retail sales jumped 0.8% in October, and the September series was revised to flat from -0.2%. It was the first increase since April.  Pre-Xmas sales were reported.  Separately, the UK government reported that the cost of servicing the national debt has risen more than three-fold over the past year, leaving the budget deficit higher than anticipated.  It appears that the swaps market is pricing in a 15 bp hike at the December 16 BOE meeting, though some are talking about a bigger move.    Several ECB officials, including President Lagarde, have successfully pushed back against expectations of a 20 bp rate hike next year that had appeared discounted by the swaps market earlier this month. The market has pushed it into early 2023.  The implied yield of the December 2022 Euribor futures contract has fallen 20 bp this month.  The December 2022 Eurodollar futures contract is moving in the opposite direction.  The implied yield has risen by about 4.5 bp this month.  The net result is the US premium has increased to over 125 bp, the highest since last March.  In late 2019, the premium was around 180 bp.  This is recognized as a factor helping lift the dollar against the euro, and it appears to have become more salient recently.   The euro's bounce yesterday, its first gain in seven sessions (since the US CPI shocker), stalled near $1.1375, where a 780 mln euro option expires today.   The euro traded quietly in Asia before being sold aggressively as news of the virus hit the wires.  The euro traded through $1.1285 before catching a bid.  Resistance now will likely be encountered around $1.1320.  The euro is posting its first back-to-back weekly of more than 1% since March 2020.  Sterling is also sliding back toward the week's lows, just above $1.3400.  A break could signal a test on the $1.3350 area, but it appears stretched on an intraday basis.  While the euro-sterling cross is practically flat, the euro has punched below CHF1.05 for the first time in six years.  It would not be surprising to learn that the SNB has been intervening.  There appears to be little chart support until closer to CHF1.0250. America The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office offered its evaluation of the Biden administration's Build Back Better initiative.  It sees $1.636 trillion in spending over the next decade and almost $1.27 trillion in revenue.  That leaves a deficit of $367 bln.  A notable difference between it and the administration is how much more revenue will be generated by increasing the number of IRS agents.  Even if it passes the House of Representatives, it will likely be marked up in the Senate.  The jockeying for position and spin around it will likely dominate the session, which sees no US economic reports outside of the rig count later today.  The Fed's Clarida and Waller speaker today.  It seems that most market participants still see the Fed behind the curve and disagree with our idea that to secure the ability to respond to a wide range of possible outcomes, the Federal Reserve may accelerate its tapering starting in January.   It is not clear exactly when the debt ceiling will be reached, but it is being played.  The Democrats do not want to lift it through the reconciliation process, though they have forced the Republicans to do so in the past.  The Republicans appear to have the discipline and will to oppose.  No one seems to think the US will really default, and getting even this close seems undignified.  Yet, the desire to avoid being caught out encouraged investors to demand a high yield on the four-week bill sold.  Yesterday's auction saw the yield more than double to 11 bp (annualized).  It is the highest yield since July 2020.  In contrast, the eight-week bill, which is thought to be beyond the shenanigans, yield slipped to 4.5 bp from six previously and a higher bid-cover ratio.   Canada reports September retail sales figures today.  After a 2.1% rise in August, some weakness is expected.  Ahead of it, the Canadian dollar is trading at new lows for the week, though it is faring better than the other dollar-bloc currencies.  The US dollar is approaching the (61.8%) retracement objective of the decline since the CAD1.29 level was tested on September 20.  The retracement level is near CAD1.2665, and a break would target CAD1.2700-CAD1.2750.  The upper  Bollinger Band is found near CAD1.2655 today.   The Mexican peso is also under pressure.  It, too, has fallen to a new low for the week today.  The greenback looks set to test the eight-month high set earlier this month near MXN20.98.  Note that the central bank's Deputy Governor warned that inflation was accelerating, and it could rise to 7% this month and 7.1%-7.3% next month.  In October, the CPI stood at 6.24% year-over-year.  Banxico meets next on December 16, the day after the FOMC meeting.  Lastly, we note that the Brazilian real is off for four consecutive sessions coming into today.  The dollar closed above its 20-day moving average against it yesterday and looks poised to probe above BRL5.60 today. The high for the month was closer to BRL5.70.   Disclaimer
Market Quick Take - November 19, 2021

Market Quick Take - November 19, 2021

Saxo Bank Saxo Bank 19.11.2021 10:43
Summary:  Equity markets charged higher in the US session to close at new record highs, and the upside extended further in the futures market overnight. In FX, the recent USD strength eased slightly, while oil prices are creeping back higher despite the recent fears of strategic reserve releases. Markets are nervously awaiting the announcement of who US President Biden will nominate to head the Fed after the current Powell term ends in February. What is our trading focus? Nasdaq 100 (USNAS100.I) and S&P 500 (US500.I) - US equities pushed to new all-time highs yesterday led by technology stocks and strong macro figures across manufacturing surveys and job market data such as jobless claims. Nasdaq 100 futures are trading around the 16,560 level in early European trading with the 16,500 being the intraday day support level. A recent survey among institutional investors shows that a majority is believing in the transitory inflation narrative which can help explain why investors in equities are looking through the latest inflation pressures. EURUSD and EURGBP – the beleaguered euro finally bounced back a bit after its recent remarkable slide, although it is tough to see what could engineer a reversal of the move below the 1.1500 level, which is the key chart resistance now, although Biden announcing Brainard as his pick to head the Fed next February could drive considerable short-term volatility. To stop the euro from a persistent slide, we would need a very different tone from the ECB than it has delivered recently, with no real opportunity to do so until the December 16 ECB meeting. With power prices and a new Covid wave weighing on the outlook, the ECB will very likely be happy to stay firmly dovish. USDJPY – the highs for the cycle near the psychologically important 115.00 look safe as long as US treasury yields at the longer end of the curve remain rangebound, but trading above that level could get volatile if it is broken, as some options structures may be linked to its breaking or not breaking. The next test for the price action is clearly the Fed Chair nomination that appears imminent – possibly today or over the weekend (more below in What are we watching next?). Gold (XAUUSD) has spent the week trading within a relatively narrow range between $1850 and $1870 as it awaits a fresh catalyst following last week’s breakout. The impressive rally that occurred despite headwind from a stronger dollar has stalled with bond yields picking up and the market wondering how the US Federal Reserve will manage the current inflation spike. Silver and especially platinum have both struggled to keep up with gold while ETF investors have yet to show any interest in accumulating exposure. All developments raising the risk of a retracement towards the $1830-35 key area of support. Crude oil (OILUKJAN22 & OILUSDEC21) managed to recover yesterday after the market brushed aside the potential negative price impact of a US SPR release. US attempts to attract wider support from other major importing countries seems to have fallen flat, except for China who is “working” on a release. Having dropped more than five dollars since speculation began, the market has concluded for now that the price impact of a release could be limited. The market, however, may still have to deal with the recent updates from EIA and IEA, in which they both forecast current tight market conditions could start to ease early next year as well as renewed Covid-related reductions in mobility. US Treasuries (IEF, TLT). Yesterday’s 10-year US TIPS auction stopped through, pricing at a record low yield at -1.145%. It is a signal that investors are ever more concerned about inflation risk.  The Treasury also sold 4-week and 8-week T-Bills. While the latter was priced in line with the Reverse Repurchase facility, 4-week T-Bills priced with a yield of 0.11%, more than double the RRP rate. As we approach the day in which the Treasury will run out of cash, we expect volatility in the money market to increase, while long-term yields will remain compressed as they will serve as a safe haven. In the meantime, the move index continues to rise indicating that the bond market remains on the hedge. What is going on? Central Bank of Turkey cut another 100 basis points from the policy rate, lira plunge extends. The Turkish lira has lost more than 10% versus the US dollar this week and trades well over 11.00 after Turkish President Erdogan earlier this week declared himself once again against high interest rates, which he believes cause inflation. Central bank chief Kavcioglu, who is seen as doing Erdogan’s bidding, cut rates for a third time by 1.0% to take the policy rate to 15%, but with the Turkish lira losing over 10% this week alone and more than 30% since Erdogan fired the prior more hawkish central bank head in favour of Kavcioglu, inflation will run far beyond the rate. Not even some guidance that the easing cycle may conclude in December was enough to halt the lira’s slide. US Nov. Philly Fed survey hits 39.0, a very hot reading and fourth highest ever - with Prices Paid at 80 and just missing the 42-year high of 80.7 in June, although the Prices Received was at 62.9, the highest since 1974. Special survey questions in the Novemer  survey included one on inflation expectations, with firms expecting a median 5.3% increase in their own prices, and an increase in wages of 4.8%. The median forecast for 10-year inflation was 3.5%, up from the 3.0% the last time the question was asked in August. The Bloomberg Agriculture Index hit a fresh five-year high this week with food prices likely to stay high in 2022 with labor shortages, La Ninã weather impacts, surging cost of fertilizers being the common denominator across the sector. Recent gains being led by coffee, which we highlighted earlier in the week as a commodity currently seeing multiple price supportive developments. Wheat is heading for a nine-year high in Chicago while hitting record highs in Europe with inventories tumbling amid strong demand from importers and now also a rain threat to the soon-to-be harvested Australian crop. Soybeans have seen a strong bounce after the latest WASDE report showed a tighter than expected outlook for the coming year, and following a recent rush of Chinese buying from the US and South America. Apple doubles down on self-driving cars. The company is aiming to develop fully autonomous driving capabilities for cars by 2025 under the project name Titan. Apple has developed its own chip and is aiming to soon have a car on the roads for testing. However, delivering self-driving cars is a difficult endeavor with Uber Technologies having sold its unit and Waymo (Google’s unit) has been struck by fatigue and key people leaving the project. Tesla is also still struggling to deliver self-driving cars. What are we watching next? Who will US President Biden nominate to head the Fed next February? Powell is still seen as more likely to get the nod that Brainard by roughly two to one, and this Fed Chair nomination issue is hanging over the markets, as the current Fed chair term ends in early February and from comments made earlier this week, an announcement could be made any day now. One uncertainty that would come with a Brainard nomination is the potential difficulty of having her nomination approved by the Senate. The nomination news could generate significant short-term volatility on the choice of the nominally more dovish Lael Brainard over current Fed Chair Powell, though we see little difference in the medium-longer term implications for monetary policy, and the Fed is likely to get a prominent new regulatory role either way (under Brainard or someone else if she is nominated to replace Powell). Vote on $1.7 trillion US fiscal bill today in the House of Representatives after the Congressional Budget office said the bill, which focuses on social spending and climate initiatives, would add some $367 billion to the US Federal deficit (around 1.5% of current US nominal GDP) over the next 10 years. Earnings Watch – there are no important earnings today and this earnings week has been good in the US and Europe, while a bit more mixed among Chinese companies. The list below shows earnings releases next week. Monday: Sino Pharmaceutical, Prosus, Zoom Video, Agilent TechnologiesTuesday: Xiaomi, Kuaishou Technology, Compass Group, Medtronic, Analog Devices, Autodesk, VMWare, Dell Technologies, XPeng, HP, Best Buy, Dollar TreeWednesday: DeereThursday: AdevintaFriday: Meituan, Pinduoduo Economic calendar highlights for today (times GMT) 0830 – ECB President Lagarde to speak1200 – UK Bank of England Chief Economist Huw Pill to speak1330 – Canada Sep. Retail Sales1715 – US Fed Vice Chair Clarida to speak on global monetary policy coordination Follow SaxoStrats on the daily Saxo Markets Call on your favorite podcast app: Apple Spotify Soundcloud Sticher
We Might Say Next FED Moves Are Not Obvious As Some Factors Differentiate Circumstances

Silver, shrugging off attacks

Korbinian Koller Korbinian Koller 20.11.2021 13:32
Weekly chart, Silver in US-Dollar, strong along gold: Silver in US-Dollar, weekly chart as of November 20th, 2021. The weekly chart illustrates price behavior over the last 15 months. Silver prices are trading near the center of the sideways range. Gold in US-Dollar, weekly chart, rumors shrugged off: Gold in US-Dollar, weekly chart as of November 20th, 2021. The weekly chart of gold isn’t much different from where prices stand. In short, there is no evidence that gold has lost its luster. Otherwise, we would see silver trading in a relationship much lower. Rumors are just that – rumors! Silver is shrugging them off. Silver in US-Dollar, quarterly chart, room to go: Silver in US-Dollar, quarterly chart as of November 20th, 2021. A historical review with a quarterly chart over the last eighteen years reveals that silver prices can sustain extreme extensions from the mean (yellow line) for extended periods. Using the extreme of the second quarter in 2011 as a projective measurement (orange vertical line) for an upcoming target would provide for a price target more than 10% above all-time highs at US$56. In addition, the chart shows that we find ourselves in a strong quarter so far, which is in alignment with cyclical probabilities. Silver in US-Dollar, weekly chart, prepping the play: Silver in US-Dollar, weekly chart as of November 20th, 2021. Trade setup Let us return to the weekly time frame for a possible low-risk entry scenario with this target in mind.We find a supply zone based on fractal transactional volume analysis near the price of US$24.11 and US$22.65. Both attractive entry zones for excellent risk/reward-ratio plays.   Phase 1 drilling program at Guigui discovered not only the largest intrusive ever found in the district, but it’s the first mineralized skarn ever seen in Guigui! Silver, shrugging off attacks: It will not be rumors, doubts, and speculations that will be the catalyst for silvers’ success or failure. It isn’t a question of “if,” but just a question of “when” we will see the next massive price advance in this precious metal. The odds are stacked too much in favor of a continued price movement up that the long-term investor should let doubts allow for diverging from a splendid opportunity to partake in wealth preservation and a very profitable way to participate in a chance rarely presented this prominent. Feel free to join us in our free Telegram channel for daily real time data and a great community. If you like to get regular updates on our gold model, precious metals and cryptocurrencies you can also subscribe to our free newsletter. This article does not contain investment advice or recommendations. Every investment and trading move involves risk, and readers should conduct their own research when making a decision. The views, thoughts and opinions expressed here are the author’s alone. They do not necessarily reflect or represent the views and opinions of Midas Touch Consulting. By Korbinian Koller|November 20th, 2021|Tags: Crack-Up-Boom, Gold, Gold bullish, Gold/Silver-Ratio, inflation, low risk, Silver, silver bull, Silver Chartbook, silversqueeze, technical analysis, time frame, trading principles|0 Comments About the Author: Korbinian Koller Outstanding abstract reasoning ability and ability to think creatively and originally has led over the last 25 years to extract new principles and a unique way to view the markets resulting in a multitude of various time frame systems, generating high hit rates and outstanding risk reward ratios. Over 20 years of coaching traders with heart & passion, assessing complex situations, troubleshoot and solve problems principle based has led to experience and a professional history of success. Skilled natural teacher and exceptional developer of talent. Avid learner guided by a plan with ability to suppress ego and empower students to share ideas and best practices and to apply principle-based technical/conceptual knowledge to maximize efficiency. 25+ year execution experience (50.000+ trades executed) Trading multiple personal accounts (long and short-and combinations of the two). Amazing market feel complementing mechanical systems discipline for precise and extreme low risk entries while objectively seeing the whole picture. Ability to notice and separate emotional responses from the decision-making process and to stand outside oneself and one’s concerns about images in order to function in terms of larger objectives. Developed exit strategies that compensate both for maximizing profits and psychological ease to allow for continuous flow throughout the whole trading day. In depth knowledge of money management strategies with the experience of multiple 6 sigma events in various markets (futures, stocks, commodities, currencies, bonds) embedded in extreme low risk statistical probability models with smooth equity curves and extensive risk management as well as extensive disaster risk allow for my natural capacity for risk-taking.
COT: Solid gold buying raising short term concerns

COT: Solid gold buying raising short term concerns

Ole Hansen Ole Hansen 22.11.2021 11:35
Summary:  This summary highlights futures positions and changes made by hedge funds across commodities, forex and financials up until last Tuesday, November 16. The report shows the reaction to the US inflation shock on November 11 which among others drove strong demand for gold and more surprisingly a reduction in the dollar long. Also another strong week for most agriculture commodities with positions in coffee and KCB wheat hitting fresh multi-year highs Saxo Bank publishes weekly Commitment of Traders reports (COT) covering leveraged fund positions in commodities, bonds and stock index futures. For IMM currency futures and the VIX, we use the broader measure called non-commercial. Link to latest report This summary highlights futures positions and changes made by hedge funds across commodities, forex and financials up until last Tuesday, November 16. A week where the market responded to the US inflation shock on November 11 by sending  the dollar up by 2% to fresh high for the cycle while 10-year breakeven yields jumped 20 basis point a decade high. While bond market volatility jumped, stocks held steady with the VIX showing a small decline. The commodity sector was mixed with gains in precious metals and not least grains and soft commodities helping offset weakness across the energy sector.  Commodities Hedge funds raised their total commodity exposure, measured in lots, across 24 major futures contracts by the most since July. Driven by continued strong price action across the agriculture sector and more recently also precious metals in response to surging inflation. These sectors saw all but one market being bought while the energy sector were mixed with continued selling of crude oil only being partly offset by demand for gasoline and natural gas. Energy: Crude oil’s four week slide resulted in the biggest weekly reduction since July, and this time, as opposed to recent weeks, it was WTI that led the reduction with a 10% cut to 307k apart from a deteriorating short-term technical outlook also being driven the prospect of a US stockpile release to dampen domestic gasoline prices. Brent meanwhile saw its net long slump to a one-year low at 221.5k lots, and during the past six weeks the net length has now slumped by one-third, a reduction which gathered momentum after the late October failure to break the 2018 high at $86.75, now a double top. Crude oil comment from our daily Market Quick Take: Crude oil (OILUKJAN22 & OILUSDEC21) opened softer in Asia after Friday’s big drop but has so far managed to find support at $77.85, the previous top from July. The market focus has during the past few weeks shifted from the current tight supply to the risk of a coordinated reserve release, fears about a renewed Covid-driven slowdown in demand and recent oil market reports from the EIA and IEA pointing to a balanced market in early 2022. Having dropped by around 10% from the recent peak, the market may have started to conclude that a SPR release has mostly been price in by now. Metals: Another week of strong gold buying has now raised the alarm bells given the risk of long liquidation should the yellow metal fail to hold onto its US CPI price boost above $1830. Last week the net long in gold reached a 14-month high at 164k lots and the speed of the accumulation, especially the 70% jump during the past two weeks alone carries, will be raising a red flag for tactical trading strategies looking for pay day on short positions should support give way.  Gold extended Friday’s drop below $1850 overnight, before bouncing ahead of key support in the mentioned $1830-35 area. The risk of a quicker withdrawal of Fed stimulus supporting real yields and the dollar has for now reduced gold's ability to build on the technical breakout. However, the price softness on Friday helped attract ETF buying with Bloomberg reporting a 10 tons increase, the biggest one-day jump since January 15. A second week of silver buying lifted the net to a four-week high at 35.9k lots, but still below the May peak at 47.8k lots. Copper’s rangebound trading behavior kept the price and the net long unchanged. The latter due to an even size addition of both new long and short positions. Agriculture: Broad gains across the grains market lifted the combined long across the six most traded contracts to a six-month high at 560k lots. Buyers returned to soybeans after the net long recently hit a 17-month low, the corn long was the biggest since May while the KCB wheat long at 60.6k lots was the highest since August 2018. Supported by an increasingly worrying supply outlook, coffee speculators lifted their net long by 16% to a five-year high at 55k lots. Cotton and sugar longs also rose while short-covering helped halve the cocoa net short. More on the reasons behind the current strength in wheat and coffee, and agriculture in general can be found in may recent update: Agriculture rally resumes led by coffee, wheat and sugar ForexIn a surprise response to the US inflation shock on November 11 speculators ended up making a small reduction in their overall dollar long against ten IMM futures and the Dollar index. Selling of euro in response to the 2.4% drop and a 161% increase in the sterling short to a 17 month high ended up being more than off-set by the buying of all other major currencies, most notably JPY and CHF. The result being a fifth weekly reduction in the dollar long to $21.3 billion, now down by 17% reduction from the near 30-month high reached during October. What is the Commitments of Traders report? The COT reports are issued by the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) and the ICE Exchange Europe for Brent crude oil and gas oil. They are released every Friday after the U.S. close with data from the week ending the previous Tuesday. They break down the open interest in futures markets into different groups of users depending on the asset class. Commodities: Producer/Merchant/Processor/User, Swap dealers, Managed Money and otherFinancials: Dealer/Intermediary; Asset Manager/Institutional; Leveraged Funds and otherForex: A broad breakdown between commercial and non-commercial (speculators) The reasons why we focus primarily on the behavior of the highlighted groups are: They are likely to have tight stops and no underlying exposure that is being hedged This makes them most reactive to changes in fundamental or technical price developments It provides views about major trends but also helps to decipher when a reversal is looming
COT Speculators drop British pound sterling bets to lowest level in 76-weeks

COT Speculators drop British pound sterling bets to lowest level in 76-weeks

Invest Macro Invest Macro 22.11.2021 11:46
November 20, 2021 By InvestMacro | COT | Data Tables | COT Leaders | Downloads | COT Newsletter Here are the latest charts and statistics for the Commitment of Traders (COT) data published by the Commodities Futures Trading Commission (CFTC). The latest COT data is updated through Tuesday November 16th 2021 and shows a quick view of how large traders (for-profit speculators and commercial entities) were positioned in the futures markets. All currency positions are in direct relation to the US dollar where, for example, a bet for the euro is a bet that the euro will rise versus the dollar while a bet against the euro will be a bet that the euro will decline versus the dollar. Highlighting the COT Currency data this week is the second straight decline in British pound sterling speculative positions. The pound sterling speculator contracts dropped sharply for the second consecutive week this week and have now fallen by a total of -46,646 contracts over just this two-week time period. These declines have pushed the overall speculative position into a bearish sentiment level of -31,599 contracts which marks the lowest standing of the past seventy-six weeks, dating back to June 2nd of 2020. The GBPUSD currency pair has been under pressure since the middle of October and fallen from around 1.3800 exchange rate to just above the 1.3435 level currently, a drop of almost 400 pips. Data Snapshot of Forex Market Traders | Columns Legend Nov-16-2021 OI OI-Index Spec-Net Spec-Index Com-Net COM-Index Smalls-Net Smalls-Index EUR 705,698 86 -3,826 34 -26,985 68 30,811 25 JPY 252,897 91 -93,126 10 115,758 94 -22,632 1 GBP 207,099 43 -31,599 51 41,182 54 -9,583 36 MXN 170,102 33 -47,655 2 46,127 99 1,528 50 AUD 166,688 57 -61,153 27 69,858 71 -8,705 31 CAD 148,955 30 8,709 62 -26,717 35 18,008 74 USD Index 59,387 88 34,908 86 -40,455 7 5,547 77 RUB 52,624 58 22,625 67 -23,936 31 1,311 70 CHF 49,320 27 -8,889 54 18,767 52 -9,878 34 NZD 42,945 30 13,965 95 -15,521 6 1,556 70 BRL 31,767 32 -15,698 48 15,743 54 -45 66 Bitcoin 13,648 78 -1,478 69 357 0 1,121 23   US Dollar Index Futures: The US Dollar Index large speculator standing this week was a net position of 34,908 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly lowering of -540 contracts from the previous week which had a total of 35,448 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bullish-Extreme with a score of 86.0 percent. The commercials are Bearish-Extreme with a score of 7.4 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bullish with a score of 77.2 percent. Free Reports: Top 5 Companies Added to Our Stock Watch List this Quarter - Here are the Stock Symbols that stood out so far in the fourth quarter of 2021. Get our Weekly Commitment of Traders Reports - See where the biggest traders (Hedge Funds and Commercial Hedgers) are positioned in the futures markets on a weekly basis.   US DOLLAR INDEX Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 80.8 3.4 12.8 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 22.0 71.5 3.5 – Net Position: 34,908 -40,455 5,547 – Gross Longs: 47,959 2,000 7,621 – Gross Shorts: 13,051 42,455 2,074 – Long to Short Ratio: 3.7 to 1 0.0 to 1 3.7 to 1 NET POSITION TREND:       – COT Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 86.0 7.4 77.2 – COT Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bullish-Extreme Bearish-Extreme Bullish NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX:       – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: 5.0 -2.7 -13.6   Euro Currency Futures: The Euro Currency large speculator standing this week was a net position of -3,826 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly reduction of -7,599 contracts from the previous week which had a total of 3,773 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bearish with a score of 33.8 percent. The commercials are Bullish with a score of 68.1 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bearish with a score of 25.4 percent. EURO Currency Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 28.1 57.3 12.8 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 28.6 61.1 8.4 – Net Position: -3,826 -26,985 30,811 – Gross Longs: 198,181 404,266 90,261 – Gross Shorts: 202,007 431,251 59,450 – Long to Short Ratio: 1.0 to 1 0.9 to 1 1.5 to 1 NET POSITION TREND:       – COT Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 33.8 68.1 25.4 – COT Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bearish Bullish Bearish NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX:       – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: 5.7 -5.2 -0.0   British Pound Sterling Futures: The British Pound Sterling large speculator standing this week was a net position of -31,599 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly lowering of -19,506 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -12,093 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bullish with a score of 51.2 percent. The commercials are Bullish with a score of 54.0 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bearish with a score of 35.8 percent. BRITISH POUND Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 24.4 61.4 11.3 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 39.6 41.5 15.9 – Net Position: -31,599 41,182 -9,583 – Gross Longs: 50,443 127,197 23,322 – Gross Shorts: 82,042 86,015 32,905 – Long to Short Ratio: 0.6 to 1 1.5 to 1 0.7 to 1 NET POSITION TREND:       – COT Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 51.2 54.0 35.8 – COT Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bullish Bullish Bearish NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX:       – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: -8.3 9.2 -8.1   Japanese Yen Futures: The Japanese Yen large speculator standing this week was a net position of -93,126 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly increase of 12,225 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -105,351 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bearish-Extreme with a score of 10.4 percent. The commercials are Bullish-Extreme with a score of 93.7 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bearish-Extreme with a score of 0.8 percent. JAPANESE YEN Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 9.7 80.5 8.6 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 46.6 34.7 17.6 – Net Position: -93,126 115,758 -22,632 – Gross Longs: 24,635 203,468 21,790 – Gross Shorts: 117,761 87,710 44,422 – Long to Short Ratio: 0.2 to 1 2.3 to 1 0.5 to 1 NET POSITION TREND:       – COT Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 10.4 93.7 0.8 – COT Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bearish-Extreme Bullish-Extreme Bearish-Extreme NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX:       – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: -18.4 15.5 -4.1   Swiss Franc Futures: The Swiss Franc large speculator standing this week was a net position of -8,889 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly rise of 8,154 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -17,043 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bullish with a score of 54.4 percent. The commercials are Bullish with a score of 52.0 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bearish with a score of 34.3 percent. SWISS FRANC Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 11.2 64.2 24.4 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 29.2 26.1 44.5 – Net Position: -8,889 18,767 -9,878 – Gross Longs: 5,502 31,663 12,048 – Gross Shorts: 14,391 12,896 21,926 – Long to Short Ratio: 0.4 to 1 2.5 to 1 0.5 to 1 NET POSITION TREND:       – COT Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 54.4 52.0 34.3 – COT Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bullish Bullish Bearish NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX:       – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: 11.9 -12.2 11.8   Canadian Dollar Futures: The Canadian Dollar large speculator standing this week was a net position of 8,709 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly rise of 3,605 contracts from the previous week which had a total of 5,104 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bullish with a score of 62.3 percent. The commercials are Bearish with a score of 34.9 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bullish with a score of 74.0 percent. CANADIAN DOLLAR Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 29.6 42.1 27.1 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 23.8 60.0 15.0 – Net Position: 8,709 -26,717 18,008 – Gross Longs: 44,147 62,689 40,389 – Gross Shorts: 35,438 89,406 22,381 – Long to Short Ratio: 1.2 to 1 0.7 to 1 1.8 to 1 NET POSITION TREND:       – COT Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 62.3 34.9 74.0 – COT Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bullish Bearish Bullish NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX:       – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: 29.6 -26.4 10.0   Australian Dollar Futures: The Australian Dollar large speculator standing this week was a net position of -61,153 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly gain of 2,271 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -63,424 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bearish with a score of 27.1 percent. The commercials are Bullish with a score of 71.0 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bearish with a score of 31.2 percent. AUSTRALIAN DOLLAR Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 18.5 67.2 11.8 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 55.1 25.3 17.1 – Net Position: -61,153 69,858 -8,705 – Gross Longs: 30,760 112,044 19,744 – Gross Shorts: 91,913 42,186 28,449 – Long to Short Ratio: 0.3 to 1 2.7 to 1 0.7 to 1 NET POSITION TREND:       – COT Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 27.1 71.0 31.2 – COT Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bearish Bullish Bearish NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX:       – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: 27.1 -29.0 24.4   New Zealand Dollar Futures: The New Zealand Dollar large speculator standing this week was a net position of 13,965 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly boost of 1,083 contracts from the previous week which had a total of 12,882 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bullish-Extreme with a score of 94.7 percent. The commercials are Bearish-Extreme with a score of 6.5 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bullish with a score of 69.7 percent. NEW ZEALAND DOLLAR Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 61.4 24.1 11.5 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 28.9 60.2 7.8 – Net Position: 13,965 -15,521 1,556 – Gross Longs: 26,388 10,349 4,923 – Gross Shorts: 12,423 25,870 3,367 – Long to Short Ratio: 2.1 to 1 0.4 to 1 1.5 to 1 NET POSITION TREND:       – COT Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 94.7 6.5 69.7 – COT Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bullish-Extreme Bearish-Extreme Bullish NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX:       – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: 9.9 -11.8 19.8   Mexican Peso Futures: The Mexican Peso large speculator standing this week was a net position of -47,655 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly gain of 752 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -48,407 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bearish-Extreme with a score of 1.5 percent. The commercials are Bullish-Extreme with a score of 98.8 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bearish with a score of 49.5 percent. MEXICAN PESO Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 41.1 55.3 3.1 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 69.2 28.2 2.2 – Net Position: -47,655 46,127 1,528 – Gross Longs: 69,984 94,074 5,245 – Gross Shorts: 117,639 47,947 3,717 – Long to Short Ratio: 0.6 to 1 2.0 to 1 1.4 to 1 NET POSITION TREND:       – COT Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 1.5 98.8 49.5 – COT Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bearish-Extreme Bullish-Extreme Bearish NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX:       – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: -5.5 5.6 -1.5   Brazilian Real Futures: The Brazilian Real large speculator standing this week was a net position of -15,698 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly decrease of -240 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -15,458 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bearish with a score of 47.6 percent. The commercials are Bullish with a score of 54.4 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bullish with a score of 66.3 percent. BRAZIL REAL Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 26.7 64.6 8.0 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 76.1 15.0 8.2 – Net Position: -15,698 15,743 -45 – Gross Longs: 8,468 20,507 2,545 – Gross Shorts: 24,166 4,764 2,590 – Long to Short Ratio: 0.4 to 1 4.3 to 1 1.0 to 1 NET POSITION TREND:       – COT Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 47.6 54.4 66.3 – COT Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bearish Bullish Bullish NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX:       – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: -17.9 19.3 -12.9   Russian Ruble Futures: The Russian Ruble large speculator standing this week was a net position of 22,625 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly advance of 1,922 contracts from the previous week which had a total of 20,703 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bullish with a score of 66.9 percent. The commercials are Bearish with a score of 30.7 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bullish with a score of 70.2 percent. RUSSIAN RUBLE Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 57.7 37.7 4.6 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 14.7 83.2 2.1 – Net Position: 22,625 -23,936 1,311 – Gross Longs: 30,357 19,849 2,418 – Gross Shorts: 7,732 43,785 1,107 – Long to Short Ratio: 3.9 to 1 0.5 to 1 2.2 to 1 NET POSITION TREND:       – COT Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 66.9 30.7 70.2 – COT Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bullish Bearish Bullish NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX:       – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: 5.2 -3.3 -20.9   Bitcoin Futures: The Bitcoin large speculator standing this week was a net position of -1,478 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly reduction of -11 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -1,467 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bullish with a score of 68.7 percent. The commercials are Bullish with a score of 71.4 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bearish with a score of 22.9 percent. BITCOIN Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 63.4 5.0 14.7 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 74.2 2.4 6.5 – Net Position: -1,478 357 1,121 – Gross Longs: 8,649 678 2,008 – Gross Shorts: 10,127 321 887 – Long to Short Ratio: 0.9 to 1 2.1 to 1 2.3 to 1 NET POSITION TREND:       – COT Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 68.7 71.4 22.9 – COT Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bullish Bullish Bearish NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX:       – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: 0.9 -20.8 4.5 Article By InvestMacro – Receive our weekly COT Reports by Email *COT Report: The COT data, released weekly to the public each Friday, is updated through the most recent Tuesday (data is 3 days old) and shows a quick view of how large speculators or non-commercials (for-profit traders) were positioned in the futures markets. The CFTC categorizes trader positions according to commercial hedgers (traders who use futures contracts for hedging as part of the business), non-commercials (large traders who speculate to realize trading profits) and nonreportable traders (usually small traders/speculators) as well as their open interest (contracts open in the market at time of reporting).See CFTC criteria here.
The Telegraph Publishes Misleading Story about Omicron

Covid Surge Compounds Monetary Divergence to give the Euro its Biggest Weekly Loss in Five Months

Marc Chandler Marc Chandler 22.11.2021 09:39
Strong US consumption and production figures kept the greenback well supported last week on the heels of the jump in CPI to 6.2%.  Meanwhile, the surge of Covid cases in Europe underscores the divergences with the US, sending the euro to new lows for the year.   At the same time, oil prices headed south for the fourth consecutive week, matching the longest decline in more than two years.  It did not favor the Norwegian krone, the weakest of the majors, with a 2.15% drop.  It brought this year's loss to almost 3.5%, despite it being the first G10 central bank to hike rate, with another likely next month.   The prospects of a Bank of England rate hike next month were lifted by the strong inflation and retail sales figures.  Sterling was the best performing major currency, rising a little more than 0.25% against the dollar.  It also traded at its best level against the euro since March 2020.  At the end of the week, the euro also broke down against the Swiss franc, trading below CHF1.05 for the first time since July 2015.   Japan's October CPI showed that excluding fresh food and energy, the world's third-largest economy has still not broken free of deflation's grip (-0.7% year-over-year).  A weaker yen is not a problem for Japanese policymakers or corporates.  Japan has averaged a monthly trade surplus this year through October of about JPY7.8 bln a month, hardly the stuff that should excite protectionists.  The BIS estimates that eurozone inflation would be closer to 1.5% than the 4.1% reported in October without the supply chain disruptions. The weakness of the euro does not appear problematic for the ECB either.  With the Fed already slowing the pace of its monetary accommodation, a stronger dollar reinforces the policy thrust. Even though net exports shaved Q3 growth by about 1.1 percentage points, it has yet to spur criticism, and September was a record shortfall.   Dollar Index:  The Dollar Index rose for the fourth consecutive week.  It met the (50%) retracement objective of its slide from March 2020 (~103.00) to the January 6 low (~89.20), which is found near 96.10.  DXY stalled ahead of the weekend, just shy of the high set in the middle of the week near 96.25. A move above there targets the next retracement (61.8%), which is close to 97.75.    The MACD is over-extended but still headed higher, while the Slow Stochastic appears to be turning lower.  Support is seen around 95.50.  The market seems to have discounted much of the good news for the dollar and Fed policy.  We note that the US 2-year yield fell almost six basis points last week.  That leaves it off about 4.5 bp this month, despite the strong CPI reading, robust retail sales, and industrial output figures. Euro: The divergence of monetary policy has been the critical weight on the euro, but at the end of last week, it seemed that surge in Covid cases in Europe helped drive the single currency to new lows. It fell to $1.1250 ahead of the weekend to take out the mid-week low near $1.1265.  The weekly loss of about 1.3% is the biggest in five months.  Recall that the $1.1290 area represented the (61.8%) retracement of the rally that began in March 2020.  The momentum indicators are stretched, but a possible bullish divergence is appearing in the Slow Stochastic. A cap seems to be forming around $1.1375.  After repeated tests, and much to the chagrin of the Swiss National Bank, the euro was sold through CHF1.05 ahead of the weekend for the first time since July 2015.  Given its modus operandi, the SNB is likely resisting.  There is little on the charts ahead of CHF1.0250.  In the second half of last week, the euro found support near GBP0.8385, its lowest level since March 2020.  Support is seen close to GBP0.8275-GBP0.8300.  Lastly,  the euro found support near JPY128.00, which has more or less withstood several tests since moving above there in February.   Japanese Yen:  The greenback recorded a new four-year high against the yen, less than a handful of pipis from JPY115 in the middle of last week.  It reversed lower and settled ever so slightly below the previous session's low to leave a key reversal in its wake.  It recorded the week's low ahead of the weekend near JPY113.60.  Since the dollar pushed above JPY112 early last month, we have suggested a JPY113-JPY115 trading range.  It did trade to about JPY112.75 on November 10 and 11 but snapped back into the range.  The US 10-year note futures (December contract) posted a key reversal in the middle of last week, too, and also ended the week at eight-session highs, which, of course, means lower yields.  The dollar-yen exchange rate still seems to be a range-bound creature, more the most part, and heavily influenced by external factors, like US 10-year yield and broader risk appetites.  British Pound:  Sterling outperformed the other major currencies last week, but the 0.3% gain is nothing to write home about.  It remained within the previous week's range. It was unable to sustain the upside momentum after approaching the (50%) retracement objective of the decline since the month's high and outside down day on November 4 (BOE meeting).  That retracement stands at $1.3525.  The strong CPI report on November 17 helped lift sterling to the week's high near $1.3515.  However, the underlying strength of the dollar proved too much, and ahead of the weekend, sterling traded a little below $1.3410.  The momentum indicators have turned higher, and as long as $1.3400 holds, sterling looks attractive.  However, the market appears to have a 15 bp hike at next month's meeting fully discounted.  While it remains a distinct possibility, if not a likelihood, but 100% confidence may leave sterling vulnerable to a reassessment.  Canadian Dollar:  The US dollar rose for the fourth consecutive week against the Canadian dollar, matching the longest advance since early last year.  With the pre-weekend gain, the greenback met the  (61.8%) retracement objective of decline since CAD1.29 was approached on September 20, found near CAD1.2665. The US dollar's broad strength, coupled with the stock market wobble (a proxy for risk), and the drop in crude prices by around 4.25%, the fourth consecutive weekly decline shaved about 0.75% off the Canadian dollar.  The implied yield of the June 2022 Banker Acceptances fell last week and is now about 10 bp lower than at the end of last month.  The MACD is headed up though over-extended, while the Slow Stochastic has flatlined at extreme levels and has not yet confirmed the new highs.  The US dollar continues to hug the upper Bollinger Band, which will begin the new week near CAD1.2650. Australian Dollar:   The Aussie fell for the third straight week, and ahead of the weekend, approached $0.7225, last seen in early October.  As seen with some of the other currency pairs, the MACD is still warning of currency weakness, while the Slow Stochastic is flatlining but over-extended.  The trendline connecting the August and September lows initially held last week. It (~$0.7240) yielded ahead of the weekend, but the Aussie managed to close back above it.   It needs to resurface above $0.7300 to be anything meaningful.  Softer than expected, wage growth may have reinforced the RBA's message to the markets, and the yield of the June 2022 T-bill futures fell seven basis points last week and is now down 31 bp on the month.   Mexican Peso:  Emerging markets currencies remain out of favor in a strong dollar environment.  The JP Morgan Emerging Market Currency Index slumped by more than 2% last week, the most since June.  The Turkish lira collapsed by nearly 11%.  The Indian rupee rose by 0.3%, the strongest in the EM space.  The greenback made a new marginal high in two-and-a-half weeks before the weekend, slightly below MXN20.89.  The momentum indicators are constructive for the dollar, but it is at the upper end of its recent range (~MXN20.12-MXN21.00).  The high for the year was set in March near MXN21.64, and it will come into view when the greenback rises above MXN21.15.   Chinese Yuan:   By shadowing the dollar so tightly, the yuan is dragged higher on a trade-weighted basis in the stronger greenback environment. The yuan is at six-year highs on the basket the PBOC tracks (CFETS).  The PBOC reportedly stressed the importance of exchange risk management ahead of the weekend, and it may be a warning that its willingness to tolerate a stronger yuan is limited.  The yuan slipped an inconsequential 0.12% against the dollar last week.  For nearly the past five weeks, the exchange rate has been mostly confined to a CNY6.38-CNY6.40 range.  It is a fuzzy range and allows for around a big figure in both directions. The index of Chinese companies listed in the US (NASDAQ Golden Dragon Index) fell about 5.7% last week.  The major benchmarks in China, including the CSI 300, posted small gains.  The Hang Seng fell 1.1% last week, and most of that was before the weekend on disappointing earnings from Alibaba (-10.3% in HK).     Disclaimer
Like the Latest Bond Flick, the US Dollar Has No Time to Die

Like the Latest Bond Flick, the US Dollar Has No Time to Die

Przemysław Radomski Przemysław Radomski 22.11.2021 15:11
While the dollar is on a tear, precious metal stocks have gotten away with it lately. But how long will their resistance last? The USD Index (USDX) After the USD Index’s negative response to the ECB’s monetary policy meeting on Oct. 28, I warned on Oct. 29 that dollar bears were unlikely to celebrate for much longer. I wrote: Based on the rather random comment during the conference, the traders panicked and bought the EUR/USD, which triggered declines in the USD Index (after all, the EUR/USD is the largest component of the USDX). Was the breakout to new 2021 lows invalidated? No. The true breakout was above the late-March highs (the August highs also served as a support level, but the March high is more important here) and it wasn’t invalidated. What was the follow-up action? At the moment of writing these words, the USDX is up and trading at about 93.52, which is just 0.07 below the August high in terms of the closing prices. Consequently, it could easily be the case that the USD Index ends today’s session (and the week) back above this level. You’ve probably heard the saying that time is more important than price. It’s the end of the month, so let’s check what happened in the case of previous turns of the month; that’s where we usually see major price turnarounds. I marked the short-term turnarounds close to the turns of the month with horizontal dashed blue lines, and it appears that, in the recent past, there was practically always some sort of a turnaround close to the end of the month. Consequently, seeing a turnaround (and a bottom) in the USD index now would be perfectly normal. And with the USD Index making quick work of 94, 95, and now 96, the greenback’s rally continues to gain steam. What’s more, the USD Index also surged above its late 2020 resistance and 98 should be the next bullish milestone. More importantly, however, gold, silver, and mining stocks are sensing that something is amiss. For example, while they largely ignored the USD Index’s recent ascent, their negative correlations resurfaced last week (on a very short-term basis, so far, but still). Moreover, while the precious metals’ recent rallies were likely euro-weakness-driven and not USD Index-strength-driven, the dollar basket’s uprising should elicit more pain for gold, silver, and mining stocks over the medium term. To explain, I wrote on Nov. 17: The euro recently declined and the prices of silver and gold recently rallied shortly after dovish comments from the eurozone. Namely, while the expansionary nature of fiscal and monetary decisions in the U.S. might be after its peak (with the infrastructure bill signed even despite high inflation numbers), the eurozone is far from limiting its expansionary (i.e., inflationary) policies, and it was just made clear recently. That was bearish for the euro and bullish for the gold price – as more money (euros in this case) would be chasing the same amount of physical gold. The point here is that it might have been the decline in the value of the European currency that caused gold to rally, and it had little to do with what happened in the USD Index. Don’t get me wrong, most of the time, the gold-USD link is stable and negative. In some cases, gold shows strength or weakness by refusing to move in tune (and precisely: again) with U.S. dollar’s movement. But in this case, it seems that it’s not about the U.S. dollar at all (or mostly), but rather about what happened in the Eurozone and euro recently. As a result, with the USD Index likely to take the lead in the coming months, the precious metals should suffer along the way. For context, the USD Index is approaching overbought territory and a short-term decline to ~95 isn’t out of the question. However, it’s more of a possibility than a given. Moreover, the greenback’s medium-term outlook remains robust, and any short-term pullback is likely a corrective downswing within a medium-term uptrend. Circling back to the euro, I’ve been warning for months that the Euro Index was materially overvalued and that a sharp re-rating would likely unfold. I wrote previously: The next temporary stop could be ~1.1500 (the March 2020 highs, then likely lower). For context, the EUR/USD accounts for nearly 58% of the movement of the USD Index, and that’s why the euro’s behavior is so important. And after the Euro Index sunk to a new 2021 low last week, the European currency has officially fallen off a cliff. To that point, after breaking below the declining support line of its monthly channel, a drawdown to ~111 is likely next in line (which is signaled by the breakdown below its bearish head & shoulders pattern). The Euro Index is near oversold territory and a short-term bounce may ensue, but the bearish medium-term implications remain intact. Please see below: Adding to our confidence (don’t get me wrong, there are no certainties in any market; it’s just that the bullish narrative for the USDX is even more bullish in my view), the USD Index often sizzles in the summer sun and major USDX rallies often start during the middle of the year. Summertime spikes have been mainstays on the USD Index’s historical record and in 2004, 2005, 2008, 2011, 2014 and 2018 a retest of the lows (or close to them) occurred before the USD Index began its upward flights (which is exactly what’s happened this time around). Furthermore, profound rallies (marked by the red vertical dashed lines below) followed in 2008, 2011 and 2014. With the current situation mirroring the latter, a small consolidation on the long-term chart is exactly what occurred before the USD Index surged in 2014. Likewise, the USD Index recently bottomed near its 50-week moving average; an identical development occurred in 2014. More importantly, though, with bottoms in the precious metals market often occurring when gold trades in unison with the USD Index (after ceasing to respond to the USD’s rallies with declines), we’re still far away from that milestone in terms of both price and duration. Again, the recent move higher in the USD Index doesn’t necessarily apply in the case of the above rule, as it was not the strength of the USD but weakness in the euro that has driven it. Likewise, with the USD Index now approaching its long-term rising support line (which is now resistance), a rally above the upward sloping black line below would invalidate the prior breakdown and support a move back above 100. However, with the dollar basket’s weekly RSI (Relative Strength Index) now above 70, a short-term consolidation may ensue. Conversely, please note that the recent medium-term rally has been calmer than any major upswing witnessed over the last 20 years where the USD Index’s RSI has hit 70. I marked the recent rally in the RSI with an orange rectangle and I did the same with the second-least and third-least volatile of the medium-term upswings. The sharp rallies in 2008 and 2014 were of much larger magnitudes. And in those historical analogies, the USD Index continued its surge for some time without suffering any material corrections. As a result, the short-term outlook is more of a coin flip. However, the medium-term outlook remains profoundly bullish, and gold, silver, and mining stocks may resent the USD Index’s forthcoming uprising. Just as the USD Index took a breather before its massive rally in 2014, it seems that we saw the same recently. This means that predicting higher gold prices (or the ones of silver) here is likely not a good idea. Continuing the theme, the eye in the sky doesn’t lie. And with the USDX’s long-term breakout clearly visible, the wind still remains at the dollar’s back. Please see below: The bottom line? With my initial 2021 target of 94.5 already hit, the ~98 target is likely to be reached over the medium term, and the USDX will likely exceed 100 at some point over the medium or long term. Keep in mind, though: we’re not bullish on the greenback because of the U.S.’ absolute outperformance. It’s because the region is fundamentally outperforming the Eurozone, the EUR/USD accounts for nearly 58% of the movement of the USD Index, and the relative performance is what really matters. In conclusion, while the USD Index’s 2021 surge caught the consensus by surprise, I’ve been sounding the bullish alarm for many months. And with more strength likely to materialize over the medium term, the ‘death of the dollar’ narrative has been grossly over-exaggerated. Moreover, while gold, silver, and mining stocks recently ignored the greenback’s fervor, history implies that their relative strength won’t last. As a result, more downside will likely confront the precious metals over the next few months. Thank you for reading our free analysis today. Please note that the above is just a small fraction of today’s all-encompassing Gold & Silver Trading Alert. The latter includes multiple premium details such as the targets for gold and mining stocks that could be reached in the next few weeks. If you’d like to read those premium details, we have good news for you. As soon as you sign up for our free gold newsletter, you’ll get a free 7-day no-obligation trial access to our premium Gold & Silver Trading Alerts. It’s really free – sign up today. Przemyslaw Radomski, CFAFounder, Editor-in-chiefSunshine Profits: Effective Investment through Diligence & Care * * * * * All essays, research and information found above represent analyses and opinions of Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA and Sunshine Profits' associates only. As such, it may prove wrong and be subject to change without notice. Opinions and analyses are based on data available to authors of respective essays at the time of writing. Although the information provided above is based on careful research and sources that are deemed to be accurate, Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA and his associates do not guarantee the accuracy or thoroughness of the data or information reported. The opinions published above are neither an offer nor a recommendation to purchase or sell any securities. Mr. Radomski is not a Registered Securities Advisor. By reading Przemyslaw Radomski's, CFA reports you fully agree that he will not be held responsible or liable for any decisions you make regarding any information provided in these reports. Investing, trading and speculation in any financial markets may involve high risk of loss. Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA, Sunshine Profits' employees and affiliates as well as members of their families may have a short or long position in any securities, including those mentioned in any of the reports or essays, and may make additional purchases and/or sales of those securities without notice.
More And More Universities Are Including Metavers In Their Education Program

Fixed income market: the week ahead

Althea Spinozzi Althea Spinozzi 22.11.2021 14:23
Summary:  This week it's all about a surge of Covid-19 cases and inflation. The debt ceiling issue will keep long-term yields in check in the United States while spurring volatility in money markets. Lack of collateral and new lockdown measures are also compressing spreads in the Euro area. Yet, policymakers' engagement to the idea of less accommodative monetary policies on both sides of the Atlantic indicates that yields will not remain rangebound for long. Once the lid is lifted, inflationary pressures will push yields higher. Therefore, it's safe to assume a continuous bear flattening of yield curves. US Treasuries: volatility in money markets will keep long-term yields in check. Yet, inflation concerns continue to grow, pointing to higher rates once the debt ceiling issue is resolved. This week, investors will need to focus on the Fed Minutes released on Wednesday, inflation numbers, and the White House's announcement concerning the Federal Reserve Chair nomination. The Fed’s minutes might unveil details regarding the decision that led to tapering this month and whether FOMC members begin to fret about inflationary pressures. Last week, several Fed’s speakers opened up about accelerating tapering and hiking interest rates in 2022. Among them, Fed Vice Chair Richard Clarida called for a discussion to expedite tapering to enable the central bank to hike interest rates sooner. At the same time, if Biden nominates Leal Brainard as Fed Chair, it could advance inflation worries. Brainard is known to be more dovish than Powell. In the case of her nomination, the market could anticipate interest rates to remain low for longer, implying stickier inflation, provoking a selloff in bonds. The Personal Consumption Expenditure Index, one of the inflation data most looked at after the Federal Reserve, will be released on Wednesday. The PCE core deflator index YoY is expected to rise to 4.1%, the highest in more than 31 years. As we mentioned in earlier editions of “Fixed income market: the week ahead”, we expect inflationary pressures to continue to rise and higher rents, housing and wages to make inflation stickier, putting at odds policymakers’ transitory narrative. Therefore, although the US yield curve has already flattened substantially, we cannot expect anything else than more flattening. The only difference is that once the debt ceiling issue is resolved, long term yields will need to rise together with short term yields, putting at risk weaker credits. The debt ceiling will be a crucial topic for December. Janet Yellen has said that the US Treasury will run out of cash soon after the 3rd of December if an agreement over the debt ceiling is not found. However, money markets have started to price a default during the second half of December. Indeed, last week's 4-week T-Bills auction was priced with a yield of 0.11%, more than double the Reverse Repurchase facility rate. We expect volatility in money markets to continue to remain elevated until the debt ceiling is lifted or suspended. Until then, the long part of the yield curve will serve as a safe haven causing yields to remain compressed. Yet, once the debt ceiling hurdle has cleared, long-term rates will resume their rise. European sovereigns: lack of collateral and a surge in Covid-19 cases will keep yields compressed. Yet, something is changing among policymakers. In Europe, governments are imposing new lockdown measures due to increasing Covid-19 cases, causing yields to drop significantly. Yet, inflationary forces have already been set into motion. Another lockdown might exacerbate inflation further as consumption will switch from services to goods, putting more pressure on prices. Meanwhile, policymakers have started to open to the possibility that upside inflation risk might remain throughout winter. Therefore, near-term hikes expectations are unlikely to reverse despite new lockdown measures. Yet, lack of collateral in the euro area contributes to keeping short-term yields compressed across the euro area, including the periphery. At the same time, swaps with the same maturity have widened as the market prices earlier interest rate hikes. Demand for collateral will remain strong until the end of the year. However, 2022 opens up to widening risk, as demand for bonds will start to wane, and the front part of the yield curve will shift higher according to interest rate hikes expectations. Source: Bloomberg and Saxo Group. However, it looks too early to call for higher yields in the Euro area, as a lot still depends on yields in the US and December's ECB meeting. Suppose more governments across the euro area impose lockdown measures. In that case, the central bank might look to extend the PEPP bond-buying program after March, compressing yields further. The next few weeks preceding Christmas are going to be critical to set direction in European sovereigns. Economic calendar: Monday, the 22nd of November  Spain:  Balance of Trade United States: Chicago Fed National Activity Index, Existing Home Sales (Oct),  2-year Note Auction, 5-year Note Auction Eurozone: Consumer Confidence Flash (Nov) Tuesday, the 23rd of November Germany: Markit Composite, Manufacturing and Services PMI Flash (Nov) Eurozone: Markit Composite and manufacturing PMI Flash (Nov) United Kingdom: market/CIPS Composite, Manufacturing and Services PMI Flash (Nov) United States: Markit Manufacturing PMI flash (Nov), NY Fed Treasury Purchases TIPS 7.5 to 30 years, 2-year FRN Auction, 7-year Note Auction Wednesday, the 24th of November New Zealand: Interest Rate Decision, RBNZ Press Confidence France: Business Confidence Germany: Ifo Business Climate (Nov), 15-year Bund Auction United States: Durable Goods Orders (Oct), GDP Growth Rate QoQ 2nd Est (Q3),  Continuing Jobless Claims, Corporate Profits QoQ Prel (Q3), Durable Goods Orders (Oct),  Goods Trade Balance (Oct), Initial Jobless Claims, Jobless Claims 4-week Average, retail Inventories Ex Autos (Oct), Core PCE Price Index (Oct), Michigan Consumer Sentiment Final (Nov), PCE Price Index (Oct), Personal Income (Oct), Personal Spending (Oct), FOMC Minutes, 4-week and 8- week bill auction Thursday, the 25th of November New Zealand: Balance of Trade Japan: Foreign bond Investment, Coincident Index Final, Leading Economic Index Final (Sep) Germany: GDP Growth Rate YoY Final (Q3), GfK Consumer Confidence (Dec) Sweden: Monetary Policy Report, Riskbank Rate Decision France: Unemployment Benefit Claims Canada Average weekly earnings YoY Friday, the 26th of November Australia: Retail Sales MoM Prel (Oct) South Korea: Interest Rate Decision France: Consumer Confidence Switzerland: GDP Growth Rate YoY (Q3) Italy: Business Confidence (Nov)
Inflation Risk: Milton Friedman Would Buy Gold Right Now

Inflation Risk: Milton Friedman Would Buy Gold Right Now

Arkadiusz Sieron Arkadiusz Sieron 19.11.2021 16:50
Powell maintains that inflation is transitory, but the monetary theory of inflation suggests otherwise. So, elevated inflation could stay with us!, Some economists downplay the risk stemming from elevated inflation, saying that comparisons to the 1970s style stagflation appear unfounded. They say that labor unions are weaker and economies are less dependent on energy than in the past, which makes inflationary risks less likely to materialize. Isabel Schnabel, Board Member of the European Central Bank, even compared the current inflationary spike to a sneeze, i.e., “the economy’s reaction to dust being kicked up in the wake of the pandemic and the ensuing recovery”. Are those analysts right? Well, in a sense, they are. The economy is not in stagnation with little or no growth and a rising unemployment rate. On the contrary, the US labor market is continuously improving. It’s also true that both the bargaining power of workers and energy’s share in overall expenditure have diminished over the last fifty years. However, general inflation is neither caused by wages nor energy prices. Higher wages simply mean lower profits, so although employees can consume more, employers can spend less. If wages are set above the potential market rates, then unemployment emerges - not inflation. Similarly, higher energy prices affect the composition of spending, but not the overall monetary demand spent on goods and services. It works as follows: when the price of oil increases, people have to spend more money on oil (assuming the amount of consumed oil remains unchanged), which leaves less money available for other goods and services. So, the overall money spent on goods won’t change. As a consequence, the structure of relative prices will change, but widespread prices increases won’t happen. In other words, Milton Friedman’s dictum remains valid: “Inflation is always and everywhere a monetary phenomenon in the sense that it is and can be produced only by a more rapid increase in the quantity of money than in output”. It’s quite a simple mechanism, even central bankers should be able to understand it: if the stock of goods remains unaltered while the stock of money increases, this, as Frank Shostak put it, “must lead to more money being spent on the unchanged stock of goods – an increase in the average price of goods” Let’s look at the chart below, which displays the annual growth rates in the broad money supply (M2, red line) and in the CPI (green line). We can notice two important things. First, in the 1970s, the pace of broad money supply growth was relatively high, as it reached double-digit values at some point. As a consequence, inflation accelerated, jumping above 10% for a while. In other words, stagflation was born. Since then, the rate of growth in the money supply never reached double-digit numbers on a prolonged basis, including the Great Recession, so high inflation never materialized. And then the pandemic came. In March 2020, the money supply growth rate crossed the 10% threshold and never came back. In February 2021, it reached its record height of 27.1%. The pace of growth in the M2 money aggregate has slowed down since then, dropping to a still relatively high rate of 13%. This is a rate that is almost double the pre-pandemic level (6.8% in February 2020) and the long-term average (7.1% for the 1960-2021 period ). So, actually, given the surge in the broad money supply and the monetary theory of inflation, rapidly rising prices shouldn’t be surprising at all. Second, there is a lag between the money supply growth and the increase in inflation rates. That’s why some analysts don’t believe in the quantity theory of money – there is no clear positive correlation between the two variables. This is indeed true – but only when you take both variables from the same periods. The correlation coefficient becomes significant and positive when you take inflation rates with a lag of 18-24 months behind the money supply. As John Greenwood and Steve Hanke explain in opinion for Wall Street Journal, According to monetarism, asset-price inflation should have occurred with a lag of one to nine months. Then, with a lag of six to 18 months, economic activity should have started to pick up. Lastly, after a lag of 12 to 24 months, generalized inflation should have set in. If this relationship is true, then inflation won’t go away anytime soon. After all, the money supply accelerated in March 2020 and peaked in February 2021, growing at more than four times the “optimal” rate that would keep inflation at the 2-percent target, according to Greenwood and Hanke. In line with the monetarist description, the CPI rates accelerated in March 2021, exactly one year after the surge in the money supply. So, if this lag is stable, the peak in inflation rates should happen in Q1 2022, and inflation should remain elevated until mid-2022 at least. What does it mean for the gold market? Well, if the theory of inflation outlined above is correct, elevated inflation will stay with us for several more months. Therefore, it’s not transitory, as the central bank tells us. Instead, inflation should remain high for a while, i.e., as long as the money supply growth won’t slow down and go back below 10% on a sustained basis. What’s more, the velocity of money, which plunged when the epidemic started, is likely to rise in the coming months, additionally boosting inflation. So, I would say that Milton Friedman would probably forecast more persistent inflation than Jerome Powell, allocating some of his funds into the yellow metal. Gold is, after all, considered to be an inflation hedge, and it should appreciate during the period of high and rising inflation. Although so far gold hasn’t benefited from higher inflation, this may change at some point. Actually, investors’ worries about inflation intensified in October, and gold started to show some reaction to the inflationary pressure. My bet is that the next year will be better for gold than 2021: the Fed’s tightening cycle will already be inaugurated, and thus traders will be able to focus on inflation, possibly shifting the allocation of some of their funds into gold as a safe-haven asset. Thank you for reading today’s free analysis. We hope you enjoyed it. If so, we would like to invite you to sign up for our free gold newsletter. Once you sign up, you’ll also get 7-day no-obligation trial of all our premium gold services, including our Gold & Silver Trading Alerts. Sign up today! Arkadiusz Sieron, PhDSunshine Profits: Effective Investment through Diligence & Care.
Betting on Hawkish Fed

Betting on Hawkish Fed

Monica Kingsley Monica Kingsley 23.11.2021 15:46
S&P 500 reversed from fresh ATHs as spiking yields sent tech packing. Value didn‘t soar, but held up considerably better – still, stock bulls are getting on the defensive. Markets have interpreted the Powell nomination as a hawkish choice. I‘ve written the prior Monday:(…) the Fed is still printing a huge amount of money on a monthly basis, and it remains questionable how far in tapering plans execution they would actually get – I see the risks to the real economy coupled with persistently high inflation as rising since the 2Q 2022 (if not since Mar already, but most pronounced in 2H 2022.Inflation hasn‘t moved to the Fed‘s sights, and yesterday‘s rection in yields and precious metals is a bit too harsh. While rates are on a rising path as I‘ve written yesterday, precious metals overreacted. True, the bullish argument for the dollar stepped to the fore as yields differential between the U.S. and the rest of the world got more positive, and at the same time, various yield spreads keep compressing. That‘s a reflection of less favorable incoming economic data. Just as much as Friday‘s reaction was about corona economic impact projections, yesterday‘s one was about monetary policy anticipation.Inflation expectations though barely budged – the decline doesn‘t count as trend reversal. CPI isn‘t done rising, and the more forward looking incoming data (e.g. producer prices) would confirm there is more to come. All in all, it looks like precious metals (and to a smaller degree commodities), are giving Powell benefit of the doubt, which I view to be leading to disappointment over the coming months. Should Powell heed the markets‘ will, the real economy would weaken dramatically, forcing him to make a sharp dovish turn – and he would, faster than he flipped since getting challenged in Dec 2018.We‘re experiencing an overreaction in real assets – as stated yesterday:(…) the Fed would have to reverse course once the tapering effects start biting some more – not now, with still more than $100bn monthly addition. Cyclicals and commodities that had massively appreciated vs. year ago (oil doubled), are feeling the pinch of fresh economic activity curbs speculation in spite of the polar shift of U.S. strength in energy of 2019 and before. Begging the OPEC+ to increase production might not do the trick, and with so much inflation already in (and still to come), the key investment theme is of real assets strength.Precious metals have broken out, are no longer an underdog, and the inflation data will not decelerate for quite a few months still. And even as they would, it would come at a palpable cost to the real economy, and the resolute fresh stimulus action wouldn‘t be then far off. As I wrote in Apr 2020, it‘s about the continuous stimulus that‘s the go-to response anytime the horizon darkens, for whatever reason. Wash, rinse, repeat.Let‘s move right into the charts (all courtesy of www.stockcharts.com).S&P 500 and Nasdaq OutlookS&P 500 bulls lost the momentary upper hand, and value recovery isn‘t yet strong enough to carry it forward. A less heavy move in bonds – temporary yields stabilization – would be needed to calm down stock market nerves.Credit MarketsTreasuries held up best, and that‘s characteristic of a very risk-off sentiment. The low volume in HYG isn‘t a promise of much strength soon returning.Gold, Silver and MinersPrecious metals turned sharply lower, and haven‘t stabilized yet. Bond market pressures are keenly felt even though inflation expectations didn‘t follow with the same veracity. The next few days will be really telling.Crude OilCrude oil bulls have made a good move, and more strength needs to follow. The fact that it would be happening when the dollar is strengthening, and many countries are tapping their strategic reserves, bodes well for black gold‘s recovery.CopperCopper springboard bulding goes on, and the CRB Index isn‘t tellingly yielding – the hawkish Fed bets better be taken with a (at least short-term) pinch of salt.Bitcoin and EthereumBitcoin and Ethereum are still going sideways, and today‘s resilience is a good omen – across the board for risk assets.SummaryS&P 500 bulls need tech to come alive again, and odds are it would with a reprieve in spiking yields. While bond markets are getting it right, yesterday‘s fear in corporate bonds was a bit too much – the Fed isn‘t yet in a position to choke off the real economy through slamming on the breaks. Markets are prematurely speculating on that outcome, which would be a question of second or third quarter next year. Treasuries have though clearly topped, and stocks do top with quite a few months‘ lag – we aren‘t there yet. Enjoy the commodities ride, and confidence gradually returning to precious metals.Thank you for having read today‘s free analysis, which is available in full at my homesite. There, you can subscribe to the free Monica‘s Insider Club, which features real-time trade calls and intraday updates for all the five publications: Stock Trading Signals, Gold Trading Signals, Oil Trading Signals, Copper Trading Signals and Bitcoin Trading Signals.
Article by Decrypt Media

More Public Debt Is Coming. Another Gold’s Rally Ahead?

Arkadiusz Sieron Arkadiusz Sieron 23.11.2021 15:13
  Democrats are not slowing down - the social spending bill follows the infrastructure package. Will gold benefit, or will it get into deep water? Will the American spending spree ever end? On Monday last week (November 15, 2021), President Biden signed a $1 trillion infrastructure package, and just a few days later, Biden’s social spending bill worth another $1.75 trillion passed the US House of Representatives. Apparently, $1 trillion was not enough! Apparently, we don’t already have too much money chasing too few goods. No, the economy needs even more money! Yes, I can almost hear the lament of American families: “we need more money, we already bought everything possible, we already own three cars and a lot of other useless crap, but we need more! Please, the almighty government, give us some bucks, let your funds revive our land”. Luckily, the gracious Uncle Sam listened to the prayers of its poor citizens. Given the above, one could think that the US economy is not already heavily indebted. Well, it’s the exact opposite. As the chart below shows, the American public debt is more than $27 trillion and 125% of GDP, but who cares except for a few boring economists? Of course, neither infrastructure nor spending bill will increase the fiscal deficits and overall indebtedness to a similar extent as the pandemic spending packages. These funds will be spread over years. Additionally, the fiscal deficit should narrow in FY 2022 as pandemic relief spending phases out (this is already happening, as the chart below shows), while the economic recovery combined with inflation tax bracket creep increases tax revenues. However, both of Biden’s bills will increase indebtedness, lowering the financial resilience of the US economy. What’s more, the overall debt is much larger than the public debt I focused on here. Other categories of debt are also rising. For instance, total household debt has jumped 6.2% in the third quarter of 2021 year-over-year, to a new record of $15.2 trillion.   Implications for Gold What does the fiscal offensive imply for the precious metal market? In the short run, not much. Fiscal hawks like me will complain, but gold is a tough metal that does not cry. Both of Biden’s pieces of legislation have been widely accepted, so their impact has already been incorporated into prices. Actually, the actual bills could be even seen as conservative – compared to Biden’s initial radical proposals. In the long run, fiscal exuberance should be supportive of gold prices. The ever-rising public debt should zombify the economy and erode the confidence in the US dollar, which could benefit the yellow metal. However, the empire collapses slowly, and there is still a long way before people cease to choose the greenback as their most beloved currency (there is simply no alternative!). So, it seems that, in the foreseeable future, gold’s path will still be dependent mainly on inflation worries and expectations of the Fed’s action. Most recently, gold prices have stabilized somewhat after the recent rally, as the chart below shows. Normal profit-taking took place, but gold found itself under pressure also because of the hawkish speech by Fed Governor Christopher Waller. He described inflation as a heavy snowfall that would stay on the ground for a while, rather than a one-inch dusting: Consider a snowfall, which we know will eventually melt. Snow is a transitory shock. If the snowfall is one inch and is expected to melt away the next day, it may be optimal to do nothing and wait for it to melt. But if the snowfall is 6 to 12 inches and expected to be on the ground for a week, you may want to act sooner and shovel the sidewalks and plow the streets. To me, the inflation data are starting to look a lot more like a big snowfall that will stay on the ground for a while, and that development is affecting my expectations of the level of monetary accommodation that is needed going forward. So, brace yourselves, a janitor is coming with a big shovel to clean the snow! Just imagine Powell with a long-eared cap, gloves, and galoshes giving a press conference! At least the central bankers would finally do something productive! Or… maybe shoveling is not coming! Although the Fed may turn a bit more hawkish if inflation stays with us for longer than expected previously, it should remain behind the curve, while the real interest rates should stay ultra-low. The December FOMC meeting will provide us with more clues, so stay tuned! If you enjoyed today’s free gold report, we invite you to check out our premium services. We provide much more detailed fundamental analyses of the gold market in our monthly Gold Market Overview reports and we provide daily Gold & Silver Trading Alerts with clear buy and sell signals. In order to enjoy our gold analyses in their full scope, we invite you to subscribe today. If you’re not ready to subscribe yet though and are not on our gold mailing list yet, we urge you to sign up. It’s free and if you don’t like it, you can easily unsubscribe. Sign up today! Arkadiusz Sieron, PhDSunshine Profits: Effective Investment through Diligence & Care
Tech Sell-Off Continues

Tech Sell-Off Continues

Marc Chandler Marc Chandler 23.11.2021 22:41
November 23, 2021  $USD, EMU, Federal Reserve, Oil, OPEC+, SPR, UK, US Overview:  The markets are unsettled.  Bond yields have jumped, tech stocks are leading an equity slump, and yesterday's crude oil bounce reversed.  Gold, which peaked last week near $1877, has been dumped to around $1793.  The tech sell-off in the US carried into the Asia Pacific session, and Hong Kong led most markets lower.  The local holiday let Japanese markets off unscathed, though the Nikkei futures are off about 0.4%.  Australia and India managed to post minor gains as the MSCI Asia Pacific Index fell for the fourth time in five sessions.  Europe's Stoxx 600 has slid around 1.5% today, its fourth consecutive decline, but has clawed back nearly half the gains.  It is the longest retreat in two months.  US futures are lower, with the NASDAQ leading the move.   Near 1.64%, the US 10-year yield is at the upper end of this month's range.  Last month it reached 1.70%.  European bond yields are mostly 4-6 bp higher, and peripheral spreads have widened a little.  The dollar is sitting in the middle of the major currencies.  The dollar bloc, sterling, and the Norwegian krone, which are the risk-on, levered to growth currencies, are weaker.  The euro, yen, and Swiss franc are little changed but firmer.  The dollar briefly traded above JPY115.00 in Asia, without Tokyo,  before being pushed back. The steady euro has taken some pressure off most of the regional currencies.  The Turkish lira has been in a virtual freefall following President Erdogan's spirited defense of his efforts to drive down rates.    There was around 10 lira to the dollar in the middle of November.  Today, at its peak, there is about 12.48 lira to the dollar.   Asia Pacific Over the weekend, Japan expressed willingness to cap its strategic reserves.  Press reports indicated yesterday that India is amenable to coordinating a release of some of its oil stocks.  South Korea may also participate.  It has been under consideration for a couple of weeks, at least, in the US, and China appears willing to repeat September's release of crude from its reserves.  However,  it seems naive to have expected OPEC+ to simply standby.  January WTI posted a bearish outside down day ahead of the weekend by trading on both sides of the previous day's range and settling below the previous session's low.  Follow-through selling yesterday took it down about $1.20 from the close, but when OPEC+ announced that a coordinated release of the oil could prompt it to reconsider its own plans.  It is to meet next week to review its strategy. Through yesterday's low, January WTI had retreated by nearly 11% from the October 25 higher near $83.85.   A band of resistance is seen between $78 and $80.   OPEC+ had previously agreed to boost output by 400k barrels a day per month to restore pre-pandemic output levels.  That said, not all the members can produce their quota, leading to a shortfall.  OPEC+, the IEA, and EIA all seem to agree that supply-demand considerations shift in next year, and the market will once again be in oversupply.  Moreover, OPEC+ argues that the real dislocation is not with oil as its with gas.   The US imports about 2.9 mln barrels a day, India, about 4.2 mln, and Japan, about 3.1 mln barrels a day.  South Korea imports around 2.5 mln barrels a day.  Together it is around 12.7 mln barrels a day of imports.   If together, 100 mln barrels are released, about eight days of imports would be covered.  This is a high estimate.  India, for example, has indicated it may release 5 mln barrels.   Australia's flash November PMI was better than expected.  Manufacturing edged up to 58.5 from 58.2, while services rose to 55.0 from 51.8.  This produced a 55.0 composite reading, a gain from 52.1 in October.  Recall, the pandemic and lockdown led to weakness in the economy in the May-August period.  The composite PMI bottomed in August at 43.3.  It has risen for three months but remains well off the peak in April of 58.9.  Separately, New Zealand real retail sales were hit in Q3 by the social restrictions, but the drop was not quite as bad as feared.  Reall retail sales fell 8.1% after a 3.3% increase in Q2.  Economists (Bloomberg median) had anticipated a 10.5% pullback.  The RBNZ meets the first thing tomorrow and is widely expected to hike 25 bp, to lift the cash rate to 0.75%. There is still a slight bias toward a larger move in the swaps market.   The dollar briefly traded above JPY115.00 for the first time since March 2017.  We note that Japanese dealers were on holiday and did not participate in the move.  As risk-off sentiment took over, the dollar was sold back to JPY114.50.  Resistance in Europe has been found near JPY114.80.  Note that there is an option for about $980 mln at JPY115.50 that expires tomorrow.  The Australian dollar initially edged lower to almost $0.7210, its lowest levels since October 1 before steadying. A break of $0.7200 signals a retest of the late September low near $0.7170.  Initial resistance is seen in the $0.7230-$0.7250 area.  The PBOC is sending plenty of verbal signals that it does not want to see strong yuan gains, and today's fixing underscores that point.  The dollar's reference rate was set at CNY6.3929, wider than usual above the market expectation (Bloomberg) for CNY6.3904.  The greenback is firm inside yesterday's range.  Caution is advised here as the PBOC could escalate its disapproval.   Europe The flash EMU November PMI was better than expected.  The aggregate manufacturing PMI rose to 58.6 from 58.3.  The market anticipated a decline.  The service PMI rose to 56.6 from 54.6, also defying expectations for a sequentially weaker report.  The composite snapped a three-month slide and rose to 55.8 from 54.2.   The cyclical peak was in July at 60.2.    A flash release is made for Germany and France.    German manufacturing slowed slightly (57.6 from 57.8) and held up better than expected (Bloomberg median 56.9).  Services actually improved (53.4 from 52.4).  The composite rose to 52.8 from 52.0 to end a three-month downdraft after peaking in July at 62.4.  French numbers were even better.  The manufacturing PMI rose to 54.6 from 53.6.  The service PMI rose to 58.2 from 56.6.   The composite improved to 56.3 from 54.7 to snap a four-month fall.  Recall that yesterday the Bundesbank warned that the German economy may practically stagnate this quarter and that inflation may approach 6% this month.   The UK's flash PMI was more mixed.  The manufacturing PMI had been expected to have slowed but instead improved for the second consecutive month (58.2 from 57.8).  Services were nearly as weak as anticipated slipping to 58.6 from 59.1.  The composite eased slightly to 57.7 from 57.8, ending a two-month recovery from the June-August soft patch.  Meanwhile, Prime Minister Johnson's rambling speech yesterday hurt people's ears, and in terms of substance,  the changes to social care funding that may result in lower-income people having to sell homes to pay for support did not go over well.  It is spurring talk of a possible cabinet reshuffle.  The euro has edged to a new low for the third session today, slipping to almost $1.1225 before catching a bid that lifted it back to $1.1275.  There is an option for around 765 mln euros at $1.1220 that expires today.  The nearby cap is seen in the $1.1290-$1.1310 area.   The euro may struggle to sustain upticks ahead of tomorrow's US PCE deflator report (inflation to accelerate).    Sterling met new sellers when it poked above $1.3400. It has ground lower in the European session, and sterling fell to almost $1.3355.  Note that the low for the year and month was set on November 12, slightly above $1.3350.  We see little chart support below there until closer to $1.3165.   America We suspect many pundits exaggerated the link between the renomination of Powell for a second term and the sell-off in US debt and technology shares.  First, it was not a surprise.  Second, it assumes a substantive difference in the conduct of monetary policy between Powell and Brainard.  There isn't.  The difference was on regulatory issues and on the role of climate change.  Third, the idea that the Fed may accelerate its bond purchases next month was sparked by the high CPI reading on November 10.  Yesterday, Bostic joined fellow Fed President Bullard.  Two governors (Clarida and Waller) also seem to be moving in that direction (Waller may be faster than Clarida). The fact or the matter, nearly all of the high-frequency data for October, including employment, auto sales,  retail sales, industrial production, and inflation, came in higher than expected.  The US sees the preliminary November PMI today.  It is expected to have risen for the second consecutive month after fall June-September.   The reception to yesterday's US two- and five-year note auctions was relatively poor.  The higher yields (compared with the previous auctions) did not produce better bid-cover ratios.  Today the Treasury comes back with $55 bln seven-year notes and re-opens the two-year floater.  Many observers see the debt ceiling constraint being likely an early 2022 problem rather than this year.  Still, tomorrow's sale of the four-week bill may be the test.  Recall that at last week's auction, the 4-week bill yield doubled to 11 bp.   Europe's virus surge and social restrictions became a market factor last week.  Many think that the US is a few weeks behind Europe.  The seven-day infliction rate in the US rose 18% week-over-week.  Several states, including Colorado, Minnesota, and Michigan, are being particularly hard hit.  Nationwide 59% of Americans are reportedly fully vaccinated. However, it leaves about 47 mln adults and 12 mln teens unvaccinated.  The risk-off mood and the drop in oil prices are helping the US dollar extend its gains against the Canadian dollar.  The greenback, which started the month below CAD1.24, is now pushing close to CAD1.2750 to take out last month's high.  A move above here would target CAD1.28 and then the September high near CAD1.2900.  Still, the market is getting stretched, and the upper Bollinger Band is slightly below CAD1.2730.  The risk-off mood does not sit right with the Mexican peso either.  The dollar settled above MXN21.00 yesterday, its highest close in eight months.  The same forces have lifted it to MXN21.1250 today. However, the anticipated gain in September retail sales (0.8% Bloomberg median after a flat report in August) may not give the peso much support if the risk-off continues. The high for the year was set on March 8 near MXN21.6360.   Disclaimer
Intraday Market Analysis – EUR Stays Under Pressure

Intraday Market Analysis – EUR Stays Under Pressure

John Benjamin John Benjamin 24.11.2021 09:15
EURUSD struggles to rebound The euro bounced back after PMI readings in the eurozone exceeded expectations. The pair is testing July 2020’s lows around 1.1200. The RSI’s oversold situation on the daily chart may limit the downward pressure for now. We can expect a ‘buying-the-dips’ crowd as price action stabilizes. Sentiment remains fragile though and sellers may fade the next rebound. The bulls will need to lift 1.1360 before a reversal could take shape. Failing that, a bearish breakout would trigger a new round of sell-off towards 1.1100. NZDUSD lacks support The New Zealand dollar softened after the RBNZ met market expectations and raised its cash rate by 25bps. The downward pressure has increased after 0.6980 failed to contain the sell-off. The pair has given up all gains from the October rally, suggesting a lack of interest in bidding up the kiwi. An oversold RSI caused a rebound as short-term traders took profit and the bears were swift in selling into strength. The directional bias remains bearish unless 0.7010 is cleared. The September low at 0.6860 is the next support. UKOIL bounces back Brent crude recovers on speculation that OPEC+ may lower production to counter a release of strategic reserves. A break below 79.30 has shaken out the weak hands. The price has met buying interest over the daily demand zone around 77.70, which coincides with last July’s peak. A surge above 82.00 puts the bears on the defensive. Short-covering would exacerbate short-term volatility. An overbought RSI may cause a brief pullback. Then 85.50 is a key hurdle before the uptrend could resume.
Market Quick Take - November 22, 2021

Market Quick Take - November 22, 2021

Saxo Bank Saxo Bank 22.11.2021 10:04
Summary:  Equity markets closed last week somewhat mixed, but the Asian session was mostly strong on indications that the Chinese PBOC is shifting its attitude on monetary policy toward easing. Elsewhere, the difficult wait for the Fed Chair nomination news continues this week ahead of the US Thanksgiving holiday on Thursday. Crude oil bounced after finding support overnight, but the risk of SPR release and Covid demand worries still linger. What is our trading focus? Nasdaq 100 (USNAS100.I) and S&P 500 (US500.I) - a new week following a new all-time high in US equities on the close on Friday, which is starting with Nasdaq 100 futures opening up higher trading around the 16,610 level in early European trading. Last week showed that investors and traders are utilizing the Covid-19 lockdown playbook selling off physical companies while buying online companies that are better equipped to navigate new lockdowns in Europe. With the US 10-year yield remaining in a range around the 1.55% there is nothing from preventing equities from extending recent gains. EURUSD and EURGBP – new Covid restrictions across Europe, which has become the center of the latest Covid wave, have crimped sentiment for the euro, as has the still very elevated power and natural gas prices. EURUSD has traded back down toward the lows of the cycle near 1.1265 overnight, with the next psychological magnet lower likely the 1.1000 area as long as the big 1.1500 break level continues to provide resistance. In EURGBP, last week saw the break of the prior major pivot low near 0.8400, with the next objective the post-Brexit vote low near 0.8275. USDJPY – threatened support on Friday on a spike lower in long US treasury, but a reversal of much of that action by this morning in late Asian trading is likewise seeing USDJPY trying to recover back into the higher range, with a focus on the recent top just short of 115.00. We likely need for long US treasury yields to sustain a move higher to support a major foray above this huge 114.5-115.00 chart area, which has topped the market action since early 2017. Meanwhile, if risk sentiment worsens further in EM and darkens the outlook for JPY carry trades there, while US treasuries remains rangebound or head lower, the JPY could squeeze higher as the speculative interest is tilted heavily short. Gold (XAUUSD) extended Friday’s drop below $1850 overnight, before bouncing ahead of key support in the $1830-35 area. The risk of a quicker withdrawal of Fed stimulus supporting real yields and the dollar has for now reduced gold's ability to build on the technical breakout. However, the price softness on Friday helped attract ETF buying with Bloomberg reporting a 10 tons increase, the biggest one-day jump since January 15. Gold’s biggest short-term threat remains the tripling of futures long held by funds during the past seven weeks to a 14-month. Most of that buying being technical driven with the risk of long liquidation now looming on a break below the mentioned support level.   Crude oil (OILUKJAN22 & OILUSDEC21) opened softer in Asia after Friday’s big drop but has so far managed to find support at $77.85, the previous top from July. The market focus has during the past few weeks shifted from the current tight supply to the risk of a coordinated reserve release, a renewed Covid-driven slowdown in demand and recent oil market reports from the EIA and IEA pointing to a balanced market in early 2022. Speculators who for the last six weeks have been net sellers of crude oil futures cut their combined WTI and Brent long to a three-month low in the week to November 16. Focus on SPR and Covid risks this week US treasuries (SHY, IEF, TLT). Government bond yields worldwide dropped as new lockdown measures were imposed in Austria on Friday. Ten-year yields tumbled to 1.55%, and they are likely to continue to trade range-bound as the debt ceiling issue will continue to compress long-term yields as volatility peaks in money markets. Investors will focus on this week’s PCE index, FOMC minutes and any news regarding a change of leadership of the Federal Reserve. If Brainard is appointed as Fed chair, the market will expect low rates for longer, thus inflation expectations will advance putting upward pressure on yields. Thus, it is unavoidable to continue to see the 5s30s continue to flatten. German Bunds (IS0L). We expect European sovereigns, in general, to continue to benefit from news related to a surge of Covid cases and lack of collateral as the year ends. Yet, the perception of inflation is changing among ECB members with Isabel Schnabel last week saying that the central bank will need to be ready to act if inflation proves more durable. Therefore, as we enter in the new year, and collateral shortages will be eased, we anticipate spreads to resume their widening. What is going on? Fed Vice Chair Clarida suggests faster Fed taper - in comments on Friday, suggesting that the December FOMC meeting could speed the pace at which the Fed will reduce its asset purchases. “I’ll be looking closely at the data that we get between now and the December meeting...It may well be appropriate at that meeting to have a discussion about increasing the pace at which we are reducing our asset purchases.” China’s central bank signals that it may ease policy. In a monetary policy report from Friday, the PBOC dropped language from prior reports, including phrase suggesting that the bank will maintain “normal monetary policy” and a promise not to “flood the economy with stimulus”. This comes in the wake of considerable disruption in the property sector as the government cracks down on an overleveraged property sector. Asian equities were mostly higher on the news, especially in Korea, although the Hang Seng index was slightly in the red as of this writing. Ericsson to acquire cloud provider Vonage in $6.2bn deal. This pushes the Swedish telecommunication company into the cloud communication industry seeking to add more growth to the overall business. Vonage has delivered 11% revenue growth in the past 12 months hitting $1.4bn with an operating margin of 10.4%. Global proceeds from IPOs hit $600bn in record year. This is the biggest amount since 2007 and almost 200% above the level in 2019 highlighting the excessive risk sentiment in equities. More confusing signals from Bank of England. Governor Bailey said in an interview for the Sunday Times that risks to the country are “two-sided” at the moment as growth slows and inflation rises, and that the cause of inflation problems is supply side constraints and that “monetary policy isn’t going to solve those directly.” Similarly, BoE Chief Economist Huw Pill said on Friday that the Bank of England said that the weight of evidence was shifting in favour of rate hikes but that he has not yet made a decision, encouraging observers to focus on the longer term rather than meeting-to-meeting decision. US shared intelligence with allies suggesting potential for Russia to invade Ukraine - according to Bloomberg sources. The intelligence noted up to 100,000 soldiers could be deployed in such a scenario, and that some half of that number are already in position.  Russian president Vladimir Putin denied Russia intends to invade, but seemed to pat himself on the back for “having gotten the attention of the US and is allies, which he accused of failing to take Russia’s ‘red lines’ over Ukraine seriously”, as the article puts it. What are we watching next? Who will US President Biden nominate to head the Fed next February? Powell is still seen as more likely to get the nod that Brainard by roughly two to one, and this Fed Chair nomination issue is hanging over the markets, as the current Fed chair term ends in early February and from comments made last week by President Biden, an announcement could come any day. One uncertainty that would come with a Brainard nomination is the potential difficulty of having her nomination approved by the Senate. The nomination news could generate significant short-term volatility on the choice of the nominally more dovish Lael Brainard over current Fed Chair Powell, though we see little difference in the medium-longer term implications for monetary policy, and the Fed is likely to get a prominent new regulatory role either way (under Brainard or someone else if she is nominated to replace Powell). Will Germany announce a Covid lockdown? - Friday saw some volatility on Austria’s announcement of a full Covid lockdown, with Germany’s health minister saying that a similar move in Germany could not be ruled out. Later that day, that was contradicted by comments from another minister. Meanwhile, resistance against Covid restrictions has turned violent in Netherlands. Earnings Watch – the number of important earnings is falling rapidly, but this week Tuesday is the most important day with key earnings from Xiaomi, XPeng and Kuaishou, both important Chinese technology companies. Also on Tuesday, US companies such as Medtronic, Autodesk and Dell Technologies are worth watching. Monday: Sino Pharmaceutical, Prosus, Zoom Video, Agilent Technologies Tuesday: Xiaomi, Kuaishou Technology, Compass Group, Medtronic, Analog Devices, Autodesk, VMWare, Dell Technologies, XPeng, HP, Best Buy, Dollar Tree Wednesday: Deere, Thursday: Adevinta Friday: Meituan, Pinduoduo Economic calendar highlights for today (times GMT) 0900 - Switzerland SNB weekly sight deposit data1330 – US Chicago Fed Oct. National Activity Index1500 – US Oct. Existing Home Sales1730 – ECB's Guindos to speak2145 – New Zealand Q3 Retail Sales2200 – Australia Nov. Flash Services & Manufacturing PMI0105 – Australia RBA’s Kohler to speak Follow SaxoStrats on the daily Saxo Markets Call on your favorite podcast app: Apple Spotify Soundcloud Sticher
FX Update: USD remains firm, RBNZ taps brakes on expectations

FX Update: USD remains firm, RBNZ taps brakes on expectations

John Hardy John Hardy 24.11.2021 13:44
Summary:  The US dollar remains firm after the news of Fed Chair Powell getting the nod for a second term on Monday, but a more aggressive extension of its recent strength is avoided as US yield rises were tempered yesterday. Elsewhere, a less hawkish than expected RBNZ saw the kiwi sharply weaker as the market removed a chunky bit of forward rate hike expectation on the latest guidance. FX Trading focus: USD follows US yields higher in the wake of Powell getting nod for 2nd term The US dollar strengthening in the wake of President Biden’s announcement that he would tap Jay Powell for a second term as Fed Chair extended modestly yesterday and into this morning, somewhat tempered by a strong US 7-year treasury auction taking the steam out rises in yields yesterday – with the 7-year benchmark actually notching new highs for the cycle before retreating in the wake of the auction. The more widely tracked 10-year US treasury yield benchmark is still rangebound below the October pivot high of 1.7% and the post-pandemic outbreak high of 1.75%  from the end of March. This has kept USDJPY from extending notably above the sticky 115.00 area of the moment. Elsewhere, the euro remains relatively weak despite ECB Vice President de Guindos out speaking and hinting some concern on inflation rises: “the ECB is continuously pointingout that the inflation rebound is of a transitory nature....However, we have also seen how in recent months these supply factors are becoming more structural, more permanent.” But just this morning we also have the ECB’s Holzmann out saying that inflation is likely to slow from next year. Later today we will get the expected German government coalition deal (SPD’s Scholz as Chancellor with Green’s Baerbock reportedly set for the foreign minister post and importantly, the liberal LDP’s Lindner set to lead the finance ministry), with a press conference set for 3 p.m. EURJPY and EURUSD are heavy this morning and note that  the 128.00 level in EURJPY is a well-defined range low, while EURUSD doesn’t have notable  support until well below 1.1200 and arguably not until psychological levels like 1.10. With covid spiking and a galloping energy crisis, I don’t envy the new German leadership. Overnight, the Reserve Bank of New Zealand waxed a bit more cautious than was expected by the market, and not only by raising the rates 25 basis points rather than the 50 basis points that a minority were expecting to see. In the central bank’s new statement, the bank strikes a more cautious tone: yes, clearly further rate hikes are set for coming meetings, but the bank is clearly in a wait and see mode, given the tightening of financial conditions already in the bag and that which the market has already priced in: “the Committee expressed uncertainty about the resilience of consumer spending and business investment....(and) also noted that increases in interest rates to householdsandbusinesses had already tightened monetary conditions. High levels of household debt, and a large share of fixed-rate mortgages re-pricing in coming months, could increase the sensitivity of consumer spending to these interest rate increases.” Later today, we have a stack of US data releases crammed into today because of the Thanksgiving holiday tomorrow (and for most, Friday as well). The most important of these is the October PCE Infation data print. Not expecting much from the FOMC minutes later as all eyes are on whether we are set for an acceleration of the QE taper at the December FOMC meeting, with some arguing that Powell and company have more room to move and administer a bit more hawkish message, if they so desire, as the nomination news is out of the way and this reduces hyper-sensitivity to bringing any message that could risk cratering market sentiment. Chart: AUDNZDThe 2-year yield spread between Australia and New Zealand has risen sharply in recent days and especially overnight, where the more cautious than expected tones from the RBNZ inspired a 14 basis point drop in 2-year NZ yields. The price action in AUDNZD was sympathetic with the rally back toward local resistance near 1.0450, though the rally needs to find legs for a move up to 1.0600 at least to indicate we may have put a structural low in with a double bottom here. A brighter relative outlook for  Australia could be in the cards if China is set to stimulate and raise steel output, the anticipation of which has already sharply lifted iron ore prices this week, a key indicator for the Aussie. No notable expectations for the Riksbank tomorrow – as the central bank is expected to wind down its balance sheet expansion next year, while the policy forecast is thought to be in play (perhaps a late 2024 lift-off built into expectations, though the market is ahead of that as 2-year Swedish swap rates have risen close to 30 basis in recent weeks. This is the area where the Riksbank can surprise in either direction relative to expectations). The EURSEK rally has now reversed the entirety of the prior sell-off leg and double underlines the very weak sentiment on Europe, which remains “non-existential” in nature, i.e., so far the market is keeping this about policy divergence and dark clouds over the economic outlook, not about the longer term viability of the EMU, etc…, which in the past 2010-12 crisis inspired SEK upside as a safe haven. Table: FX Board of G10 and CNH trend evolution and strengthA bit of a relative pick-up in petro-currencies in the wake of yesterday’s oil rally, as the market bought the fact of US President Biden announcing a release of barrels from strategic reserves. Elsewhere, the NZD is losing relative altitude and the USD and especially CNH reign supreme. Table: FX Board Trend Scoreboard for individual pairs.Here, note AUDNZD flipping back to positive - a move that would be “confirmed” by a close solidly above 1.0450. Also note NOKSEK trying to flip positive on the latest oil rally, although beware the Riksbank meeting up tomorrow there. .Upcoming Economic Calendar Highlights (all times GMT) 1330 – US Weekly Initial and Continuing Jobless Claims 1330 – US Oct. Advance Goods Trade Balance 1330 – US Q3 GDP Revision 1330 – US Oct. Durable Goods Orders 1430 – UK BoE’s Tenreyro to speak 1500 – US Oct. PCE Inflation 1500 – US Final University of Michigan Sentiment Survey 1500 – US Oct. New Home Sales 1900 – US FOMC Meeting Minutes
Turkey gets a Reprieve before US Thanksgiving, but Capital Strike may not be Over

Turkey gets a Reprieve before US Thanksgiving, but Capital Strike may not be Over

Marc Chandler Marc Chandler 24.11.2021 14:28
November 24, 2021  $USD, Currency Movement, Germany, Japan, Mexico, RBNZ, Turkey Overview:  The dramatic collapse of the Turkish lira was like an accident one could not help look at, but it was not an accident, but the result of a disregard for the exchange rate and compromised institutions.  The lira was off around 15% at its worst yesterday, before settling 11.2% lower.  After falling for 11 sessions, it has steadied today (~2.7%)  but the capital strike may not be over.  On the other hand, the Reserve Bank of New Zealand delivered the 25 bp rate hike and seemed to give hawkish guidance, and yet the New Zealand dollar was sold and the worst-performing of the major currencies, off 0.65% through the European morning.  The tech losses on Wall Street yesterday weighed on Asia Pacific equities today, where the large markets fell but in China.  Europe's Stoxx 600 is less tech sensitive and is trying to snap a four-day air pocket, but early gains have been reversed. The US futures point to around a 0.5% lower opening.  The greenback has a firmer bias ahead of the full economic calendar ahead of tomorrow's holiday.  The yen is the notable exception.  The greenback rose to a new multi-year high near JPY115.25 but has come back offered and is straddling the JPY115 level in late morning turnover in Europe.  Emerging market currencies are mixed, though the JP Morgan Emerging Market Currency Index is firmer after six consecutive down sessions.  Gold is steadying after a four-day drop that took it from around $1870 to about $1782. Oil extended yesterday's recovery after the concerted agreement to release strategic reserves from six countries but is struggling to sustain the upside momentum.  The market was unimpressed with the new supply and had it (and more?) discounted.  European (Dutch) gas rose 8% yesterday and remains firm today.  Iron ore prices are higher for the fourth session, during which time it has risen by around 20%.  Copper is also firmer for the second session.  It is up about 4.5% from the middle of last week's low.   Asia Pacific The Reserve Bank of New Zealand hiked its cash rate 25 bp to 0.75%.  It was widely expected, and many had leaned to a 50 bp move.  The forward guidance saw the cash rate at 2.0% at the end of next year.  The swaps market had this nearly priced in as well.  This might help explain the profit-taking on the New Zealand dollar.  The 2-year yield fell 14 bp, and the 10-year yield eased by 5.5 bp.  New Zealand stocks defied the regional pressure and rose by about 0.6%.   Japan's economy is recovering. The economy contracted by 0.8% in Q3, but after a slow start, the vaccination program has been successful.  It has allowed a re-opening of the economy.  This is evident in the flash PMI report.  The manufacturing PMI rose to 54.2 from 53.2, and the services PMI improved to 52.1 from 50.7.  The composite new stands at 52.5 (from 50.7) and represents a new cyclical high.  Recall that it bottomed in August at 45.5.  The fiscal support being offered by the supplemental budget is pro-cyclical; it will accelerate the recovery.   The break of JPY115.00 has seen limited follow-through dollar buying.  It peaked near JPY115.25 in Asia and fell to around JPY114.80, where it has found a bid in European dealing.  The nearly $950 mln option that expires today at JPY115 has likely been neutralized (hedged/offset), and the one at JPY115.50 for $1.2 bln may be too far away to be impactful.  Our idea of a JPY113.-JPY115 range is being tested, but recall that earlier this month, the dollar has slipped to almost JPY112.70.  The range is not carved in stone, and some fraying is inevitable.  Still, a move above JPY115.50 would suggest that this consolidation since mid-October is over, and a new and higher range is likely.  Next:  JPY118-JPY120, maybe.  The Australian dollar leaked lower and briefly dipped below $0.7200 for the first time since October 1.  There is an option that is expiring today there for about A$355 mln.  It steadied after early Asia Pacific trading and approached the nearby cap near $0.7230.  A move above here would help the technical tone.  Officials appear to have broken the one-way trading in the yuan.  It has been alternating between gains and losses this week, but the movement has been small, and the yuan is virtually unchanged this week.  The reference rate was set at CNY6.3903, slightly more than the market expected (Bloomberg) of CNY6.3898.   Lastly, we note that South Korea is widely expected to hike the seven-day repo by 25 bp tomorrow, following a similar hike in August.   Europe It has taken the better part of the two months, but the new German coalition appears to have been agreed upon.  However, what the soon-to-be Chancellor Scholz is inheriting is a mess.  The Bundesbank warned recently that the economy may be stagnating this quarter (though the flash PMI yesterday did not confirm this), and inflation may be approaching 6%.  Moreover, the covid infection rate has reportedly doubled in the past two days.  The US CDC put Germany (and Denmark) on a heightened travel advisory.   As one would expect, this is taking a toll on sentiment.  The IFO investor survey showed this.  The current assessment fell to 99.0 from 100.2.  The expectations component eased to 94.2 from 95.4.  The assessment of the overall business climate stands now at 96.5, down from 97.7. After falling for the fifth consecutive month,  it is at the lowest level since April.   The euro's losses were extended to almost $1.12.  The weakness seems most pronounced in Europe, which lends credence to ideas that European financial firms are key sellers, which some related to year-end adjustments.  However, the three-month cross-currency basis swap has steadied since Monday, and pressure on the euro remains.   We note that the two-year US-German interest rate differential rose for the fourth consecutive session yesterday to reach 135 bp, the most since last March, but is steadying today.  Since the convincing break of $1.13, we do not see strong chart support until closer to $1.10.  Sterling made a margin new low for the year yesterday near $1.3345.  It remains stuck near there in quiet turnover.  The $1.3400 area offers nearby resistance.  Here we see little technical support until around $1.3165.  America The US holiday tomorrow is forcing a heavy data release schedule today.  Not all the data is of equal importance.  Of the first set of reports, the weekly jobless claims will command attention.  They have fallen for the past seven weeks and are at their lowest level since the pandemic (268k).  The November national employment report is due at the end of next week, and another 500k jobs were thought to have been filled.  The October trade balance and durable goods orders are notable.  Nearly all the October data has been reported better than expected.  Growth differentials warn of the risk of a wider trade shortfall.  The revisions to Q3 GDP (likely higher) are unlikely to capture much attention as it is too backward-looking.   The second batch of data may see a bigger market reaction, especially in the debt market.  The US is expected to report a jump in personal spending (consumption needs to accelerate if the economy strengthens this quarter).  Income is likely to recover a bit from the 1.0% drop reported in September.  The market may be most sensitive to the deflators.  Here inflation is set to accelerate.  The headline is projected to rise above 5%, while the core should peak above 4%.   Lastly, new homes sales surged 14% in September and maybe lucky to sustain those higher levels in October.  Late in the session, when many in the US may be winding down ahead of the holiday, the FOMC minutes from this month's meeting will be released.  The current focus is on the possibility that the Fed accelerates its tapering next month, and anything that sheds light on this could shape the market's reaction.    The US dollar reversed lower yesterday after reaching CAD1.2745.  It settled near its lows (~CAD1.2670), but there has been no follow-through selling, and the five-day moving average, which it has not closed below since November 15, held (~CAD1.2660). Initial resistance is seen now around CAD1.2700-CAD1.2720.  We note that Canadian bonds are under some pressure, and the 10-year yield is above 1.80%, the highest level since April 2019.  The dollar rose to MXN21.30 yesterday and remains firm, even if off the high today.  News that Mexico's President pulled the nomination of Herrera, the former finance minister, as the next central bank governor, injected some volatility into the peso.  Reports suggest that Herrera's nomination was retracted a few months ago but was kept confidential.  It is not clear what happens next.  Some suspect Herrera may still get the nomination.  It does not appear that any official statement or clarification has been provided.  The median seems to be playing up the likelihood of some announcement in the coming days.  Meanwhile, Mexico reports its bi-weekly CPI figures, and inflation is still accelerating.  Tomorrow's final Q3 GDP is expected to confirm that the economy contracted.  The dollar recorded the high for the year against the peso in March near MXN21.6360.   Disclaimer
Ahead Of The US CPI, Speaking Of Crude Oil And Metals - Saxo Market Call

Market Quick Take - November 26, 2021

Saxo Bank Saxo Bank 26.11.2021 09:25
Macro 2021-11-26 08:30 6 minutes to read Summary:  Fears linked to a new and different covid variant discovered in South Africa helped send a wave of caution over global markets overnight. Stocks in Asia and the US slumped, Treasuries rallied while the dollar traded near a 16-month high. Crude oil shed 3% and gold rose with the detection of the new covid strain. US markets will have a shortened session today as many are still away for the holiday, aggravating liquidity concerns ahead of the weekend. What is our trading focus? Nasdaq 100 (USNAS100.I) and S&P 500 (US500.I) - US equity futures shot lower from the moment they opened overnight on the new Covid variant news, a jolting development after Wednesday’s pre-Thanksgiving holiday closed seemed to show risk sentiment trying to make a stand after some early last week, and perhaps in part in anticipation of the traditionally strong seasonal run into the winter holidays in late December. Given poor liquidity today in the US as many are away from their desks for a long holiday weekend and the market is only for a half session, any significant flows by traders looking to reduce risk could mean significant volatility. Stoxx 50 (EU50.I) - the main European equity futures contract is down 3.2% on the news of a new more infectious Covid strain as it increases the probability of new lockdowns to safeguard hospitals. We observe the pandemic playbook in equities with technology and online companies falling less than physical companies such as miners, energy, and retailers. Stoxx 50 futures have broken below the 50% retracement level measured on the recent runup since early October. The next critical support levels are at 4,125 and 4,058. As this is a Friday, the liquidity situation could be significantly worsened and exacerbate intraday moves. USDJPY and JPY crosses – The huge shift in market mood overnight saw risk aversion sweeping across global markets driving US treasuries back higher and US yields lower, and triggering a huge jolt of JPY buying, as the JPY trading up against all of its G10 peers. USDJPY is well back below the 115.00 level that was broken overnight and the classic “risk proxy” AUDJPY was blasted for steep losses, with GPJPY also in particularly steep retreat. Another pair worth watching is EURJPY, where there is a well-defined range low near 128.00. Further risk aversion and falling yields could support a significant extension of the JPY rally if we are seeing a sustained change of mood here. Gold (XAUUSD) traded higher overnight as renewed Covid fears spread to financial markets with US Treasuries trading sharply higher, thereby reducing the threat that earlier in the week helped send gold crashing below $1835. A combination of high inflation and the economic risks associated with the new virus strain could provide renewed demand following the recent washout. US ten-year real yields slumped to –1.09% while the nominal yield dropped to 1.54% just days after threatening to break above 1.7%. From a technical perspective, a break above $1816 would signal renewed strength and a possible fresh challenge towards the $1830-35 resistance area. Crude oil (OILUKJAN22 & OILUSJAN21) slumped on renewed Covid concerns ahead of next week’s OPEC+ meeting. The market got caught up in a wave of caution overnight with Brent falling 3% as the new and fast mutating virus variant drives worries about renewed restrictions on mobility at the time when the existing delta is already triggering renewed lockdowns in Europe. Next week’s OPEC+ decision on production levels for January has suddenly been made extra hard with the risk of weaker Covid-related demand coming on top of the SPR release announcement earlier this week. US treasuries (SHY, IEF, TLT). A new Covid wave is leading investors to fly to safety provoking yields to drop roughly 10bps across the whole US yield curve. However, we expect the bond rally to be short-lived for several reasons. First, the market has learnt through earlier new strains that Covid is temporary. Secondly, a renewal of lockdown measures would make supply chain bottlenecks worse, introducing even more inflationary pressures to the economy. Therefore, it’s necessary for central banks to stop stimulating demand, keeping intact the recent Fed’s hawkish tilt. We expect more aggressive monetary policies beginning with an acceleration of the pace of tapering in December, followed by earlier interest rate hikes expectations. It will be inevitable for yields to resume their rise and the yield curve to bear flatten. Today investors will find poor liquidity in markets due to the Thanksgiving holiday, cautious will be needed. German Bunds (IS0L). The new German government unveiled a governing coalition deal. Among the extensive list of policies, bond investors should focus on the accommodative fiscal policies for 2022 and 2023, the beginning of a “decade of investment” and the rejection of a new lockdown amid a record rise of Covid cases. More spending translates to higher Bund yields. However, yields remain muted as Europe becomes the new epicenter of Covid-19 infections. With news of the new South Africa strain, yields might fall until we’ll have a full picture of what is happening. Italian BTPS (BTP10). Italian government bonds remained in check as governments in Europe move forward to impose new restrictions due to a rise Covid-19 infections. Yet, investors should remain vigilant as the PEPP program will still end in March. To weaken sentiment in BTP’s further is also the news that President Mattarella is going to vacate his position in January leaving a political vacuum. Parties are pushing Draghi to il Quirinale to get rid of him and go to early elections. If that were to happen, the stability that Italian BTPS enjoyed since Draghi entered in Italian politics will vanish provoking a fast widening of the BTPS-Bund spread. What is going on? What we know about the new Covid virus variant that’s hurting markets. The new Covid virus variant, with a scientific description of B.1.1.529 but with no Greek letter yet designated, has been identified in South Africa and observers fear that its significant mutations could mean that current vaccines may not prove effective, leading to new strains on healthcare systems and complicating efforts to reopen economies and borders. Researchers have yet to determine whether it is more transmissible or more lethal than already known variants. As of Thursday, 90% of 100 positive PCR tests in a specific area of South Africa were of the new variant. The South Korean central bank raised its policy rate 25 bps to 1.00% as expected and signaled further rate hikes to come, saying that rates are still accommodative after now having hiked twice for this cycle. The Swedish Riksbank kept rates at 0%, sees lift-off by the end of 2024. This is the first time the bank has indicated a positive rate potential in their policy forecast horizon. SEK tried to rally yesterday, but is stumbling badly overnight, with EURSEK is soaring this morning in correlation with the decline in global market sentiment, as the Swedish krona is very sensitive to the EU economic outlook and a weaker euro and to risk sentiment more generally. The 2021 EURSEK high near 10.33 is suddenly coming into view after the pair traded south of 10.00 less than two weeks ago. Australia Retail Sales leap 4.9% month-on-month versus 2.2% expected, as lockdowns ended across the country, but with the market is not in the right place to celebrate the news as new Covid strain fears elsewhere dominate the news flow and the Aussie traditionally trades weaker when risk sentiment tanks as it has done since last night. What are we watching next? This is a remarkable and violent shift in mood at an awkward time for markets - as the most liquid global market, the US, was out yesterday for a holiday and the Friday after Thanksgiving (today) usually sees the vast majority of traders and investors still on holiday, with the US equity market only open for a half session. Ahead of the weekend and with the new virus news afoot, markets may have a hard time absorbing new trading flows and the risk of gap-like moves rises. Black Friday consumer spending – retail sales during Black Friday today and over the weekend is often a good barometer on consumer confidence and causes big moves in retailers the following week as their weekend sales are announced. Earnings Watch – the new Covid-19 virus strain observed in South Africa is obviously overshadowing the two important earnings releases from Meituan and Pinduoduo, but they are important for investors investing in Chinese technology companies. Despite Chinese companies at the margin have fared better than expected on earnings in Q3, estimates for Q4 and beyond are still coming down. Friday: Meituan, Pinduoduo Economic calendar highlights for today (times GMT) 0800 – ECB President Lagarde to speak0830 – Sweden Oct. Retail Sales1300 – UK Bank of England Chief Economist Huw Pill to speak1330 – ECB Chief Economist Lane to speak   Follow SaxoStrats on the daily Saxo Markets Call on your favorite podcast app: Apple Spotify Soundcloud Sticher
Santa preparing to take back the reins of the market! | MarketTalk: What’s up today? | Swissquote

Silver on Christmas gift list

Korbinian Koller Korbinian Koller 26.11.2021 11:06
Monthly chart, Silver in US-Dollar, favorable timing: Silver in US-Dollar, monthly chart as of November 26th, 2021. Timing for a physical acquisition is in alignment as well. The monthly chart shows a high likelihood for November’s candle closing as an inverted hammer. Consequently, it provides for silver prices approaching the low end of the last 17-month sideways range near US$22. The white line assumes a potential price projection for 2022. Even if we are wrong with our assessment, a gift of silver for a long-term horizon is highly likely to appreciate from momentary levels to a much higher price target. Silver in US-Dollar, weekly chart, silver on Christmas gift list: Silver in US-Dollar, weekly chart as of November 26th, 2021. The value of a gift like this doesn’t stop there. Numismatics provides for children and teenagers a way to study history. Beautiful coins and bars inspire us to hold on to value for future times and encourage saving. The weekly silver chart shows in a bit more detail possible price expansion from a time perspective. This would be our most conservative picture of the future. The green bordered box is an entry zone for a potential reversal to the upside. With a high likelihood of an interest rate change by the Federal Reserve Bank in the second quarter of 2022, the inner yellow curve supersedes in probability for the expected time frame for a price increase. Silver in US-Dollar, daily chart, physical only, spot to risky: Silver in US-Dollar, daily chart as of November 26th, 2021. If you look at the daily chart above, you will find that we have seen a swift downward move in the past. Under our beauty principle, there is a good likelihood that this might occur again. If so, reaction times are much longer with a physical purchase than with spot price trading. Meaning there is no need to precision trade (precision purchase) physical silver, but be not spooked if a swift, extended decline might happen. Consequently, we are pointing this purchase out for physical acquisition only but do not advise taking a spot price position based on the risk.   Phase 1 drilling program at Guigui discovered not only the largest intrusive ever found in the district, but it’s the first mineralized skarn ever seen in Guigui! Silver on Christmas gift list: In this bargain hunting season around Black Friday, we find it is especially sensible to refocus and ask different questions. The human psyche is prone to give in to instant gratification, especially after the hard time the last two years provided. But with this much at stake for 2022, possibly being a year that sets a mark in history, it might be more prudent to look for wealth preservation in a longer time horizon to invest one’s fiat currencies rather than short-lived pleasures. After all, a careful look for generations to come, your children, is a view most valuable in general. Feel free to join us in our free Telegram channel for daily real time data and a great community. If you like to get regular updates on our gold model, precious metals and cryptocurrencies you can also subscribe to our free newsletter. This article does not contain investment advice or recommendations. Every investment and trading move involves risk, and readers should conduct their own research when making a decision. The views, thoughts and opinions expressed here are the author’s alone. They do not necessarily reflect or represent the views and opinions of Midas Touch Consulting. By Korbinian Koller|November 26th, 2021|Tags: Crack-Up-Boom, Gold, Gold/Silver-Ratio, inflation, low risk, Silver, silver bull, Silver Chartbook, silversqueeze, technical analysis, time frame, trading principles|0 Comments About the Author: Korbinian Koller Outstanding abstract reasoning ability and ability to think creatively and originally has led over the last 25 years to extract new principles and a unique way to view the markets resulting in a multitude of various time frame systems, generating high hit rates and outstanding risk reward ratios. Over 20 years of coaching traders with heart & passion, assessing complex situations, troubleshoot and solve problems principle based has led to experience and a professional history of success. Skilled natural teacher and exceptional developer of talent. Avid learner guided by a plan with ability to suppress ego and empower students to share ideas and best practices and to apply principle-based technical/conceptual knowledge to maximize efficiency. 25+ year execution experience (50.000+ trades executed) Trading multiple personal accounts (long and short-and combinations of the two). Amazing market feel complementing mechanical systems discipline for precise and extreme low risk entries while objectively seeing the whole picture. Ability to notice and separate emotional responses from the decision-making process and to stand outside oneself and one’s concerns about images in order to function in terms of larger objectives. Developed exit strategies that compensate both for maximizing profits and psychological ease to allow for continuous flow throughout the whole trading day. 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Covid Strikes Back

Covid Strikes Back

Marc Chandler Marc Chandler 26.11.2021 12:44
November 26, 2021  $USD, Covid, Currency Movement, Hungary, Mexico, South Korea Overview: Concerns that a new mutation of the Covid virus has shaken the capital markets.  Equities are off hard, and bonds have rallied.  In the foreign exchange market, the Japanese yen and Swiss franc have rallied.  While there may be a safe haven bid, there also appears to be an unwinding of positions that require the buying back of the funding currencies, which is also lifting the euro.  The currencies levered from growth, the dollar-bloc and Scandis are weaker.   Oil has been knocked back by around  6.7%, with January WTI trading near $73. Led by 2%+ losses in Japan, Hong Kong, and India, and 1%+ losses in South Korea, and Taiwan, the MSCI Asia Pacific Index has slumped to its lowest level since July.   Europe's Stoxx 600 gapped lower and is off around 2.4% near midday.  US futures are sharply lower (1.25%-2.5%).  The US 10-year yield has dropped around 12 bp to nearly 1.50%.  While UK Gilts have kept pace with US Treasuries, continental benchmark yields are off 6-8 bp.  The US 2-year yield is about 15 bp lower (~0.49%), while European 2-year yields are mostly 2-5 bp lower.  The 2-year Gilts yield has shed about 12 bp, as the market unwinds some of the chances of a rate hike next month.   Key Development: A new variant of the Covid virus was found.  It is thought to have the most mutations to date.  The EU, UK, Israel, and Singapore have quickly banned travel from South Africa and five neighboring countries.  This is coming on top of and is separate from the outbreak in Europe, where Germany has reported a record number of new cases and several other countries have introduced new restrictions.  Almost a third of Shanghai flights were canceled as three local cases were found.  US infections are also on the rise.  Asia Pacific  As widely expected, South Korea hiked its key 7-day repo rate by 25 bp to 1.0% yesterday.   It follows a 25 bp hike in August.  Consumer inflation rose 3.2% year-over-year in October, while the core rate rose 2.8%.  Growth in Q3 was 4.0%.  With today's roughly 0.3% decline, it brings this year's loss to almost 9%.  Only the yen (~-9.4%) and the Thai baht (~-11%) have performed worse in the region.   Australia reported stronger than expected October retail sales.  The 4.9% month-over-month surge was more than twice the Bloomberg median forecast (2.2%) and follows September's 1.3% gain.  It underscores the recovery that is taking place. The preliminary PMI showed the recovery continuing into November.  The composite rose to 55.0, its highest reading since June.   The dollar was fraying the upper end of the range we anticipated against the yen, pushing against JPY115.50.  The momentum looked to have been at risk of stalling when the news struck.  The dollar was sold to almost JPY113.65.  An option for $710 mln at JPY113.70 expires today.  The price action appears to be stabilizing a bit in the European morning, and the greenback is hovering around JPY114.00.    The trendline connecting the September and the previous two November lows comes in today near there today.  The JPY114.50 area looks to offer initial resistance.  The Australian dollar had been leaking through $0.7200, and the risk-off move sent it slightly through $0.7115, just above the low for the year set on August 20, closer to $0.7105.  A break could spur a move toward $0.7050, which is the (38.2%) retracement of the Australian dollar's recovery since March 2020, when it hit a low near $0.5500.  The $0.7140 area may provide the initial cap for the bounce.   The Chinese yuan is a rock.  It has hardly moved despite the broader developments.  The greenback is slightly (less than 0.05%) firmer and still a little below CNY6.39.  The PBOC set the dollar's reference rate at CNY6.3936, a touch above the CNY6.3934 median projection (Bloomberg survey).   Europe Part of the limited reaction short-end of the European debt market derives from the fact that investors had not expected a change in ECB's monetary policy until the very end of next year, at the earliest.  The surge in the delta strain had already emerged as a weight on the euro.  We had put emphasis on the divergence with the US and saw it captured in the two-year interest rate differential between the US and Germany.  The US premium had risen from around 90 bp in mid-September to 140 bp in the middle of this week.  It has fallen back to about 128 bp today.  Some observers had focused on the year-end adjustments of European banks and the shifting of liquidity through the cross-currency swap basis.   The new German coalition has been announced, and it will have its work cut out.  A record number of new cases have been reported in Germany, and many countries are introducing new social restrictions.  Portugal will try something a bit different.  It is set to require people to work from home in early January for a week to avoid a spike in the virus after the holidays.   Hungary was more aggressive than expected yesterday.  It raised its one-week deposit rate by 40 bp to 2.90%.  Recall that on November 18, it had hiked the one-week deposit rate 70 bp to 2.50%.  Two days earlier, it lifted the base rate 30 bp to 2.10%.  The forint had fallen to a record low against the euro on November 23.   The euro's high was just shy of HUF372, and it fell back to about HUF364.80 yesterday before jumping back to almost HUF369.50 today.  It has steadied around HUF368 in the European morning.   The euro's downside momentum had begun easing as bids below $1.12 were being filled.  The virus developments have spurred what appears to a be short-covering rally that has lifted the single currency thought $1.1280, where a 460 mln euro option expires today.  Nearby resistance is seen near $1.1300 and then last week's high near $1.1375.  Sterling recorded a new low for the year near $1.3280 in late Asian turnover before finding support.  It recovered to about $1.3335 so far.  A move above yesterday's high (~$1.3355) could spur a move to $1.3400-$1.3425.    America The dollar's rally has been fueled by the prospect of a divergence of monetary policy that favored the Fed over the ECB and BOJ.  Indeed, since the November 10 surprise jump in the October CPI to above 6%, we had emphasized the likelihood that the Fed would have to taper quicker to give it the flexibility to lift rates earlier if needed.  Since then, 4-5 Fed officials and several large banks have also underscored this possibility. However, this scenario is being called into question today, which is evident in the swaps markets and the Fed funds futures.  The implied yield of the June 2022 Fed funds futures contract is 7.5 basis points lower, and the December 2022 contract implied yield is down 14.5 bp.  The US dollar rallied to CAD1.2775, its highest level since late September.  It tests a downtrend line connecting the August (~CAD1.2950) and September (~CAD1.2900) highs. A convincing break of the trendline would signal a test on those earlier highs.   We are inclined to see it hold but cannot be confident until CAD1.2720 yields.   The Mexican peso was trampled before today amid concerns about the implications of President AMLO pulling Herrera's nomination for central bank head.  Herrera is a seasoned hand, and although he worked closely with AMLO from the finance ministry, his appointment did not seem to jeopardize the independence of the central bank.  Perhaps the market has been influenced by developments in Turkey, but the nomination of a less experienced and less known candidate has weighed on sentiment.  The dollar, already bid, jumped to MXN22.1550, at its best level since September 2020.   It has pulled back to around MXN21.83, which leaves it up around 1.2%.  This would be the seventh consecutive decline in the peso.  Support is seen around MXN21.60.  Disclaimer
FX Update: Position squaring in FX as new covid strain roils markets

FX Update: Position squaring in FX as new covid strain roils markets

John Hardy John Hardy 26.11.2021 14:30
Forex 2021-11-26 14:05 5 minutes to read Summary:  The contagion across asset markets triggered by new covid strain concerns has hit FX in the form of classic deleveraging, as euro and yen shorts are squeezed on a reversal of recent US yield rises and safe haven seeking, while the US dollar gets a pass elsewhere because it is still safer than smaller, less liquid currencies, particularly in EM. The timing is terrible for this wave of risk aversion as we have thin trading conditions over the US Thanksgiving holiday.   FX Trading focus: Position squaring hits heavy euro- and yen shorts Risk contagion across the board overnight on the news of a new covid strain in South Africa with significant mutations and signs of overtaking as a percentage of cases in regional outbreaks. There may a sudden “straw that broke the camel’s back” angle to this, given the covid concerns elsewhere, particularly in Europe. The timing is worse than unfortunate, as the liquidity backdrop of particular concern as the news has hit with the US out on holiday yesterday and only open for half a session today, with few likely anticipating until last night or this morning that they would even need to bother showing up for work today. The sense of whiplash has been particularly acute as we have just had a look at US President Biden nominating Powell for a second term and many highlighting the focus on inflation in his acceptance speech for the nomination, with Brainard’s acceptance speech also highlighting inflation as a major concern. This had jolted Fed expectations for next year to new highs for the cycle at the outset of this week, and now just a few days later we get covid mutation concerns that have sent a deleveraging wave across markets. In US treasuries, this has mean a sharp drop along the entire US yield curve, giving the euro and the yen a strong boost, as the euro in particular was headed south and fast on the policy divergence theme of the ECB seen likely to maintain zero rates and even some level of QE out over the horizon while the market had priced in three full Fed rate hikes by the end of next year before this sudden reversal. On the weak side, while the US dollar has fallen within the G3 and is approximately flat against sterling, the smaller currencies are sharply lower against all of the above, and EM generally doubly so. Meanwhile, a chunky new drop in oil prices on the anticipation of widening international travel restrictions and even domestic lockdowns in places is adding to the NOK woes just after that currency was trying to recover versus the single currency last week, sending EURNOK up through its 200-day moving average and above 10.20 at one point today after trading below 9.70 barely over a month ago. Chart: AUDJPYAUDJPY is doing its usual job of capturing a wave of risk aversion as the lurch lower in risk sentiment was reflected here, and the clearly important 200-day moving average gave way with a bang. This is beginning to demolish the longer-term bullish hopes as it is a hold below the 200-day moving average here is a kind of confirmation of the rejection of the next cycle highs above 85.00 that were attempted last month. Theoretically, if the last gasp support of the 61.8% retracement of the local rally wave can avoid falling, there is shred of hope, but that would likely depend on a full reversal of everything we have just seen overnight. As we emphasized in this morning’s Saxo Market Call podcast, it is impossible to know how the virus situation shapes up here until further details emerge, but the market appears poorly positioned here for a more difficult global growth outlook at a time was just on how much the Fed is going to have to course correct and end QE and hike rates because US Q4 GDP is running incredibly hot. And that was in turn driving the predominant focus on relative policy divergences, with especially Europe being singled out for its particularly weak outlook, given the energy crunch and it being at the epicenter of the latest covid wave. If I am to poke around at places where moves are getting a bit overdone here in the short term, the EURSEK squeeze move looks a bit excessive, but that isn’t to say that poor liquidity and the usual market correlations can’t send it squeezing higher still. Yesterday, the Riksbank brought a rate hike into its forward guidance (late 2024) for the first time for the cycle at a time as the market is front running that and even pricing the ECB to achieve lift-off next year. Trading a market move like the one has developed overnight is tricky business as anything can happen and either direction. Concern may deepen and dramatically so that nations will scramble to limit the spread of this new variant until more is known, and we still know little about its virulence. And in the very short-term, a self-propelling position squaring can extend aggressively ahead of the weekend as risk managers force adjustments linked to the blow-up in volatility. Then the gap risk can move in the other direction over the weekend. Impossible to know, only to limit risk and exercise patience and a couple of weeks or more of headline risks before we know the lay of the land better. Table: FX Board of G10 and CNH trend evolution and strengthAs noted above, the big direction change here is in the euro and the JPY, which have pulled sharply higher in most crosses, with the Swiss franc happy to continue higher as well (suggesting that the USDCHF pair was increasingly important positioning-wise recently?). Elsewhere, SEK downside is beginning to look extreme, and CNH upside likewise if commodity prices continue to crater. Table: FX Board Trend Scoreboard for individual pairs.Far too early to talk trends when what we have here is a sudden positioning wipeout – but we will have to see how the next few days develop. Most “flips” as of this update are linked to the oil move (NOKSEK, CAD crosses etc.) although note the euro ripping higher against AUD and NZD.
Focusing On US CPI, Fed, Commodities and Bank Of Japan - Saxo Market Call

Market Quick Take - November 29, 2021

Saxo Bank Saxo Bank 29.11.2021 09:48
Macro 2021-11-29 08:40 6 minutes to read Summary:  The market is trying to brush off fears that the new omicron covid variant may significantly disrupt the global economy, with only partial success as cases of the variant have been discovered in multiple countries outside of the original outbreak area. Equities and crude oil markets have erased a portion of the enormous losses from Friday, but the Japanese yen strength actually accelerated at times overnight as Japan will move to halt entry by all foreign visitors. What is our trading focus? Nasdaq 100 (USNAS100.I) and S&P 500 (US500.I) - US equity futures with especially Nasdaq 100 futures are charging ahead trading above the 50% retracement level based on Friday’s price action. The new Covid variant has for now made the market put monetary tightening on pause for a while until we get a better picture of the new variant and its impact. This is supporting US technology stocks as it puts less upward pressure on interest rates. Stoxx 50 (EU50.I) - European equities were down the most on Friday logically bouncing back the most in today’s session with Stoxx 50 futures trading at the 50% retracement level of Friday’s selloff at the 4,151 level. The next big resistance level on the upside is 4,189. If the new Covid variant ends up restricting mobility and travelling we expect Europe and emerging markets to perform worse than US equities. USDJPY and JPY crosses – The Friday meltdown in risk sentiment saw the Japanese yen rallying strongly, with a classic risk proxy pairing like the AUDJPY suffering its worst single day draw-down since the pandemic outbreak in March of 2020. While other markets tried to put on a hopeful face at the start of the week in Asia today, it is notable that the JPY strength has actually accelerated, perhaps in part as Japan is taking the remarkable step of banning all inbound travel from foreign destinations starting tomorrow. In USDJPY, we watch the important pivot low of 112.73, a fall through which could set up a challenge of the 111.50-111.00 zone that supports the trend from the lows of early 2021. Speculative positioning is quite short the JPY, so there is considerable potential fuel for an extension of this JPY rally. EURJPY has broken down through the important 128.00 area support overnight. EURUSD – the squeeze higher in EURUSD on Friday appears linked with the market moving quickly to remove expectations of Fed rate hikes in the wake of the news of the new omicron covid variant, which improves the equation for the euro from a “yield spread” perspective. For EURUSD to trade to new cycle lows from here, we would likely either need to see a return to new highs for the cycle in Fed expectations or some new meltdown in sentiment that would reward the US dollar more as a safe haven. Resistance is perhaps 1.1350-1.1385. Gold (XAUUSD) failed to attract a strong safe haven bid on Friday to push it through resistance at $1816. This despite multiple tailwinds emerging from the omicron-driven carnage after bond yields slumped while the dollar and the VIX jumped. Instead, a slump across industrial metals spread to silver and platinum, thereby curtailing golds potential upside. Gold trades lower today with other markets making a tentative recovery in the belief Friday’s selloff was overdone. However, until we have more details about the virus (see below) the markets will remain nervous as can be seen in fresh yen strength this Monday (see above). Four failed attempts to break below $1781, a key Fibonacci level, may also offer returning bulls some comfort. Crude oil (OILUKJAN22 & OILUSJAN21) suffered one of its largest one-day crashes on Black Friday in response to worries the new omicron virus variant could drive renewed demand weakness caused by widespread lockdowns and travel bans. Equally importantly was probably the very bad timing with the news hitting the markets on a low liquidity day after the Thanksgiving holiday. The market traded higher in Asia as buyers concluded the selloff was overdone while also speculating OPEC+ may act to support prices when they meet on Thursday. The group may decide to postpone the January production increase or if necessary, temporary cut production into a period that was already expected to see the return of a balanced market. Ahead of the meeting and until we know more about the new strain and its associated risks, the market will remain very volatile. US Treasuries (IEF, TLT). The omicron strain will be in the spotlight this week as well as monetary policies expectations and the non-farm payrolls on Friday. Jerome Powell’s speech tomorrow and on Wednesday will be key as the Coronavirus and CARES act will be discussed. It’s likely that rates will remain compressed across the yield curve as there continue to be uncertainties surrounding the omicron strain. Yet, we expect the Federal Reserve to stick to their hawkish agenda and accelerate the pace of tapering in December as inflation will continue to be a concern. It implies, the yield curve will continue to bear flatten, and could even invert as economic expectations dive, pinning down long-term yields. If the White House looks to add more stimulus, that would imply more bond issuance, putting further pressure in the front part of the yield curve. German Bunds (IS0L) and Italian BTPS (BTP10). This week’s focus will be the Eurozone CPI flash numbers and news concerning Covid lockdowns and restrictions. Friday’s flight to safety provoked yields to drop across the euro area, including among sovereigns with a high beta such as Italy. The reason behind it is that German Bunds are tightly correlated to US Treasuries and that the market was anticipating more accommodative monetary policies from the ECB, which have been benefitting mostly the periphery. Investors should remain cautious. Indeed, inflation remains a big focus and could drive towards less accommodative policies rather than more. What is going on? Market is grappling with what to do about the omicron covid variant. The worst impact so far is from the speed with which countries are moving to halt inbound foreign travel, with many countries stopping all flights from South Africa and other countries in the region, while Japan has taken the dramatic step of halting all inbound foreign travel from tomorrow. More hopeful indications from virologists in the virus origin area are anecdotally that this variant is not particularly virulent, although others point out that too little is known about the virus’ effects on more vulnerable patients. Weak Black Friday spending in the US, particular in-store sales. While up strongly from last year’s virus impacted activity at physical stores, US Black Friday spending in-store was down some 28% from 2019 levels and the online shopping on Friday was at $8.9 billion vs. $9.0 billion in 2019, rather disappointing totals, although some suggest that Americans have brought forward their holiday shopping this year because of widespread fears of shortages of popular products. What are we watching next? Whether market can quickly recover from fresh wave of virus concerns. The virus concerns triggered by the new variant were a jarring development, given the prior focus recently on inflation and central banks having to bring forward tightening plans to stave off inflationary risks. US stocks have been the quickest to try to put a brave face on the situation and there is some support for equities as rate hike expectations from the Fed have dropped sharply and long US treasury yields are also sharply lower, but it will take time to learn how transmissible and virulent this new omicron virus strain is, as well as how much damage will be done to growth and sentiment by new limitations on travel and other restrictions. We also have to recall that prior to this news, Europe was the epicenter of the latest wave of the delta variant and was already trading somewhat defensively. US President Biden is set to speak this evening on the new virus variant. The UN FAO will publish its monthly World Food Price Index on Thursday, and another strong read is expected, although the year-on-year increase look set to ease from 31.3%. November has been another strong month for the grains sector led by wheat due to strong demand and worries about the Australian harvest. Elsewhere Arabica coffee trades near a ten-year high on increased concerns about production in Brazil. Before Friday’s carnage across markets the Bloomberg Agriculture Spot index had reached a 5 ½-year high after rallying by 40% during the past year. Earnings Watch – earnings this week are light with the key ones to watch being Li Auto, Snowflake, Crowdstrike, Elastic, and DocuSign. Monday: Sino Biopharmaceutical, China Gas, Acciona, Li Auto Tuesday: Bank of Nova Scotia, Salesforce, Zscaler, NetApp, HP Enterprise Wednesday: Trip.com, Royal Bank of Canada, National Bank of Canada, Snowflake, Synopsys, Crowdstrike, Veeva Systems, Okta, Splunk, Elastic, Five Below Thursday: Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce, Toronto-Dominion Bank, Cooper Cos, Marvell Technology, DocuSign, Ulta Beauty, Asana, Dollar General, Kroger Friday: Bank of Montreal Economic calendar highlights for today (times GMT) 0830 – Sweden Q3 GDP 0830 – ECB's Guindos to speak 0930 – UK Oct. Mortgage Approvals 1000 – Euro Zone Nov. Confidence Surveys 1130 – ECB's Schnabel to speak 1300 – Germany Nov. Flash CPI 1330 – Canada Oct. Industrial Product Prices 1530 – US Nov. Dallas Fed Manufacturing Survey 1715 – ECB President Lagarde to speak 2000 – US Fed’s Williams (voter) to speak 2005 – US Fed Chair Powell gives opening remarks at conference 2350 – Japan Oct. Industrial Production 0030 – Australia Oct. Building Approvals 0100 – China Nov. Manufacturing and Non-manufacturing PMI 0200 – Australia RBA’s Debelle to speak  Follow SaxoStrats on the daily Saxo Markets Call on your favorite podcast app: Apple Spotify Soundcloud Sticher
The Dollar Moves Back to the Fulcrum between the Funding and Higher Beta Currencies

The Dollar Moves Back to the Fulcrum between the Funding and Higher Beta Currencies

Marc Chandler Marc Chandler 29.11.2021 10:46
November 28, 2021  $USD The new covid variant injected a new dynamic into the foreign exchange market.  The World Health Organization cautioned against the need to impose travel restrictions, but policymakers, by and large, do not want to be bitten by the same dog twice.  To err on the side of caution is to minimize one's biggest regret.  The risk is that the uncertainty is not lifted quickly but lingers, which would likely unpin volatility.   US and European benchmark 10-year yields fell sharply ahead of the weekend.  In the US, the market unwound some of its aggressive pricing in of Fed policy.  This is reflected in the commensurate drop at the short-end.  In Europe, the decline in 10-year yield reflected a slowing of growth/inflation as its short-end was largely unchanged.   There are three areas in which market participants cannot be as confident as they were in the middle of last week.  First, the odds of a Bank of England hike next month were diminishing and fell further at the end of last week.  Second, an acceleration in the Fed's tapering seemed increasingly likely given the strength of recent data and the jump in price pressures.  However, the emergence of this new strain makes an aggressive rate hiking campaign less likely.  Third, the prospects for stronger world growth diminished on the margins.  This undermines risk appetites and weakens those currencies that often appear to do better in robust growth phases (e.g., dollar bloc, Scandis, and most emerging market currencies).   Dollar Index:  The Dollar Index put in a new high for the year on November 24, slightly below 97.00. It was confined to a narrow range when the US markets were closed on November 25 and sold off on news of the new variant and imposition of travel controls by several countries.  The setback was sufficient to turn the MACD lower from over-extended territory, though the Slow Stochastic hasn't and remains stretched.  If we assume a correction has begun, a key question is what move is being retraced.  A conservative but logical assumption is that the last leg up, since the November 10 CPI, is in play.  The first (38.2%) target is near 95.75, and then the (50%) retracement is around 95.40.  A break of 95.00 could signal another cent decline.  Euro:  Interest rate differentials and the surge in delta variant cases had sent the euro to almost $1.1185 in the middle of the last week, the lowest since July 2020.  When news of the new variant broke, what appears to be a short-covering rally lifted the euro to almost $1.1325.  The (38.2%) retracement of the leg down since November 10 is near $1.1340.  A more formidable resistance area is in the $1.1375-$1.1400 band.  As was the case with the Dollar Index, the MACD is turning, but the Slow Stochastic is lagging.  Initial support now is seen near $1.1260. With the old and now new variant, the surge accelerated inflation expected to be reported next week may not be the fodder for the ECB has that some anticipated.   Japanese Yen:  We have suggested that the dollar was in a JPY113-JPY115 range.  Earlier this month, it had dipped briefly below JPY112.75 and snapped back.  Indeed, in the first part of last week, it was fraying the upper end of the range and traded slightly through JPY115.50.  However, the pre-weekend turmoil saw the greenback drop back to the lower end of the range (~JPY113.05).  The trendline connecting the August low and the two November lows, found near JPY114.10 ahead of the weekend, was taken out with determination. The MACD is turning down but never recovered from the mid-October-mid-November decline.  The Slow Stochastic is edging back into over-extended territory. British Pound:   As the December short-sterling futures contract rallied, implying a less likely chance of a BOE hike before year-end, the pound fell.  The interest rate futures contract will begin next week with a seven-day rally intact.  Sterling, itself has fallen for six sessions, and a new low for the year was set near  $1.3320 before the weekend.  Here, both the MACD and Slow Stochastic are falling while being over-extended on the downside.   A move above $1.3350 would help stabilize the tone,  but it requires a push above $1.3400 to be notable.  On the downside, we continue to see a risk of a test on the  $1.3165, the first retracement (31.8%) of sterling's rally since Mach 2020.     Canadian Dollar:  Talk about trending currencies; the Canadian dollar fell for the fifth consecutive week following a five-week rally.  Net-net,  it is little changed.  The US dollar settled near CAD1.2765 on September 17, which was between the Bank of Canada meeting and the FOMC.  The greenback reached CAD1.28 ahead of the weekend before settling back near CAD1.2760.  There is little chart resistance until closer to CAD1.29.  As one would expect, the momentum indicators are stretched and frayed the upper Bollinger Band (~CAD1.2770).  It requires a break of the CAD1.2630-CAD1.2640 area to be meaningful.   Australian Dollar:  In the pre-weekend carnage, the Australian dollar came within a whisker of the year's low set in August near $0.7100.  The Aussie, like the Canadian dollar, has been streaking.  Its four-week decline comes are a four-week rally.  The move was underway before the new variant was announced.  The next target is around $0.7050, the (38.2%) retracement of the rally from the March 2020 low (~$0.5500).  Below there is the $0.7000 area, which caught the lows in September and October 2020.   The MACD continues to fall, while the Slow Stochastic has begun to flatline in the trough.  The 25 bp hike by the Reserve Bank of New Zealand, which was fully expected, and disappointed those that looked for a larger move, did little to support the New Zealand dollar.  Indeed, it was the worst-performing major currency last week, losing about 2.5%, more than twice as much as the Canadian dollar and two-thirds more than the Australian dollar.  It also tested the year's low set in August (~0.6800). A break would open the door to steeper losses, but the next area of support may be found in the $0.6760-$0.6780 area.   Mexican Peso:  The peso was the second weakest currency in the world last week (after the Turkish lira), falling around 4.3% to a new low for the year.  It had three strikes against it last week.  First, emerging market currencies broadly are out of favor.   The JP Morgan Emerging Market Currency Index has fallen for 10 of the past 12 weeks.  Second, the new variant and the dramatic risk-off saw the peso's losses accelerate.  Third are domestic considerations.  AMLO's nomination to head the central bank starting next year did not bolster the market's confidence, which was on the heels of the Turkish debacle.  Also, domestic economic conditions have worsened.  The data have been softer than expected, including a downward revision in Q3 GDP showing a contraction of 0.4% rather than 0.2%. At the same time, the bi-weekly CPI rose above 7%.   Ahead of the weekend, the dollar rose to MXN22.1550, and although it pulled back, it found support above the previous session's high (~MXN21.60).  Nearly all the emerging market currencies fell against the dollar (The Brazilian real was a notable exception.  It eked out ~0.5% gain).  However, Mexico seems particularly vulnerable.  The credibility of the central bank may be called into question.  The economic challenge of surging inflation and weak economic activity would seem to require fiscal support, for which AMLO shows little interest.  In April 2020, the greenback reached nearly MXN25.7850, and the MXN22.47 area corresponds to the halfway mark of its subsequent decline.   Chinese Yuan:  Chinese officials appear to have expressed mild displeasure with the foreign exchange market, cautioning against a one-way market and checking prop positions.  Officials would seem to think that the banks are short dollars, while many outside observers, trying to reconcile the large current account surplus with little currency movement and stable reserves, think the large banks are accumulating dollars ostensibly on behalf of officials (hence the talk of stealth intervention). In fact, the one-way market has been broken.  On November 16, the dollar traded between CNY.3670 and CNY6.3965 and has not moved out of that range.  We suspect the risk is for an upside break for the dollar and initially see a move toward CNY6.42.   Disclaimer
Sentiment Remains Fragile

Sentiment Remains Fragile

Marc Chandler Marc Chandler 29.11.2021 14:08
November 29, 2021  $USD, Covid, Currency Movement, Federal Reserve, Inflation, Japan Overview: The fire that burnt through the capital markets before the weekend, triggered by the new Covid mutation, burned itself out in the Asian Pacific equity trading earlier today. A semblance of stability, albeit fragile and tentative, has emerged. Europe's Stoxx 600 is up about 1%, led by real estate, information technology, and energy.  US index futures are trading higher, with the NASDAQ leading.  Benchmark 10-year yields are firmer.  The US 10-year Treasury yield has risen about six basis points to 1.53%.  European yields are mostly 1-2 basis points higher, while the UK Gilt yield is up four basis points. The dollar remains, as we say, at the fulcrum of the major currencies, but in an opposite way, with the funding currencies that rallied strongly before the weekend seeing their gains pared today, while the dollar bloc and Scandis trade firmer.  Among the emerging market currencies, the liquid and freely accessible currencies, such as the South African rand, Russian rouble, and Mexican peso are leading the recovery.  The Turkish lira and central European currencies, perhaps dragged down by the softer euro, underperform.  The JP Morgan Emerging Market Currency Index is slightly firmer after falling around 0.4% before the weekend.  Gold held support near $1780 but has been unable to resurface above $1800.  January WTI jumped by about 5% after the 13% drop at the end of last week.  Iron ore surged 6.5%, recouping in full the 5.6% decline in the last session to approach its recent highs.  Winter weather is beginning to be experienced in Europe, and natural gas (Netherlands) is up 7.75% after falling 4.8% ahead of the weekend.  Copper is recouping a little less than half of last Friday's nearly 4% fall.   Asia Pacific Faced with much unknown about the new mutation, several Asia Pacific countries are opting to close their borders to foreign travelers.  Initially, countries limited the travel ban to a handful or so of countries from Southern Africa.  It does appear that the omicron variant has been around before being sequenced in South Africa, and it is has been found in several countries. However, the origin is still not clear.  While some reports from South Africa suggest mild symptoms, there is good reason for the World Health Organization's caution.  If a new vaccine is needed for the variant, reports suggest it could take around 100 days.  Recall that Japan has lifted its formal emergency in late September, and the economy is rebounding as anticipated.  Today's data showed retail sales rose for a second month in October.  The 1.1% increase lifted the year-over-year rate to 0.9%.   Purchases of clothing and food surged by 9.2%.  Auto sales, still hampered by supply chain disruptions, was the only category that fell.  After a frustratingly slow start, Japan's inoculation efforts have been successful, and the vaccination rate is above 75%.   Before news of the new variant broke, the dollar was around JPY115.50.  It fell to nearly JPY113.00 before the weekend.  It recovered in early dealing to almost JPY113.90 before the weakness of the regional equities contributed to its push lower.  Bloomberg pricing data showed it recorded a JPY112.99 low near midday in Tokyo.  It bounced to almost JPY113.65 in late dealings and has been consolidating in the European morning.  The option for $350 mln at JPY113.40 that expires today has likely been neutralized.  The market appears to be waiting for a new development to push it out of the JPY113-JPY114 range.  The Australian dollar held the pre-weekend low slightly below $0.7115 and is making session highs late in the European morning near last Friday's high (~$0.7155).  Nearby resistance is seen in the $0.7180-$0.7200 area. Recall that last week's 1.55% decline was the fourth consecutive weekly loss and the largest in three months.  The greenback gave up its pre-weekend gain against the Chinese yuan and a bit more today.  It did not even trade above CNY6.39 today, settling above it at the end of last week.  As we have noted, it remains within the range set on November 16 of roughly CNY6.3670-CNY6.3965. The PBOC set the dollar's reference rate at CNY6.3872 and continued to set it above expectations (CNY6.3858, via Bloomberg).   Two issues seem to be receiving attention today.  First are the prospects of easing by the PBOC in the face of continuing weakening of the economy. The November PMI will be released starting first thing tomorrow.  Second, China's property developers have an estimated $1.3 bln in debt servicing next month, following $2 bln this month.   Europe Outside of the virus, two issues dominate investors' attention in Europe today.  First are the November inflation reports from Spain and Germany ahead of the preliminary aggregate figures tomorrow.  The other is the increasingly bellicose rhetoric between the UK and France over the channel crossings and fishing.   Spain's harmonized November CPI rose by 0.3% to lift the year-over-year rate to 5.6%.  It is the fastest pace since 1992.  It follows October's 1.6% increase and 5.4% 12-month rate.  Food and energy were the main drivers.  The increase was in line with forecasts.  In September, the central bank's chief economist had anticipated that November could be the peak in inflation and anticipated it falling back below the 2% target in 2022.  German states are reporting their November CPI figures, and the country's measure will be reported late today.  The states' measures are consistent with forecasts calling for the nation's harmonized measure to fall around 0.2%.  However, the year-over-year pace is projected to accelerate to 5.5% from 4.6% due to the base effect.  The EMU aggregate preliminary CPI is forecast (Bloomberg median) to be flat on the month for a 4.5% year-over-year pace (up from 4.1% in October).  The core rate is projected to climb to 2.3% from 2.0%.  The euro poked slightly above $1.1330 at the end of last week and settled just above $1.1315.  It traded near $1.1260 in late Asia/early Europe and caught a bid that brought it back to about $1.1290.  There is a 1.7 bln euro option at $1.13 that expires today.  The intraday momentum indicators are getting stretched, warning of the downside risk in early North American activity.  Sterling recorded a new low for the year ahead of the weekend, near $1.3280. It is trading in about a quarter-cent range today, around $1.3335, and staying within last Friday's range.  The pre-weekend high was closer to $1.3365.   After an eight-day rally, the December short-sterling interest rate futures contract is trading slightly heavier today.  The market expectations have shifted from a good chance of a hike next month to a bit more than a third of a chance.   America The US auto sales and jobs highlight this week, but Fed officials are out in force too.  Today Powell, Williams, and Hasson speak at an innovation conference, and Bowman discusses the central bank and indigenous economies. Tomorrow, Powell and Yellen testify before a Senate committee on the CARES Act.  Their prepared remarks are expected to be released later today that may also work for the testimony on Wednesday on the same topic before a House committee.    Tuesday, Clarida discusses the Fed's independence, while Williams will speak on food security.  The Beige Book, in preparation for next month's FOMC meeting, is due Wednesday too.  No fewer than five Fed officials speak in the second half of the week.  Our initial bias continues to be for faster tapering at the December FOMC meeting. It still seems to be the prudent course to maximize the Fed's ability to respond to a broad range of probable economic outcomes.  The US pending home sales and the Dallas Fed manufacturing survey, due today, are not typically market movers.  And today is unlikely to be an exception.  Canada reports its Q3 current account surplus (expected to be around C$5.7 bln, up from C$3.6 bln in Q2.  It also reports raw material and industrial prices for October.  The week's highlight is tomorrow's September and Q3 GDP, followed by Friday's employment report.  Mexico reports October unemployment figures (median forecast in Bloomberg's survey calls for a 4.07% rate, down from 4.18% in September). Concerns about President AMLO's appointment to the central bank lingers even though the peso may benefit from the correction to the 1.6% pre-weekend drop.   The US dollar spiked to almost CAD1.28 before the weekend.  It fell to nearly CAD1.2720 today.  The pullback was seen in Asia, and it has been consolidating since then.  Still, the greenback looks vulnerable to a further retracement of the pre-weekend gains. Initial potential extends toward CAD.2680-CAD1.2700.   The broader risk appetites may be the key today for both the Canadian dollar and Mexican peso.  The greenback jumped to MXN22.1550 amid the pre-weekend turmoil.  This now marks the high for the year.  It pulled back initially to MXN21.6850 in Asia, but the selling pressure eased, and it traded in an MXN21.7630-MXN21.9000 range in Europe.  We suspect the combination of the trajectory of US monetary policy plus the concerns about the central bank of Mexico boosts the chances that the peso underperforms generally.  Moreover, rising price pressures and a weak economy put officials in a difficult position, especially given AMLO's reluctance to deploy fiscal measures to support the economy.   Disclaimer
Feeling the Quickly Changing Pulse

Feeling the Quickly Changing Pulse

Monica Kingsley Monica Kingsley 30.11.2021 16:15
S&P 500 rebound still ran into selling pressure before the close – the bulls lost momentum however well the government and Fed‘s words were received. Credit markets hold the key – specifically, how corporate bonds and Treasuries perform compared to each other. This would be also reflected in the yield spreads, dollar moves, or cylicals vs. stay-at-home stocks.Today‘s analysis will be shorter than usually, so let‘s dive into the charts to fulfill my title‘s objective (all charts courtesy of www.stockcharts.com).S&P 500 and Nasdaq OutlookS&P 500 is still far out of the woods, and the bulls have to decidedly repel any selling pressure - a good sign of which would be a close in the 4,670s.Credit MarketsAs encouraging as the HYG upswing is, it‘s too early to call a budding reversal a done deal. LQD to TLT performance is a good start, which however needs to continue. The worst for the bulls would be renewed rush into Treasuries, sending other parts of the bond market relatively down.Gold, Silver and MinersPrecious metals retreated again, but the bullish case is very far from lost. As discussed in the caption, the upswing appears a question of time – gold and silver are ready to turn on soothing language of fresh accomodation.Crude OilCrude oil upswing left a lot to be desired and as I tweeted yesterday, remains the most vulnerable within commodities. The dust clearly hasn‘t settled yet within energy broadly speaking.CopperCopper held up considerably better than many other commodities, and gives the impression of sideways trading followed by a fresh upswing as having the highest probability to happen next.Bitcoin and EthereumBitcoin and Ethereum marching up today, is a positive omen for gradual and picky return of risk-on trades. The overall mood is still one of catious optimism.SummaryFriday‘s rout hasn‘t been reversed entirely, and markets remain vulnerable to fresh negative headlines. The degree to which current ones (relatively positive ones, it must be said) helped, is a testament of volatility being apt to return at a moment‘s notice. I‘m certainly not looking for the developments to break inflation‘s back – CPI clearly hasn‘t peaked. Precious metals are well positioned to appreciate when faced with any grim news necessitating fresh monetary or fiscal activism.Thank you for having read today‘s free analysis, which is available in full at my homesite. There, you can subscribe to the free Monica‘s Insider Club, which features real-time trade calls and intraday updates for all the five publications: Stock Trading Signals, Gold Trading Signals, Oil Trading Signals, Copper Trading Signals and Bitcoin Trading Signals.
COT: Speculative positioning ahead of Fridays omicron dump

COT: Speculative positioning ahead of Fridays omicron dump

Ole Hansen Ole Hansen 30.11.2021 18:42
Commodities 2021-11-30 10:30 Summary:  Futures positions and changes made by hedge funds across commodities, forex and financials up until last Tuesday, November 23. While a lot of water has flowed under the bridge since last Tuesday, it is nevertheless interesting, not least considering the report encapsulated the market reaction to last weeks renomination of Fed chair Powell which helped send both treasury yields and the dollar sharply higher, as well as the oil market reaction to the coordinated SPR release announcement. Finally, it also gives us an idea about the level of positioning ahead of Friday's omicron related sell off Saxo Bank publishes weekly Commitment of Traders reports (COT) covering leveraged fund positions in commodities, bonds and stock index futures. For IMM currency futures and the VIX, we use the broader measure called non-commercial. Link to latest report The below summary highlights futures positions and changes made by hedge funds across commodities, forex and financials up until last Tuesday, November 23. The report normally released on Friday's was delayed due to last weeks Federal holidays, and while a lot of water has flowed under the bridge, its nevertheless interesting. Not least considering the report encapsulated the market reaction to last weeks renomination of Fed chair Powell which helped send both treasury yields and the dollar sharply higher, as well as the oil market reaction to the coordinated SPR release announcement. Also it gives a good idea about how funds and speculators were positioned ahead of the sharp risk off to the new omicron virus variant. Commodities The commodity sector saw sizable shift out of energy and metals into the agriculture sector where all 13 futures contracts covered in this update saw net buying. During the week the energy sector lost 2.1% while precious metals dropped 4.3% after gold broke below key support at $1830. A 1.5% rise in copper was not enough to convince speculators who cut their net long by 20%. Most noticeable however was the strong buying seen across the agriculture sector, with strong demand and weather worries more than offsetting the headwind caused by the stronger dollar. Energy: Crude oil, both Brent and WTI, were sold ahead of the coordinated SPR release announcement last Tuesday. The combined net long dropped by 14k lots to a one-year low at 514.6k lots. The loss of price momentum during the past few months has, despite an overriding bullish sentiment in the market, been driving the reduction, and following Friday's 10% price collapse these traders have been rewarded for sticking to the signals the market was sending instead of listening to bullish price forecasts. Hedge funds are not "married" to their positions hence their better ability to respond to changes in the technical and/or fundamental outlook.Metals: Having increase bullish gold bets by 65k lots during the previous two weeks, funds were forced to make 45k lots reduction last week in response to the Powell renomination sending gold sharply lower and below support in the $1830-35 area. Speculators have been whipsawed by the price action in recent weeks and it helps to explain why they are in no mood to reenter in size despite renewed support from Covid19 angst. Silver's 6% sell off during the week helped trigger a 17% reduction in the net long to 30k lots while in copper a small price increase was not enough to stem the slide in net length. Following seven weeks of selling, the net length has dropped by 64% to 19.5k lots, a 13-week low. Months of rangebound behaviour has reduced investor focus, and until we see High Grade Copper make an attempt to break its current $4.2 to $4.5 range, the level of positioning is likely to remain muted. Agriculture:  More concerned with other drivers such as weather, strong demand and supply chain disruptions helped trigger across the board buying of all 13 futures contracts split into grains, softs and livestock. The combined long held across these contracts reached a six-month high at 1.13 million lots, representing a nominal value of $43.5 billion. Buying was broad with the top three being corn, sugar and soybeans. Elsewhere the net long in Arabica coffee reached a fresh five-year high at 58k lots and KCB wheat a four-year high at 65.6k lots. UPDATES from today's Market Quick TakeCrude oil (OILUKJAN22 & OILUSJAN21) turned sharply lower in early European trading as the mood across markets soured on renewed concerns about the omicron virus strain. This after Moderna’s head told the Financial Times that existing vaccines will be less effective at tackling omicron and it may take months before variant-specific jabs are available at scale. The news come days before the OPEC+ group of producers meet to discuss production levels for January. Brent crude oil already heading for its biggest monthly loss since March 2020 trades below its 200-day moving average for the first time in a year, a sign that more weakness may lie ahead, thereby raising the prospect for OPEC+ deciding to pause or perhaps even make a temporary production cut. Gold (XAUUSD) received a muted bid overnight in response to the omicron virus comments from the head of Moderna (see oil section above). In addition, comments from Fed chair Powell helped reduced 2022 rate expectations from three to two after he said the omicron virus posed risks to both sides of the central bank’s mandate for stable prices and maximum employment. Despite this development together with softer Treasury yields and a weaker dollar, gold continues to struggle attracting a safe-haven bid. Silver (XAGUSD) looks even worse having dropped to a six-week low on weakness spilling over from industrial metals. Forex:Broad dollar buying following Fed chair Powell's renomination helped drive a 20% increase in the greenback long against ten IMM currency futures and the Dollar index to $25.4 billion and near a two-year high. All the currencies tracked in this saw net selling with the biggest contributors being euro (12.6k lots), CAD (11.8k) and JPY (4.1). The net short on the latter reached 97.2k lots or the equivalent of $10.6 billion, a short of this magnitude helps explain the strength of the sell off in USDJPY since last Thursday when safe haven demand picked up as the omicron news began to spread. Despite hitting a 16-month low last week the euro short only reached 12.6k lots, a far cry from the -114k lots reached during the panic month of February last year when the pair briefly traded below €1.08. What is the Commitments of Traders report? The COT reports are issued by the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) and the ICE Exchange Europe for Brent crude oil and gas oil. They are released every Friday after the U.S. close with data from the week ending the previous Tuesday. They break down the open interest in futures markets into different groups of users depending on the asset class. Commodities: Producer/Merchant/Processor/User, Swap dealers, Managed Money and otherFinancials: Dealer/Intermediary; Asset Manager/Institutional; Leveraged Funds and otherForex: A broad breakdown between commercial and non-commercial (speculators) The reasons why we focus primarily on the behavior of the highlighted groups are: They are likely to have tight stops and no underlying exposure that is being hedged This makes them most reactive to changes in fundamental or technical price developments It provides views about major trends but also helps to decipher when a reversal is looming
Ahead Of The US CPI, Speaking Of Crude Oil And Metals - Saxo Market Call

Market Quick Take - December 1, 2021

Saxo Bank Saxo Bank 01.12.2021 09:27
Macro 2021-12-01 08:45 6 minutes to read Summary:  Even more whiplash for global markets yesterday as Fed Chair Powell has clearly set an entirely different tone ahead of his new term as Fed Chair, saying that it was time to retire the word transitory when discussing inflation and pointing to accelerating the slowing of Fed asset purchases, among other comments. This led to a sharp repricing of Fed expectations higher just after they had been taken sharply lower by the news of the omicron covid variant. What is our trading focus? Nasdaq 100 (USNAS100.I) and S&P 500 (US500.I) - the initial reaction to Powell’s statement about retiring “transitory” inflation was lower equities and higher interest rates, but the subsequent price action has not followed through. Nasdaq 100 futures, which are the most interest rate sensitive, are trading at the high end of the recent trading range around the 16,380 level with the obvious resistance level at 16,438. Short-term the price action way be confusing with low signal-to-noise ratio, but our view has been clear for over a year, and that is, that inflation is coming and in size not seen in many decades. This will have a negative effect on the most richly valued equities such as our bubble basket on stocks. Stoxx 50 (EU50.I) - one would think that Powell’s comments on inflation would lift value stocks and interest rates, and thereby creating a bigger rebound in European equities, but that is not what we are observing this morning. Stoxx 50 futures are trading around the 4,100 level with an important resistance level at 4,125; if this level can be overcome then our view is that Stoxx 50 futures could go to 4,200 and test the 200-day moving average. USDJPY and JPY crosses – whiplash for JPY cross traders yesterday, as the hawkish comments from Fed Chair Powell on inflation took Fed expectations for next year sharply back higher. Longer US yields, to which USDJPY is normally more sensitive, were less impacted, somewhat muting the impact on USDJPY, but the development came at a critical time, just after USDJPY had dipped below 112.73 range support yesterday. The reversal is a tentative sign that the pair will avoid pushing lower, but we would likely need to see the entire US yield curve lifting to have support for a renewed rally focusing on the 115.00+ recent top. EURUSD - will the ECB be forced to change its tune? Christine Lagarde’s insistence that inflation is a temporary phenomenon is under severe strain, even as she has been out this week defending this viewpoint, as was the ECB’s Schnabel, who boldly claimed that the November CPI data (more below) would prove the peak of the cycle. EURUSD churned sharply yesterday from a high of 1.1383 to a low of 1.1236 on the Fed Powell comments (below) before rebounding to 1.1336. The resilience later in the day despite a sharp repricing of Fed expectations is an interesting development, but the price action would need to threaten above 1.1500 to point to a technical reversal of the recent large sell-off. Crude oil (OILUKFEB22 & OILUSJAN21) trades sharply higher after hitting a three-month low on Tuesday in response to omicron related demand worries and general weak risk sentiment following Fed chair Powell’s comments on inflation. The market attention now turns to tomorrow’s OPEC+ meeting where the group may decide to pause production hikes while signaling a willingness to cut production should the demand suffer from fresh initiatives to curb mobility, especially for overseas travel. As a sideshow, the EIA will release its weekly inventory report later with the API reporting a 0.7m barrels draw in crude oil stock while fuel stocks rose. Gold (XAUUSD) trades higher after once again recovering from a Powell statement. Yesterday the Fed chair confirmed his recent change in focus away from creating jobs towards increasing efforts to curb elevated inflation. Risk appetite took another setback on the news but has recovered overnight as traders weighed positive regional economic data and divided views from drugmakers over how effective existing vaccines are against omicron. Overall, gold chart looks increasingly messy with no clear signal to be found at present. A break above the 21-DMA at $1820 is needed to spark fresh momentum interest while support continues to be found below $1780. US Treasuries (IEF, TLT). Powell’s testimony in front of the senate put things in perspective: inflation is not transitory, and the Federal Reserve will use its tools to stop it. These words provoked a fast bear-flattening of the yield curve where short term yields rose faster than log-term yields were dropping. We expect this trend to continue throughout winter as a new wave of covid will pin down the long part of the yield curve, but the Fed is likely to accelerate the pace of tapering. An inversion risk cannot be excluded. The 20s30s part of the yield curve is already inverted, while the 7s10s is just 7bps to get inverted. Although the 2s10s and 5s30s spreads are much wider, any flattening can pose a threat to next year’s Fed’s interest rate hike agenda. Powell and Yellen will testify again in front of the Senate today. Job numbers remain a big focus for Friday. US junk bonds (HYG, JNK). According to Bloomberg Barclays indexes, junk bonds’ OAS widened by 30bps to 330bps amid Friday’s selloff reflecting the lack of liquidity in markets. Despite negative real rates continuing to support corporate bond valuations, it’s safe to expect junk bond spreads to widen throughout the end of the year amid poor liquidity. If the volatility in rates remains sustained, the widening of spreads could accelerate, posing a threat also for stocks. German Bunds (IS0L) and Italian BTPS (BTP10). Inflation accelerated more than expected in the Eurozone during the month of November setting the yearly figure to 4.9%. Inflation figures together with the new German government adds to the catalysts of higher Bund yields. However, covid distortions are keeping yield in check. We exclude Bund yield to rise to test 0% until the new wave of covid eases. However, as soon as the worries concerning covid ease, they will resume their rise. What is going on? Fed Chair Powell confirms that Fed emphasis has shifted to inflationary risks. In testimony before a Senate committee yesterday, Fed Chair Powell waxed far more hawkish than the market anticipated on inflation concerns, saying outright that it is time to retire the word “transitory” regarding the description of inflation, that “the risk of higher inflation has increased” and that “the risk of persistent high inflation is also a major risk to getting back to such a labor market.“ (referring to the pre-pandemic labor market). Powell also pointed to the likelihood that the Fed would wind down Fed balance sheet expansion more quickly than previously anticipated: “perhaps a few months sooner”. In response, expectations for Fed rate hikes next year were jolted back higher, just after they had been jolted lower by the omicron covid variant news. Hot EU CPI numbers for November. Preliminary headline November EU CPI was out at 4.9% year-on-year, far above the 4.5% expected and the 4.1% in October and by far the highest inflation print since the launch of the euro. Core CPI rose to 2.6% year-on-year, above the 2.3% expected and the October level of 2.0%. This is also the highest level since the launch of the euro in 1999. Germany’s incoming chancellor Scholz speaks on inflation, compulsory covid vaccination. The political pressure on the ECB to act is ratcheting higher after incoming German chancellor Scholz said that action must be taken if inflation fails to drop, though he seemed now to accept the notion that inflation is linked to covid measures and the spike in energy prices. He also spoke yesterday in favor of mandatory covid shots. Salesforce shares down 6% on Q4 guidance. Investors are used to being spoiled by Salesforce with consistently beating analyst expectations, but last night the cloud application software company disappointed on Q4 guidance with revenue in line and adj EPS at $0.72-0.73 vs est. $0.82. The company also announced that Bret Taylor will become co-CEO next to founder Marc Benioff in a sign that the founder may soon step down like so many other technology founders in recent years. What are we watching next? Markets adjusting to new reality of a more hawkish Fed. In particular if the omicron variant of the covid virus proves a temporary distraction, global markets will need to adjust the major adjustment in the Federal Reserve’s focus and what that could mean for the US dollar and asset valuations ahead. Fed Chair Powell’s rhetoric yesterday likely mean a heightened reactivity to incoming data from here on out, all modulated in the very near term by headline risks in either direction on the omicron variant. The first major data points are the ISM Service index and November jobs report up on Friday. The Average Hourly Earnings could take over in importance from the payrolls change number if it shows more aggressive rises, as it seems clear that labor supply is the chief problem US companies face, as seen in record job availability and “quits” as workers leave jobs for greener pastures. ADP employment figures for November. With the US economy operating at full capacity according to estimates from CBO, continued strong job gains will add fuel to the “inflation fire”, so today’s ADP figures could more interest rates and equities. Economists are looking at 525K vs 571K in October which would be a significant two-month change for an economy that has closed the output gap, but on the other hand, the US economy is still short around 8.5mn jobs from current levels to where employment would have been if we did not have the pandemic. Earnings Watch – growth investors will have their eyes on Snowflake set to report after the market close with analysts expecting FY22 Q3 (ending 31 Oct) revenue growth of 92% y/y. Crowdstrike, being one of the fastest growing cyber security companies in the world, will also be key to watch today. Wednesday: Trip.com, Royal Bank of Canada, National Bank of Canada, Snowflake, Synopsys, Crowdstrike, Veeva Systems, Okta, Splunk, Elastic, Five Below Thursday: Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce, Toronto-Dominion Bank, Cooper Cos, Marvell Technology, DocuSign, Ulta Beauty, Asana, Dollar General, Kroger Friday: Bank of Montreal Economic calendar highlights for today (times GMT) 0730 – Switzerland Nov. CPI 0815-0900 – Euro Zone Final Nov. Manufacturing PMI 1315 – US Nov. ADP Employment Change 1330 – Canada Oct. Building Permits 1445 – US Nov. Final Markit Manufacturing PMI 1500 – US Fed Chair Powell, Treasury Secretary Yellen to testify before House panel 1500 – US Nov. ISM Manufacturing 1530 – DOE’s Weekly Crude Oil and Fuel Inventories 1900 - Fed Beige Book 0030 – Australia Oct. Trade Balance   Follow SaxoStrats on the daily Saxo Markets Call on your favorite podcast app: Apple Spotify Soundcloud Sticher
Dogecoin price could see 400% gains if DOGE holders band together

Dogecoin price could see 400% gains if DOGE holders band together

FXStreet News FXStreet News 30.11.2021 17:39
Dogecoin price is moving sideways after a breakout from a descending triangle pattern. A potential 400% move to $1.08 will face obstacles up to $0.35, beyond which, DOGE should rally swiftly. On-chain metrics are hinting at an increase in large transactions and a paradigm shift in the nature of holders. Dogecoin price is at a crucial tipping point in its evolution with the potential for it to trigger a massive volatile move. Hurdles exist, however, that will make it difficult to reach its intended target, of a new all-time high. Dogecoin price at make or break levels Dogecoin price has set up three lower highs and two higher lows, which when connected using trend lines reveals a descending triangle. This technical formation forecasts a 361% upswing to $1.09, obtained by adding the distance between the first swing high and low to the breakout point at $0.24. DOGE breached the triangle’s hypotenuse on October 18 at $0.24. Since this point, the meme coin has struggled to move higher but failed. Interestingly, Dogecoin price has been moving sideways and has retested the $0.193 support level thrice since August 3 with the latest revisit on November 26. This created a triple-tap setup, a bullish technical formation that forecasts a reversal in the trend. Since Shiba Inu has stolen DOGE’s spotlight, things have been calm and consolidative for the original meme coin. If the buying pressure increases, however, pushing Dogecoin price to pierce through the $0.29 level to $0.35, and it produces a daily close above it, it will trigger an uptrend. In this scenario, it will allow market makers to collect the sell-stop liquidity resting above $0.35. This development will allow DOGE to create a platform for the next leg-up at $0.44. Clearing this hurdle will open the path to retest the current all-time high for Dogecoin price at $0.74. According to this prediction, DOGE could extend its bull rally to tag $1.09, its intended target. Due to the recent downswing, this upswing will represent a 400% gain from the current position at $0.22. DOGE/USDT 1-day chart As mentioned earlier, Shiba Inu seems to have siphoned off the hype, investors, and capital from Dogecoin, affecting its price, but things seem to be reverting, with some on-chain metrics suggesting a flip of the narrative is possible. On-chain metrics predict a bright future Looking at the transaction data tells a story about the nature of investors. Large transactions track transfers that are $100,000 or more. An increase in this metric serves as a proxy for institutions and their investment thesis. Over the past six months, the number of such transactions has increased by 70.7% from 1,570 to 2,680. This uptick in the metric suggests that high networth investors are starting to take interest in DOGE at the current price levels. DOGE large transaction chart While the above metric provides an insight into the potential investments, IntoTheBlock’s Global In/Out of the Money (GIOM) model shows where significant blockades are present. This fundamental index reveals that the DOGE will face formidable challenges ranging from $0.30 to $0.34. Here roughly 500,000 addresses that purchased 47 billion DOGE are “Out of the Money” and are likely to sell to breakeven, increasing the selling pressure. If buyers overcome this uptick in sell-side momentum and produce a daily close above $0.35, however, it will clear the daily demand mentioned above. This move will also open the path up for market makers to collect liquidity. All in all, this on-chain metric also promotes a bullish idea for DOGE with a contingency that the bullish momentum pushes the meme coin above $0.35. DOGE GIOM chart While the on-chain metrics described above serve as a tailwind for the bullish thesis, the new addresses joining the network add a dent to it. This metric shows that new users joining the Dogecoin network over the past six months have declined by 34.7% from 34,320 to 22,380. This reduction indicates that despite the capital inflows observed in the large transaction metric, a majority of investors are not yet interested in DOGE. Hence, this divergence between the new addresses and the large transaction chart paints indecision. DOGE new addresses chart The discrepancy noticed above can be explained in the holders’ chart which shows a paradigm shift. In November 2020, the composition of DOGE investors was 74.2% holders (1+ years), 18.6% Cruisers (1 month to 1 year) and 7.2% traders (less than a month). As of November 2021, this composition has changed and shows that cruisers are currently dominating with a 50.7% stake, while holders have dropped to 42.1%. This drastic decrease in the long-term holders suggests that these investors have been distributing their holdings over the past year ie., indicating increased sell-side pressure, which adds credence to DOGE’s lackluster performance over the period. In summary, if long-term holders stop offloading their DOGE holdings, investors can expect Dogecoin price to start inflating. DOGE Ownership chart On the other hand, if the selling pressure increases, knocking Dogecoin price below the $0.193 support level, it will lead to a retest of the descending triangle’s base at $0.16. If the bears produce a daily candlestick below this crucial barrier, it will open up DOGE to a massive 45% crash to $0.09, with a potential pitstop at $0.12.  
Intraday Market Analysis – Yen’s Rally Gains Traction

Intraday Market Analysis – Yen’s Rally Gains Traction

John Benjamin John Benjamin 29.11.2021 10:01
EURJPY breaks double bottom The safe-haven Japanese yen soars on news of a vaccine-resistant covid variant. A bearish MA cross on the daily chart indicates weakness in the euro’s previous rebound. The pair has closed below last September’s low at 127.90, a major floor to keep price action afloat in the medium term. This is a bearish signal that the sell-off is yet to end with 127.00 as the next support. The RSI’s double bottom in the oversold area may attract some buying interest. However, the bulls will need to lift 129.50 before a reversal could take shape. GBPUSD struggles to bounce back The pound continues on its way down against the US dollar over divergent monetary policy. The pair is hovering near a 12-month low around 1.3280. Sentiment remains bearish after a failed rebound above 1.3420. A bullish RSI divergence suggests a deceleration in the downward momentum. 1.3390 is the first hurdle ahead. Its breach would prompt the short side to cover and open the door to the daily resistance at 1.3510. Otherwise, a bearish breakout would send the price to 1.3200. GER 40 to test major floor The Dax 40 plunged as investors fret that new lockdowns could wreck the recovery. The gap below 15760 has forced leveraged buyers to bail out, stirring up volatility in the process. The momentum is typical of a catalyst-driven sell-off. Below 15150 the index is testing the psychological level of 15000. The RSI’s oversold situation has attracted a ‘buying-the-dips’ crowd in the demand zone. Further down, 14820 is a key floor to maintain the uptrend. 15530 has become the closest resistance in case of a rebound.
Fragile Calm Returns and Powell's Anti-Inflation Rhetoric Ratchets Up

Fragile Calm Returns and Powell's Anti-Inflation Rhetoric Ratchets Up

Marc Chandler Marc Chandler 01.12.2021 14:08
December 01, 2021  $USD, China, Currency Movement, EMU, Federal Reserve, Japan, PMI, South Korea, UK Overview:  Into the uncertainty over the implications of Omicron, the Federal Reserve Chairman injected a particularly hawkish signal into the mix in his testimony before the Senate.  These are the two forces that are shaping market developments.  Travel restrictions are being tightened, though the new variant is being found in more countries, and it appears to be like closing the proverbial barn door after the horses have bolted. Equities are higher.  The MSCI Asia Pacific Index, led by South Korea, and India, rose for the first time in four sessions, and Europe's Stoxx 600 is recouping more of yesterday's loss.  US futures are trading more than 1% higher.  Benchmark yields are higher.  The 10-year US Treasury yield is up four basis points though is still below 1.50%.  European yields are mostly 3-5 bp higher, though Italy's benchmark is 8 bp higher near 1.05%.  The dollar remains the fulcrum of the see-saw, but the funding currencies (yen, Swiss franc, and euro) are lower, and the dollar bloc is higher.  The dollar is pulling back against the Turkish lira after approaching TRY14 yesterday, even though President Erdogan's rhetoric about pushing for even lower rates seemed to have ratcheted up.  Emerging market currencies are more broadly mixed, but the JP Morgan Emerging Market Currency Index is up for the third consecutive session to match the longest advance in nearly three months.  Gold posted an outside down day yesterday, but there has been no follow-through selling today, and the yellow metal is consolidating inside yesterday's range.  January WTI slipped below $65 yesterday and is pushing above $69 today ahead of the OPEC meeting.   Dutch natural gas prices are firm, recouping most of yesterday's loss.  Iron ore and copper prices are also retracing yesterday's weakness.   Asia Pacific China's Caixin manufacturing PMI unexpectedly slipped below the 50 boom/bust level, albeit barely (49.9).  It was expected to be unchanged at 50.6.  It had eased below 50 in August (49.2).  Recall that the world's second-largest economy nearly stagnated in Q3 (0.2% quarter-over-quarter), and it appears to be accelerating here in Q4. Still, many look for the PBOC to provide more stimulus, perhaps in the form of a cut in reserve requirements, as it did this past July.  Separately,  officials seem to be cracking down harder on the "variable interest entity" structure that characterizes offshore listings, especially in the US.   Japan's November manufacturing PMI was revised to 54.5 from 54.2.  It stood at 53.2 in October.  The world's third-largest economy is recovering.  Australia reported Q3 GDP contracted by 1.9%, less than the 2.7% contraction economists had projected (Bloomberg median).  Its economy also is recovering.  The November manufacturing PMI was confirmed at 59.2, up from 58.2 previously.  House prices in Australia and New Zealand rose last month but sequentially at a slower pace.  To round out this regional overview, note that South Korea's exports in November were stronger than expected, pointing to robust foreign demand.  Exports rose 32.1% year-over-year.  Economists (Bloomberg median) expected a 27.2% pace after 24.1% in October.   It is the strongest pace since August.  Imports jumped 43.6% year-over-year, which was also more than expected, and follows a 37.7% increase previously.   The dollar is firm after being sold to its lowest level against the yen yesterday since October 11 (~JPY112.55).  It stalled near JPY113.60 in late Asia, which is slightly lower than the high seen in the US yesterday in response to the Fed's Powell hawkish pivot. However, barring fresh negative impulses, the JPY113 area may offer support again.  The Australian dollar is firm near yesterday's highs after falling to a new low for the year yesterday.  That low (~$0.7065) approached the (38.2%) retracement objective of the Aussie's rally from the March 2020 low near $0.5500.  A move now above $0.7080 would lift the technical tone and target the $0.7120-$0.7150 area.  The greenback initially fell to nearly CNY6.36, just ahead of the year's low recorded in May near CNY6.3570, before recovering to around CNY6.3720.  Resistance may be seen in the CNY6.3750-CNY6.3800 area.  The PBOC set the dollar's reference rate CNY6.3693.  The market (Bloomberg survey) had anticipated CNY6.3682.   Europe Covid was surging in several parts in Europe, including Germany, before the sequencing of the Omicron variant, and things have gotten worse.  The economic impact is beginning to be evident.  Germany's October retail sales, which economists had expected to recover after falling by 1.9% in September, disappointed with a 0.3% decline. The final November manufacturing PMI was revised to 57.4 from the flash 57.6 (and 57.8 in October).  It is the fourth consecutive decline.  The French manufacturing PMI was revised to 55.9 from the preliminary estimate of 54.6 (53.6 in October).  It is the first gain since May.  Economists hoped that Spain's manufacturing PMI was going to rise after falling for two months through October.  Instead, it fell again (51.1 vs. 57.4) to stand at its lowest level since March.  Italy is the standout.  Its manufacturing PMI was stronger than expected, jumping to 62.8 from 59.7, representing a new cyclical peak.  The aggregate for the eurozone as a whole edged up to 58.4 from 58.3 in October, but slower than the 58.6 flash estimate.  Still, it managed to eke out its first gain since June.  The UK's November manufacturing PMI stands at 58.1, down slightly from the preliminary estimate (58.2).  It was at 57.8 in October.  It is the second consecutive monthly gain after falling from June through September.  The UK economy grew by 1.3% in Q3 and is expected to slow to 1.1% this quarter.  The implied yield of the December 2021 short-sterling interest rate futures fell for eight sessions coming into this week.  It has been choppy so far this week, and net-net, the yield is about 1.5 bp higher than at the end of last week.  The overnight index swaps imply about a 40% chance of a hike next month.   The euro traded on both sides of Monday's range yesterday and closed above Monday's high.  However, there has been no follow-through buying today, and a consolidative tone has emerged.  A move above $1.1400 is needed to lift the tone, and it most likely won't happen today.  A 1.2 bln euro option is struck there that expires today.  The focus is on the downside. So far, it has held above $1.13, and support is seen around $1.1290.  Sterling recorded the low for the year yesterday, a little below $1.3200.  It stopped shy of our $1.3165 target, the (38.2%) retracement of cable's recovery from the March 2020 low. Its bounce off yesterday's lows fizzled out near $1.3330. Note that there is a GBP600 mln option at $1.33 that expires tomorrow.   America We have argued that the US October CPI surprise (6.1%) was a pivot point for Fed officials, even a reputed dove like San Francisco's Daly.  We also detected a change in rhetoric, and this point was driven home by Fed Chair Powell yesterday.  He clearly brandished his anti-inflaton credentials. Powell declared that the Fed would use its tools to step inflation from becoming entrenched.  At the same time, he recognized that it cannot assess Omicron now, though it clearly poses a risk.  Still, the next FOMC meeting is two weeks away, and by then, more information will be known.  Powell confirmed that the Fed would discuss the pace of tapering.  While the Fed will stop referring to inflation as transitory, Powell echoed Yellen's recent assessment that price pressures are projected to ease in H2 22.  Of note, the short end of the coupon curve sold off, but the long end remained firm.  The 30-year bond yield slipped to its lowest level since January, and the 2-10 year curve flattened 13 bp to below 90 bp, the flattest in 10 months.   The North American economic calendar is jammed today.  The US sees ADP's private-sector jobs estimate. Around 525k jobs are expected to have been filled, down from 571 in October.  In the last three months, the ADP estimate has undershot the official measures by an average of 23k.  Year-to-date, the average under-estimate is a little more than 50k.  November auto sales are expected to have risen for the second consecutive month after falling from May through September.  The final manufacturing PMI will also be reported.  The flash reading was the first increase since July.  The ISM manufacturing survey will also be published.  It has been a bit more resilient than the PMI.  Late in the session, the Beige Book will be released.  Canada reports October building permits (expected softer after the 4.3% gain in September) and the manufacturing PMI (57.7 in October).  Mexico reports its manufacturing PMI and IMEF surveys.  The central bank's inflation report is also due.  Mexico reports October worker remittances today.  They have averaged $4.15 bln a month this year through September.  The average for the same period in 2020 was $3.33 bln, and in 2019 $3.03 bln.  Note that the average trade deficit this year (through October) is almost $1.2 bln.   After reaching almost CAD1.2840 yesterday, its highest level since the September FOMC meeting, the greenback has come back offered today. It briefly and marginally traded below yesterday's CAD1.2730 low.  It needs to convincingly break below CAD1.2720 to be of any technical significance.  Initial resistance now may be seen near CAD1.2780.  The dollar peaked against the Mexican peso at the end of last week near MXN22.1550.  It is moving lower for the third consecutive session, and found initial support around MXN21.27 today.  The MXN21.20 area is the halfway mark of last month's range.  A move above  MXN21.40 may signal the dollar's downside correction is over.   Disclaimer
FX Update: Powell is now an inflation fighter, not a punchbowl spiker

FX Update: Powell is now an inflation fighter, not a punchbowl spiker

John Hardy John Hardy 01.12.2021 16:30
Forex 2021-12-01 15:25 4 minutes to read Summary:  Fed Chair Powell cemented recent evidence that the Fed has changed its stripes from a punch bowl refiller for the economy and the labor market to an inflation fighter at large. The market is finding it tough to absorb this message, given the recent market choppiness and virus distractions, but interesting that the US dollar has not found more strength on this momentous pivot. FX Trading focus: Hawkish broadside from Powell Fed Chair Powell cemented the impression that the Fed has shifted firmly into inflation fighting mode with an appearance yesterday before a Fed panel. The rhetoric was direct and of a make-no-mistake variety. Powell said that the end of balance sheet expansion would likely wind down a few  months sooner than originally foreseen, even with the current omicron variant of covid concerns. He also spelled out that it is probably time to retire the word “transitory” when discussing inflation, ad said that the risk of higher inflation has increased. Perhaps most interesting was a comment that persistent higher inflation brought a risk to getting the labor market back to where it was pre-covid. It is crystal clear at this point that the Fed has pivoted to inflation-fighting and tightening and will move in that direction as quickly as it can until the inflation numbers improve markedly. Of course, the market was already adjusting to clear signs that the Fed is moving into a far more hawkish stance early last week, only to be sidelined viciously by the omicron variant worries in recent days. Were it not for that interlude, Fed expectations would likely be at new cycle highs as yesterday’s signals from Powell make the Fed shift as clear as day. As it is, we have only clawed back a majority of the 2022 hikes priced in pricing of Fed rate hikes, still some 8 basis points to go for end of year Fed pricing (the “omicron discount” being perhaps 15 basis points or more?). The two curious things are that the US yield curve continues to viciously flatten and the market continues to price the terminal Fed rate for the coming hiking cycle at 2.00%. The inability for the longer yields to lift higher recently may be reining in the USD upside for. The other indicator besides yield-curve shifts that is making waves here on my radar screen of financial conditions is the measure of corporate credit, where spreads have blown wider, as discussed over the last couple of episodes of the Saxo Market Call podcast. The bluntness from the Fed yesterday may have driven the particularly bad day for junk bonds as the new style from the Fed could lead investors in the riskiest debt to conclude that they may be allowed to twist in the breeze down the road if inflation levels stay high, rather than receiving endless bailouts that keep zombie companies in business and able to forever roll forward their debts. We are set up for an interesting 2022 that will likely look very different from 2021. The shift in Fed rhetoric will make the market extra-sensitive to US data and developments that impact inflation, from energy prices, to the CPI/PCE data itself and the average hourly earnings data perhaps even more than the usual nonfarm payrolls change focus. Today’s Beige Book could be interesting for anecdotal evidence from interviews with companies on their impression of supply constraints, wage adjustments and issues finding qualified workers, etc. Today’s November ADP Payrolls was another strong 500k+ as expected. Chart: USDJPYUSDJPY was handcuffed by developments yesterday – on the one hand with the USD supported by a rise in Fed expectations, but on the other hand, JPY traders finding no fresh reason to bid up the JPY as the long end of the US yield curve remains pinned at quite low yields and there has been no shift in the Fed’s “terminal rate” – where the market sees the Fed rate hike cycle peeking out. So the price action bobbed well back above the 112.73 range pivot level that was broken yesterday, but has a steep wall to climb to threaten the 115.00+ cycle highs again, something that would likely require the entire Fed yield curve to lift, and more aggressively than expectations for policy normalization elsewhere. Source: Saxo Group Table: FX Board of G10 and CNH trend evolution and strengthAgain, the market is finding the reaction function increasingly difficult to the recent jolts in inputs. Note the huge momentum shift in SEK, where the market overdid the recent squeeze, but the strength there will likely only improve once the euro bottoms and the outlook for EU yields and fiscal improves. Table: FX Board Trend Scoreboard for individual pairs.Well entrenched trends are few and far between, but the EURCNH and EURCHF downtrends stand out, with the latter’s lack of volatility after recent direction changes remarkable. The Swiss franc does well as a safe haven and does well because the SNB can’t be seen weakening the currency when inflation pressures are rising. Upcoming Economic Calendar Highlights (all times GMT) 1500 – US Fed Chair Powell, Treasury Secretary Yellen to testify before House panel 1500 – US Nov. ISM Manufacturing 1530 – DOE’s Weekly Crude Oil and Fuel Inventories 1900 - Fed Beige Book 0030 – Australia Oct. Trade Balance
December Monthly

December Monthly

Marc Chandler Marc Chandler 02.12.2021 15:00
December 01, 2021  $USD, Macro The pandemic is still with us as the year winds down and has not yet become endemic, like the seasonal flu.  Even before the new Omicron variant was sequenced, Europe was being particularly hard hit, and social restrictions, especially among the unvaccinated, were spurring social strife.  US cases, notably in the Midwest, were rising, and there is fear that it is 4-6 weeks behind Europe in experiencing the surge.  Whatever herd immunity is, it has not been achieved.  Moreover, despite plenty of vaccines in high-income countries, inoculation efforts in many low-income countries won't begin in earnest until next year.   That said, the new variant has injected a new element into the mix, and it is with a heightened degree of uncertainty that we share our December outlook.  Given the unknowns, policymakers can choose the kind of error they are willing to make. They are trying to minimize their maximum regret.  The utmost regret is that the mutation is dangerous and renders the existing vaccines and treatment significantly less effective.  This will leave them vulnerable to accusations of over-reacting if the Omicron turns out to be a contagious but less deadly variation.   Meanwhile, there has been some relief to the supply chain disruptions.  Covid-related factory closures in Asia, the energy shortage, and port congestion are easing. Large US retailers have stocked up for the holiday shopping season, some of which chartered their own ships to ensure delivery. There are also preliminary signs that the semiconductor chip shortage may be past its worst.  Indeed, the recovery of the auto sector and rebuilding of inventories will help extend the economic expansion well into next year, even though fiscal and monetary policy are less supportive for most high-income countries.  The flash November US manufacturing PMI saw supplier delivery delays fall to six-month lows.   We assume that the US macabre debt ceiling ritual will not lead to a default, and even though it distorted some bill auctions, some resolution is highly probable.  The debate over the Build Back Better initiative, approved by the House of Representatives, will likely be scaled back by moderate Democratic Senators and Republicans.  Besides assessing the risks posed by the new variant, the focus in December is back on monetary policy.  Four large central banks stand out.  The Chinese economy has slowed the People's Bank of China quarterly monetary report modified language that signals more monetary support may be forthcoming.  Many observers see another reduction in reserve requirements as a reasonable step.  Unlike in the US and Europe, which saw bank lending dry-up in the housing market crisis (2008-2009), Beijing is pressing state-owned banks to maintain lending, including the property sector.   The Federal Reserve meets on December 15.  There are two key issues.  First, we expect the FOMC to accelerate the pace of tapering to allow it to have the option to raise rates in Q2 22.  The Fed's commitment to the sequence (tapering, hikes, letting balance sheet run-off) and the current pace of tapering deny the central bank the needed flexibility.  The November CPI will be reported on December 10.  The headline will likely rise to around 6.7%, while the core rate may approach 5%.  Second, the new "Summary of Economic Projections" will probably show more Fed officials seeing the need to hike rates in 2022.  In September, only half did.  The rhetoric of the Fed's leadership has changed.  It will not refer to inflation as transitory and is signaling its intention to act.  The European Central Bank and the Bank of England meet the day after the FOMC.  The ECB staff will update its forecasts, and the key here is where it sees inflation at the end of the forecasting period.  In September, it anticipated that CPI would be at 1.5% at the end of 2023.  Some ECB members argued it was too low.   It may be revised higher, but the key for the policy outlook is whether it is above the 2% target.  We doubt that this will be the case.  While the ECB will likely announce that it intends on respecting the current end of the Pandemic Emergency Purchase Program next March, its QE will persist. The pre-crisis Asset Purchase Program is expected to continue and perhaps even expand in Q2 22.  The "modalities" of the post-emergency bond-buying program, size, duration, and flexibility (self-imposed limits) will be debated between the hawks and doves.  With eurozone inflation approaching 5% and Germany CPI at 6%, the hard-money camp will have a new ally at the German Finance Ministry as the FDP leader Linder takes the post.  On the other hand, the Social Democrats will name a Weidmann's replacement at the head of the Bundesbank, and nearly anyone will be less hawkish.   While we correctly anticipated that the Bank of England would defy market expectations and stand pat in November, the December meeting is trickier.  The decision could ultimately turn on the next employment and CPI reports due 1-2 days before the BOE meeting.  The risk is that inflation will continue to accelerate into early next year and that the labor market is healing after the furlough program ended in September.  On balance, we suspect it will wait until next year to hike rates and finish its bonds purchases next month as planned.   Having been caught wrong-footed in November, many market participants are reluctant to be bitten by the same dog twice. As a result, the swaps market appears to be rising in about a 35% chance of a 15 bp move that would bring the base rate up to 25 bp.  Sterling dropped almost 1.4% (or nearly two cents) on November 4, the most since September 2020 when the BOE failed to deliver the hike that the market thought the BOE had signaled.   The combination of a strong dollar and the Fed tapering weighed emerging market currencies as a whole.  The JP Morgan Emerging Market Currency Index fell by about 4.5% in November, its third consecutive monthly decline, bringing the year-to-date loss to almost 10%.  It fell roughly 5.7% in 2020.  Turkey took the cake, though, with the lira falling nearly 30% on the month.  It had depreciated by 15% in the first ten months of the year.  This follows a 20% depreciation last year.  Ten years ago, a dollar would buy about 1.9 lira.  Now it can buy more than 13 lira.  The euro's weakness was a drag, and the geopolitical developments (e.g., Ukraine, Belarus) weighed on central European currencies. The central bank of Hungary turned more aggressive by hiking the one-week deposit rate by 110 bp (in two steps) after the 30 bp hike in the base rate failed to have much impact.  The forint's 3.1% loss was the most among EU members.   Colombian peso was the weakest currency in Latam, depreciating by almost 5%. It was not rewarded for delivering a larger than expected 50 bp rate hike in late October.  Bannockburn's GDP-weighted global currency index (BWCI) fell by nearly 1% in November, the largest monthly decline since June.  It reflected the decline of the world's largest currencies against the dollar.  Three currencies in the index proved resilient  On the GDP-weighted basis, China has immense gravity, with a 21.8% weighting (the six largest EM economies, including China, account for a 32.5% of the BWCI). It appreciated by about two-thirds of a percent. The Brazilian real managed to rise (~0.25%) too.  Since the day before the Omicron variant was sequenced, the Japanese yen gained a little more than 2%, reversing the earlier decline that had brought it to four-year lows.  It rose by  0.7% in November, making it the strongest currency in the index.  Among the major currencies, the Australian dollar fell the most, declining about 5.2%.  The Canadian dollar was next, with around a 3% loss.   As it turns out, the dollar (Dollar Index) recorded its low for the year as shocking events were unfolding in Washington on January 6.  The bottomed against the yen and euro the same day.   The greenback did not bottom against the Australian dollar until February, but it took it until early June to put in a low against sterling and the Canadian dollar.  The BWCI peaked in early June and, by the end of last month, had retreated by about 2.7%.  We suspect it may decline by another 2%, which would return it the levels of late 2019.  That, in turn, implies the risk of a stronger dollar into the first part of next year.     Dollar:  The jump in US CPI to above 6%, and a strong sense that it is not the peak, spurred speculation that the Federal Reserve would likely accelerate the pace of tapering at the December meeting. Several Fed officials seemed sympathetic, including San Francisco President Daly, who is perceived to be a dove. The minutes of the November meeting underscored the central bank's flexibility over the pace of tapering.  At the same time, most of the high-frequency data for October came in stronger than expected, lending credence to ideas that after a disappointing Q3, the world's largest economy is accelerating again in Q4.  The divergence of monetary policy and the subsequent widening interest rate differentials is the primary driver of expectations for dollar appreciation against the euro and yen.  The market had been leaning toward three rates hikes in 2022 before news of the new Covid mutation emerged and trimmed the odds.  Powell was renominated for a second term at the helm of the Federal Reserve, Brainard was nominated to be Vice-Chairman.  There is still the Vice-Chair for supervision and an empty governor seat for President to Biden to fill.  In addition to the changes in leadership, the rotation of the voting members of the FOMC brings in a somewhat more hawkish bias next year.   Euro:  In contrast with the US, eurozone growth is set to slow in Q4. After two quarters that growth exceeded 2% quarter-over-quarter, growth is likely to moderate to below 1% in Q4 21 and Q1 22.  Food and energy are driving inflation higher.  The EC continues to negotiate with the UK over changes to the Northern Ireland Protocol.  The dispute over fishing licenses and migrant crossing of the channel are also unresolved sources of tension with the UK. Tensions between the EC and Poland/Hungary over the rule of law, judicial independence, and civil liberties have also not been settled.  As was the case in the spring, Russia's troop and artillery movement threatened Ukraine, though the tension on the Poland/Belarus border has eased.  The ECB's leadership continues to maintain the price pressures are related to the unusual set of circumstances but are ultimately temporary.  Its December 16 meeting, the last one before Bundesbank President Weidmann steps down, is critical. In addition to confirming the end of the Pandemic Emergency Purchase Program in March 2022, and the expansion of the Asset Purchase Program, the ECB staff will update its inflation forecasts.  The focus here is on the 2023 CPI projection of 1.5%.  There was a push back against it in September, and a slight upward revision is likely. Nevertheless, it will probably remain below the 2% target.  The swaps market is pricing in a 25 bp hike in 2023.   (November indicative closing prices, previous in parentheses)   Spot: $1.1335 ($1.1560) Median Bloomberg One-month Forecast $1.1375 ($1.1579)  One-month forward  $1.1350 ($1.1568)    One-month implied vol  7.1%  (5.1%)         Japanese Yen:  Japan has a new prime minister who has put together a large fiscal stimulus package that will help fuel the economic recovery that had begun getting traction since the formal state of emergency was lifted at the end of September.  After a frustratingly slow start, the inoculation efforts have started bearing fruit, with vaccination rates surpassing the US and many European countries.  Unlike most other high-income countries, Japan continues to experience deflationary pressures.  Food and energy prices may be concealing it in the CPI measure, but the GDP deflator in Q2 and Q3 was  -1.1%. However, the BOJ does not seem inclined to take additional measures and has reduced its equity and bond-buying efforts.  The exchange rate remains sensitive to the movement of the US 10-year note yield, which has chopped mostly between 1.50% and 1.70%. With a couple of exceptions in both directions, the greenback has traded in a JPY113-JPY115 range.  The emergence of the new Covid mutation turned the dollar back after threatening to break higher.  A convincing move above the JPY115.50 area would likely coincide with higher US rates and initially target the JPY118 area.    Spot: JPY113.10 (JPY113.95)       Median Bloomberg One-month Forecast JPY113.30 (JPY112.98)      One-month forward JPY113.00 (JPY113.90)    One-month implied vol  8.2% (6.4%)   British Pound:  Sterling never fully recovered from disappointment that the Bank of England did not hike rates in early November.  Market participants had understood the hawkish rhetoric, including by Governor Bailey, to signal a hike.  The implied yield of the December 2021 short-sterling interest rate futures plummeted by 30 bp by the end of the month, and sterling has not seen $1.36, let alone $1.37, since then.  Indeed, sterling chopped lower and recorded new lows for the year in late November near $1.3200.  Growth in the UK peaked in Q2 at 5.5% as it recovered from the Q1 contraction.  It slowed to a 1.3% pace in Q3 and looks to be slowing a bit more here in Q4.  The petty corruption scandals and ill-conceived speeches by Prime Minister Johnson have seen Labour move ahead in some recent polls.  An election does not need to be called until May 2024, but the flagging support may spur a cabinet reshuffle.  The next important chart point is not until around $1.3165 and then the $1.30 area, which holds primarily psychological significance.       Spot: $1.3300 ($1.3682)    Median Bloomberg One-month Forecast $1.3375 ($1.3691)  One-month forward $1.3315 ($1.3680)   One-month implied vol 7.5% (6.8%)      Canadian Dollar:  The Canadian dollar appreciated by almost 2.4% in October and gave it all back, plus some in November.  Indeed, the loss was sufficient to push it fractionally lower for the year (-0.4%), though it remains the best performing major currency against the US dollar.   The three major drivers of the exchange rate moved against the Canadian dollar last month.  First, its two-year premium over the US narrowed by 17 bp, the most in four years.  Second, the price of January WTI tumbled by around 18.2%.  Commodity prices fell more broadly, and the CRB Index snapped a seven-month rally with a 7.8% decline.  Third, the risk appetites faltered is reflected in the equity markets. The Delta Wave coupled with the new variant may disrupt growth.  Still, the swaps market has a little more than two hikes discounted over the next six months.   The government is winding down its emergency fiscal measures, but the spring budget and election promises mean that the fiscal consolidation next year will be soft.     Spot: CAD1.2775 (CAD 1.2388)  Median Bloomberg One-month Forecast CAD1.2685 (CAD1.2395) One-month forward CAD1.2770 (CAD1.2389)    One-month implied vol 7.2% (6.2%)      Australian Dollar:  The Australian dollar fell by more than 5% last month, slightly less than it did in March 2020.  It did not have an advancing week in November after rallying every week in October.  Australia's two-year premium over the US was chopped to less than 10 bp in November from nearly 28 bp at the end of October.  The Reserve Bank of Australia pushed back against aggressive rate hike speculation.   The unexpected loss of jobs in October for the third consecutive month took a toll on the Australian dollar, which proceeded to trend lower and recorded the low for the year on November 30, slightly below $0.7065.  A break of $0.7050 would initially target $0.7000, but convincing penetration could spur another 2-2.5-cent drop.  The 60-day rolling correlation between- changes in the Australian dollar and the CRB commodity index weakened from over 0.6% in October to below 0.4% in November. The correlation had begun recovering as the month drew to a close.       Spot:  $0.7125 ($0.7518)        Median Bloomberg One-Month Forecast $0.7195 ($0.7409)      One-month forward  $0.7135 ($0.7525)     One-month implied vol 9.7%  (9.1%)        Mexican Peso:  The broadly stronger US dollar and the prospects of more accelerated tapering weighed on emerging market currencies in November, but domestic considerations also weighed on the peso.   The Mexican peso fell by around 4.1%, the most since March 2020.  The economy unexpectedly contracted by 0.4% in Q3.  There is little fiscal support to speak of, while monetary policy is becoming less accommodative too slowly compared with some other emerging markets, such as Brazil.  Price pressures are still accelerating, and the bi-weekly CPI rose above 7% in mid-November. The swaps market discounts nearly a 25 bp hike a month for the next six months.  The government's policies, especially in the energy and service sectors, are not attractive to investors.  President AMLO dealt another blow to investor confidence by retracting the appointment of former Finance Minister Herrera for his deputy to head up the central bank starting in January.  This is seen potentially undermining one of the most credible institutions in Mexico.  Lastly, Mexico's trade balance has deteriorated sharply in recent months and through October has recorded an average monthly trade deficit of nearly $1.2 bln this year.  In the same period, in 2020, it enjoyed an average monthly surplus of almost $2.5 bln, and in the first ten months of 2019, the average monthly trade surplus was a little more than $150 mln.     Spot: MXN21.46 (MXN20.56)   Median Bloomberg One-Month Forecast  MXN21.23 (MXN20.42)   One-month forward  MXN21.60 (MXN20.65)     One-month implied vol 14.9% (9.6%)      Chinese Yuan:  The Chinese yuan has been remarkably stable against the US dollar, and given the greenback's strength, it means the yuan has appreciated sharply on a trade-weighted basis.  Going into the last month of the year, the yuan's 2.6% gain this year is the best in the world.  Chinese officials have signaled their displeasure with what it sees as a one-way market.  At best, it has orchestrated a broadly sideways exchange rate against the dollar, mainly between CNY6.37 and CNY6.40. The lower end of the dollar's range was under pressure as November drew to a close.   Even though the Chinese economy is likely to accelerate from the near-stagnation in Q3 (0.2% quarter-over-quarter GDP), it remains sufficiently weak that the PBOC is expected to consider new stimulative measures.  It last reduced reserves requirements in July, and this seems to be the preferred avenue rather than rate cuts.  Yet, given the interest rate premium (the 10-year yield is around 2.85%), record trade surpluses ($84.5 bln in October), portfolio inflows, and limited outflows, one would normally expect a stronger upward pressure on the exchange rate.    Spot: CNY6.3645 (CNY6.4055) Median Bloomberg One-month Forecast  CNY6.38 (CNY6.4430)  One-month forward CNY6.3860 (CNY6.4230)    One-month implied vol  3.5% (3.5%)    Disclaimer
Hawks Triumph, Doves Lose, Gold Bulls Cry!

Hawks Triumph, Doves Lose, Gold Bulls Cry!

Arkadiusz Sieron Arkadiusz Sieron 02.12.2021 17:20
The hawkish revolution continues. Powell, among the screams of monetary doves, suggested this week that tapering could be accelerated in December! People live unaware that an epic battle between good and evil, the light and dark side of the Force, hard-working entrepreneurs and tax officials is waged every day. What’s more, hawks and doves constantly fight as well, and this week brought a victory for the hawks among the FOMC. The triumph came on Tuesday when Fed Chair Jerome Powell testified before Congress. He admitted that inflation wasn’t “transitory”, as it is only expected to ease in the second half of 2022. Inflation is therefore more persistent and broad-based than the Fed stubbornly maintained earlier this year, contrary to evidence and common sense: Generally, the higher prices we’re seeing are related to the supply and demand imbalances that can be traced directly back to the pandemic and the reopening of the economy. But it’s also the case that price increases have spread much more broadly and I think the risk of higher inflation has increased. Importantly, Powell also agreed that “it’s probably a good time to retire that word.” You don’t say! Hence, the Fed was wrong, and I was right. Hurray! However, it’s a Pyrrhic victory for gold bulls. This is because the recognition of the persistence of inflation pushes the Fed toward a more hawkish position. Indeed, Powell suggested that the FOMC participants could discuss speeding up the taper of quantitative easing in December: At this point the economy is very strong and inflationary pressures are high and it is therefore appropriate, in my view, to consider wrapping up the taper of our asset purchases, which we actually announced at the November meeting, perhaps a few months sooner, and I expect that we will discuss that at our upcoming meeting in a couple of weeks. What’s more, Powell seemed to be unaffected by the Omicron coronavirus strain news. He was a bit concerned, but not about its disturbing impact on the demand side of the economy; he found supply-chain disruptions that could intensify inflation way more important. That’s yet another manifestation of Powell’s hawkish stance.   Implications for Gold What does the Fed’s hawkish tilt imply for the gold market? Well, gold bulls get along with doves, not hawks. A more aggressive tightening cycle, including faster tapering of asset purchases, could boost expectations of more decisive interest rates hikes. In turn, the prospects of a more hawkish Fed could increase the bond yields and strengthen the US dollar. All this sounds bearish for gold. Indeed, the London price of gold dropped on Wednesday below $1,800… again, as the chart above shows. Hence, gold’s inability to stay above $1,800 is disappointing, especially in the face of high inflation and market uncertainty. Investors seem to have once again believed that the Fed will be curbing inflation. Well, that’s possible, but my claim is that despite a likely acceleration in the pace of the taper, inflation will remain high for a while. I bet that despite the recent hawkish tilt, the Fed will stay behind the curve. This means that the real interest rates should stay negative, providing support for gold prices. The previous tightening cycle brought the federal funds rate to 2.25-2.5%, and we know that after an economic crisis, interest rates never return to the pre-crisis level. This is also what the euro-dollar futures suggests: that the upcoming rate hike cycle will end below 2%. The level of indebtedness and financial markets’ addiction to easy money simply do not allow the Fed to undertake more aggressive actions. Will gold struggle in the upcoming months then? Yes. Gold bulls could cry. But remember: tears cleanse and create more room for joy in the future. If you enjoyed today’s free gold report, we invite you to check out our premium services. We provide much more detailed fundamental analyses of the gold market in our monthly Gold Market Overview reports and we provide daily Gold & Silver Trading Alerts with clear buy and sell signals. In order to enjoy our gold analyses in their full scope, we invite you to subscribe today. If you’re not ready to subscribe yet though and are not on our gold mailing list yet, we urge you to sign up. It’s free and if you don’t like it, you can easily unsubscribe. Sign up today! Arkadiusz Sieron, PhDSunshine Profits: Effective Investment through Diligence & Care
RBA Jettisons Yield Curve Control but Continues to Resist Market Pressure

RBA Jettisons Yield Curve Control but Continues to Resist Market Pressure

Marc Chandler Marc Chandler 03.11.2021 10:54
Overview: The third record close of the S&P 500 failed to lift Asia Pacific and European shares today.  In Asia, the large bourses fell, except South Korea, which rallied a little more than 1%.  Europe's Stoxx 600 is threatening to snap a three-day advance, while US index futures are soft.  The US 10-year yield is firm, around 1.56%.  European bonds are rallying.  Peripheral yields are off 8-9 bp, while core rates are 3-5 lower.  The Reserve Bank of Australia formally abandoned its yield-curve control, and the local debt market was quiet, but the Australian dollar is selling off and dragging the other dollar-bloc currencies lower.  Only the yen, among the majors, is gaining on the greenback.  Emerging market currencies are faring better, led by Asian currencies and most central and eastern European currencies.  The JP Morgan Emerging Market Currency Index is rising for the first time in five sessions.  Gold continues to consolidate within the range set before the weekend (~$1771-$1801) but is a bit softer on the day.  Oil prices are firm, and the December WTI contract is at the upper end of the $80-$85 range that has prevailed since mid-October.  Copper initially moved higher but reversed lower, and a break of $432 could signal another two percent decline.   Asia Pacific The Reserve Bank of Australia formally jettisoned its yield-curve control of targeting the April 2024 bond yield at 10 bp.  The market expected this after the RBA had been missing in action as the yield soared.  Today, the on-the-run 3-year yield fell six basis points after falling 21 yesterday.  It has now returned below 1%.  Governor Lowe did not fully capitulate but is trying to hold on to a middle ground.  He said the central bank will be patient on rates, and it is still plausible not to raise rates until 2024. However, he acknowledged rates could be lifted in 2023.  The swaps market is pricing in almost 80 bp of tightening over the next 12 months, with a 10 bp hike seen in six months.   European and American equities have recovered from the wobble in mid-September that sparked fear that Evergrande's losses would trigger a Lehman-like event.  Yet, the problem with Chinese property developers continues, even though Evergrande took advantage of its 30-day grace period, it serviced its debt.  China's high yield bond market is dominated by the property development sector.  The yields rose for eight consecutive sessions through yesterday and briefly rose above 20% last week.  Estimate debt servicing costs amount to around $2 bln this month.  House sales and prices are falling, a separate challenge to the economy than the energy crunch and high commodity prices.  It is still unclear whether Chinese officials are prepared to take more decisive action to support the economy, like a cut in reserve requirements.  New economic initiatives may emerge from the Communist Party's Central Committee meeting (November 8-11).  Officially it will focus on the achievements in preparation for the 20th Congress next year that will likely confirm another term for President Xi but possibly shuffle other senior posts.   The dollar rose to almost JPY114.45 yesterday and has come back offered today.  It has slipped below the 20-day moving average (~JPY113.55) for the first time since September 23.  Last week's low was closer to JPY113.25.  A break of JPY113.00 could signal losses toward JPY112.60 initially.  The price action is lending credence to the JPY114.50-JPY115.00 being the top of the new range. The lower end of the range is less clear.  The Australian dollar's 4% rally led the majors last month, but it stalled near the 200-day moving average (~$0.7555) and is breaking down today.  It has taken out last week's lows (~$0.7465) marginally, but the downside momentum has continued in the European morning.  There is near-term scope toward $0.7435 and maybe $0.7410.   The PBOC set the dollar's reference rate at CNY6.4009, firmer than the median (Bloomberg) forecast of CNY6.3986. The gap was slightly wider than it has been.  The last time the gap was more than 20 pips was October 20. So if it is a protest, it is still faint. Meanwhile, stricter virus curbs took a toll on Chinese equities. The greenback has risen above CNY6.40 on an intraday basis but continues to struggle to sustain it on a closing basis.   Europe The EMU final manufacturing PMI was slightly lower than the preliminary estimate, owing to a softer than expected Spain reading and a downward revision in Germany.  The aggregate stands at 58.3, down from 58.5 initially and 58.6.  It is the fourth consecutive decline, but it can hardly be considered weak.  Germany's manufacturing PMI was lowered to 57.8 from the 58.2 preliminary projection and 58.4 in September.  The French reading was tweaked up to 53.6 from 53.5.  It is still down from 55.0 and is the fifth straight loss.  Spain disappointed with a 57.4 report.  It was projected to be unchanged at 58.1, which seemed optimistic from the get-go.  Italy offered an upside surprise.  Its manufacturing PMI rose to 61.1 from 59.7.  Economists had expected some slippage.   Some pressure on the euro appeared to be coming from the cross against the Swiss franc.  Since the Fed met in September through the end of last week, the euro fell about 3.35% against the franc. Sight deposits rose steadily in October after falling in the first half of September.  Last week's increase was the most in two months as the euro broke below CHF1.08 for the first time since  May 2020. The rise in sight deposits is consistent with stepped-up intervention by the Swiss National Bank.  Yesterday, the euro fell against the Swiss franc, even as it rose against the dollar.  Clearly, the intervention is not arresting the euro's weakness. SNB is more likely moderating the decline.   Moreover, if the SNB also seeks to maintain a certain currency allocation of its reserves, it needs to acquire dollars after acquiring euros.  And if it does not want to grow reserves like Japan or China, it will sell some of the euros for dollars, minimizing the intervention effect on reserve accumulation.  The value of the SNB's reserves declined slightly in the year through September.    The pace of the euro's decline against the franc has accelerated in the past two sessions and closed below the lower Bollinger Band (two standard deviations below the 20-day moving average) for the second consecutive session.  Last year's low was set near CHF1.05 and yesterday, the euro pushed briefly through CHF1.0550.  It is now near CHF1.0570. The next technical support may be around CHF1.0250. However, speculators in the futures market see it differently.   They have the largest net short franc position (~19.3k contracts) since December 2019 and the smallest gross longs (~1245 contacts) since 2003.   French President Macron is holding back from imposing retaliatory measures against the UK over the fishing license dispute.  Reports suggest that Jersey is considering granting temporary licenses to French trawlers.  Separately, despite some confusing gas flows yesterday (from Germany to Poland), Russia says Putin's promise to boost gas shipment to Europe starting next week, after Gazprom completely rebuilding its domestic inventories, remains intact.  Look for results shortly of the auctions for pipeline capacity.   After falling a little more than 1% before the weekend, the euro bounced back yesterday and managed to close above $1.16. Follow-through buying was limited to about $1.1615, but it has struggled to sustain the positive momentum.  There is an option for 1.8 bln euros at $1.1585 that expires today.  A break signals a test on nearby support seen in the $1.1540-$1.1560 area.  Last week's low was about $1.1535, and the year's low is closer to $1.1525.  Sterling is off for the third consecutive session.  It reached $1.3630, the lowest level since October 14, which is about the (50%) retracement objective of last month's rally.  Some sales may have been related to the GBP316 mln option at $1.3650 that expires today.  The next (61.8%) retracement is by $1.3575.  America Today is the quietest day of the week for North American economic data. However, there is one feature, monthly autos sales.  Due to the supply chain disruptions, especially semiconductor chips, auto production has been crushed, and by extension, auto sales.  This is not limited to the US by any means.   Yesterday, Japan reported that October auto sales are off slightly more than 30% year-over-year in October. European auto registrations, a proxy for sales, were down 23.1% year-over-year in September.  Last week's Q3 GDP showed that growth was halved to 4% but the problems in the auto sector.  In September, US auto sales were about 25.5% below September 2020 sales.  Bloomberg's survey found a median forecast for October sales of 12.5 mln vehicles (seasonally adjusted annual basis), which would be the first increase since April.  Cox Automotive warns of another decline to 11.8 mln vehicles. The US Treasury unexpectedly boosted its Q4 borrowing needs to about $1.02 trillion, or around $312 bln more than it anticipated in August.  It appears to be largely a function of adjusting its cash balances and the calculations around the debt ceiling.  It is projecting Q1 22 borrowing needs at less than half of the Q4 sum.  Of course, it is assuming that the debt ceiling will be raised or suspended. Still, tomorrow's quarterly refunding announcement is expected to reduce its coupon offerings for the first time since 2016.  Separately, but not totally unrelated, the Democratic Party is still struggling to agree on the infrastructure initiative.   The US dollar continues to consolidate against the Canadian dollar but is enjoying a firmer tone today.  The Bank of Canada met on October 27, and it surprised the market by ending its bond-buying program and acknowledging the risk of an earlier hike.  The US dollar covered a range of roughly CAD1.2300 to CAD1.2435.  It has remained in that range since then. We note that speculators in the futures market switched to a net long position for the first time since early September in the week through last Tuesday.  The greenback is knocking on initial resistance in the CAD1.2400-CAD1.2410 area, and a break could signal a move toward CAD1.2430-CAD1.2450.  An option for about $900 mln expires tomorrow at CAD1.2450.  The greenback has a five-day rally in tow against the Mexican peso.  Earlier today, it pushed above last month's high (~MXN20.90), but it has stalled.  It is trading little changed on the session around MXN20.8500 as the North American session is about to start.   Still, unless it can break below MXN20.80, we look for higher levels.  That said, the pace of the dollar's rally is threatening the upper Bollinger Band (~MXN20.95)
Considering Portfolios In Times Of, Among Others, Inflation...

Profit-Taking on Dollar Longs after Better than Expected Jobs Report Sets Stage Until CPI

Marc Chandler Marc Chandler 08.11.2021 09:57
The US dollar turned in a solid week's performance, rising against most currencies and recording a marginal new high for the year against the euro.  Sterling and the Australian dollar competed for the worst performer.  Both central banks pushed against market expectations for aggressive near-term tightening.  The central banks triggered a short squeeze in the bond market, where 10-year benchmark yields from 10 bp in the US to 34 bp in Italy.  UK 10-year Gilts and French Oats yields fell nearly 22 bp.  Germany lagged with an almost 18 bp decline.  The speculative market had its largest net short Treasury note futures position since March 2020.  It has swung from its largest net long position in four years (~181k contracts) in early October to a net short position of almost 270k as of November 2.  The macro focus shifts back to inflation next week with American and Chinese reports.  Rising inflation in the world's two largest economies may arrest the rally in the bond markets. We anticipated the dollar to move broadly higher this month, and the move we envision does not appear over.  However, important support has been approached in a sharp thrust that has penetrated Bollinger Bands, suggesting some patience may be needed.  The dollar did close relatively softly, especially given the stronger than expected employment report.   Dollar Index: A new high for the year was recorded after the employment report was slightly above 94.60.  The momentum indicators are trending higher, and the five-day moving average crossed back above the 20-day moving average.  Recall that the 94.50 area is (38.2%) retracement of the sell-off since the March 2020 peak (~103).  The high from last September was closer to 94.75, but above there, nothing stands out until the 95.70-96.10 band. Yet ahead of the weekend, it finished poorly and formed a potential bearish shooting star candlestick.  Initial support is seen around 93.80.   Euro:   The single currency was virtually flat last week, but it does not hide the fact that a new low for the year (~$1.1515) was recorded.  The MACD and Slow Stochastic are moving lower, and the price action has been poor.  The $1.1490 area corresponds to the (50%) retracement objective of the rally from the March 2020 low (~$1.0635).  The next retracement (61.8%) is found a little below $1.13.  The euro finished on a firm note near session highs, suggesting scope for some corrective gains at the start of the new week. The new momentum shorts are frustrated with the lack of follow-through and maybe in weak hands.  A close above $1.1620 would lift the technical tone.  Japanese Yen:  The Japanese yen was the strongest of the major currencies, gaining an inconsequential 0.25% against the dollar.  The decline in US rates helped drag the dollar lower against the yen.  In terms of market positioning, short-yen carry trades had become momentum trades, too and the unwind was also supportive of the yen.   The dollar-yen exchange rate continues to track US 10-year yields.  The 10-year yield fell below 1.50% for the first time in a month ahead of the weekend, and the dollar made a new low for the week near JPY113.30.  Recall that in the big picture, we have suggested a range-trading affair between around JPY113.00 and JPY114.50-JPY115.00.  That still seems reasonable.  However, we note the dollar's momentum is flagging, and the five-day moving average slipped below the 20-day for the first time since late September.   The Slow Stochastic and MACD are trending lower.  A break of JPY113.00 signals the next leg down into the JPY112.00-JPY112.50 band.  British Pound: After the Bank of England confounded market expectations, sterling was spanked, falling more than 1% for only the second time this year (the other was on September 28, which arguably was more of a dollar move).  Expectations, partly facilitated by official comments, for tighter monetary policy spurred a roughly 4.3-cent rally in sterling last month.  If the BOE is saying, "sorrow about the mate, you misunderstood the conditionality and our job," it seems only fitting that sterling return to the late-September low near $1.3400.  It did so ahead of the weekend to $1.3425.  Ahead of the weekend, it settled below the lower Bollinger Band for the second consecutive session.  The momentum indicators are still falling. However, it managed to close near session highs, and a potential hammer candlestick may have been formed.  However, if $1.34 does not hold, it is difficult to find much chart support ahead of the $1.3165-$1.3200 area should $1.3400 be convincingly broken.  Canadian Dollar:  The Canadian dollar fared better than the other dollar-bloc currencies but still lost about 0.5% against the US dollar.  Since meeting the head and shoulders objective near CAD1.23, the US dollar has been consolidating and forming a rounded bottom.  The five-day moving average crossed back above the 20-day for the first time in a month.  The greenback finished the week bumping against the 200-day moving average (CAD1.2480), while the momentum indicators suggest there is more to come.  A retracement (38.2%) of the greenback's slide since September 20 high (~CAD1.29) is found near CAD1.2520, and the next retracement (50%) is slightly below the neckline of the head and shoulders pattern (~CAD1.2600).     Australian Dollar:  The Australian dollar's pullback has been more profound than the other majors.  It dropped almost 2.6% from the late October higher (~$0.7555), which was its best level since early July, and retraced half of last month's rally at the pre-weekend low (~$0.7360).  The momentum indicators are still falling, and the five and 20-day moving averages have crossed for the first time in nearly a month.  The next (61.8%) retracement target is closer to $0.7315.  Still, it closed firmly and with a possible bullish hammer candlestick, suggesting a bounce early next week is likely. The $0.7430-$0.7450 area may be the first important hurdle.  The Reserve Bank of Australia, like many other central banks, is emphasizing labor market developments in their forward guidance. Given the gap between what the RBA is saying (no hike likely until 2024) and what the market is saying (the swaps market implies nearly 70 bp of tightening over the next 12 months), next week's October jobs data may have greater impact.  Australia lost almost 285k jobs in August and September amid the lockdown.  A modest recovery is expected. In fact, the worst was probably in August. Full-time positions increased by almost 27k in September.   Mexican Peso:   The peso staged a brilliant recovery last week, but only after first falling to its lowest level since March.  The fall in US rates helped take pressure off the peso and emerging markets more broadly.  The strong US employment report bolstered risk appetites and lifted the JP Morgan Emerging Market Currency Index, which had been lower on the week, ahead of the data.  The dovish FOMC tapering announcement saw the dollar record a key downside reversal against the peso by reversing lower after making new highs and closing below the previous session's low.  Modest follow-through selling pushed the dollar through the (61.8%) retracement objective (~MXN20.46) of the rally that had begun in late October (from ~MXN20.21), ahead of the FOMC meeting and jobs report.  Before the weekend, it settled at the lows for the week (~MXN20.30).  Initial support is seen near MXN20.20.  The central bank meets next week (November 11).  Most expect a 25 bp hike, but an acceleration in CPI last month ( to be reported on November 9) may boost the risk of a 50 bp move.   Chinese Yuan:  The yuan's 2% gain this year puts it in third place globally, behind the Russian ruble (4.5%) and the Canadian dollar (2.3%).  The yuan has drifted higher in recent weeks.  It has risen for the past three months for a cumulative gain of a little less than 1%.  For the past several weeks, the PBOC consistently set the dollar's reference rate above market expectations (median projection in Bloomberg's survey) but did not do so ahead of the weekend.  Last week the dollar traded quietly within the range seen in the past two weeks.  The dollar recorded four-month lows in October in front of CNY6.38.  Given the official penchant for stability, the issue now is the upper end of the range, and it seems to be CNY6.40-CNY6.41.  Since late September, the dollar has not settled above the 20-day moving average (~CNY6.4075), the middle of the Bollinger Bands.  China's 10-year bond yields peaked in mid-October near 3.05% and last week finished below 2.90% for the first time in several weeks. It is the only country whose 10-year yield has fallen this year (~25 bp).  The October inflation gauges are the market's focus, but trade and lending figures may generate more insight into the economic drivers.   Disclaimer
Intraday Market Analysis – Gold Awaits Breakout - 03.12.2021

Intraday Market Analysis – Gold Awaits Breakout - 03.12.2021

John Benjamin John Benjamin 03.12.2021 09:42
XAUUSD tests key support Gold treads water as markets await US jobs data release. The metal remains under pressure after it failed to maintain bids above 1780. Sellers are testing the daily support at 1760. A bearish breakout would shatter hopes of a swift rebound and send the price to last September’s low at 1725. That move could then threaten the integrity of the uptrend on a longer timeframe. 1806 is a fresh resistance and sellers could be waiting to double down at a better price. On the upside, a bullish breakout may propel the metal to 1845. EURUSD attempts bullish reversal The euro recoups losses as traders reposition ahead of today’s nonfarm payrolls. A bullish RSI divergence indicates a slowdown in the bearish push. The pair has found support near June 2020’s lows around 1.1190. Then successive breaks above 1.1270 and 1.1370 have prompted short interests to bail, paving the way for a potential reversal. 1.1460 next to the 30-day moving average would be the target and its breach may turn sentiment around. 1.1240 is a key support to keep the rebound relevant. US 500 heads towards daily support The S&P 500 continues on its way down as investors jump ship amid the omicron scare. The latest rebound has been capped by 4650, a sign that the bears are in control of short-term price action. A combination of pessimism and lack of buying interest means that the index is stuck in a bearish spiral. An oversold RSI may cause a limited rebound as intraday sellers cover their positions. 4450 at the origin of a previous bullish breakout would be the next target. 4360 is a second line of defense that sits in a daily demand zone.
Bridge Too Far

Bridge Too Far

Monica Kingsley Monica Kingsley 02.12.2021 16:36
S&P 500 gave up sharp intraday gains on the first Omicron patient in CA. Corona packing punch still, and sending TLT far above yesterday‘s highs while the dollar remained unchanged. That‘s as risk-off as can be on a little surprising headline – the key difference is though that the Fed doesn‘t have the back of buy the dippers this time. The accelerated taper noises coupled with demand destruction thanks to Omicron, is delivering an inflation repreive. Make no mistake though, should demand be choked off too hard, fresh stimulus would have to come – for now in the heat increasingly being turned on, practically all asset classes suffer to varying degrees. The market isn‘t yet at a stage of sniffing out fresh stimulus countering the destructive policy effects which are being felt currently. Economic activity around the world hasn‘t been hampered, but markets are willing to err on the pessimistic side. For now and still – only when the riskier debt instruments such as HYG turn up to deal with the prior downswing, would be a reason to cheer for animal spirits returning. That idea sounds though hollow at this time. The bears have the upper hand unless proven otherwise – that is, by a close in the 4670s. Which is what the title says... Let‘s move right into the charts (all courtesy of www.stockcharts.com). S&P 500 and Nasdaq Outlook S&P 500 breaking below the 50-day moving average, and taking time consolidating below, isn‘t bullish at all. The reversal was broad based, arguably hitting value more. Yes, market breadth is dismal. Credit Markets Positive HYG divergence is gone – the broad underperformance of S&P 500 must be reversed first to make stock market upswings trustworthy. It remains unclear how much would HYG be able to rebound when quality debt instruments cool off. Gold, Silver and Miners Precious metals weakness remains, but isn‘t convincing enough to short the market, no. The coming reversal to the upside would be ferocious, but we aren‘t there yet. Crude Oil Crude oil plunge is slowing down, and it‘s more than black gold that‘s looking for direction here – this concerns the commodities complex as such. I‘m looking for copper to show the way, and oil to follow. Copper Copper is sitting at a rising support line, undecided yet whether to take the Fed and Omicron threats seriously or not. It‘s wait and see for now, but the bullish side has the medium-term upper hand. Bitcoin and Ethereum Bitcoin and Ethereum are cautious as well, but the bears are looking for an ambush – let‘s see how far they can get. Summary The ugly S&P 500 close concerns both value and tech – and there was no premarket upswing to speak of. The bears have the upper hand for today as markets look to be in the phase of sell first, ask questions later. Any reversal (in stocks or commodities) has to be accompanied by a credible upswing in riskier bonds, ideally with money coming out of the dollar as well. Thank you for having read today‘s free analysis, which is available in full at my homesite. There, you can subscribe to the free Monica‘s Insider Club, which features real-time trade calls and intraday updates for all the five publications: Stock Trading Signals, Gold Trading Signals, Oil Trading Signals, Copper Trading Signals and Bitcoin Trading Signals.
The Greenback Finds Traction ahead of the Jobs Report

The Greenback Finds Traction ahead of the Jobs Report

Marc Chandler Marc Chandler 03.12.2021 12:19
December 03, 2021  $USD, Australia, Canada, China, Currency Movement, EMU, FOMC, Inflation, Japan, jobs, UK Overview:  The Omicron variant has been detected in more countries, but the capital markets are taking it in stride.  Risk appetites appear to be stabilizing.  The MSCI Asia Pacific Index rose for the third consecutive session, though Hong Kong and Taiwan markets did not participate in the advance today.  Europe's Stoxx 600 is struggling to hold on to early gains, while US futures are narrowly mixed.  The US 10-year yield is a little near 1.43%, down around six basis points this week.  European yields are slightly softer. Core yields are off 5-6 bp this week.  The dollar is firm ahead of the jobs data.  The Antipodeans and Swedish krona are the heaviest, falling around 0.6% through the European morning.  The Swiss franc and euro are up about 0.1% and are the most resilient so far today.   The JP Morgan Emerging Market Currency Index is trading lower for the third session and is set to extend its losing streak for the fourth consecutive week.  Accelerating inflation is the latest drag on the Turkish lira.  The 0.6% decline today brings the week's drop to around 10.5%.  Gold is little changed within yesterday's range.  Last week, it settled a little above $1802.  Now it is below $1775  Oil is extending yesterday's recovery. Although OPEC+  unexpectedly stuck with plans to boost output by 400,000 barrels a day next month, it warned it could change its collective mind at any point.  January WTI recovered from around $62.40 yesterday to close at $66.50.  It is trading close to $68.20 before US markets open.  US natural gas fell nearly 25.5% over the past four sessions but is bouncing by around 3.7% today. European gas (Dutch) is stabilizing after yesterday's 5.6% decline.  Still, it is posting gains for the fifth consecutive week and is up more than 35% over the run.  Iron ore and copper prices are little changed.   Asia Pacific At the same time that Chinese officials are cracking down on the "variable interest entity" form of offshore listings for domestic companies, the US SEC is moving to enforce the 2002 laws that require foreign companies to allow greater scrutiny by US regulators.  Didi, the ride-hailing service, which listed in the US over local official objections, is now in the process of reversing itself.  The press reports that China and Hong Kong companies are the only ones to refuse to acquiesce to US demands.  This seems to be another facet of the decoupling meme.  Note that the NASDAQ Golden Dragon Index that tracks 98 Chinese companies listed in the US has fallen for five consecutive sessions coming into today, for a cumulative loss of about 10%.  China's Caixin service PMI was weaker than anticipated at 52.1, down from 53.8.  This, coupled with the softer manufacturing reading, shaved the composite to 51.2 from 51.5.   In contrast, Japan and Australia's flash service and composite PMIs were revised higher.  In Japan, the service PMI was revised to 53.0 from 52.1 and 50.7 in October.  The composite was revised to 53.3 from 52.5, to rise for its third consecutive month.  Australia's service PMI stands at 55.7, up from the flash reading of 55.0 and 51.8 in October.  The composite PMI is at 55.7, its third consecutive monthly rise as well.  Japan and Australia's PMI contrasts with the disappointment in China and Europe, and the US. This is because they are recovering from the long emergency (Japan) and lockdowns (Australia).   Trading remains choppy, and market confidence is fragile.  The dollar remains in the range set against the yen on Tuesday((~JPY112.55-JPY113.90).  Today's high has been just below JPY113.50, where options for $520 mln expire today.   Options for around $1.3 bln at JPY113.00 also will be cut today.  The greenback settled last week slightly below JPY113.40.  The Australian dollar has been sold to new lows for the year a little lower than $0.7050.  We have noted that this area corresponds to the (38.2%) retracement of the Aussie's rally from the March 2020 low near $0.5500.  The next area of support is seen around $0.7000.  It is the fifth consecutive weekly decline that began in late October above $0.7500.  The US dollar's two-day rise against the Chinese yuan is ending with a minor loss today. Similarly, the greenback posted gains for the past two weeks and has given it all back this week.  The PBOC set the dollar's reference rate at CNY6.3738, just below the median (Bloomberg survey) projection of CNY6.3740.   Offshore investors appear to have bought the most Chinese stocks today via the connect-link in a couple of weeks.  Also, note that China extended the tax exemption for foreign institutional investors from the interest tax through the end of 2025.    Europe German and French PMIs were revised lower, while Spain and Italy surprised on the upside.  The revisions shaved the gains initially reported for the service and composite PMIs.  Still, the German composite rose for the first time in four months to stand at 52.2 from 52.0.  The French composite PMI stands at 56.1, up from 54.7.  It is the first increase since June.  Separately, France reported a 0.9% rise in October industrial output, which is better than expected, but the September contraction was revised to -1.5% from -1.3%.   Spain's service PMI rose to \59.8 from 56.6 and was well above expectations.  The composite reading is 58.3, up from 56.2.  It is the first gain in five months and is the highest since August.  Italy's service PMI rose to 55.9 from 52.4.  Economists had expected something closer to 54.5.  The composite rose to 57.6 from 54.2.  It has softened in September and October, and the November reading is the best since August.   The UK's service and composite PMI were revised to show a slightly larger decline than initially seen in the flash report.  The service PMI slipped to 58.5, from 58.6 preliminary estimate and 59.1 in October.  The composite PMI was shaved to 57.6 from the 57.7 initial estimate and 57.8 in October.  The November weakness was disappointing after rising in September and October to snap a three-month decline.  The December short-sterling interest rate futures consolidated in a choppy activity this week after the implied yield fell for eight consecutive sessions previously.  The market is discounting about a 1 in 3 chance of a hike at the BOE meeting on December 16.  The euro slipped to a three-day low slightly above $1.1280 in late Asian turnover before resurfacing the $1.1300 area in the European morning.  Still, we suspect the upside is limited.  The 20-day moving average is near $1.1350, and the single currency has not traded above it since November 9.  The euro remains within the range set on Tuesday (~$1.1235-$1.1385).  Given the divergence of monetary policy, resistance looks stronger than support.  For its part, steering is holding barely above its three-day low near $1.3260.  It, too, remains within Tuesday's range (~$1.3195-$1.3370).  Recall that the $1.3165 area corresponds to the (38.2%) retracement objective of the rally from the March 2020 low near $1.14.  Meanwhile, the euro is pressing below CHF1.04.  It has not closed below there in six years.   America Fully cognizant of the irony here, but barring a shockingly poor report, today's US employment data may have little last impact on the market.  If there was any doubt about it before, since Federal Reserve Chair Powell spoke, there isn't.  The Fed has shifted from helping to facilitate recovery to preventing inflation expectations from getting entrenched.  That means that even a mediocre report today will be overshadowed by next week's CPI, which will likely show that inflation is still accelerating.  Conventional wisdom holds that the White House prefers doves at the Fed, but that does not hold now.  President Biden's public approval rating is low, and the Vice President's is lower still. Polls suggest that inflation is a knock against the administration.  When Biden announced the re-nomination of Powell and Brainard's nomination to Vice-Chair, both candidates reaffirmed their commitment to combat inflation.  What is true of the employment data also holds for the final services and composite PMI, factory orders, and the service ISM.  There may be headline risk but little implication for policy.  The Senate passed the stop-gap measures to keep the federal government funded through February 18.  Meanwhile, the debt ceiling is expected to hit between December 21 and late January.   Canada's labor market has recovered quicker than the US.  Today's another constructive report will likely solidify expectations that the Bank of Canada may hike rates in the March-April period.  The Bank of Canada meets next week.  Of course, it may be cautious with the unknowns surrounding the Omicron variant, but the economic recovery is solid after the weakness in Q2.  Trade tensions with the US are rising.  The US doubled its anti-dumping and countervailing tariffs on Canadian softwood imports (almost 18%).  US January lumber prices were limit up ($45) Wednesday and yesterday and have risen by more than 19% so far this week to reach five-month highs. There is a dispute over Canadian potato exports as well.  There are also disputes over some US initiatives' "Buy American" thrust, including electric vehicles.   The US dollar is at its best level against the Canadian dollar since late September.  It is pushing near CAD1.2840. The September high was closer to CAD1.29, and the late August high, which is also the high for the year, was near CAD1.2950. Barring a reversal, this will be the sixth consecutive week of the greenback's gains.  The swaps market has the first hike discounted for March 2022.  The US dollar began the week with a seven-day advance against the Mexican peso in tow.  It ended with a 1%+ pullback on Monday and again on Tuesday.  It consolidated Wednesday and fell another 1%+ yesterday.  It is little changed today near MXN21.29.  Next week, the November CPI will be reported.  It looks set to accelerate from about 6.25% to around 7.25%.  The central bank meets on December 16, after the FOMC meeting.  A 25 bp rate hike is the consensus, but an argument can be made for a 50 bp increase from the current 5.0% target.   Disclaimer
Ready, set, silver, go

Ready, set, silver, go

Korbinian Koller Korbinian Koller 03.12.2021 12:56
The most obvious first step is: “How much?” Depending on your time horizon and if your approach is purely diversification for your overall portfolio, a percentage of total investment capital needs to be set. This percentage should be higher on a more aggressive wealth preservation strategy and higher expected returns on beating inflation. Another aspect is if silver is traded as the only hedge or alongside other precious metals. Silver already has a leverage factor in relationship to gold. For example, gold’s response to covid was a 37% up move, while silver moved up 80%. This volatility leverage works both ways, increasing the risk for silver if not purchased on low-risk entry points and traded with appropriate money management. We have pointed out various reasons why we find silver an extremely attractive play long term in this year’s chart book releases. Monthly chart (a week ago), Silver in US-Dollar, ready: Silver in US-Dollar, monthly chart as of November 26th, 2021. The above chart was posted in our last week’s publication. We wrote:” The monthly chart shows a high likelihood for November’s candle closing as an inverted hammer. Consequently, it provides for silver prices approaching the low end of the last 17-month sideways range near US$22.” Monthly chart, Silver in US-Dollar, set: Silver in US-Dollar, monthly chart as of December 3rd, 2021. We were spot on. The anticipated entry zone has been reached. We added to our physical holdings and shared the trade live in our free Telegram channel. Silver in US-Dollar, weekly chart, silver: Silver in US-Dollar, weekly chart as of December 3rd, 2021. We asked, “how much?” and in what diversification, which leaves us with the question of what denomination. The rule of thumb is that the smaller the weight amount is and the more recognizable the brand, the higher the cost. In addition, valuable numismatic collector’s coins have premiums as well. Generally, we find the added cost of brand items (Canadian maple leaf, American eagles, Austrian Philharmonic, and alike) to be of value since it adds to liquidity at a time of sale. While we would stay away from the added cost of numismatic collectible coins, we find there to be value to have a mix of coins and larger bars to arrive at a reasonably low-cost basis with a high degree of liquidity at the time of sale (larger bars are harder to sell than one-ounce coins). The weekly chart above illustrates that as much as we have entered the “shopping zone” for silver, there is a probability that we might see a quick spike down as we have seen at the end of September. As pointed out in the previous chart book, the goal of physical acquisition should not be the ultimate lowest price but availability and execution itself. We make a point of this, especially since we noticed that physical acquisition prices have in percentage retraced much less than the spot price right here, and once the turn is complete, could proportionally faster jolt up. Silver in US-Dollar, quarterly chart, go: Silver in US-Dollar, quarterly chart as of December 3rd, 2021. It is essential to have an exit strategy in place before entry. These exit projections are necessary to measure risk/reward-ratios. Moreover, with the entire plan clear, there will be no debate while in the trade. This part of exit psychology is often overlooked, but a low-risk entry point alone does not provide a good strategy. We expect a price advance on silver within the next six to eight quarters to a price target of US$74.40! Significant profits allowing for an outstanding risk/reward-ratio. Ready, set, silver, go: Last week, we anticipated the market’s direction correctly and find ourselves now at the desired low-risk entry zone. With possible additional questions about physical acquisition answered today, we might have reduced doubt. The devil is in the details, and due to the various countries, their taxation law, and the wide variety of official precious metal dealers, we did not dive into the details on where to take possession of your possibly desired purchase.  Nevertheless, our multinational membership in our free Telegram channel might provide helpful information to your specific situation. We hope we have provided enough knowledge to erase doubt. We encourage participation since we see procrastination towards a wealth preservation strategy as the poorest choice in this challenging time for your hard-earned money. Feel free to join us in our free Telegram channel for daily real time data and a great community. If you like to get regular updates on our gold model, precious metals and cryptocurrencies you can also subscribe to our free newsletter. This article does not contain investment advice or recommendations. Every investment and trading move involves risk, and readers should conduct their own research when making a decision. The views, thoughts and opinions expressed here are the author’s alone. They do not necessarily reflect or represent the views and opinions of Midas Touch Consulting. By Korbinian Koller|December 3rd, 2021|Tags: Crack-Up-Boom, Gold, Gold/Silver-Ratio, inflation, low risk, Silver, silver bull, Silver Chartbook, silversqueeze, technical analysis, time frame, trading principles|0 Comments About the Author: Korbinian Koller Outstanding abstract reasoning ability and ability to think creatively and originally has led over the last 25 years to extract new principles and a unique way to view the markets resulting in a multitude of various time frame systems, generating high hit rates and outstanding risk reward ratios. Over 20 years of coaching traders with heart & passion, assessing complex situations, troubleshoot and solve problems principle based has led to experience and a professional history of success. Skilled natural teacher and exceptional developer of talent. Avid learner guided by a plan with ability to suppress ego and empower students to share ideas and best practices and to apply principle-based technical/conceptual knowledge to maximize efficiency. 25+ year execution experience (50.000+ trades executed) Trading multiple personal accounts (long and short-and combinations of the two). Amazing market feel complementing mechanical systems discipline for precise and extreme low risk entries while objectively seeing the whole picture. Ability to notice and separate emotional responses from the decision-making process and to stand outside oneself and one’s concerns about images in order to function in terms of larger objectives. Developed exit strategies that compensate both for maximizing profits and psychological ease to allow for continuous flow throughout the whole trading day. In depth knowledge of money management strategies with the experience of multiple 6 sigma events in various markets (futures, stocks, commodities, currencies, bonds) embedded in extreme low risk statistical probability models with smooth equity curves and extensive risk management as well as extensive disaster risk allow for my natural capacity for risk-taking.
Weekly Close Out

Weekly Close Out

Luke Suddards Luke Suddards 04.12.2021 17:45
Omicron: In today’s weekly I’ll be dedicating some digital ink for the latest information on the new variant omicron. Ok so what are the major points of importance. New admissions to hospitals in Gauteng increased by 144% last week (hospitalisations lag cases by around 1-3 weeks). So far the early data shows the majority of these hospitalisations are from the unvaccinated (if that trend remains that’s positive). However, a recent study released from South Africa indicates reinfection risk is 3 times higher than previous variants. In terms of the deadliness of this variant, the early data looks good with Australia’s Chief Medical Officer Paul Kelly stating that of the 300 cases recorded worldwide all were very mild or had no symptoms at all. However, the sample size is too small so we can’t draw solid conclusions at this stage. The major vaccine makers have offered timelines of two to six weeks for assessing the vaccine escape properties of omicron via in-vitro lab tests. Interestingly, Moderna is less optimistic than Pfizer about expecting current vaccines needing to be tweaked to fend off the omicron variant. Volatility will remain high as the market remains on tenterhooks as new information drips through. Dollar Index (DXY): The greenback is flat on the week, with many quite perplexed by the lack of gains (particularly against the euro) given the hawkish Fed pivot and risk sentiment remaining on edge. The dollar coming in flat is a combination of gains against high-beta cyclical companies offset by losses against traditional safe haven currencies. Just take a look at the charts of USDJPY and AUDUSD. In terms of the euro, I’ll chat more about that below in the EURUSD paragraph. The big domestic news for the dollar this week was Jerome Powell’s hawkish rhetoric. The word transitory is to be retired as he admits the threat of persistently higher inflation has grown. On the QE purchases side of things, he remains open to it being wrapped up earlier than originally expected with a discussion on a faster pace taking place in 2 weeks at their December meeting. He elucidated his thoughts on the employment side of their mandate, stating that a great labour market requires a protracted expansion and in order to achieve this price stability has to occur. I see this as inflation now taking primacy over employment goals, indicating a shift in the Fed’s thinking with regards to inflationary pressures. The hawkish commentary from FOMC members this week such as Daly, Quarles, Barkin and Bostic would certainly suggest this is the case. STIRs are showing rate lift-off for practically June 2022 (96%) and over 2.5 hikes through December 2022. All attention now falls to the Non-Farm Payrolls number out today. The preliminary indicator such as ISM manufacturing index, ADP and jobless claims all pointing towards decent numbers from the jobs report today disappointed as NFP numbers missed expectations by a significant amount. Price moves have been muted as traders may be reluctant to place any fresh positions on and chase with the risk of adverse news over the weekend regarding omicron. Bottom line - traders should expect cross-asset volatility to remain higher over December. Next week we’ll receive November US inflation data, which is expected to remain elevated. DXY has regained the upper trend line of its ascending channel, putting some distance between price and its moving averages. The 21-day EMA continues to provide some dynamic support to price dips. The RSI has held above the key 55 level of support. Targets wise keep an eye out on the 96.5 on the upside and to the downside the 21-day EMA and former support around 95.5. EURUSD: So why did EURUSD strengthen on the market sell-off due to omicron on Friday and has remained fairly defensive throughout this week? It’s certainly not because the euro is a safe-haven currency in times of risk aversion. This price action has more to do with its use as a funding currency. Traders borrow euros to search for higher yield globally which is a decent strategy when risk conditions are favourable, however, when that risk dial flips in other direction we see the typical carry trade unwind, leading to flows back into the euro. Additionally, because expectations for rate hikes with regards to the eurozone are already significantly low, it’s at much less risk of a dovish repricing working favourably in terms of spread differentials with the dollar. Political pressure is rising on the ECB to act, particularly from Germany. A Reuters article out mid-week pointed towards some members wanting to rather hold off declaring their asset purchase intentions at this December meeting due to uncertainty caused by omicron. However, the ECB's Muller stated that he doesn’t think omicron is a reason to shift the scheduled end date for PEPP. Following this line of thought just today Madame Lagarde expressed that she feels certain that PEPP will cease in March as planned, saying markets require clarity in December. On the data front we had better than expected inflation prints from Germany (5.2% YoY) and the eurozone (4.9% YoY). It’s quiet in terms of economic data next week with the ZEW survey out as we lead up to a crucial ECB meeting in two weeks. EURUSD is drifting lower from its 21-day EMA. The RSI has stalled around the 40 level. Looking at the technicals clearly EURUSD is in a downtrend. Rallies in my opinion should be short lived with sellers coming in. Key levels to monitor in both directions are 1.135 (21-day EMA) and on the downside 1.12. GBPUSD: With a vacuum of economic data for the UK, the words of central bankers took centre stage. Bailey didn’t provide much meat at his speech this Wednesday. However, Saunders (leans hawkish) who spoke today has caused a repricing lower in the probability of a 15bps rate hike come December (only an additional 4bps now from around 8bps pre-speech). He expressed the need for potentially taking a patient approach with the uncertainty from omicron. Cable is lower as a result. On the virus front, the UK regulator has given the green light for booster doses to be offered to all adults. Additionally, the government has signed a contract for 114 million vaccine doses from Pfizer and Moderna, including access to modified vaccines if they're needed to tackle omicron and other future variants of concern. On the political front, domestically the Tories held the seat of Old Bexley and Sidcup, however, with a reduced majority. On Brexit, it’s been quiet of late with some optimism around the granting of additional fish licences to French fisherman in Guernsey, Jersey is the more important zone though prone to flare ups in tension. However, temperatures remain high between France and the UK on issues related to immigration. Next week sees UK October GDP data released. EURGBP has been moving higher on the back of dovish commentary (given he’s a hawk) from Saunders as well as benefiting from any souring in risk-sentiment. The 200-day SMA isn’t far aware, which has previously capped price gains. Cable continues to -plumb fresh YTD lows and is now nearing 1.32. The RSI is near to oversold territory but with some room remaining to eke out further losses. Moving averages are all pointing downwards. Targets wise, on the upside the 1.335 and above there former support around 1.34 (21-day EMA too). USDJPY: This pair continues to trade on US 10-year yield moves and now it’s status as a safe-haven currency has kicked back in. Early Friday morning has seen a bid coming in, which could be some pre NFP positioning on expectations of a move higher in the back end of the US yield curve. Put EURJPY on your radar, price is at a key support level around 128. USDJPY is finding support around its 50-day SMA, 113 round number and the 38.2% Fibonacci level. Price is trying to overcome resistance from the 50-day SMA. The former range support is providing some resistance around 113.5. The RSI is trying to get back into its range support around 46. Targets wise on the upside, 114 will be important and on the downside 112.5 (this week's lows). Gold: Gold has slipped below the $1775 support level as the hawkish fed leads to higher short term rates, kryptonite for the shiny yellow metal. Fears over inflation have failed to help gold stay propped up as well as risk-off fears from omicron. Inflation data out from the US next week will be a risk event for gold traders as well as the Fed meeting the following week. Today’s NFP hasn’t ignited much excitement in gold markets. Gold is trying to reclaim the $1775 support level. The 50-day SMA has made a very minor cross above the 200-day SMA. The 21-day EMA has been capping further gains. The RSI is in no man's land around 38. Targets wise, if $1775 is cleared then $1800 opens up (moving averages just below there). On the downside, $1750 comes into view. Oil: Crude fell sharply into a bear market this week as risk-off, Fed tightening, fears over further lockdowns and travel bans from the new omicron variant led to a repricing on the demand side of the equation. OPEC+ the main event for crude traders this week, decided to stick to their scheduled 400k bpd for January, but caveated this with the meeting remaining in “session”, meaning changes to the supply side could be made before their 4 January meeting if omicron causes a further deterioration. This led to yo-yo style price behaviour. Until there is more clarity regarding omicron, I expect oil’s price to remain choppy without a solid price trend. Backwardation spreads have narrowed, indicating a more balanced supply and demand equation. Iranian Nuclear Negotiations began the week positively, but sentiment turned pessimistic towards the end of this week, providing further short-term bullish tailwinds to crude’s price. JPM has some very bullish forecasts with the bank expecting crude to hit $150 by 2023. Oil is having a run at its 200-day SMA. The RSI has moved out of overbought territory and is a fair distance below its 50-day SMA (some mean reversion). Right now price will remain choppy within a range as omicron news flow prevents a trend from forming. Targets wise, on the upside the 200-day SMA and $73.50 dollar mark will be key. On the downside $68 support is important.
Semblance of Stability Returns though Geopolitical Tensions Rise

Semblance of Stability Returns though Geopolitical Tensions Rise

Marc Chandler Marc Chandler 06.12.2021 12:39
December 06, 2021  $USD, China, Currency Movement, EU, Hungary, Italy, Russia Overview:  The absence of negative developments surrounding Omicron over the weekend appears to be helping markets stabilize today after the dramatic moves at the end of last week.  Asia Pacific equities traded heavily, and among the large markets, only South Korea and Australia escaped unscathed today.  Europe's Stoxx 600 is trading higher, led by energy, financials, and materials.  US futures are narrowly mixed.  Similarly, Asia Pacific bonds played a little catch-up with the large Treasury rally ahead of the weekend.  The US 10-year had approached 1.30% but is now up almost four basis points to almost 1.39%.  European yields are also a little firmer, though Italian bonds are outperforming after the pre-weekend credit upgrade by Fitch. The dollar is mixed.  The yen and Swiss franc are the heaviest, while the Scandis lead the advancers.  Among the emerging market currencies, most liquid and freely accessible currencies are higher, while India, Indonesia, and Turkey are trading lower.  The JP Morgan Emerging Market Currency Index has a four-week drop in tow and is starting the new week with a small gain.  Gold initially moved higher but is now little changed.  Iron ore and copper remain firm.  January WTI is trading firmly within the pre-weekend range, while natural gas, which collapsed by 24% in the US last week, extended its sell-off today.  European natural gas (Dutch benchmark) is trading lower after rising for the past five weeks.   Asia Pacific As tipped by Chinese Premier Li last week, the PBOC cut reserve requirement by 0.5%.  This frees up an estimated CNY1.2 trillion.  Many market participants had anticipated the timing to help banks pay back borrowing from the Medium-Term Lending Facility.  Banks owe about CNY950 bln on December 15 and another CNY500 bln on January 15.   Separately, several property developers have debt serving payments due and Evergrande is at the end of a grace period today.  Lastly, the US and a few other countries are expected to announce a diplomatic boycott of the Winter Olympics.  This is seen as largely symbolic as few diplomats were going to attend due to the severe quarantine imposed by Chinese officials.   China needs bargaining leverage if it is going to influence US policy.  It might come from an unexpected source.   While recent press reports focused on China's attempt to project its power into Africa, they have missed a potentially more impactful development.  Consider the Caribbean, which the US often acts as if it is theirs.  Barbados became a constitutional republic last week, though it is still a member of the UK Commonwealth.  The left-of-center government is friendly toward Beijing.  Under the Belt Road Initiative, Barbados and Jamaica have received several billion dollars from China.  Moreover, a recent US State Department report found that the two countries have voted against the US around 75% of the time at the UN last year.   This week, the regional highlights include the Reserve Bank of Australia (outcome first thing tomorrow in Wellington) and the Reserve Bank of India (December 8).  The RBA may revise up its economic outlook, yet, it is likely to continue to push against market expectations for an early hike.  The derivatives market appears to have the first hike priced in for late next summer.    India is expected to be on hold until early next year but could surprise with a hike.  China is expected to report trade figures tomorrow and the November CPI and PPI on Wednesday.  Lending figures may be released before the weekend.  Japan's highlights include October labor earnings and household spending tomorrow, the current account, and the final Q3 GDP on Wednesday.   The dollar's range against the yen on November 30 (~JPY112.55-JPY113.90) remains dominant.  It has not traded outside of that range since then.  The rise in US yields and equities has helped the dollar regain a toehold above JPY113.00.  The pre-weekend high was near JPY113.60, which might be too far today.  The Australian dollar traded below $0.7000 before the weekend and again today, but the selling pressure abated, and the Aussie has traded to about $0.7040. A band of resistance from $0.7040 to $0.7060 may be sufficient to cap it today.   The dollar has been in essentially the same range against the Chinese yuan for three sessions (~CNY6.3670-CNY6.3770).  If the dollar cannot get back above CNY6.38, a new and lower range will appear to be established.  The PBOC set the dollar's reference rate at CNY6.3702.  The market (Bloomberg median) had projected CNY6.3690.   Europe Germany's new government will take office in the middle of the week.  It has three pressing challenges.  First is the surge in Covid, even before the Omicron variant was detected.  Second, the economy is weak.  Last week's final PMI reading picked up some deterioration since the flash report and the 0.2 gain in the composite PMI more than 10.0 point fall in the previous three months. Third, today Germany reported dreadful factory orders.  The market had expected a slight pullback after the 1.3% gain in September.  The good news is that the September series was revised to a 1.8% gain.  However, this is more than offset by the 6.9% plummet in October orders.  If there is a silver lining here, it is that domestic orders rose 3.4% after falling in August and September.  Foreign orders plunged 13.1%, and orders from the eurozone fell by 3.2% (after falling 6.6% in September).  Orders outside the euro area collapsed by 18.1%.  The sharp drop in factory orders warns of downside risk to tomorrow's industrial production report.  Industrial output fell by 3.5% in August and 1.1% in September. Before today's report, economists were looking for a 1% gain.  Germany also reports the December ZEW survey tomorrow. Again, sentiment is expected to have deteriorated.  The third issue is Russia.  Reports suggest the US has persuaded Europe that Russia is positioned to invade Ukraine early next year.  US intelligence assessment sees Russia planning a multifront offensive.  Putin and Biden are to talk tomorrow.  Meanwhile, Putin makes his first foreign visit today in six months.  He is in India.  India is buying an estimated $5 bln of Russian weapons, including the S-400 anti-aircraft system that Turkey purchased to the dismay of Washington, which banned it from the F-35 fighter jet program.  India is a member of the Quad (with the US, Japan, and Australia), a bulwark against China.  A Russian official was quoted in the press claiming India sent a strong message to the US that it would not tolerate sanctions against it.  The regional alliances are blurry, to say the least. The US maintains ties with Pakistan.  India has had border skirmishes with China.  Russia and China have joint military exercises.   Before the weekend, Fitch upgraded Itay's credit rating one notch to BBB.  It cited the high vaccination rate, increased public and private spending, and confidence in the Draghi-led government's ability to spend the 200 bln euro funds from the EC prudently.  Recall that last week's composite PMI rose to 57.6 to snap a two-month decline.  The market (Bloomberg median) sees the Italian economy as one of the strongest in Europe this year, expanding around 6.3%.  The IMF sees it at 5.8%. The euro has been confined to about a quarter-cent range on both sides of $1.1300.  It is within the pre-weekend range (~$1.1265-$1.1335).  It was offered in Asia and turned better bid in the European morning.  Still, the consolidative tone is likely to continue through the North American session.  A move above the 20-day moving average (~$1.1335), which has not occurred for over a month, would help lift the technical tone.  Sterling tested $1.3200 before the weekend, and it held.  The steadier tone today saw it test the $1.3265 area.  It will likely remain in its trough today, though a move above the $1.3280-$1.3300 area would be constructive.   America Today's US data includes the "final" look at Q3 productivity and unit labor costs.  These are derived from the GDP and are typically not market-movers.  The US also reported that the October trade balance and improvement have been tipped by the advance merchandise trade report.  October consumer credit is due late in the session, and another hefty rise is expected ($25 bln after nearly $30 bln in September.  Consumer credit has risen by an average of $20.3 bln this year.  It fell last year and averaged $15.3 bln in the first nine months of 2019.  No Fed officials speak this week, and the economic highlight is the November CPI report at the end of the week.   Canada reports October trade figures and IVEY survey tomorrow.  The highlight of the week is the Bank of Canada decision on Wednesday.  It is not expected to do anything, but officials will likely be more confident in the economic recovery, especially after the very strong jobs report before the weekend.  The Canadian dollar's challenge is that the market has five hikes already discounted for the next 12 months.  Mexico reports November vehicle production and exports today.  The economic highlights come in the second half of the week.  November CPI on Thursday is expected to see the headline rate rise above 7%.  Last month alone, consumer prices are projected to have risen by 1%.  On Friday, Mexico is expected to report that industrial output rose by 0.9% in October after falling 1.4% in September.  Brazil reports its vehicle production and exports today and October retail sales on Thursday before the central bank meeting.  A 150 bp increase in the Selic rate, the second such move in a row, has been tipped and will put the key rate at 9.25%.  Ahead of the weekend, the IPCA measure of inflation is due.  It is expected to have ticked up closer to 11% (from 10.67%).  Lastly, we note that Peru is expected to deliver another 50 bp increase to its reference rate on Thursday, which would lift it to 2.5%.   The US dollar posted an outside up day against the Canadian dollar ahead of the weekend.  The risk-off mood overwhelmed the positive implications of the strong jobs data.  There has been no follow-through selling of the Canadian dollar today.  The pre-weekend US dollar low near CAD1.2745 is key.  Last Wednesday's range remains intact for the greenback against the Mexican peso (~MXN21.1180-MXN21.5150).  So far today, it has been confined to the pre-weekend range.   Initial support is seen near MXN21.16.  The cap around MXN21.50 looks solid.  Meanwhile, the US dollar closed above BRL5.60 for six consecutive sessions coming into today.   Disclaimer
Awaiting US CPI And Speaking Of Disney and Uber. SEK And PLN As Central Banks Moves

COT: Specs exit commodities on Omicron and Fed worries

Ole Hansen Ole Hansen 06.12.2021 12:33
Commodities 2021-12-06 10:50 Summary:  Futures positions and changes made by hedge funds across commodities, forex and financials up until last Tuesday, November 30. A week that encapsulated the markets very nervous reaction to the Omicron virus news as well as Jerome Powell's increased focus on combatting inflation. While global stocks and US long end yields dropped, a 7% correction in the Bloomberg commodity index helped trigger the biggest and most widespread hedge fund exodus since February 2020. Saxo Bank publishes weekly Commitment of Traders reports (COT) covering leveraged fund positions in commodities, bonds and stock index futures. For IMM currency futures and the VIX, we use the broader measure called non-commercial. Link to latest report This summary highlights futures positions and changes made by hedge funds across commodities, forex and financials up until last Tuesday, November 30. The reporting week encapsulated the markets very nervous reaction to the Omicron virus news as well as Jerome Powell confirming inflation is no longer being transitory. His comments to the Senate banking committee raised expectations for faster tapering with the first full 0.25% rate hike now priced in for July next year. The US yield curve flattened considerably with virus related safe-haven demand driving down the yield on 10-year US treasury notes by 22 basis point. Global stocks slumped with the VIX jumping 8%. Hardest hit, however was the commodity sector after the Bloomberg commodity index slumped by 7%, thereby triggering the biggest and most widespread hedge fund exodus since February 2020. Commodities Hedge funds responded to heightened growth and demand concerns related to the omicron virus, and the potential faster pace of US tapering, by cutting their net long across 24 major commodity futures by 17% to a 15-month low at 1.8 million lots. This the biggest one-week reduction since the first round of Covid-19 panic in February last year was triggered by net selling of all but three livestock contracts. Energy: Hardest hit was the energy sector where renewed demand concerns sent the prices of WTI and Brent down by more than 15%. In response to this, hedge funds accelerated their pace of futures selling with the combined net long slumping by 90k lots to a one-year low at 425k lots. The loss of momentum following the late October peak has driven an eight-week exodus out of oil contracts, culminating last week, and during this time the net length has seen a 35% or 224k lots reduction. Potentially setting the market up for a strong speculative driven recovery once the technical and fundamental outlook turns more friendly.Latest: Crude oil (OILUKFEB22 & OILUSJAN21) trades higher following its longest stretch of weekly declines since 2018. Today’s rise apart from a general positive risk sentiment in Asia has been supported by Saudi Arabia’s decision to hike their official selling prices (OSP) to Asia and US next month. Thereby signaling confidence demand will be strong enough to absorb last week's OPEC+ production increase at a time when mobility is challenged by the omicron virus. For now, both WTI and Brent continue to find resistance at their 200-day moving averages, currently at $69.50 and$72.88 respectively.  Metals: Gold was net sold for a second week as speculators continued to reduce exposure following the failed breakout attempt above $1830. With Fed chair Powell signaling a change in focus from job creation to fighting inflation, sentiment took another knock, thereby driving a 13.7k lots reduction to a four-week low at 105k lots. Industrial metals also suffered with the net long in HG copper slumping by one-third to a three-month low at 13.4k lots. Copper’s rangebound trading behavior since July has sapped hedge funds involvement with the current net length a far cry from the 92k record peak seen this time last year.Latest: Gold (XAUUSD) received a small bid on Friday following mixed US data, but overall, it continues to lack the momentum needed to challenge an area of resistance just above $1790 where both the 50- and 200-day moving averages meet. Focus on Friday’s US CPI data with the gold market struggling to respond to rising inflation as it could speed up rate hike expectations thereby putting upward pressure on real yields which are inverse correlated to gold's performance.  A full 25 basis point rate hike has now been priced in for July and the short-term direction will likely be determined by the ebb and flow of future rate hike expectations. Agriculture: The whole sector with the exception of livestock took a major hit, just one week after funds had increased bullish bets on grains and softs by the most in 15 months. Both sectors suffered setbacks of more than 5% with recent highflyers like wheat and cotton taking big hits. As mentioned, selling was broad and led by corn, soybeans, sugar and cocoa, with the latter together with palladium being the only two contracts where speculators hold an outright short position.This week the grain market will be focusing on weather developments in Australia and its potential impact on the wheat harvest, as well as the monthly World Agriculture Supply & Demand report (WASDE) from the USDA.  Forex In forex, speculators reacted to renewed virus concerns by increasing bullish dollar bets against ten IMM currency futures and the Dollar Index to an 18-month high at $27.9 billion. Speculators were buyers of JPY (18.4k lots or $2 billion equivalent) but sellers of everything else, including euros (6.8k) and the two commodity currencies of AUD (16.9k) and CAD (10.9k). These changes resulting in the aggregate dollar long rising by $2.3 billion. In terms of extended positioning, a euro short at 23k lots was last seen in March 2020, the GBP short at 39k lots was a two-year high while the 60k lots MXN short was the highest since March 2017. What is the Commitments of Traders report? The COT reports are issued by the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) and the ICE Exchange Europe for Brent crude oil and gas oil. They are released every Friday after the U.S. close with data from the week ending the previous Tuesday. They break down the open interest in futures markets into different groups of users depending on the asset class. Commodities: Producer/Merchant/Processor/User, Swap dealers, Managed Money and otherFinancials: Dealer/Intermediary; Asset Manager/Institutional; Leveraged Funds and otherForex: A broad breakdown between commercial and non-commercial (speculators) The reasons why we focus primarily on the behavior of the highlighted groups are: They are likely to have tight stops and no underlying exposure that is being hedged This makes them most reactive to changes in fundamental or technical price developments It provides views about major trends but also helps to decipher when a reversal is looming
US Dollar Still Has the Green Light

US Dollar Still Has the Green Light

Przemysław Radomski Przemysław Radomski 06.12.2021 16:13
  The dollar looks poised for another rally, to gold’s dismay. So, what’s the price target for the greenback over the winter months? While the consensus across the financial markets (especially at the beginning of the year) was that the U.S. dollar was destined for devaluation, I warned that the greenback would rise from the ashes. And with gold, silver, and mining stocks often moving inversely to the U.S. dollar, the latter’s ascent helped make the precious metals one of the worst-performing asset classes in 2021. Moreover, after more dollar doubters emerged in October – and the precious metals rallied hard – the USD Index eventually cut through 94, 95, and then 96 like a knife through butter. And with the precious metals reversing sharply once again, I expect another rally to push the USD Index to ~98 over the medium term. Perhaps quite soon. And the implications for the precious metals sector, are bearish. On top of that, while overbought conditions elicited a short-term pullback, end-of-month turnarounds and / or rallies are commonplace for the greenback. For context, I warned that a consolidation was likely overdue by highlighting the USD Index’s overbought RSI (Relative Strength Index) readings with the red arrows above. Conversely, the blue vertical dashed lines above demonstrate how the USD Index often bottoms near the end of each month, and rallies often follow. And while the current consolidation may need some more time to run its course, higher highs should materialize over the medium term. To explain, after the USD Index recorded sharp rallies in June and July, consolidation phases unfolded before the uptrends continued. And while the secondary uprisings occurred at more moderate paces, the USD Index still managed to make new highs. As a result, ~98 should materialize during the winter months. Furthermore, if the forecast proves prescient, the USD Index’s strength will likely usher gold back to its previous 2021 lows. Adding to our confidence (don’t get me wrong, there are no certainties in any market; it’s just that the bullish narrative for the USDX is even more bullish in my view), the USD Index often sizzles in the summer sun and major USDX rallies often start during the middle of the year. Summertime spikes have been mainstays on the USD Index’s historical record and in 2004, 2005, 2008, 2011, 2014 and 2018 a retest of the lows (or close to them) occurred before the USD Index began its upward flights (which is exactly what’s happened this time around). Furthermore, profound rallies (marked by the red vertical dashed lines below) followed in 2008, 2011 and 2014. With the current situation mirroring the latter, a small consolidation on the long-term chart is exactly what occurred before the USD Index surged in 2014. Likewise, the USD Index recently bottomed near its 50-week moving average; an identical development occurred in 2014. More importantly, though, with bottoms in the precious metals market often occurring when gold trades in unison with the USD Index (after ceasing to respond to the USD’s rallies with declines), we’re still far away from that milestone in terms of both price and duration. Again, the recent move higher in the USD Index doesn’t necessarily apply in the case of the above rule, as it was not the strength of the USD but weakness in the euro that has driven it. Likewise, with the USD Index now approaching its long-term rising support line (which is now resistance), a rally above the upward sloping black line below would invalidate the prior breakdown and support a move back above 100. Also, please note that the recent medium-term rally has been calmer than any major upswing witnessed over the last 20 years, where the USD Index’s RSI has hit 70. I marked the recent rally in the RSI with an orange rectangle and I did the same with the second-least and third-least volatile of the medium-term upswings. The sharp rallies in 2008 and 2014 were of much larger magnitudes. And in those historical analogies, the USD Index continued its surge for some time without suffering any material corrections. As a result, the short-term outlook is more of a coin flip. However, the medium-term outlook remains profoundly bullish, and gold, silver, and mining stocks may resent the USD Index’s forthcoming uprising. Just as the USD Index took a breather before its massive rally in 2014, it seems that we saw the same recently. This means that predicting higher gold prices (or the ones of silver) here is likely not a good idea. Continuing the theme, the eye in the sky doesn’t lie. And with the USDX’s long-term breakout clearly visible, the wind remains at the dollar’s back. Furthermore, dollar bears often miss the forest through the trees: with the USD Index’s long-term breakout gaining steam, the implications of the chart below are profound. And while very few analysts cite the material impact (when was the last time you saw the USDX chart starting in 1985 anywhere else?), the USD Index has been sending bullish signals for years. Please see below: The bottom line? With my initial 2021 target of 94.5 already hit, the ~98 target is likely to be reached over the medium term (and perhaps quite soon), mind, though: we’re not bullish on the greenback because of the U.S.’ absolute outperformance. It’s because the region is fundamentally outperforming the Eurozone, the EUR/USD accounts for nearly 58% of the movement of the USD Index, and the relative performance is what really matters. In conclusion, gold, silver, and mining stocks have reversed sharply in recent weeks. And though the trio tried to ignore the USD Index’s recent uprising, I wrote on Jul. 23 that the time-tested relationship of ‘U.S. dollar up, PMs down’ will likely be a major storyline during the Autumn months. To that point, with the theme likely to continue over the medium term, lower lows should confront gold, silver, and mining stocks over the next few months. Thank you for reading our free analysis today. Please note that the above is just a small fraction of today’s all-encompassing Gold & Silver Trading Alert. The latter includes multiple premium details such as the targets for gold and mining stocks that could be reached in the next few weeks. If you’d like to read those premium details, we have good news for you. As soon as you sign up for our free gold newsletter, you’ll get a free 7-day no-obligation trial access to our premium Gold & Silver Trading Alerts. It’s really free – sign up today. Przemyslaw Radomski, CFAFounder, Editor-in-chiefSunshine Profits: Effective Investment through Diligence & Care * * * * * All essays, research and information found above represent analyses and opinions of Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA and Sunshine Profits' associates only. As such, it may prove wrong and be subject to change without notice. Opinions and analyses are based on data available to authors of respective essays at the time of writing. Although the information provided above is based on careful research and sources that are deemed to be accurate, Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA and his associates do not guarantee the accuracy or thoroughness of the data or information reported. The opinions published above are neither an offer nor a recommendation to purchase or sell any securities. Mr. Radomski is not a Registered Securities Advisor. By reading Przemyslaw Radomski's, CFA reports you fully agree that he will not be held responsible or liable for any decisions you make regarding any information provided in these reports. Investing, trading and speculation in any financial markets may involve high risk of loss. Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA, Sunshine Profits' employees and affiliates as well as members of their families may have a short or long position in any securities, including those mentioned in any of the reports or essays, and may make additional purchases and/or sales of those securities without notice.
Intraday Market Analysis – USD Treads Water - 07.12.2021

Intraday Market Analysis – USD Treads Water - 07.12.2021

John Benjamin John Benjamin 07.12.2021 09:00
GBPUSD attempts to rebound The sterling consolidates as BOE officials stress due to inflationary pressure from a tight labor market. So far, rebounds have been an opportunity for trend followers to sell into strength. The pound is testing last December’s demand zone around 1.3200. An oversold RSI may help lift bids momentarily as sellers take profit. 1.3300 is the immediate resistance. Then the bulls will need to clear the origin of the latest sell-off at 1.3370 to attract more buying interest. On the downside, a breakout would send the price to 1.3100. NZDUSD sticks to downtrend The US dollar edged higher thanks to a rally in Treasury yields. Increasing divergence between the 20 and 30-day moving averages suggests a deterioration in market sentiment. On the hourly chart, a short-lived rebound has struggled to stay above 0.6780. And that is a sign that the bears are still in control of the direction. 0.6700 is the next support. Its breach would extend the sell-off to November 2020’s lows near 0.6600. The RSI’s oversold situation may cause a limited rebound with 0.6810 as the closest resistance. US 30 breaks higher The Dow Jones recoups losses as the omicron variant may have less impact than feared. The index bounced off last October’s lows around 34000. An oversold RSI in this demand zone has attracted a crowd to buy the dips. A break above 34950 and then 35300 would prompt short-term sellers to cover, paving the way for a sustainable rally. 35950 would be a key hurdle and its breach may turn the cautious mood around and resume the bullish trend. 34700 is the first support when the bulls try to catch their breath.
Animal Spirits Roar Back

Animal Spirits Roar Back

Marc Chandler Marc Chandler 07.12.2021 16:47
December 07, 2021  $USD, Canada, China, Currency Movement, Germany, Hungary, Japan, Mexico, RBA, Russia, US Overview:  A return of risk appetites can be seen through the capital markets today, arguably encouraged by ideas that Omicron is manageable and China's stimulus.  Led by Hong Kong and Japan, the MSCI Asia Pacific rose by the most in three months, while Europe's Stoxx 600 gapped higher, leaving a potentially bullish island bottom in its wake.  US futures point to a gap higher opening when the local session begins.  The bond market is taking it in stride.  The US 10-year Treasury is slightly firmer at 1.44%, while European yields are 1-3 bp higher.  The dollar-bloc currencies and Norway are leading the move higher among most major currencies.  The yen and euro are softer.  Sterling struggles to sustain upticks. Among emerging markets currencies, the Turkish lira is bouncing, while most central European currencies are being dragged lower by the weaker euros.  The JP Morgan Emerging Market Currency Index is slightly higher after four consecutive losses.  Gold is trading within yesterday's narrow range.  Oil continues to recover, and the January WTI contract is up around 2.5% (after yesterday's 4.9% advance) and is above $71.50 a barrel.  US natgas prices dropped 11.5% yesterday and have come back firmer today, while the European benchmark (Dutch) is up 7% today (~+0.5% yesterday) to near last week's highs.  Iron ore prices jumped 7.7% today after 2.5% yesterday, perhaps encouraged by strong Chinese import figures.  Copper prices are also firm.    Asia Pacific The Reserve Bank of Australia stuck to its stance. It may take two years to reach the 2-3% inflation target, and the uncertainties surrounding the Omicron variant also favor a cautious approach. This was in line with expectations.  The swaps market still has about 75 bp of higher rates discounted next year.   The Australian dollar's gains reflect the risk-on mood.   Japan's economy is on the mend.  Household spending rose 3.4% month-over-month in October.  Paradoxically, outlays on medical care actually fell (-5.7%) year-over-year in October.  Meanwhile, Labor cash earnings rose by 0.2% year-over-year, the same as in September, but less than expected.  Households headed by a worker rose 0.5% year-over-year.   China's trade surplus fell to $71.7 bln in November from $84.5 bln in October.  The US accounted for a little more than 50% of the surplus (~$37 bln).  Exports rose by 22% year-over-year, less than the 27.1% increase in October.  But, what really stood out were China's imports.  They surged, jumping 31.7% from a year ago after a 20.6% increase in October.  Commodity imports were robust.  The 35 mln tons of coal imported was the most this year. Oil imports were at three-month highs.  Iron ore imports reached a 13-month high,  Gas purchases were the highest since January.  Copper imports appear to be a record.  Separately, China reported that the value of its foreign exchange reserves rose by a minor $4.7 bln to $3.222 trillion.  Economists (Bloomberg survey median) had expected around an $11 bln decline.   The dollar has forged what appears to be a solid base now around JPY112.55.  So far, today is the first session since November 26 that the greenback has held above JPY113.00.  It has been confined to a narrow range between JPY113.40 and JPY113.75.  The dollar looks poised to move higher but may stall around JPY114.00, where an option for around $865 mln expires today.  The Australian dollar rose about half of a cent yesterday and is up around another half-cent today to test $0.7100.  An option for A$1.04 bln expires today there ($0.7100).  It is also the (61.8%) retracement objective of last week's drop.  A move above there would target the $0.7130 area and possibly $0.7200.  The reduction in Chinese banks' reserve requirements and the divergence with the direction the Fed appears headed did not deter the yuan from strengthening.  The dollar held CNY6.38 yesterday and is near CNY6.3660 now.  The low for the year was set at the end of May near CNY6.3570.  The dollar's reference rate was set at CNY6.3738, a touch higher than the models (Bloomberg survey) projected of CNY6.3734.   Europe According to the proverb, for want of a nail, a kingdom was lost.  US intelligence warns that Russia is poised to invade Ukraine.  Beijing continues to act as a bully in the South China Sea.  US President Biden is hosting a "Summit for Democracy" December 9-10.   Reportedly 110 countries will be represented, even Taiwan, which the US officially does not recognize as a country.  All of the EU members have been invited but Hungary.  Hungary, like Poland, is in a serious fight with the EC over the rule of law.  It is being fined for failing to comply with the European Court of Justice over its harsh treatment of asylum seekers.  Poland, which is invited to the summit, is also being fined a record 1 mln euros a day for deviations from the EU standards of the rule of law.   Yet Hungary's exclusion is needlessly antagonistic.  Hungary will hold parliamentary elections in April (though possibly May), and the opposition is united behind the center-right Marki-Zay.  Most polls show him ahead of Orban.   It is an insult to the EU, and Orban used his veto to block the EU from formally participating and prevented it from submitting a position paper.  It is a vulnerable position for the US to be the judge and jury about democracy and the rule of law.   Laura Thorton, director of the Alliance for Securing Democracy of the German Marshall Fund of the United States, expressed shock and dismay in a recent Washington Post op-ed over developments in Wisconsin. She wrote, "If this [where the GOP is seeking to replace the bipartisan oversight of elections with just its party's control] occurred in any of the countries where the US provides aid, it would immediately be called out as a threat to democracy.  US diplomats would be writing furious cables, and decision-makers would be threatening to cut off the flow of assistance."  Separately, the US embassy in Tokyo warned Japan about "racially profiling incidents" following the closure of its borders to new foreign entries into the country.   The US response to the Russian aggression in Georgia in 2008 and the annexation of Crimea in 2014 was soft.  Despite bringing NATO to Russia's door in the Baltics, the US recognized by its actions that it is difficult to defend what Russia calls its near-abroad. Ukraine is different.  When Ukraine gave up its nuclear weapons, the Budapest Memorandum  (1994), Russia, the US, and the UK committed to respecting its independence and territorial integrity.  Russia clearly violated the agreement, but the US says it is not legally binding.  Nevertheless, reports indicate that the Biden administration is contemplating new sanctions against Russia and Putin's inner circle.  Reportedly under consideration is removing Russia from the SWIFT payment system and new sanctions of Russia's energy companies, banks, and sovereign debt.  In late April, the European Parliament approved a non-binding resolution to exclude Russia from the SWIFT if it attacked Ukraine.  Russia is a heavy user of SWIFT, as few foreign banks, including the Chinese, are willing to use Russia's own payment system.  After a dismal factory orders report, the market had been prepared for a poor industrial output report today.  Instead, Germany surprised with its strongest gain for the year.  Industrial output surged 2.8% in October.   It is only the third monthly gain this year.  Moreover, September's decline of 1.1% was halved to 0.5%.  It appears auto production (capital goods) may be behind the improvement in activity.  Separately, the ZEW survey was mixed.  The expectations component was stronger than expected, but still, at 29.9, lower than November's 31.7 reading.  The assessment of the current situation deteriorated sharply to -7.4 from 12.5.  It has been declining since September, but this is the lowest since June.  On November 30, the euro spiked higher and has subsequently worked its way lower.  Today, it reached almost $1.1250, its lowest level since November 30, low near $1.1235. The 20-day moving average (~$1.1320) continues to block the upside.  It has not closed above it for a little more than a month.  The low for the year so far was recorded on November 24 near $1.1185.  For its part, sterling remains in its trough. The low for the year was set on November 30, slightly below $1.32.  Before the weekend, it was in a roughly $1.3210-$1.3310 range and remains well within that range yesterday and today.  It has been blocked ahead of $1.3300.  There is an option for about GBP450 mln at $1.3250 that expires today.   America The US is expected to report that productivity fell in Q3 by 4.9% rather than the 5% that was initially reported.  Productivity increased by 2.4% in Q2 and 4.3% in Q1.  It averaged 2.6% last year and 2.3% in 2019.  Unit labor costs are the most holistic measure, including wages, benefits, and output.  Looking at a four-quarter moving average, unit labor costs rose 1.6% in 2018 and 1.45% in 2019.  They jumped to 6.25% last year and fell by an average of 0.85% in H1 21.  The initial estimate for Q3 was an 8.3% surge.   The US also reports the October trade balance.  The preliminary goods balance signaled a likely improvement from the $80.9 bln deficit in September.  The median forecast (Bloomberg) sees a deficit of slightly less than $67 bln.  Through September, the monthly average was nearly $71 bln, up from $53.3 bln in the same period last year and less than a $50 bln average in the first nine months of 2019. Late in the session, the US reports October consumer credit, and another substantial increase is expected.  It jumped almost $30 bln in September.  It has averaged $20.275 bln a month through September.  Last year was too distorted, but in the first three quarters of 2019, consumer credit rose by an average of $15.3 bln a month.    Canada reports its October merchandise trade figures today, ahead of the Bank of Canada meeting tomorrow  The median forecast in Bloomberg's survey call for a C$2.08 bln surplus, which, if accurate, would the be third largest surplus since 2008.  The June surplus was larger at C$2.26, as was the December 2011 surplus of C$2.12 bln.   Canada's goods trade balance through September swung into surplus with an average of C$703 mln.  In the same period in 2020, the monthly deficit averaged C$3.1 bln and  C$1.4 bln in 2019.  The merchandise surplus may be sufficient to lift the current account too.  Canada has been running a current account deficit since 2009.   The OECD forecasts a surplus this year of 0.3% of GDP and projects it to be in balance next year.  Canada and Mexico have expressed concerns about the credits for electric vehicles in the Build Back Better US initiative.  They claim it violates the USMCA.  Europe has expressed similar problems, and the EU Trade Commissioner Dombrovskis has reportedly sent a formal letter warning that the Biden administration's efforts may also violate WTO rules.  Meanwhile, there is talk that the initiative may be blocked this year.  If this is the case, the odds of passage next year seem even slimmer.  On a different front, Mexico's controversial energy reforms, which expand the state sector, over some objections by US energy companies, look to be delayed due to lack of support.  The US dollar posted an outside up day against the Canadian dollar before the weekend, despite Canada's strong employment report.  There was no follow-through yesterday, and the greenback recorded an inside day and settled on its lows.  The US dollar has been sold to around CAD1.2700 today.  Initial support is around CAD1.2675, but the more significant test is near CAD1.2640.  A break would strengthen the conviction that a high is in place.  Meanwhile, the greenback continues to consolidate against the Mexican peso.  It remains within the range set last Wednesday (~MXN21.1180-MXN21.5150).  Thus far today, it is holding above yesterday's low (~MXN21.1720), which was- above the pre-weekend low (~MXN21.1625).            Disclaimer
Intraday Market Analysis – USD Edges Lower

Intraday Market Analysis – USD Edges Lower

John Benjamin John Benjamin 08.12.2021 09:07
EURUSD seeks support The euro bounced higher after the bloc’s Q3 GDP beat expectations. A previous rebound was capped by the 20-day moving average, suggesting that the bearish sentiment still prevails. The RSI’s double top in the overbought area has prompted short-term buyers to take profit. The pair has met support above 1.1240. The bulls will need to lift offers around 1.1330 before they could attract momentum buyers. A bearish breakout would send the price to the floor at 1.1190. Its breach would trigger a new round of sell-off. AUDUSD breaks higher The Australian dollar soared after the RBA remained optimistic about the economic recovery. The pair saw strong buying interest at the psychological level of 0.7000, which also sits near November 2020’s lows. An oversold RSI on the daily chart compounds the ‘buying-the-dips’ behavior. An initial pop above 0.7070 forced bearish trend followers to cover their latest bets. 0.7170 would be the next target though the RSI’s overbought situation may limit the surge. 0.7040 is the first support for buyers to regroup and accumulate. USDJPY attempts to rebound The yen stalled after Japan’s GDP showed an unexpected contraction in Q3. A break below the daily support at 112.70 has put the bulls on the defensive. The latest consolidation is a sign of indecision as to whether the correction would continue. The greenback found support over 112.50 and a close above 113.95 could help the bulls regain the upper hand. Then the psychological level of 115.00 would be the next step before the uptrend could resume. On the downside, a fall below 113.10 would retest the key support at 112.50.
Who Wants to Buy Bitcoin Now?

Who Wants to Buy Bitcoin Now?

Alex Kuptsikevich Alex Kuptsikevich 08.12.2021 08:40
Since yesterday, Bitcoin has gone from almost $52K to $50.7K. On Tuesday, the crypto market was green on nearly all fronts, including ETH, ADA, XRP, etc. And although the Fear Index continued to remain in the horror zone with 26 points, everyone was buying altcoins. However, BTC did not gain a foothold above the resistance at $51,800, so it is premature to talk about conquering the heights and completing the correction. Perhaps this is not even a correction now, but a search for the actual price without rose-coloured glasses and excessive optimism. Whether there are still those who want to ride up at their own expense on the market, we will only find out when Bitcoin rises above $56K. A Grayscale poll found that 26% of American investors have already bought BTC. So, apparently, we just need the remaining 74% to join in. But do they have any motivation? Moreover, the United States has introduced cryptocurrencies into its anti-corruption strategy, although exactly how this will affect the market is unclear. Aside from the local downward trend in Bitcoin, the cryptocurrency market remains bullish, rapidly changing sentiment and moving from correction to growth. Based on the posts on Twitter, the popularity of cryptocurrencies is only growing. Thus, in partnership with the Gemini crypto exchange, the largest bank in Colombia, Bancolombia, added transaction services with BTC, ETH, LTC, and BCH to its list. Video game developer Ubisoft has launched an NFT platform, and blockchain project Spiral, a division of Jack Dorsey's Block, will improve Bitcoin's Lightning Network. Among the small altcoins, the hot class of projects related to the metauniverses remains. This topic is so popular that almost any new project considers it its duty to point out the potential for the development of this topic. It seems that investors are recruiting all newcomers to their portfolio, hoping to get an impressive profit if at least one project hits. However, you should be extremely careful. At the end of November, it seemed that the Covalent coin, issued six months ago, recovered relatively quickly from the traditional drawdown in the first months of its life. However, since the beginning of December, its value has been rapidly decreasing, colouring the first eight days of the month in red and confidently remaining below the offering price. At the same time, this cryptocurrency suits well for intraday trading: for yesterday's session, for example, it grew by 3.62%, although this did not affect the overall “red” result.
Weak November Payrolls Won’t Help Gold

Weak November Payrolls Won’t Help Gold

Arkadiusz Sieron Arkadiusz Sieron 07.12.2021 17:14
  November employment report was mixed. Unfortunately for gold, however, it won’t stop the Fed’s hawkish agenda. Nonfarm payrolls disappointed in November. As the chart below shows, the US labor market added only 210,000 jobs last month. This number is much lower than both October’s figure (546,000 gains) and the market expectations (MarketWatch’s analysts forecasted 573,000 added jobs). So, it’s a huge blow to those optimistic about the US economy. However, this is a huge blow that nobody will care about because the disappointing payrolls were accompanied by a big decline in unemployment. As the chart above shows, the unemployment rate decreased by 0.4 percentage points, from 4.6% in October to 4.2% in November. What’s more, the unemployment rate declined simultaneously with the increases in both the labor-force participation rate (from 61.6% to 61.8%) and the employment-to-population ratio (from 58.8% to 59.2%). This means that the reduction in unemployment was genuine and rather not a result of dropping out from the labor market. Additionally, wage inflation has slowed down from 4.84% in October to 4.8% in November, remaining below expectations, which could slightly ease inflationary concerns. Last but not least, after revisions, employment in September and October combined was reported to be 82,000 higher than previously indicated, and the monthly job growth has averaged 555,000 so far this year. Therefore, even a weak November doesn’t change the fact that 2021 marked a great improvement in the US labor market.   Implications for Gold What does the November employment report imply for the gold market? The nonfarm payrolls disappointed, but it’s not enough to stop the Fed from accelerating the pace of tapering its quantitative easing, especially given the significant reduction in the unemployment rate. So, the hawkish revolution won’t be stopped. It may even be strengthened, as a big decline in unemployment brings us closer to “full employment” and meeting the criteria for hiking interest rates. This is, of course, not good news for the gold bulls. After hearing worries about inflation a few weeks ago, the Fed managed to calm investors. They’ve believed that Powell and his colleagues would take the inflationary threat seriously. Markets now expect a speed-up in the pace of tapering in December and as much as three interest rates hikes in 2022 (there are even investors who bet on seven hikes by the end of the next year!). However, there is a silver lining here. With the unemployment rate at 4.2%, the potential for further improvement is rather limited. And when a new upward trend begins, we will have rising unemployment rate and high inflation at the same time. Such conditions create stagflation, which would take gold higher. This is still a song of the future, though. Let’s focus on the recent past: gold prices increased slightly on Friday (December 3, 2021). Although the London P.M. Fix hardly changed (see the chart below), the New York price rebounded to about $1,783 on Friday from $1,769 the day before. However, it doesn’t change the fact that gold remains stuck in a sideways trend below $1,800, as concerns about inflation exist along with expectations of a more aggressive Fed tightening cycle. Luckily for gold, despite its hawkish rhetoric, the US central bank will remain behind the inflation curve. The cautious, dovish policy is simply too tempting, as hitting the brakes too hard could trigger a financial crisis and a recession. With the CPI annual rate above 6%, the Fed should have already hiked the federal funds rate instead of waiting until Q2 2022. And even with three 25-basis point hikes, real interest rates will remain deeply in negative territory, which should be supportive of gold prices. If you enjoyed today’s free gold report, we invite you to check out our premium services. We provide much more detailed fundamental analyses of the gold market in our monthly Gold Market Overview reports and we provide daily Gold & Silver Trading Alerts with clear buy and sell signals. In order to enjoy our gold analyses in their full scope, we invite you to subscribe today. If you’re not ready to subscribe yet though and are not on our gold mailing list yet, we urge you to sign up. It’s free and if you don’t like it, you can easily unsubscribe. Sign up today! Arkadiusz Sieron, PhDSunshine Profits: Effective Investment through Diligence & Care
Ahead Of The US CPI, Speaking Of Crude Oil And Metals - Saxo Market Call

Market Quick Take - December 3, 2021

Saxo Bank Saxo Bank 03.12.2021 09:02
Macro 2021-12-03 08:45 6 minutes to read Summary:  Risk sentiment rebounded yesterday in the US session, erasing the rather steep losses of the prior day. Sentiment in Asia is also on the mend, while oil prices recovered all of the lost ground from an intraday plunge in the wake of the OPEC+ meeting yesterday. Today, focus swings to the US November jobs report, with extra focus likely on average hourly earnings data as investors watch for signs of a wage-price spiral developing. What is our trading focus? Nasdaq 100 (USNAS100.I) and S&P 500 (US500.I) - US equities bounced back yesterday after finding a new low for the current short-term cycle lower with Nasdaq 100 futures trading around the 15,975 level this morning in European trading. Long-term US interest rates are not moving much so we expect a quiet session unless the Nonfarm Payrolls for November throws a curveball at the market. In the medium-term risk in equities will be determined by pricing of interest rates hikes next year and updated information on the new Omicron variant of Covid. Stoxx 50 (EU50.I) - Stoxx 50 futures are stuck in a stabilisation zone between 4,100 and 4,160 with the 100-day moving average at 4,157 which is obviously the key resistance level to watch today should we get risk-on. European equities remain pulled by two opposite forces with the first being that higher expected interest rates are positive for this value market, while the continent has the most to lose short-term from the Omicron variant. If the latter fades over the coming weeks, we expect investors to move back into European equities. USDJPY and JPY crosses – With every day that passes and no follow-through lower unfolds after the recent omicron-variant inspired tumble from the 115.00+ level, the odds of a reversal back higher grow, though as we have mentioned often in this space, this would likely require that US yields lift all along the curve, not just near the front of the curve where Fed expectations operate the most forcefully. A fresh wave of weak global risk sentiment, on the other hand, could bring another wave of JPY strength, particularly in the crosses like AUDJPY and CADJPY, some of which saw their largest single-day moves since the pandemic outbreak early last year. For USDJPY, the downside pivot is now near 112.50. USDCAD – USDCAD has rallied as the market has been adjusting to the more hawkish shift from the Fed, especially after this week’s testimony from Fed Chair Powell. As well, uncertainties and the real threat of a reduction in travel due to the new omicron variant of covid have taken down crude oil prices nearly twenty dollars from their late October peak, around the time USDCAD was bottoming out near 1.2300. Now it trades near 1.2800 and the top of the range (only intraday price spikes from August and September rose above this level) as oil has staged a significant rebound yesterday. If risk sentiment can stabilize and oil prices recover, this important 1.2800+ area resistance could hold. Crude oil (OILUKFEB22 & OILUSJAN21) trades up 8% from yesterday’s low point after the OPEC+ group of producers adopted a flexible approach on supply while at the same time agreeing to maintain the current rate of production increases. The market gripped with omicron angst this past week rallied on the news due to several reasons 1) the market had already priced in a significant and not yet realised reduction in demand, and 2) it the meeting was left “in session” meaning changes can be made before January 4. 3) the move eased political tensions with large consumers, 4) some of the SPR barrels on offer may not leave storage due to lack of demand from refineries, and 5) members with spare capacity wanted to increase production, as the group has not delivered the promised increases due to some struggling to reach their quotas. The next upside level to watch being the 200-day moving average at $72.85. Gold (XAUUSD) slumped to a one-month low at $1762 yesterday, as the dollar strengthened in response to robust economic data, before finding a small bid from recovering crude oil prices. Otherwise, it has been another troubled week, the third in a row, with the yellow metal struggling to put up a defense against the Fed’s changed focus from employment to combatting inflation. In addition, the spreading of the omicron variant and its potential threat to the economic recovery has so far failed to support prices despite driving bond yields sharply lower and the VIX higher. Silver (XAGUSD) has struggled even more given its industrious link with XAUXAG ratio trading near a two-month high. Focus today being the US job report with the first major upside level of interest in gold being $1792 with support at $1760. US Treasuries (IEF, TLT). Today the focus is on the nonfarm payrolls numbers, as a better-than-expected report would confirm the intention of the Federal Reserve to taper at this month's FOMC meeting. The US yield curve continued to bear-flatten yesterday as Fed’s speakers including Bostic, Daly, Quarles, and Barkin commented on the possibility of a faster tapering to open for rate hikes next year. Two-year yields rose by 8 bps, while five-year yields cheapened by 5bps. Long-term yields dropped contributing to an increased flattening of the yield curve in the 2s10s and 5s30s areas. In the meanwhile, Eurodollar futures have started to price rates cut in 2025. We expect the flattening of the yield curve to continue until Covid distortions are eased. Afterward, the long part of the yield curve will need to shift much higher adjusting to interest rate hikes expectations. US junk bonds (HYG, JNK). According to Bloomberg Barclays indexes, junk bonds’ OAS widened by 30bps to 330bps amid last Friday’s selloff reflecting the lack of liquidity in markets. Despite negative real rates continuing to support corporate bond valuations, it’s safe to expect junk bond spreads to widen throughout the end of the year amid poor liquidity. If the volatility in rates remains sustained, the widening of spreads could accelerate, posing a threat also for stocks. German Bunds (IS0L). Rate hikes expectations for the eurozone were pushed to 2023 yesterday amid a slump in tech stocks. German and Italian government bonds more than reversed Wednesday’s losses. In Europe, Covid distortions are keeping bond yields in check. However, when Covid fears ease we can expect yields in the euro area to adjust higher given the inflationary backdrop and the new German government. What is going on? Omicron covid variant cases rise, reinfection risk judged high in one study. South African officials note that the omicron variant of covid is spreading faster than the delta- or any other variant of the virus despite estimates by some that a majority of the South African population was infected with covid in prior waves. National cases were at 11.5k yesterday versus 8.6k on Wednesday and 4.4k on Tuesday. A study there of the reinfection risk suggests that it is some three times higher than prior variants. Omicron variant cases have now been discovered worldwide, including Italy, the US and South Korea. DocuSign shares plunge 30% in extended trading. The company guided Q4 revenue of $557-563mn vs est. $574mn which is a small revenue miss, but enough to spark a massive selloff in extended trading. Investors took clearly little comfort in the fact that the company is consistently improving operating margin hitting 3.1% in Q3 and expected to climb significantly in the coming quarters. China moves to delist Didi from US exchanges. US SEC set to move against Chinese listing. The Chinese ride-sharing and transportation platform company will delist in the US and move to a Hong Kong listing, perhaps in the March time frame. Meanwhile, the US SEC is set to move against a number of Chinese companies listed on US exchanges on charges that their accounting disclosures are not in compliance with US regulations. Another strong US weekly jobless claims number was out yesterday at 222k, lower than expected and near the levels during the strong labor market before the early 2020 pandemic outbreak. The prior week’s number was one of the lowest ever and was revised even lower to 194k, suggesting a very tight labor market. What are we watching next? Study of omicron variant and its virulence. Scientists will work with the provincial government of Gauteng in South Africa, which has the most measured cases of the new omicron variant, to complete a study of the new variant’s virulence as soon as next Tuesday, though results will be released to the public later. A local official there said that hospitalizations and mortality are lower than expected thus far. US November Nonfarm Payrolls Change and Average Hourly Earnings today. With the US economy operating at full capacity according to estimates from CBO, continued strong job gains will add fuel to the “inflation fire”. Wednesday's 534k increase in the November ADP private payroll number suggests that the job market growth remains healthy in the US as we await the official nonfarm payrolls numbers today (expected to show 500k+ jobs added), where strong upward revisions to prior months’ data has been a notable trend this year due to data collection issues. As well, Average Hourly earnings numbers will be closely watched for any budding signs of a wage-price spiral, as a constrained supply of labor could see companies bidding up wages and October showed a strong rise in earnings at a faster pace than at any time from the start of the survey in 2007 to the outbreak of the covid pandemic. The October Average Hourly Earnings number rose to 4.9% year-on-year, and 5.0% is expected for today’s November number. Earnings Watch – today is a quiet day on earnings with only Bank of Montreal reporting earnings. We have also put in next week’s earnings releases. Friday: Bank of Montreal Next week’s earnings: Monday: Sino Pharmaceutical, Acciona Energias, MongoDB, Coupa Software, Gitlab Tuesday: SentinelOne, AutoZone, Ashtead Group Wednesday: Huali Industrial Group, GalaxyCore, Kabel Deutschland, Dollarama, Brown-Forman, UiPath, GameStop, RH, Campbell Soup Thursday: Sekisui House, Hormel Foods, Costco Wholesale, Oracle, Broadcom, Lululemon Athletica, Chewy, Vail Resorts Friday: Carl Zeiss Meditec Economic calendar highlights for today (times GMT) 0815-0900 – Euro Zone final Nov. Services PMI 0900 – Norway Nov. Unemployment Rate 0930 – UK Nov. Final Services PMI 1100 – UK Bank of England’s Saunders to speak 1300 – ECB Chief Economist Philip Lane to speak 1330 – US Nov. Change in Nonfarm Payrolls 1330 – US Nov. Average Hourly Earnings 1330 – US Nov. Unemployment Rate 1330 – Canada Nov. Net Change in Employment 1330 – Canada Nov. Unemployment Rate 1415 – US Fed’s Bullard (voter in 2022) to speak 1500 – US Nov. ISM Services 1500 – US Nov. Factory Orders   Follow SaxoStrats on the daily Saxo Markets Call on your favorite podcast app: Apple Spotify Soundcloud Sticher
Markets Calmer, Awaiting Fresh Incentives

Markets Calmer, Awaiting Fresh Incentives

Marc Chandler Marc Chandler 08.12.2021 13:51
December 08, 2021  $USD, Bank of Canada, Currency Movement, Germany, India, Japan, Poland, Russia Overview:  The capital markets are calmer today, and the fear that was evident at the end of last week remains mostly scar tissue. Led by gains in Japan, China, Australia, New Zealand, and India, the MSCI Asia Pacific Index extended yesterday's gains.  Europe's Stoxx and US futures are firm.  The US 10-year yield is softer, around 1.43%, while European yields are mostly 1-2 bp lower.  The Norwegian krone and euro lead major currencies higher against the greenback, but the New Zealand dollar and sterling are underperforming. Most of the emerging market currencies are enjoying an upside bias. The Turkish lira is giving back a little more than half of yesterday's 2.25% bounce.  Gold is edging higher and is near the 200-day moving average (~$1792).  January WTI is off $1 around  $71 after rallying around 8% in the past two sessions.  API reported a three million barrel drawdown in inventories but a big jump in Cushing.   US natural gas is consolidating and paring Monday's 11.5% drop.  Europe (Dutch) natural gas prices are rising for the third consecutive session and around 10% this week.  Iron ore has extended this week's rally and is at the highs since October.  Copper is flat.   Asia Pacific Australia has joined the US in the diplomat boycott of the winter Olympics in Beijing.  South Korea and Japan have not formally decided yet.  China's quarantine policies made it difficult for many diplomats to attend in any event, and many apparently will not attend.  Beijing threatens unspecified retaliation.   Japan reported an increase in its October current account, rising to JPY1.18 trillion from JPY1.03 trillion in September.  The swing in the trade balance from a JPY230 bln deficit to a JPY167 bln surplus more than accounted for it.  Japan also revised Q3 GDP to a 0.9% contraction (from -0.8%).  The composition changed.  Consumption was a greater drag (-1.3% quarter-over-quarter rather than -1.1%), and inventories contributed less (0.1% vs. 0.3%) and net exports were flat (rather than contribute 0.1 percentage points).  Business investment was less a drag (-2.3% vs. -3.8%).  Still, there is reason to be more optimistic about the outlook for the world's third-largest economy.  Social restrictions have eased, the vaccination rate is among the best, and the government is providing fresh stimulus.  The Kishida government is expected to finalize its fiscal efforts toward the end of the week. A key issue is the tax incentive (subsidy) for companies that boost wages by 3%, which has not happened since 1997.   India left its key rate corridor on hold today.  The repo rate is 4%, and the reverse repo rate is 3.35%.  Some observers saw the possibility of a hike in the reverse repo rate.  The monetary policy committee voted unanimously to keep the repo rate steady.  The reverse repo rate is a broader issue decided by the central bank, not the MPC.  The emergence of Omicron may have encouraged the central bank to maintain a steady hand, while the cut in the excise duty and VAT for petrol and diesel may help ease price pressures.  It made some technical changes in its liquidity management, which some see as a prelude to a hike in February 2022, when the central bank meets again.   The dollar is consolidating in a narrow 30-point range above JPY113.35 against the Japanese yen.  Yesterday's high was just below JPY113.80.  An option for about $550 mln will roll off today at JPY114.25, while there is a nearly $1.5 bln option at JPY114.00 that expires tomorrow.  The JPY114 area also holds the 20-day moving average, which the dollar has not closed above since November 25. The Australian dollar began the week flirting with the $0.7000 area.  It is rising for its third consecutive session and has reached almost $0.7145 today.  Last week's highs were set a little above $0.7170.  Despite words of caution by Chinese officials and the cut in reserve requirements, the yuan continues to march higher.  It is at new three-year highs today.  The dollar has been sold down to almost CNY6.3455.  Local dollar bonds and bonds below investment grade have rallied as officials signal a focus on supporting the economy.  Today the rate for re-lending to rural and small businesses was cut by 25 bp.  The PBOC has also been generous with its liquidity provisions.  The reference rate for the dollar was set at CNY6.3677, a little firmer than expected (CNY6.3665, Bloomberg survey).    Europe An era is formally over today as Germany's new government takes office.  The challenges it faces are profound.  The virus was surging even before the Omicron variant was detected.  The economy has been hobbled.  Inflation is high (6% on the harmonized measure in November) and without the fiscal stimulus seen in the US, where CPI is up 6.2% from a year ago (October).  This year, the German deficit is estimated to be about 5.8% and seen falling to 2.5% next year.  The US deficit is around 12.5% this year and is expected to fall to around 6.5% in 2022. Russia is amassing troops, and fears that it will invade Ukraine early next year are running high.  Germany reportedly will nix the controversial Nord Stream II pipeline if Russia carries through with its threat as part of the economic sanctions being considered.  Italy's Draghi has had a bit of a honeymoon, but that will change.  Two of the three largest unions will strike on December 16 to protest Draghi's budget, which must be passed by the end of the month.   Moreover, the selection of a new Italian president in January may mark the beginning of the political process that will lead to a new parliamentary election by the middle of 2023.  The president of Itlay is chosen by the Italian Parliament and regional representatives.  The current president, Mattarella, has declined to run for a second term.  Draghi does lead any political party, but the latest surveys show the center-left Democratic Party is in first place, polling a couple percentage points higher than it got in the last election at 21.4% support.  The Brothers of Italy on the right are in second place with slightly less than 20% support.  The Five Star Movement has seen its fortunes slip to about 15%.  Poland's central bank is set to hike its base rate today.  It will be the third consecutive increase.  The base rate was slashed from 1.50% last year to 10 bp.  It was hiked by 40 bp in October and 75 bp last month to stand at 1.25%. The headline CPI surged from 2.4% at the end of last year to 7.7% in November. Czech and Hungary have been more aggressive in raising rates.  Last month, Czech's central bank delivered a 125 bp increase to lift its key two-week repo rate to 2.75%.   It was at 25 bp to start the year.  Its CPI is near 6%.  Hungary has raised its base rate every month since June and taken it from 60 bp to 2.10%.  It has also taken its one-week deposit rate from 75 bp to 3.10%, with 130 bp delivered in the past three weeks. Earlier today, it reported that CPI rose to 7.4% last month from 6.5%.  Most look for a 50 bp increase from Poland's central bank today.   The euro briefly dipped below $1.1230 yesterday but recovered in the North American afternoon.  It is extending the recovery today and traded $1.1300 in the European morning.  The $1.1310-$1.1320 offers nearby resistance.  The UK government is being embarrassed by reports about its holiday party a year ago in violation of the social restrictions in place at the time.  It adds to the sleaze factor that has weakened it.  The latest polls show that the Labour Party is extending its lead.  Also, ideas that the BOE could raise rates next week have diminished and been pushed into next February.  Sterling is heavy, near $1.3200.  We have warned of near-term risk toward $1.3165, the (38.2%) retracement objective of the rally from the March 2020 low near $1.14.   America A deal appears in the works to lift the US debt ceiling.  The maneuver requires 60 votes to allow the debt ceiling to pass with a simple majority.  The Republican leadership appears willing to go along with this.  It will likely set a new precedent that will be used and possibly expanded when control of Congress changes.  PredictIt.Org shows that the Republicans are favored to win control of both houses in next year's mid-term election.   The US calendar today features the JOLTS report on job openings.  The week's highlight, the November CPI, is out on Friday, and both the headline and core rates are expected to accelerate.  Fed officials are in the blackout period ahead of next week's FOMC meeting.  Today's North American feature is the Bank of Canada meeting.  No one expects a change in rates.  It is more about the rhetoric.  Despite the uncertainty surrounding the Omicron variant, Bank of Canada officials are likely to be more confident about the strength of the recovery.  Last week's jobs data adds to the positive impulses.  Moreover, the government is providing more fiscal support.  The biggest challenge is that the market has discounted five hikes over the next 12 months.  This is aggressive and difficult for the central bank to get ahead of market expectations. Even after the strong Canadian jobs data at the end of last week, the US dollar closed firmly above CAD1.28, showing the Loonie's vulnerability to the risk-off wave.  However, as cooler heads have prevailed, the Canadian dollar has bounced back.  The US dollar closed below the 20-day moving average yesterday (~CAD1.2670) for the first time in a month and was sold to about CAD1.2620 today. The (38.2%) retracement of the greenback's rally since the October 21 low (below CAD1.23) is found near CAD1.2640. The next retracement (50%) is around CAD1.2570.  Initial resistance now is likely by CAD1.2680.  The greenback also closed below its 20-day moving average against the Mexican peso yesterday for the first time since November 9.  It has slipped below MN21.00 today for the first time in about two-and-a-half weeks.  With today's loss, the US dollar has retraced (61.8%) of its rally from November 9 low (~MXN20.2750). The move seems exaggerated, and consolidation is likely.  Nearby resistance is seen in the MXN20.05-MXN20.10 area.  Disclaimer
FX Update: Risk sentiment comeback with a few twists

FX Update: Risk sentiment comeback with a few twists

John Hardy John Hardy 08.12.2021 15:14
Forex 2021-12-08 14:45 4 minutes to read Summary:  Risk sentiment is well on its way to erasing the reaction to the news of the omicron variant of covid, with most reactions across FX adjusting as one would expect on an improved outlook, with commodity currencies performing best, while safe haven JPY and CHF trade weaker and the euro is unable to figure out what it wants to do. Adding to a more hopeful stance and a weaker US dollar overnight was China allowing its currency to push to new highs for the year, beyond the highs established back in May. FX Trading focus: CNY new highs for the year, strong resurgence in risk sentiment The US dollar has pushed lower this week on a resurgence in risk sentiment, led by fading omicron fears – particularly yesterday – but also on hopes that China is set to support the global growth outlook and signaling confidence by allowing the renminbi to push to new highs for the year versus the US dollar. The weaker US dollar elsewhere this week explains the timing of the large move to new lows in USDCNH, as the CNH has actually underperformed resurgent commodity FX and some EM FX this week even while it outperformed the strong US dollar this year on balance. If the USD is to weaken further from here, it would be no surprise to see CNH continuing higher versus the US dollar – perhaps even beyond the 2018 lows in USDCNH – while keeping it somewhat weaker versus other currencies against which it has appreciated so aggressively this year. China is clearly interested in defending the stability and purchasing power of the CNH versus the USD and its basket, but the extent of the revaluation is getting stretched if we look at the official CNY basket. In G10 FX, the resurgence in risk sentiment has boosted the usual suspects and weighed against the other usual suspects, although a couple of unusual situations stick out: GBP and SEK: Sterling is in danger of breaking down versus the euro here after testing new lows for the year this morning in GBPUSD despite sterling’s former correlation with risk appetite, perhaps as a lot of air has been taken out of Bank of England expectations as the market has shifted the expected lift-off meeting to February of next year after pricing as early as November a couple of months ago. Late last week, the BoE’s normally hawkish Saunders sounded cautious on lifting off next week, while the day before yesterday Deputy Governor Broadbent advised looking “a couple of years ahead” in predicting that “these pressures on traded goods prices are more likely to subside than intensify”, although he did say wages could be an inflation driver. Chart: EURGBPEURGBP is poking at the 200-day moving average from the downside for the third time in recent months, and the less hawkish BoE may help trigger a further squeeze higher, especially if the 0.8600 prior pivot high falls. Next focus higher still comes in at the range highs from April-May near 0.8720. Source: Saxo Group SEK has traded sideways today rather than rallying, as one would expect, on the strong comeback in risk sentiment. The krona is historically one of the most highly risk sensitive currencies. Sure, the euro is largely stuck in the water here and the EU growth outlook has plenty of clouds over it with covid shut-downs etc, but EURSEK looks “wrong” relative to other reaction to the improved mood across markets, and should be lower. A statement today by Riksbank dove Jansson that it is hard to justify rate hikes and that a more active fiscal policy is the way forward likely held back SEK, as perhaps NOKSEK buying, judging from the last couple of session in that cross. In other developments, AUDNZD has cleared the important 1.0500 level, EURCHF is trying to pull higher but is still some way from challenging the important 1.0500 level. The CHF has not behaved anything like the JPY in recent months, failing to show sensitive in EURCHF, at least, to large shifts in safe haven years. Likely, to get EURCHF off the mat, we’ll need to see a broader EUR rally that includes EURUSD on a brightening outlook for EU growth. Hard to see how it gets much worse, on a relative basis, at present (covid shutdowns, energy crunch, etc…) The Bank of Canada is out just after pixel time for this article. The market is leaning for hawkish guidance for a sure rate hike at the January meeting, which is very likely what it will get. The degree to which CAD can continue to rally will also depend on whether the now suddenly very CAD-supportive backdrop extends. USDCAD needs to bash back below 1.2500 to suggest a full reversal of the rally move off the sub-1.2300 lows in October is in the cards. Looking ahead, the next critical event risks are the Friday US November CPI print, and then the exercise next week in seeing how the market reacts to the crystallization of the now hawkish Fed’s adjustments to its new monetary policy statement and to the “dot plot” of its policy forecasts. Table: FX Board of G10 and CNH trend evolution and strengthStill mean reverting from the prior trends in most currencies, but far more upside needed from commodity currencies to fully reverse the prior trends. Source: Bloomberg and Saxo Group Table: FX Board Trend Scoreboard for individual pairs.A strong move higher in EU yields taking EURJPY back well above the important 128.00 level of contention lately – watching whether the trend can flip positive in the week ahead. Elsewhere, note again that AUDNZD has pulled above the important 1.0500, that USDCHF flipped positive (even if it is mid-range after surviving another test of the 200-day moving average), and that NOKSEK is trying flipping positive after a very sharp rebound from recent lows. Source: Bloomberg and Saxo Group Upcoming Economic Calendar Highlights (all times GMT) 1500 – Canada Bank of Canada Rate Decision 1500 – US JOLTS Job Openings survey 2130 – Brazil Selic Rate Announcement 2205 – Australia RBA Governor Lowe to speak 0001 – UK Nov. RICS House Price Balance 0130 – China Nov. CPI / PPI
The Pound: will the bears win the market without news?

The Pound: will the bears win the market without news?

Alex Kuptsikevich Alex Kuptsikevich 08.12.2021 09:27
The pound was down against the dollar on Tuesday. However, the very nature of the movements, as in the case of the euro rate, was far from ideal and straightforward. The mixed dynamics is clearly visible on the 30-minute timeframe, where the rate consolidated above a strong downtrend line with four pivots. The chart first crossed this line and then decided to resume the downward movement. It was as if the obvious buy signal turned out to be false, and it was possible to exit from it by the downward reversal of the MACD indicator. In general, it turns out that the downward trend of the pound has continued, but at the same time, the annual lows set on November 30th have not been updated so far. It should also be noted that during Tuesday, neither the UK nor the US saw a single important event or publication of economic data. They will not be there today either. Despite this, the volatility increased yesterday, and today, during the session, more calm movements are expected. On the 30-minute timeframe, the pound continues to have a downward trend. Earlier today, the downtrend line was broken, so both the continuation of the fall and a rematch, in which traders will try to return the rate above it, is possible. In general, the worsening epidemiological situation and the introduction of quarantine by the authorities of European countries make investors expect a drop in activity and sentiment by the end of the week.
Market Quick Take - December 9, 2021

Market Quick Take - December 9, 2021

Saxo Strategy Team Saxo Strategy Team 09.12.2021 09:48
Macro 2021-12-09 08:40 6 minutes to read Summary:  Global markets tried to gin up additional enthusiasm yesterday on the announcement yesterday from Pfizer that three shots of vaccine may offer far more protection from the omicron variant, but the market traded largely sideways as the sharp rally from the prior day was consolidated. The US dollar is showing signs of consolidating lower ahead of arguably the last two major event risks for the year for the currency, the Friday US November CPI data and the FOMC meeting next Wednesday. What is our trading focus? Nasdaq 100 (USNAS100.I) and S&P 500 (US500.I) - US equities momentum waned a bit yesterday and trading flat in early European trading hours. In Nasdaq 100 futures the 16,420 is the key resistance level to watch in today’s session. While Nasdaq 100 futures are flat this morning, Bitcoin is trading 2% lower which if it continues could spill over into US technology stocks as these pockets of the market are connected in terms of risk-off. Bubble stocks were the biggest gainers yesterday and provide another opportunity for retail investors to reduce exposure in bubble stocks ahead of the new year. EURUSD – The EURUSD rallied sharply yesterday as the US dollar was generally on its back foot, but a solid jump higher in EU sovereign bond yields and the official handover of power to the new German government coalition yesterday may have been elements supporting the rally. The move rose as high as 1.1350, just ahead of tactical resistance near 1.1375, the last hurdle ahead of more major trend resistance near 1.1500. In many past cycles, the calendar roll has proven a major inflection point for EURUSD. The December 15 FOMC meeting and December 16 ECB meeting both look important for the provision of new guidance, with the FOMC already having made a clear hawkish shift, while the ECB will have to deliver revised inflation forecasts and guidance on balance sheet policy after its emergency “PEPP” form of QE is set to end in March. AUDUSD – The Aussie has undergone a significant sentiment shift from one of the weakest G10 currencies to one of the strongest in recent sessions, in part on the reversal in risk sentiment, but also aided by China signaling a willingness to ease policy. Speculative positioning in the US futures market suggest a very heavy short position that, if similar to positioning in the OTC market, could provide significant fuel for a squeeze higher in the currency if the backdrop of improving risk sentiment and a focus on inflation risks further boosts the price action in key commodities like iron ore, coking coal and other metals. At any rate, AUDUSD has reversed up through the first resistance near 0.7100 and is now staring down the next pivotal area into 0.720-7250, needing to blast through this and then some to suggest an attempt to put in a bottom after touching the huge 0.7000 level within the last week. Crude oil (OILUKFEB22 & OILUSJAN22) trades higher for a fourth day as omicron demand concerns continue to ease and speculators accumulate length following last week’s washout. Flare-ups around the world resulting in temporary lockdowns is however likely to prevent the market from returning to pre-omicron levels at this point. The EIA reported a small 240k barrels weekly decline in crude stocks while inventories of fuel rose by a combined 6.6 million barrels. Next level of resistance in Brent being the 21-day moving average at $77.20 followed by $77.60. Gold (XAUUSD) remains stuck below the 200-day moving average, currently at $1793 with the market struggling for direction ahead of Friday’s key US inflation data. Support from a softer dollar continues to be offset by worries that a succession of expected US rate hikes in 2022 will drive up US real yields, thereby reducing a key source of support for gold. Ahead of Friday’s CPI data, the market has priced in three rate hikes next year with the first potentially coming as soon as May. Focus on silver (XAGUSD) which following its recent 13% slump is trying to establish support at $22, thereby supporting a lower XAUXAG ratio has stopped rising after finding resistance above 80 ounces of silver to one ounce of gold. US Treasuries (IEF, TLT). Haven bid for bonds faded as news hit the market that a third vaccine dose gives coverage for the omicron strain. Ten-year US Treasury yields rose above 1.50%, and yesterday’s 10-year US Treasury auction wasn’t as good as the 3-year auction the previous day. It tailed 0.4bps pricing at 1.518%. The bid-to-cover rose to 2.43x, a little lower than the past six auctions average. The yield curve bear steepened. Yet, we expect long-term yields to remain compressed if Covid infections still are an issue and lead to more restrictions. Today, the Treasury is selling 30-year bonds. If the selloff in the long part of the yield curve continues, we might witness a weak auction. What is going on? China PPI falls less than expected in November as it rises 12.9% year-on-year. The PPI number is widely considered a global inflation barometer as China is “the world’s factory”. The rise was higher than the 12.1% year-on-year expected, but lower than October’s 13.5%. The November China CPI number came in slightly cooler than expected at 2.3% year-on-year versus 2.5% expected and 1.5% in October. Pfizer says three shots of its vaccine offer more significant protection against the omicron covid variant. This news from yesterday sounded more promising than the news from just yesterday from a preliminary South African study that patients vaccinated with two shots showed some, but heavily reduced, production of antibodies in patients with the omicron variant. Pfizer found the same, but says that a third shot can bring the antibody response to similar levels as for the prior covid variants. Pfizer also said an omicron-targeted version of its vaccine could be ready in March. Buffett-backed digital lender Nubank to start trading today. The Brazilian-based digital bank Nubank is raising $2.6bn in its IPO becoming of the biggest IPOs this year with shares priced at $9 and first day of trading today on NYSE. This will mark one of the biggest publicly listed fintech companies in the world and provide a glimpse into the feasibility of running a large digital only bank. Bank of Canada upgrades language on inflation, likely set for January rate hike. The new Bank of Canada policy statement dropped a reference from the prior statement on “temporary” inflation forces, though it still maintained the expectation that inflation would drop toward 2 percent in the second half of next year. The strength in the jobs market was noted. Overall, the hawkish language changes were clear, if relatively small relative to rather aggressive market shift in expectations, and Canadian yields eased a few basis points lower at the front part of the yield curve, though a January rate hike from the bank remains likely, according to market expectations. Brazil hikes policy rate 150 basis points, BRL sees sharp gains. The rate hike to 9.25% was in line with expectations, but the central bank delivered hawkish guidance for another hike of the same size at the February meeting as the bank has clearly gone into aggressive inflation fighting mode. The Brazilian real responded strongly, gaining some 1.4% versus the US dollar yesterday. The EU gas and power market went from bad to worse yesterday after an unplanned outage temporarily cut supplies from Norway’s giant Troll field. Coming on top of geopolitical risks related to Ukraine, low winter supplies from Russia, freezing cold weather and rapidly declining stocks, these developments have driven Dutch TTF one month benchmark gas back above €100 per MWh or $34 per MMBtu. With rising demand for coal driving the cost of EU emissions to a fresh record above €90 per tons, the cost of power has surged as well. In Germany the one-year baseload contract reached a record €189 per MWh, or 5 times the long-term average. What are we watching next? WASDE on tap - Ahead of today’s monthly update on world supply and demand, the grains sector has seen a slight drift lower during the past week as the market tried to gauge the impact of the omicron variant. Today’s World Agriculture Supply and Demand report (WASDE) will primarily focus on ending stocks with expectations pointing to a relatively quiet update. US corn stockpiles are expected to have fallen slightly from November while wheat and soybean stocks are both expected to be higher, both in the US and globally. The EU is set to decide by December 22 whether investments in gas and nuclear energy should be labelled climate friendly. The design of the EU green investment classification system is closely watched by investors worldwide and could potentially attract billions of euros in private finance to help the green transition, especially given the need to reduce the usage of coal, the biggest polluter. This week’s earnings: Today’s focus is Oracle which is still struggling to find an attractive growth trajectory in the age of cloud applications, SaaS business models, and more open-source software on databases with flat revenue over the past four fiscal years. Lululemon has been one of the big winners during the pandemic gaining tailwind from home exercising, but generally the company taps into a longer-term trend of personal health. Analysts expect Lululemon to report 29% y/y revenue growth in Q3 (ending 31 October). Thursday: Sekisui House, Hormel Foods, Costco Wholesale, Oracle, Broadcom, Lululemon Athletica, Chewy, Vail Resorts Friday: Carl Zeiss Meditec Economic calendar highlights for today (times GMT) 0830 – Hungary Rate Announcement 1200 – Mexico Nov. CPI 1330 – US Weekly Initial Jobless Claims and Continuing Claims 1530 – EIA Natural Gas Storage Change 1700 – USDA World Agriculture Supply and Demand Report (WASDE) 1800 – US Treasury 30-year T-Bond auction   Follow SaxoStrats on the daily Saxo Markets Call on your favorite podcast app: Apple Spotify Soundcloud Sticher
Erdogan's stance keeps hurting Turkish Lira

Erdogan's stance keeps hurting Turkish Lira

Alex Kuptsikevich Alex Kuptsikevich 09.12.2021 10:20
The Turkish lira has stabilised recently, although it remains near historic lows against the dollar and euro, at 13.7 and 15.5 respectively. Erdogan’s latest comments have so far been of little help to the national currency and have not allowed it to develop a rebound after the grand overselling. In particular, the Turkish president remains firmly in the position that lower interest rates will reduce inflation in the country, and the results will be visible early next year. Mentioning that low rates will solve the inflation problem and stabilise the currency seems only to inflame the greed of currency speculators, reversing the already relatively modest achievements of the Bank of Turkey, which has intervened to stop the one-sided movement of the national currency. From the economic side, the cumulative effect of the recent devaluation (+65% since September and 77% y/y) will be transferred to consumer prices in the coming months, which promises to be a much bigger problem for Turkey than for other EM countries. Erdogan’s dispute with the conclusions of the conventional economic theory could be called a remarkable experiment if the welfare of millions of people in the country were not at stake. The decline in interest rates in response to rising inflation and a falling currency can be compared to the populist policies of some Latin American countries in previous years, which caused an endless devaluation of their currencies and a decline in living standards. And at the moment, it isn’t easy to find economic reasons to say that Erdogan’s stance allows for a bet on the rise of the lira.      
Markets Turn Cautious Ahead of Tomorrow's US CPI

Markets Turn Cautious Ahead of Tomorrow's US CPI

Marc Chandler Marc Chandler 09.12.2021 12:34
December 09, 2021  $USD, Brazil, Canada, China, Currency Movement, Germany, Japan, Portfolio flows, UK Overview: The euro has come back offered after its seemingly inexplicable advance yesterday.  The dollar is firmer against most major currencies today, with the yen an exception after JPY114.00 held on yesterday's advance.  Most emerging market currencies are also softer, with a handful of smaller Asian currencies proving a bit resilient.  Most large bourses advance in the Asia Pacific region, except Japan and Australia.  Europe's Stoxx 600 is steady after retreating late yesterday while US futures are pointing to a softer opening.  After rising for the past three sessions (~18 bp), the yield of the 10-year US Treasury is consolidating by hovering a little below 1.5%.  European yields are 3-5 bp softer.   Gold is little change.  This week's quiet tone contrasts with the sharp moves in Bitcoin and Ethereum.  Oil is consolidating after the three-day advance that lifted January WTI by around 8.5%.  US and European natural gas is also softer after the rally over the last few days.  Iron ore, which rallied over 10% in the first two sessions this week, edged lower yesterday and is off 3% today.  Copper's three-day rally is in jeopardy.   Asia Pacific The number of countries participating in a diplomatic boycott of the Beijing Winter Olympics is growing.  In addition to the US, Lithuania, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the UK have joined.  While it may annoy Chinese officials, it is symbolic.  Given Chinese quarantine protocols, many diplomats were not going to attend in the first place.  Also, the impact on China's human rights will likely be negligible.  The moral righteousness is signaling to domestic constituencies.  Yet, treatment of the Peng Shuai and the jailing of reporters needless antagonized the already precarious situation.  China's consumer inflation rose less than expected while producer prices rose more.  Owing to a jump in vegetable prices (30.6%), November CPI rose 2.3% from a year ago. The median forecast (Bloomberg survey) was for a 2.5% increase.  It is the fastest pace since August 2020. The decline in pork prices (-32.7% year-over-year) is slowing.  Excluding pork, the CPI would have risen by 3%.  Service prices remain soft.  Excluding food and energy, the core CPI is up 1.2% over the past year (1.3% previously).  Producer price inflation slowed from 13.5% in October to 12.9% in November.  Economists had forecast a 12.1% pace.  Recall officials moved to boost supplies, including coal, helping to ease the strong upside pressures.   Officials have moved to a more pro-growth stance, which means that inflation will not stand in the way of further easing monetary policy (via reserve requirements even if not interest rates) next year. Meanwhile, Evergrande and the Kaisa Group have formally missed debt-servicing payments on dollar obligations. Still, unlike the end of the property bubble in the US and Europe, China is forcing banks to continue to lend. This keeps the proverbial treadmill going.   The lending figures for November, released today, illustrate it.  New yuan loans, which track bank lending, rose by 50%+ to CNY1.27 trillion from CNY826 bln in October.  Aggregate financing, which adds shadow banking activity to bank lending, rose to CNY2.61 trillion from CNY1.59 trillion.  Note that just before publishing this report, the PBOC announced a two percentage point hike in the reserve requirement for foreign currency deposits.  This will likely weigh on the yuan, initially.    Japanese weekly portfolio flows were unusually large last week.  Data from the Ministry of Finance showed that Japanese investors were large sellers of foreign bonds for the second consecutive week.  The JPY1.18 trillion in sales followed the divestment of JPY1.34 trillion the previous week. It was the most selling in a two-week period since February.  From a high level, most of the selling last week did not require net yen buying as Japanese investors essentially shifted into foreign equities, snapping up JPY1.2 trillion.  This is the most since the time series began in 2005.  Separately, foreign investors bought JPY2.0 trillion of Japanese bonds, which appears to be the second-highest on record (after the JPY2.57 trillion bought in early July).   For the third consecutive week, foreign investors were small sellers of Japanese shares.  The dollar approached JPY114.00 yesterday and was turned back, falling to JPY113.35 today.  The JPY114 area is "defended" by a $2.2 bln option at JPY114.10 that expires today and a $1.15 bln option at JPY114.25 that expires tomorrow.  A break of JPY113.25-JPY113.35 could signal a test on JPY113.00, but the market will likely be cautious ahead of tomorrow's US CPI report.  The Australian dollar's recovery faltered earlier today slightly above $0.7185, the 20-day moving average, which it has not traded above since November 4.  The first retracement (38.2%) of this week's bounce is near $0.7115, but initial support is seen in the $0.7140 area.  The greenback edged slightly lower against the Chinese yuan (~CNY6.3430) before steadying and turning marginally higher.  It is caught between two large options expiring today.  One set is for around $2.5 bln at CNY6.34, and another set is for about $950 mln at CNY6.35.  The PBOC's reference rate for the dollar today (CNY6.3498) was the largest gap with the median projection (Bloomberg, CNY6.3467) since the middle of October.   Europe Germany's October trade figures are maybe too dated to have much market impact, but the growth of imports and exports is a constructive development.  The 4.1% rise in exports, the most since July 2020, were well above expectations, as was the 5% jump in imports (most since August 2020).  For Germany, it translates into a smaller than expected trade surplus (12.8 bln euros).  The monthly average surplus this year through October is 15.5 bln euros, which is a little above the average for the same period last year (14.4 bln euros), but off average in 2019 (through October) of 19 bln euros.   On the heels of "party-gate," UK Prime Minister Johnson has announced Plan B in the face of the new infection surge that calls for people to work from home again.  It has created much furor. Businesses have called for more government support, and unions want the furlough program to be re-instituted.  Any lingering ideas of a rate hike next week by the Bank of England have faded.  The short-sterling interest rate futures contract expiring shortly is implying the lowest yield (11 bp) in three months.   Short-covering appeared to lift the euro to $1.1355 yesterday, and it settled above its 20-day moving average for the first time since November 3.  However, this was not a harbinger of a breakout, and the euro's gains are being pared today. Initial support is seen around $1.13 and then $1.1275 area.  Sterling recorded new lows for the year yesterday slightly below $1.3165, the (38.2%) retracement of the rally since March 2020 low.  Today, it is in less than a quarter-cent range capped near $1.3215.  It is consolidating weakly.  There are options at $1.32 that expire today (~GBP370 mln) and tomorrow (GBP600 mln) that are likely neutralized.   America The US reports weekly initial jobless claims, wholesale trade and inventories, and Q3 household net worth. These are not market movers, especially today. Instead, investors' focus will likely be on equities as it waits for tomorrow's CPI.  US inflation is still accelerating, and the headline CPI is likely to move closer to 7%, setting the stage for a hawkish FOMC meeting next week.  An acceleration in tapering and more officials will likely see the need for more hikes.  Recall that in September, the last time officials updated their forecasts, half did not see a need to hike rates next year.  The market has done much of the heavy lifting for the Federal Reserve.  The implied yield of the December 2022 Fed funds futures contract has risen around 50 bp since the September FOMC meeting.  The Bank of Canada left policy on hold yesterday, as widely expected.  However, the market was disappointed that it did not upgrade its forward guidance to reflect the strong data.  The swaps market is pricing in five hikes over the next 12 months, and the central bank said nothing to encourage such an aggressive stance.  This leaves the Canadian dollar somewhat vulnerable, we think.   Brazil did not disappoint.  The central bank hiked the Selic rate by 150 bp for the second consecutive month and signaled another hike of the same magnitude in February when it meets again.  It has lifted the Selic rate by 750 bp this year.  It is being driven by rising inflation, and the economy contracted in Q2 and Q3.  The Selic rate stands at 9.25%.  The IPCA inflation measure is due tomorrow, and it is expected to have risen to 10.9% (Bloomberg survey) from 10.67% in October.   Peru is expected to hike its reference rate by 50 bp to 2.5%. It would be the third 50 bp in a row.   Its November CPI, reported at the start of the month, is slightly above 5.6%.   Mexico reports its November CPI figures today.  It is expected to rise from about 6.25% to 7.25% and set the stage for another 25 bp rate hike next week in the overnight rate to 5.25%.   The US dollar is trading firmly against the Canadian dollar, and the heavier equities may be helping it.  While initial resistance is seen near CAD1.2700, we suspect there is scope toward CAD1.2730-CAD1.2750.  The greenback fell to almost MXN20.8860 yesterday, its lowest level since November 23, and the five-day moving average crossed below the 20-day moving average for the first time since early last month.  The move appears to have exhausted itself, but the dollar needs to resurface above the MXN21.05 area to boost confidence that a low is in place.  Disclaimer
Gold Stuck Between High Inflation and Strong Dollar

Gold Stuck Between High Inflation and Strong Dollar

Arkadiusz Sieron Arkadiusz Sieron 09.12.2021 16:46
  Inflation supports gold, the expected Fed’s reaction to price pressure – not. Since gold ended November with a small gain, what will December bring? I have good and bad news. The good is that the price of gold rose 2% in November. The bad –is that the price of gold rose 2% in November. It depends on the perspective we adopt. Given all the hawkish signals sent by the Fed and all the talk about tapering of quantitative easing and the upcoming tightening cycle, even a small increase is an admirable achievement. However, if we focus on the fact that US consumer inflation rose in October to its highest level in 30 years, and that real interest rates have stayed deeply in negative territory, gold’s inability to move and stay above $1,800 looks discouraging. We can also look at it differently. The good news would be that gold jumped to $1,865 in mid-November. The bad news, on the other hand, would be that this rally was short-lived with gold prices returning to their trading range of $1,750-$1,800 in the second half of the month, as the chart below shows. Now, according to the newest WGC’s Gold Market Commentary, gold’s performance in November resulted from the fact that higher inflation expectations were offset by a stronger dollar and rising bond yields that followed Powell’s nomination for the Fed Chair for the second term. Indeed, as you can see in the chart below, the greenback strengthened significantly in November, and real interest rates rallied for a while. Given the scale of the upward move in the dollar, and that it was combined with a surge in yields, gold’s performance last month indicates strength rather than weakness. As the WGC notes, “dollar strength was a headwind in November, acting as a drag on gold’s performance, but not enough to outweigh inflation concerns.”   Implications for Gold Great, but what’s next for the gold market in December and 2022? Well, that’s a good question. The WGC points out that “gold remains heavily influenced by investors’ continued focus on the path of inflation (…) and the Fed’s and other central banks’ potential reaction to it.” I agree. Inflation worries increase demand for gold as an inflation hedge, supporting gold, but they also create expectations for a more hawkish Fed, hitting the yellow metal. It seems that the upcoming days will be crucial for gold. Tomorrow (December 10, 2021), we will get to know CPI data for November. And on Wednesday (December 15, 2021), the FOMC will release its statement on monetary policy and updated dot plot. My bet is that inflation will stay elevated or that it could actually intensify further. In any case, the persistence of high inflation could trigger some worries and boost the safe-haven demand for gold. However, I’m afraid that gold bulls’ joy would be – to use a trendy word – transitory. The December FOMC meeting will probably be hawkish and will send gold prices down. Given the persistence of inflation, the Fed is likely to turn more hawkish and accelerate the pace of tapering. Of course, if the Fed surprises us on a dovish side, gold should shine. What’s more, the hawkish tone is widely expected, so it might be the case that all the nasty implications are already priced in. We might see a “sell the rumor, buy the fact” scenario, but I’m not so sure about it. The few last dot-plots surprised the markets on a hawkish side, pushing gold prices down. I’m afraid that this is what will happen again. Next week, the Fed could open the door to earlier rate hikes than previously projected. Hence, bond yields could surge again, making gold move in the opposite direction. You’ve been warned! If you enjoyed today’s free gold report, we invite you to check out our premium services. We provide much more detailed fundamental analyses of the gold market in our monthly Gold Market Overview reports and we provide daily Gold & Silver Trading Alerts with clear buy and sell signals. In order to enjoy our gold analyses in their full scope, we invite you to subscribe today. If you’re not ready to subscribe yet though and are not on our gold mailing list yet, we urge you to sign up. It’s free and if you don’t like it, you can easily unsubscribe. Sign up today! Arkadiusz Sieron, PhDSunshine Profits: Effective Investment through Diligence & Care
Catching More Than a Decent Bid

Catching More Than a Decent Bid

Monica Kingsley Monica Kingsley 10.12.2021 15:48
S&P 500 predictably relented, but the resilience of value provides a glimmer of hope. Quite a solid one as the HYG spurt to the downside didn‘t inspire a broader selloff, including in tech. Yesterday was your regular wait-and-see session of prepositioning to today‘s CPI data. This not exactly a leading indicator of inflation clearly hasn‘t peaked, and inflation around the world either. The difference between the U.S. with eurozone, and the rest of the world, is that many other central banks are already on a tightening path.I count on such a CPI reading that wouldn‘t cause a rush to the exit door and liquidation in fears of Fed going even more hawkish (in rhetoric, it must be said). My series of pre-CPI release tweets have worked out to the letter – and now, it‘s back to the inflation trades.I already told you in yesterday‘s report:(…) A reasonably hot inflation figure is expected tomorrow – inflation expectations have risen already yesterday. The fears are that a higher than what used to be called transitory figure, would cut into profit margins and send value lower. Even if inflation (which certainly hasn‘t peaked yet as I‘m on the record for having said already) isn‘t yet strong enough to sink stocks, the Fed‘s reaction to it is. The dynamic of tapering response messing up with the economy would take months to play out – so, the bumpy ride ahead can continue. If only the yield curve stopped from getting ever more inverted...Markets keep chugging along for the time being, and the warning signs to watch for talked in Monday‘s extensive analysis, aren‘t flashing red.The pieces of the stock market and commodities rally continuation are in place, and the same goes for precious metals reversing the prior cautious stance. Even cryptos are warming up to the data release.Looking further ahead in time to 2022, I can‘t understate the bright prospects of agrifoods (DBA) – and it‘s in no way just about the turmoil in fertilizer land.Let‘s move right into the charts (all courtesy of www.stockcharts.com).S&P 500 and Nasdaq OutlookS&P 500 downswing looks ready to be reversed soon – in spite of the drying up volume which often accompanies bull markets. The daily indicators remain positioned favorably to the bulls.Credit MarketsHYG weakness looks somewhat overdone to me – the prior upswing is still getting the benefit of my doubt. The coming sessions just shouldn‘t bring a steep HYG decline in my view.Gold, Silver and MinersPrecious metals are still basing, and I‘m looking for the hesitation to be reversed to the upside. Just see the tough headwinds in comparing silver being almost at its Sep lows while gold is trading much higher. Once the inflation narratives get a renewed boost, silver would play catch up.Crude OilCrude oil upswing is running into predictable headwinds, but I‘m looking at the next attempt at $72 to succeed, and for $74 to be broken to the upside later on.CopperCopper is still lukewarm, and waiting for the broader commodity fires to reignite. The red metal isn‘t in an anticipatory, frontrunning mood – its prolonged consolidation means though it‘s prefectly prepared to rise decisively again.Bitcoin and EthereumBitcoin and Ethereum are finding buying interest, but the Ethereum underperformance has me still cautious after taking sizable ETH profits off the table yesterday.SummaryS&P 500 rally is likely to continue today, and the same goes for risk-on and real assets. The Fed evidently won‘t be forced into a more hawkish position in Dec, and the markets are starting to celebrate. Silently celebrate as it‘s not about fireworks, but a reasonable and well bid advance across the board. I hope you‘re likewise positioned!Thank you for having read today‘s free analysis, which is available in full at my homesite. There, you can subscribe to the free Monica‘s Insider Club, which features real-time trade calls and intraday updates for all the five publications: Stock Trading Signals, Gold Trading Signals, Oil Trading Signals, Copper Trading Signals and Bitcoin Trading Signals.
Silver is moving up

Silver is moving up

Korbinian Koller Korbinian Koller 11.12.2021 10:45
So, what are the facts: Monthly chart, Silver in US-Dollar, probabilities: Silver in US-Dollar, monthly chart as of December 10th, 2021. In 2020, silver broke a multiyear sideways range and moved strongly up. It has now consolidated for over a year in a sideways range again. This is a bullish setup! As much as emotions might be weary, from a probability perspective, a general rule is that the longer a congestion is from a time perspective, the more significant will be the subsequent breakout from that range. Statistical probabilities are also clearly pointing to the upside rather than returning into the prior range. Not to forget, buying near the lows of such a range box guarantees the lowest entry risk and highest risk/reward-ratio play to be taken for the long side, even if emotions might tell you otherwise. 2021 silver trades performance: 2021 silver trades performance. Another fact is that one does not need to know when and if a breakout is happening to extract money from the markets consistently. The above chart is this year’s silver trades that we posted in real-time in our free Telegram channel. The systematic approach focuses on low-risk entry points with a risk reduction method through our quad exit strategy. Sideways markets provide an income-producing aspect of one’s trading, and a possible breakout of a range would give a significant bonus. An approach like this keeps emotions in check since one’s labor gets rewarded and allows for significantly higher rewards once ranges do break. Silver in US-Dollar, quarterly chart, silver is moving up: Silver in US-Dollar, quarterly chart as of December 10th, 2021. In short, while waiting is strenuous, and one might feel doubtful, from a probability perspective, silver is an even likelier success story now than it has been six months or a year ago. What should also not be underestimated is the fundamental situation of this wealth preservation play. The extensions of governments playing the inflation game to such length are like adding fuel to the silver play. Widespread problems that are the pillars to this insurance play have, if anything, increased. Consequently, supporting a good likelihood that silver prices go up. When? Well, that is hard to say since no one knows the future, but maybe this question gets proportionally in weight too much attention since insurance isn’t just bought for the next storm to come but in principle acquired to make one feel good and to protect one’s wealth long term. The quarterly chart above shows how silvers inherent volatility can sustain, in times of market turmoil, extended phases of extreme standard deviation levels. Price moves far away from the mean (red line). We are trading near the mean as of now, and the very right green line is a projection of a possible price move up.   S&P 500 in US-Dollar, quarterly chart, Quod erat demonstrandum: S&P 500 in US-Dollar, quarterly chart as of December 10th, 2021. Still, some doubt left? Have a look at the above S&P500 chart, representing the broad market. Does that look like a healthy chart? Baby boomers and general stock-market participants might be in for a rude awakening once they realize how little their fiat currency is still worth when they cash in those stock portfolio investments. Just compare your total living cost from 2020 with 2021. All positions from food to health insurance, from car gas to electricity bills. Calculate the percentage difference from those two numbers and add this percentage to the average acquisition cost of your physical silver, and you have the real value of your silver already now. How does homelessness double to a half million people per day sleeping roofless factor in? Does this chart represent great times when we face supply chain disruptions? Or is it all smoke and mirrors, and once the music stops, there will be countless chairs missing for everyone to sit down? Silver is moving up: The essential principle in play is that markets are counterintuitive. Meaning your feelings might have switched from enthusiasm to uncertainty, even frustration, but probability facts are in direct opposition to one’s feelings. This principle is the underlying reason why moves out of extended congestion zones can result in substantial moves. Once emotionally weak hands are washed out, these breakouts come from an emotional perspective surprising. Bears step aside and bulls chase prices. Feel free to join us in our free Telegram channel for daily real time data and a great community. If you like to get regular updates on our gold model, precious metals and cryptocurrencies you can also subscribe to our free newsletter. This article does not contain investment advice or recommendations. Every investment and trading move involves risk, and readers should conduct their own research when making a decision. The views, thoughts and opinions expressed here are the author’s alone. They do not necessarily reflect or represent the views and opinions of Midas Touch Consulting.
Omicron, USDJPY, Gold, DXY highlighted in this Luke Suddards' piece

Omicron, USDJPY, Gold, DXY highlighted in this Luke Suddards' piece

Luke Suddards Luke Suddards 10.12.2021 15:15
Pfizer and BioNTech released the results of their recent laboratory study which found that their vaccine’s antibody response is capable of neutralizing omicron (levels similar to 2 doses against previous strains) after three doses. There was a more than 25-fold reduction in the efficacy of the vaccine however, showing the 32 mutations in omicron does certainly have an impact. The vaccine induced T cells are not affected by omicron and should therefore still provide protection from severe symptoms. To finish off a Japanese study showed that omicron was 4.2 times more transmissible than delta in its early stage. We know that omicron was far more transmissible already so this isn’t a major shock, however, the issue with higher transmissibility is the opportunity for further new variants to arise which (hopefully) will not increase in lethality. Dollar Index (DXY): The greenback is basically flat from where it started the week as traders remain hesitant to push price in a new direction until today’s CPI result is out the way. Omicron news as mentioned above has been on the positive side so risk-off flows derived from that side of things has been non-existent. However, where we could see more safe haven bids for the dollar is from any escalation in the Russia Ukraine tensions, with an invasion very likely seeing risk-off ensconcing markets. This would clearly benefit the dollar on the lhs of the smile (risk-off). Data wise, job numbers filled the rather quiet calendar throughout the week with vacancies reaching new records as well as jobless claims breaching the 200k mark, coming in at 184k. We also had bond auctions coming to the fore, beginning with the front end of the curve, 3-year auctions showed strong demand despite today’s inflation numbers; moving to the back end of the curve the 10-year also showed relatively robust demand. It was the 30-year bond which was very weak with yields spiking higher leading to fears over today’s inflation numbers being the main driver. Inflation numbers were smack bang in line with consensus at 6.8% YoY (highest since 1982) and 4.9% YoY for core. The initial market reaction saw the dollar softer as short term rates fell (clearly the market was positioned for 7%), but that initial dollar weakness is now being retraced as it's still a solid number (Fed won't change path) with prices increases broad based.  Next week the focus will be on the Fed meeting where the risks are definitely tilted towards the hawkish side for the dollar. (Source: TradingView - Past performance is not indicative of future performance.) The dollar is ever so slightly above its upper trend line and the 21-day EMA has provided good dynamic support. The RSI has bounced off the 55 support level too keeping the uptrend momentum in tact. There is some resistance at 96.5 to monitor and on the downside the 21-day EMA would be important to watch if price slides. EURUSD: The euro continues to tread water as it faces headwinds on multiple fronts. The week began with fairly positive ZEW sentiment reading with current conditions missing (expected with covid restrictions), but the main index reading more positive than expected. Olaf Scholz has now been inducted as Chancellor of Germany with the end of Merkel’s reign officially coming to an end. European gas has been soaring again as tensions between Russia and US led to reports than Biden could implement sanctions on Russia. Europe is highly exposed to the price of natural gas so this could be one to watch for sure. Next week sees a very important ECB meeting with a fresh set of economic projections out (I’ll be watching their inflation forecasts particularly) as well as insights into how they’ll navigate the completion of their PEPP programme and transition. I’ll be providing a preview next week.  (Source: TradingView - Past performance is not indicative of future performance.) EURUSD moves sideways with a slight tilt towards the downside capped by the overhead 21-day EMA. 1.135 resistance has formed as the one to watch. The price support at 1.125 should be on your radar too. The RSI has rolled over a touch and pointing lower. The former low around the lower trend line at 1.12 could be very important over the next week. GBPUSD: Sterling has been under pressure as multiple factors line up against it. The week began with centrist Ben Broadbent’s speech which didn’t drop any hints on what the BoE may do at their December meeting. UK GDP data was disappointing with missed expectations on a monthly time frame as well as YoY and 3-month average. Plan B restrictions have now been implemented - guidance to work from home from Monday, and an extension of face masks to most public indoor venues (public transport etc). Mandatory Covid-19 passes will now be needed for entry to places such as nightclubs and venues with large crowds. With Plan B restrictions and softer GDP data, markets are all but certain a BoE hike will not happen at next week’s meeting, opting to rather wait until February for a move. I’ll be providing a preview for this event, but we shouldn’t be getting any curve balls as expectations are widely baked in for no hike, leading to very muted reactions in GBP crosses if any. UK opinion polls have moved against Boris Johnson after the uproar caused by allegations of his rule breaking Christmas party. Labour is now ahead in a variety of polls, which hasn’t occurred for a long time. If the fallout continues the Conservative MPs may decide to trigger a vote of no confidence in him which may inject some political instability. Article 16 could be used as a deflection and distraction tactic to turn the spotlight away from himself. (Source: TradingView - Past performance is not indicative of future performance.) GBPUSD looks technically weak as it trades below the lower trend line of its descending channel. The RSI hovers just above oversold. 1.315 on the downside would be key for a move lower while 1.32.5 - 1.33 on the upside just below the 21-day EMA would be key. USDJPY: The yen continues to come under pressure as the US 10-year yield moves higher and risk sentiment leans on the positive side, reducing the need for risk-off hedges. Tensions over Russian invading Ukraine will need to be monitored though as this could see flows directed towards the yen. (Source: TradingView - Past performance is not indicative of future performance.) USDJPY continues to be bid around its 38.2% Fibonacci level and mini range support around 113.5. The 50-day SMA and 21-day EMA are bunched up right together on the price candles. The RSI edges above the 46 level of support. Targets wise, on the upside 114-114.5 will remain key while on the downside 112.5 will be important to watch. Gold: Omicron variant positive news flow is taking the allure away from gold for safe haven flows, however, rising tensions between the US and Russia is helping to offset that. Real yields have also been rising higher of late which will pressure gold as well as a stronger dollar. Gold is a tad stronger on the inflation release as traders had most likely positioned for a 7% print and this not being the case has led to some bids flowing through.  (Source: TradingView - Past performance is not indicative of future performance.) Gold remains trapped in a tight range with today's inflation data a potential catalyst for a more directional move. Price is now just above the $1775 support level. The RSI has turned back upwards, but remains in no-man's land. The important level on the upside will be $1800 just above all the key moving averages. Oil: Oil certainly saw some new hot money coming back in to drive the recent recovery up from the $68 support area. Beginning the week we saw Saudi Arabia decided to hike their selling price to Asia and the US, indicating that they believe demand will remain robust despite omicron restriction fears. So far omicron news has been positive enough not to lead to expectations of serious demand destruction. Plan B work from home guidance has probably led to some slight weakness in crude, but we’ll need to watch what airlines decided to do in the next few weeks for jet fuel demand. Official US inventory data showed a modest reduction in inventory levels, but nothing to get excited about. Iranian talks are continuing ahead with nothing of anything major to report back on (Source: TradingView - Past performance is not indicative of future performance.) Oil now between its 200-day SMA and the 21-day EMA, is looking for its next direction. Support comes in around $73.50 with the 200-dauy SMA just below there. On the upside $76 provides resistance aided by the 21-day EMA. The RSI, has turned upwards and will need to continue in that direction for bulls to be satisfied.
Can Dollar Bears Resist the Fed? Can Yuan Bulls Shrug-Off the PBOC?

Can Dollar Bears Resist the Fed? Can Yuan Bulls Shrug-Off the PBOC?

Marc Chandler Marc Chandler 13.12.2021 10:56
December 12, 2021  $USD US yields and the dollar softened after the release of the November CPI figures before the weekend.  The data were in line with expectations showing the headline rate accelerated to 6.8% and the core rate to 4.9%.  The price action likely reflected positioning rather than a reassessment of the outlook for next week's FOMC meeting.  Nearly everyone recognizes the likelihood that the pace of tapering is quickened, and the individual forecasts reflect a more aggressive tightening path than anticipated in September.  With the diverging monetary policy impulses are evident in the shifting two-year interest rate differentials in the US favor, it is increasingly expensive to resist a stronger greenback.  A critical part of the backdrop is that market participants feel more comfortable that the Omicron variant may not be as disruptive as feared in Europe and the US (where the current surge is notable in its own right). As a result, those major currencies that tend to do well when risk appetites are strong, namely the dollar bloc and Scandis, are outperforming.  At the same time, the traditional funding currencies, the yen, and Swiss franc, were out of favor.  The euro falls in the latter camp.  A return to working from home, the evaporation of speculation that the BOE would raise rates in the week ahead, and a disappointing October GDP report pinned sterling in its trough.   It is difficult to see the market getting significantly more aggressive about the next year's outlook for the Fed.  The futures market is pricing in two hikes entirely and around two-thirds of a third hike.  A similar logic has turned us more cautious about the Canadian dollar.  There the market has discounted 125 bp of hikes over the next 12-months, which seems too aggressive.   Dollar Index:  The Dollar Index has been moving broadly sideways, though it rose for the seventh consecutive week.  For the first eight sessions of December, it has traded within the range set on November 30 (~95.50-96.65).   The momentum indicators have trended lower but appear to be stabilizing near mid-range.  The next big target is slightly below 97.75, which is the high from June-July 2020, and the (61.8%) retracement target of the decline since the March 2020 high near 103.00.   Euro:  The single currency briefly traded below the November 30 low (~$1.1235) last Tuesday before short-covering lifted it to the week's high ($1.1355) the following day.  It finished the week on a firm note after wobbling initially after the US CPI report.  With a brief exception, the euro has chopped between $1.12 and $1.14 since mid-November.   The broad sideways movement has seen the momentum indicators correct from over-extended territory.  Since November 10, when the US reported the jump in CPI to 6.2%, the US 2-year premium over Germany rose by roughly 18 bp to 1.40%,  to set the year's high.  It stalled.  The consolidative phase may continue ahead of the FOMC meeting.  Given what the market is pricing in, it may be difficult for the Fed to get ahead of market expectations for next year when it meets on December 15.   Japanese Yen: After testing support near JPY112.55 to start last week, the dollar recovered to almost JPY114.00 in the middle of the week before moving sideways.  It continued to track the movement of US 10-year yields.  As yields rose in the first part of the week, the dollar traded higher against the yen, and when yields slipped min the second half of the week, so did the greenback.  The MACD has flatlined, while the Slow Stochastic is trending higher.  A break of JPY113.00 retargets the lows.  On the topside, the JPY114.00-JPY114.30 area offers nearby resistance. British Pound:  Little is going sterling way.  Support for the Prime Minister has fallen, and polls show Labour opening its largest lead in years.  It has opted for "Plan B," with people returning to working from home, though no new government support was offered.  The economic growth slowed more than expected in October, which was before the Covid wave intensified and the Omicron variant was detected.  The rate hike that looked so likely in November now seems off the table until at least February.  Meanwhile, the fishing row and the attempt to change the Northern Ireland Agreement remain unresolved but causing enough consternation to deter the US from lifting the steel and aluminum tariffs that Trump imposed, let alone discussing a free-trade agreement.  Sterling made a marginal new low for the year last week (slightly below $1.3165, which met the (38.2%) retracement objective of the rally from the March 2020 low.  The next retracement (50%) is around $1.2830.  The momentum indicators are not generating a strong signal presently.  It finished last week on a firm note but a move above $1.3300-$1.13350 is needed to signal anything important.   Canadian Dollar:  The Canadian dollar's recovery fizzled after the central bank failed to provide fresh encouragement to the market, with 125 bp of hikes priced into the swaps market over the next 12 months.  The US dollar, which had rallied and closed above CAD1.28 on December 3 despite the diverging jobs reports, fell nearly CAD1.26 before catching a good bid.  Ahead of the weekend, it had recovered to the middle of the week's range (~CAD1.2730).  A move above the CAD1.2760 area could signal another run at the highs. The MACD pulled back, but it looks like it may try turning higher, while the Slow Stochastic is still falling.  The five-day moving average is set to slip below the 20-day moving average for the first time in a month.  Canada reports November CPI figures on December 15, and the year-over-year pace is set to accelerate from the 4.7% 12-month clip seen in October.  Inflation is also likely rising even faster this month.   Australian Dollar: The Australian dollar rose almost 2.5% last week to end a five-week slide that shook a nickel from it.  The Aussie recovered from the year's low slightly below $0.7000 (December 3), the measuring objective of the potential head and shoulder pattern traced out in H1 21. However, the recovery stalled shy of $0.7190.  The initial retracement of the leg lower that began in late October was closer to $0.7210. Still, the anticipation of a strong employment report (December 15) could help underpin the Aussie.  Provided it holds above the $0.7120 area, the Australian dollar can work its way higher.  The MACD and Slow Stochastic are trending higher.   Mexican Peso: While the Australian dollar was the strongest of the major currencies, the Mexican peso led the emerging market currencies a nearly 2% gain.  Last week, Latam provided three of the four strongest emerging market currencies (Colombian peso +1.25%) and the Brazilian real (0.95%).  The Thai baht was in third place with a 1.25% gain.  Banixco meets on December 16.  It is widely expected to hike by another 25 bp.  The central bank of Chile meets on December 14 and is expected to hike 125 bp to 4.0%.  The last move in October was also for 125 bp.    The Colombian central bank meets on December 17.  Most anticipate a 50 bp hike to 3.0% after initiating the tightening cycle with a 75 bp move in October.  Mexico's central bank appears to be a laggard in this cycle, but the peso's 4.5% loss this year makes it the top performer in the region.  The US dollar fell to a new three-week low slightly below MXN20.85 before the weekend.  The momentum indicators are trending lower, and the five-day moving average crossed below the 20-day for the first time since mid-November.  Initial support is seen in the MXBN20.70-MXN20.75 band. Chinese Yuan:  Chinese officials have delivered verbal warnings and cautioned banks and businesses to adopt good foreign exchange hedging practices and avoid a one-way market.  It signaled displeasure as the yuan rose to new three-year highs against the dollar by setting the daily reference rate.  It cut reserve requirements ahead of the expected FOMC decision next week to accelerate its tapering and bring forward its first rate hike.  The PBOC also raised the reserve requirement for foreign currency deposits.  Yet, the yuan rose in all but one session last week and eked a small gain on the week.  This month, the dollar's high was set ahead of the weekend near CNY6.3835,  but the positive greenback momentum was not sustained.  The dollar finished around CNY6.3700.  In the grand scheme of things, these are small moves, yet this is where the lines are being drawn.  Some observers have argued that state-owned banks in China have operated on behalf of the central bank (stealth intervention).  If this is true,  one must ask what happened to them now or why is that channel not working?  Still, with policy divergence on the PBOC's side, the risk-reward does not seem to favor fighting it now.  If the PBOC wants to drive home its message, the dollar needs to rise above CNY6.40.  Portfolio inflows and the large trade surplus need to be offset by increased capital outflows if officials want to remove the upside pressure on the currency.  That said, if there is an escalation ladder here, officials dominate nearly every rung.  In the long game, officials cannot be seen as losing, and if the carrots do not work, the will appears to be there to use the stick.   Disclaimer
Dollar Starts the Week Bid ahead of the FOMC

Dollar Starts the Week Bid ahead of the FOMC

Marc Chandler Marc Chandler 13.12.2021 13:44
December 13, 2021  $USD, Australia, Canada, China, Currency Movement, FOMC, Japan, Mexico, South Korea, Switzerland, Turkey, UK   Overview: Equities, bonds, and the dollar begin the new week on a firm note.  Japanese, Chinese, Australian, and New Zealand equities advanced in the Asia Pacific region.  Europe's Stoxx 600 is snapping a three-day decline, and US futures are 0.25%-0.35% higher.  The US 10-year yield is a little softer at 1.48%. European benchmark yields are mostly 1-2 bp lower, and near 0.71%, the UK Gilt's yield is at a three-month low.  The dollar is rising against all the major currencies and is 0.3%-0.45% higher against most.  The Canadian dollar and sterling are the most resilient.  Among emerging market currencies, the Chinese yuan continues to defy official signals to eke out a small gain.  The Turkish lira is off more than 2%, after having dropped 4% initially. Intervention at the end of last week failed to have a lasting impact, and the central bank is expected to cut rates again later this week.  The JP Morgan Emerging Market Currency Index is giving back last week's 0.2% gain plus more today.  It was the first weekly gain in five weeks.  Gold is quiet in the upper end of the pre-weekend range, holding above $1780.  January WTI is firm but capped near the 20-day moving average (~$72.80).  US natgas is firm after falling 5% last week.  Dutch gas is up 8% to new two-month highs.  It has a six-week rally in tow, during which time it has gained a little more than 60%.  Industrial metals are higher too.  Iron ore snapped a three-day air pocket and gained it all back and more with its 6.5% rally today.  Copper has steadied after falling almost 2.5% in the last two sessions.   Asia Pacific The results of Japan's Tankan survey were in line with the talk we have picked up that while the new government, vaccination efforts, and fiscal stimulus are helping fuel the economic recovery, businesses are not yet convinced that significant change is taking place.  Sentiment among large manufacturers was steady at 18, and the outlook ticked lower.  The improvement in sentiment among the large non-manufacturers was more pronounced (9 vs. 2). However, the outlook was subdued at 8 (from 3).  Capex plans from the large businesses were softer than expected at 9.3% (from 10.1%).  Sentiment among the small companies improved, but the diffusion index and the outlook remained negative.  South Korea reported strong traded numbers for the first ten days of December (exports 20.4% and imports 42.3% year-over-year).  Seoul was busy.  Its foreign minister met with high Japanese counterpart on the sidelines of the G7 meeting and struck a cooperative tone. South Korea's President Moon met with Australia's Prime Minister Morrison and struck a A$1 bln weapon deal for self-propelled howitzers (which have already been purchased by other countries, including India and Turkey).  South Korea, however, will not be participating in the diplomatic boycott of the Winter Olympics, citing the need for Beijing's cooperation to denuclearize the peninsula.   The US dollar remains within its recent range against the Japanese yen (~JPY113.20-JPY113.95).  The 20-day moving average is at the top of the range, and it has not traded above it this month yet.  An option for almost $400 mln at JPY114.00 expires today.  It is the fifth session that the dollar has not traded below JPY113.20.  The Australian dollar's rally stalled near $0.7185 last week and is testing the lower end of its three-day range (~$0.7130) in the European morning.  Support is seen in the $0.7090-$0.7115 area.  The highlight of the week is the November jobs report, which is expected to show a strong bounce after three months of Covid-related declines.  More problems among China's property developers and activity in the manufacturing hub in Zhejiang were suspended due to an outbreak of the virus that failed to trigger a retreat in the yuan.  The dollar spent most of the local session below the pre-weekend low (~CNY6.3615).  The PBOC set the dollar's reference rate at CNY6.3669.  The market (Bloomberg survey) expected CNY6.3649.   Europe The UK appeared to make two concessions over the weekend.  First, it signaled that it was no longer seeking to exclude a role for the European Court of Justice in enforcing the Northern Ireland protocol.  Second, new fishing licenses were made available to the EU and French fishers. Jersey and the UK issued another 23 licenses, and although Paris was seeking more, it seemed sufficient to de-escalate the situation.   The UK government is under pressure from many sides.  The "partygate" scandal is a culmination of miscues by the Prime Minister, who has struggled with a Peppa Pig speech and a Kermit the Frog speech at the UN.  Several petty sleaze scandals have also marred the government.  Recent polls put Labour ahead of the Conservatives. This Thursday, the special election could see the Tories defeated in a traditional stronghold (ie Lib-Dems a protest vote for disenchanted Tories?).  The UK's stance toward the EU and the risk to the Good Friday Agreement have estranged the US government to some extent, which has not lifted Trump's steel and aluminum tariffs and put much energy into a free-trade agreement between the two special allies.   Turkey reported a large than expected October current account surplus ($3.16 bln) current account surplus.  While the currency's sharp depreciation would be expected to help the trade account, it also scares international investors.  It reported a net outflow of $2.2 bln portfolio capital in October.  Industrial output surprised on the upside in October, rising by 0.6%.  Economists (Bloomberg survey) expected a 0.1% decline after a 1.5% fall in September.  Turkey appeared to intervene in the foreign exchange market at the end of last week.  The dollar held below TRY14 but jumped to almost TRY14.76 today before pulling back.  The Swiss National Bank also looks like it intervened last week.  The euro held above CHF1.04 after having been sold to about CHF1.0375 earlier this month, its lowest level since July 2015.  Swiss domestic sight deposits rose by CHF1.12 bln, the biggest increase in three weeks.  Note that after buying euros against the franc, the SNB is believed to sell euros for dollars to maintain the allocation of its reserves.  The euro peaked last week near $1.1355.  It has been sold to a four-day low of $1.1260 today.    There is an option for 1.44 bln euros at $1.1250 that expires today.  The low for the year was set on November 24 near $1.1185, while last week's low was slightly below $1.1230.  With diverging impulses expected from the Fed and ECB this week, the euro looks vulnerable.  Sterling closed on its highs before the weekend and is on the defensive today.  The market appears to be absorbing bids that might be related to the expiration of a couple of options today (~GBP500 mln at $1.3235 and ~GBP560 mln at $1.3200).  The low for the year was set last week (December 8) near $1.3165, but initial support today is around $1.3220.  The odds of a BOE rate hike later this week have fallen to less than a 1 in 5 chance.   America The highlight of the week is the FOMC meeting.  Nearly everyone expects the Fed to accelerate its tapering and for individual forecasts to shift, matching the more hawkish rhetoric seen since the October CPI print jumped above 6% (November 10).  November's CPI, reported at the end of last week, accelerated to 6.8%.  Before we get to the FOMC meeting, though, this US reports PPI (the heading is expected to accelerate above 9% and the core above 7%) and November retail sales (a solid gain is anticipated of around 0.8% but off the heady 1.7% pace seen in October).  After the mid-week FOMC meeting conclusion, the US reports November housing starts, industrial production, and the Philly Fed's December survey.  The preliminary December PMI estimates are also due Thursday.  The week's data highlight for Canada is the mid-week estimate of November CPI.  Prices may have edged up by 0.2% on the month, but the year-over-year rate is expected to be little changed from the 4.7% pace seen in October.  The underlying measures may have edged up a little.  Price pressures are elevated but do not appear to be accelerating, as seen in the US.  Tomorrow, the new central bank mandate will be announced.  The mandate is reviewed every five years.  The press reports that the 2% inflation target will be retained, but the mandate may include a component of the labor market as it takes what is expected to be a small step toward a dual mandate like the Fed's.   Mexico's central bank meets on Thursday.  It is widely expected to lift the overnight rate target by 25 bp to 5.25%. In Bloomberg's survey of  17 economists, three forecast a 50 bp hike.  It would be the fourth hike in the cycle that began in August.  Chile and Colombia's central banks also are expected to hike rates this week.  Chile, which hiked by 125 bp in October after a 75 bp increase in August, is expected to make another 125 bp adjustment tomorrow.  It would lift the policy rate to 4%. It holds the second round of its presidential election on December 19.  Colombia's central bank meets on December 17.  A 50 bp increase would lift the repo rate to 3.0%.  The first increase in the cycle was 75 bp in October (to 2.5%).  November's CPI was a little above 5.25%.   The US dollar is rising against the Canadian dollar for the fourth consecutive session.  It is poking above CAD1.2750 in the European morning, where an option for almost $450 mln expires today (and another for $515 mln expires tomorrow).  A convincing move above CAD1.2760 could retarget the month's high (~CAD1.2855).  The market has 125 bp of hikes discounted over the next 12 months, but little new encouragement from the central bank.  The greenback fell against the peso in four of last week's five sessions.  It is little changed today, trading above the pre-weekend low (~MXN20.8430).  The next support area is seen closer to MXN20.70.  Still, the market is likely to be cautious extending short US dollar positions ahead of the Fed.   Disclaimer
Market Quick Take - December 14, 2021

Market Quick Take - December 14, 2021

Saxo Strategy Team Saxo Strategy Team 14.12.2021 11:57
Macro 2021-12-14 08:35 6 minutes to read Summary:  Risk sentiment soured yesterday, with some attributing the market nervousness to uncertainty on how hawkish a pivot the Fed is set to make at the FOMC tomorrow, although Fed rate expectations for next year as expressed in the most liquid futures have eased from recent highs. That meeting is the most significant major macro event risk for the 2021 calendar year, although important ECB and BoE meetings are set for Thursday. What is our trading focus? Nasdaq 100 (USNAS100.I) and S&P 500 (US500.I) - yesterday was a very disappointing session for US technology stocks with Nasdaq 100 futures looking to push higher early during the session but ended on the lowest close in four trading sessions. Nasdaq 100 futures are trading around the 16,110 level this morning with the 50-day average around the 15,810 level as the key support level to watch on the downside should risk-off continue. EURUSD – the EURUSD supermajor continues to coil in a tight range ahead of the FOMC meeting tomorrow and ECB meeting on Thursday, both of which are set to bring refreshed forecasts for the economy and policy. The FOMC meeting is likely to carry more weight in terms of the market reaction, especially if the Fed waxes more hawkish than expected (more below) and takes Fed rate expectations for next year to new highs for the cycle. The lines in the sand on the chart include the 1.1186 lows of November, while the recent pivot highs of 1.1355 and 1.1384 bar the upside, with 1.1500 a more structural resistance/pivot zone. AUDUSD – watching the US dollar closely over the next couple of sessions, particularly in the wake of tomorrow’s FOMC meeting and what it brings in the way of a crystallization of the Fed’s hawkish shift (more below) and in the market reaction. If the meeting brings a spike in market volatility, traditionally risk-correlated currencies like the Aussie could show high beta to swings in the US dollar in either direction (I.e., if the Fed waxes more hawkish than expected and this triggers risk-off and a stronger USD). AUDUSD recently broke down through the prior 2021 lows near 0.7100 and tested the huge 0.7000 level before staging a sharp bounce. That 0.7000 level could serve as a kind of “bull-bear” line from here. Crude oil (OILUKFEB22 & OILUSJAN22) has settled into a relatively narrow range with Brent finding resistance at $76, the 21-day moving average while support remains the 200-day moving average at $73.15. OPEC in its monthly oil market report maintained their 4.2 million barrels per day demand growth outlook for 2022 with current omicron-related weakness being offset by a strong recovery during Q1. The Saudi energy minister said the energy transition will cause an oil-price spike later this decade while also warning traders against shorting the market at a time where large speculators have reduced their Brent crude oil long to a 13-month low. On tap today we have IEA’s Monthly Oil Market Report. Gold (XAUUSD) remains stuck just below its 200-day moving average at $1794 with focus on what 20 central bank meetings this week will deliver in terms of inflation fighting measures at a time where the omicron variant continues to cloud the economic outlook. With US inflation rising at the fastest pace since the 1980’s, Wednesday’s FOMC meeting remains the top event. The market is currently pricing in three rate hikes next year with the first one due around June. The other semi-investment metals of silver (XAGUSD) and platinum (XPTUSD) both struggling with the latter’s 850-dollar discount to gold, near a one year high, potentially deserving some attention. US Treasuries (TLH, TLT). The US yield curve bulled flatten yesterday with 10-year yields falling by 7bps to test support at 1.41%. To contribute to this move was news of the first omicron death in the UK, and the winding done of short US Treasury positions before the end of the year. Price action will remain volatile ahead of the Federal Reserve meeting, where Powell is expected to announce an acceleration of the pace of tapering. The focus is going to be also on the Dot plot, where longer term projections might be moved higher, pushing up the long part of the yield curve. However, long-term yields can move higher only that much, as omicron distortions will continue to keep them compressed. It looks likely that 10-year yields will continue to trade rangebound between 1.40% and 1.70% until the end of the year. European sovereign bonds (IS0L, BTP10). The Bund yield curve bull flattened yesterday led by safe-haven buying amid concerns over omicron. Italian BTPS gained the most as the market pushes back on interest rate hikes in 2022. The focus, however, continues to be on the ECB meeting on Thursday. An announcement of the end of the PEPP program in March 2022 is widely anticipated. What’s not clear is whether it will be announced that bond purchases will be compensated by another scheme, such as the APP. It is likely that the ECB will stall as members are torn between inflation and a new wave of Covid infections. If investors feel the support of the central bank is fading, European yields might resume their rise with the periphery and Italian BTPS leading the way. Yet, the move will be contained as yields will remain compressed by covid concerns. UK Gilts (IGLT, IGLS). The BOE might not deliver on a 10bps interest rate hike this week as members are divided concerning Covid restrictions. Michael Saunders, one of the most hawkish MPC members, said that he will need to think about it twice before voting for a rate hike. As expectations for interest rate hikes in the UK are the most aggressive among developed economies. It is possible that if the central bank does not hike, the Gilt yield curve will be steeping with short-term Gilts gaining the most as the market pushes back on next year’s rate expectations. What is going on? China reports first omicron variant case of covid - bringing fears of supply chain disruptions due to the country’s zero tolerance policy on virus cases that can mean profound shutdowns in response to outbreaks. Chinese property developers under new pressure, with the focus this time on Shimao Group Holdings, whose Hong-Kong listing is down over 75% this year and down over 30% over the last week on concerns that a deal between the company’s business units is a sign of financial stress for the company. The company’s 2030 USD-denominated bonds lost almost 13% overnight as the yield rose above 10%. Other Chinese property developer shares were also under pressure overnight. Tesla shares down 5% as growth stocks are under pressure. Tesla shares pushed below $1,000 yesterday adding further pressure to related assets in the Ark Innovation ETF and Bitcoin is also seen lower this morning. Elon Musk sold $907mn worth of shares yesterday according to a filing overnight in order to pay taxes on another round stock options that were exercised. Toyota finally pushes into EV. Japan’s largest carmaker wants to compete with Tesla and Volkswagen announcing $35bn of investments into battery electric vehicles showing the first sign that Toyota is acknowledging that this is the future of the industry. Toyota has so far pursued hybrids on the ground of being more economical, but this push into BEV with 30 new models validates BEVs once and for all, even though Toyota is still saying that it does not know which technology will win. US Harley-Davidson set to spin-off EV motorcycle unit – the plan to spin off Harley’s EV business via a SPAC saw Harley-Davidson shares spike 19% before surrendering most of the gains. Harley’s LiveWire EV business unit will combine with SPAC AEA-Bridges Impact to form a new publicly traded company. The move is meant to take advantage of the premium the market is willing to pay for pure-play EV companies. EU diplomats suggest time running out on Iran nuclear deal - as Iran is progressing rapidly toward enriching uranium for potential use in nuclear weapons. The diplomats worry that without a breakthrough soon, the original 2015 agreement “will very soon become an empty shell.” What are we watching next? The Wednesday FOMC as the year’s final major macro event risk. The FOMC meeting tomorrow is set to bring a very different monetary policy statement from the prior statement after the Fed’s clear pivot to inflation fighting mode. As well, the meeting will see an update of economic forecasts and interest rate policy forecasts (the “dot plot” in which 19 Fed members forecast where the Fed funds rate will likely be in 2022-24 and in the longer term). Most interesting will be the degree to which Fed members have raised their policy rate forecasts relative to what the market is predicting, which is for just under three rate hikes through the end of next year. Prior forecasts have generally come in lower than market expectations. The baseline expectation for the pace of QE “tapering”, or slowing of purchases, is that the Fed will double the pace of tapering, which would mean the Fed’s balance sheet is set to stop growing by the end of March. Anything that suggests a faster pace of tapering than this doubling (for example, a promise to wind down before March) and that hints that a hike at the March FOMC meeting is possible would be a hawkish surprise. The European Council meets on Thursday, and apart from having to deal with Covid-19 and the Russian threat on its eastern borders, the council is also set to decide whether investments in gas and nuclear energy should be labelled climate friendly. The design of the EU green investment classification system is closely watched by investors worldwide and could potentially attract billions of euros in private finance to help the green transition, especially given the need to reduce the usage of coal, the biggest polluter. Earnings Watch – the earnings calendar is getting very thin this week and no major earnings expected today. Wednesday: Inditex, Toro, Lennar, Heico, Trip.com, Nordson Thursday: FedEx, Adobe, Accenture Economic calendar highlights for today (times GMT) 0830 – Sweden Nov. CPI 1000 – Euro Zone Oct. Industrial Production 1100 – US Nov. NFIB Small Business Optimism 1300 – Hungary Central Bank Rate Decision 1330 – US Nov. PPI 1900 – New Zealand RBNZ Governor Orr before parliament committee 2130 – API Weekly Report on US Oil and Fuel Inventories 2330 – Australia Dec. Westpac Consumer Confidence 0200 – China Nov. Retail Sales 0200 – China Nov. Industrial Production During the day: IEA’s Monthly Oil Market Report   Follow SaxoStrats on the daily Saxo Markets Call on your favorite podcast app: Apple Spotify Soundcloud Sticher
Market Quick Take - December 10, 2021

Market Quick Take - December 10, 2021

Saxo Strategy Team Saxo Strategy Team 10.12.2021 12:10
Macro 2021-12-10 08:30 6 minutes to read Summary:  Risk sentiment has consolidated after sharp gains earlier this week as the market nervously eyes the US November CPI release today from the US and whether this will trigger a more hawkish FOMC meeting next week. The US White House has already been out attempting damage control from the inflation headlines today, saying that the data will not reflect recent declines in gasoline and other prices.   What is our trading focus? Nasdaq 100 (USNAS100.I) and S&P 500 (US500.I) - US equities and particularly tech stocks consolidated a significant chunk of the sharp gains from earlier this week, with speculative sectors getting the worst of it on the day, although most stocks were down on the day. A high US November CPI release today could spook investors as it would raise the anticipation of an even more hawkish FOMC meeting next week. EURUSD – The EURUSD rally attempt from Wednesday faltered in what now looks a mere tactical squeeze ahead of today’s US November CPI report (more below). Given that the slide in EURUSD has largely tracked with the rise in Fed expectations, the degree to which those expectations are adjusted higher or lower in the wake of today’s US CPI data and then next week in the wake of the FOMC meeting Wednesday and ECB meeting Thursday will likely correlate with EURUSD direction, where the focus is on the cycle lows just below 1.1200 for a possible run at 1.1000 on a break lower and the tactical pivot high near 1.1380. USDJPY and JPY crosses – the omicron variant news of some two weeks ago triggered a huge slide in USDJPY just after it was trying to engineer a break above multi-year highs near 114-50. Similar to developments in crude oil and longer US yields, USDJPY has failed to get back to the upper reaches of the recent range since that sell-off, which bottomed out near the 112.50 area – the current trigger zone for a possible further sell-off wave (most like in a scenario of cratering risk sentiment and US treasuries serving as a safe-haven) that could poke at the important 111.00-50 downside pivot zone. Elsewhere, JPY crosses backed up very sharply this week on hopes that the omicron variant will prove mild and won’t impact the growth outlook, but the scale of the rally or squeeze has been modest relative to the prior sell-off. Watching areas like 127.50-128.00 in EURJPY and 79.00 in AUDJPY in coming sessions for whether another wave of JPY strength is in the cards. Crude oil’s (OILUKFEB22 & OILUSJAN22) week-long rally hit the buffers yesterday with Brent and WTI retracing back towards support at their 200-day moving averages at $73 and $69.80 respectively. A study finding the omicron variant is 4.2 times more transmissible than the delta combined with new restrictions among several nations helped weaken the sentiment, and with end of year approaching many traders are increasingly becoming more risk adverse, potentially leading to more fluctuations. Focus today on omicron news, US inflation data and whether the mentioned support level can be maintained. Wheat (WHEATMAR22 & ZWH2) trades near five-week low following three days of losses which accelerated yesterday after the USDA raised its outlook for global stocks. The 3% drop in Chicago also helped drag down the recent highflyers futures for Kansas and Paris milling wheat. Global stock levels at the end of the 2022-23 season received a boost from production upgrades in Russian (1mt) and Australian (2.5mt) while US export slowed with high prices curbing demand. US Treasuries (TLH, TLT).  Yesterday’s 30-year auction showed that the market is not willing to buy long-term US Treasuries at current low yields. The 30-year auction was priced with a high yield of 1.895%, tailing by 3.2bps. Although the tail was smaller than last month’s 5.2bps, it would have been enough to cause a selloff in long-term Treasuries. However, covid distortions kept yields compressed, hence volatility in rates was avoided. Today’s CPI numbers are in focus as a high number is likely to contribute to more upward pressure in the yield curve. What is going on? The US White House was already out attempting damage control on inflation before today’s CPI release. A White House official, economic adviser Brian Deese, was out late yesterday saying that today’s US November CPI release won’t reflect recent drops in the price of key commodities, especially gasoline and natural gas as it is “backward looking”. China property developers formally declared to have defaulted - as Fitch Ratings noted missed interest payments on Evergrande and Kaisa Group Holdings USD bonds as it downgraded these issues to restricted default. USDCNY and USDCNH bounce sharply a day after posting new low for the year - China fixed the USDCNY level at a far weaker level than expected and announced an FX reserve ratio increase to 9%, forcing domestic banks to maintain higher reserves of foreign currencies.  These are rather obvious signals that China would like to avoid a further rise in its currency after a powerful and broad rally that saw both the offshore and onshore yuan posting new highs for the US dollar for the year just this Wednesday. Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies close sharply lower – with Bitcoin closing at its lowest levels on a weekday since September. Technically, the 40-45k zone looks important for avoiding a more significant capitulation lower after the recent weekend meltdown that took the price some 20% lower to below 43k before support was found. According to coinmarketcap.com, the market cap of the nearly 15.5k cryptocurrencies is currently near $2.26 trillion after peaking near $2.93 trillion in November, a drawdown of over 22%. What are we watching next? US November CPI data release today, expected at 6.8% year-on-year for the headline number and 4.9% at the core, both of which would be the highest readings in decades. Given that expectations are so high, would a slightly hotter than expected number move the needle on a Friday ahead of next week’s important FOMC meeting? A significant beat to the upside just might make a difference, given that the Fed has clearly made a shift toward fighting inflation and would probably need to bring a March 2022 rate hike possibility into its forward guidance. Fed rate expectations for next year are poised near the high for the cycle, suggesting a 0.8% Fed Funds rate (vs. currently 0-0.25%) is priced in through the December 2022 Fed meeting. The EU is set to decide by December 22 whether investments in gas and nuclear energy should be labelled climate friendly. The design of the EU green investment classification system is closely watched by investors worldwide and could potentially attract billions of euros in private finance to help the green transition, especially given the need to reduce the usage of coal, the biggest polluter. Economic calendar highlights for today (times GMT) 0905 – ECB President Lagarde, others speaking at panel discussion1300 - Poland National Bank of Poland meeting minutes1330 – US Nov. CPI1500 – US Dec. Preliminary University of Michigan Sentiment Follow SaxoStrats on the daily Saxo Markets Call on your favorite podcast app: Apple Spotify Soundcloud Sticher
No Turnaround Tuesday for Equities?

No Turnaround Tuesday for Equities?

Marc Chandler Marc Chandler 14.12.2021 15:01
December 14, 2021  $USD, Canada, Chile, Currency Movement, EMU, Hungary, Japan, Mexico, UK Overview:  Activity in the capital markets is subdued today, ahead of tomorrow's FOMC meeting conclusion and the ECB meeting on Thursday.  The MSCI Asia Pacific equity index fell for the third consecutive session.  European bourses are heavy after the Stoxx 600 posted an outside down day yesterday. Today would be the fifth consecutive decline. Selling pressure on the US futures indices continues after yesterday's losses.  Australia and New Zealand bonds played catch-up to the large drop in US Treasury yields yesterday, while European benchmark yields are edging higher.  The 10-year US Treasury yield is around 1.43%.  The dollar is mixed against the major currencies.  The Canadian and Australian dollars and Norway are softer, while the Swiss franc and euro lead with around a 0.25%-0.35% gain.  Most emerging market currencies are little changed, though the Turkish lira is paring yesterday's intervention-fueled gains.  Led by the Hungarian forint ahead of the outcome of the central meeting, and helped by a firm euro, central European currencies lead the emerging markets.  The JP Morgan Emerging Market Currency Index is off for a second session after breaking a four-week slide last week.  Gold continues to consolidate and is within yesterday's range ($1782-$1791).  Oil is also trading quietly, with the January WTI contract in a $70.50-$72.00 range.  European (Dutch) natural gas is rising for the sixth session of the past seven, during which time it has increased by nearly a third.  US natgas has fallen by almost 30% in the past two weeks and is off for about 4.4% this week already.  Iron ore is paring yesterday's 6.5% gain, while copper is drifting lower and is extending its loss into the fourth consecutive session.   Asia Pacific Year-end pressures are evident in Japan's money markets, and the BOJ responded by arranging an unscheduled repo operation for the second consecutive session.  Yesterday's overnight operation was for JPY2 trillion (~$17.5 bln) after the repo rate rose to two-year highs.  The repo appeared to have been lifted by dealers securing funding for bill purchases.  Today the BOJ offered to buy JPY9 trillion of bonds under the repo agreement.   The US has offered to lift the steel and aluminum tariffs on Japan on similar terms as the deal struck with the EU.   A certain amount, based on some historical market share, can be shipped to the US duty-free, but over that threshold, a levy will be imposed.  Unlike the EU, Tokyo did not impose retaliatory tariffs.  Estimates suggest that Japan shipped around 5% of its steel to the US, though some might have made its way through Mexico.   The regional highlights for the week still lie ahead.  Tomorrow, China reports November retail sales, industrial production, new home prices, investment, and the surveyed jobless rate.  Retail sales are expected to have slowed, while industrial output may have firmed.  Investment in property and fixed assets may have stalled.  Japan has its tertiary index (October) tomorrow, a November trade balance on Thursday (it nearly always deteriorates from October), and the Friday BOJ meeting.  The BOJ is expected to extend some of its emergency facilities.  Australia reports its November jobs data first thing Thursday morning in Canberra.  After three months of job losses, a strong report is expected as social restrictions were lifted.   Today, the dollar is confined to about a quarter of a yen range above JPY113.50.  It has not traded above JPY114.00 this month so far.  Nor has it traded below JPY113.20 since last Monday.  An option for $760 mln at JPY1113.85 rolls off today.  The Australian dollar tested the session high near $0.7135 in the European morning but met a wall of sellers, perhaps, related to the nearly A$600 mln option at $0.7130 that expires today. It has traded down to a five-day low around $0.7090, which is the halfway point of last week's rally.  The next retracement (61.8%) is near $0.7065. The dollar continues to struggle to sustain upticks against the Chinese yuan. It is trading heavily today, its seventh loss in the past eight sessions.   Still, the greenback held above yesterday's low (~CNY6.3580).  It was unable to poke above CNY6.37.   The PBOC's dollar fixing was set at CNY6.3675, while the market (Bloomberg survey) anticipated CNY6.3666.   Europe The UK reported solid employment data.  The November claimant count rate eased to 4.9% from a revised 5.0% (initially 5.1%), representing a nearly 50k decline after the October decline was revised to 58.5k from -14.9k.  The pace of earnings growth slowed to 4.9% from 5.9% (three-month, year-over-year).  Employment rose by nearly 150k (three months) after a 247k increase previously.  Tomorrow, the UK sees November CPI and PPI.  Both are expected to have quickened from October.  Nevertheless, the BOE is now seen on hold until February.   Hungary's central bank is set to hike the base rate today.  A 40 bp increase would follow last month's 30 bp hike.  Today's move would be the sixth in a row.  The base rate began the year at 60 bp, and today's hike would lift it to 2.50%.  On Thursday, Hungary likely hiked the one-week deposit rate.  It has been hiked for the last four weeks.  It had been at 75 bp until June, when it was hiked by 15 bp.  It was lifted by 30 bp in July and again in August.  It reverted to 15 bp increases in September and October.  The one-week deposit rate was raised several times last month to 2.90%.  It is up another 40 bp so far this month, and it is expected to be lifted by another 20 bp this week.   In October, industrial output in the euro area rose 1.1% after a 0.2% decline in September.  The preliminary PMI will be reported on Thursday, ahead of the ECB meeting.  Activity likely slowed. The focus of the ECB meeting is on the guidance about bond-buying next year.  The emergency facility is expected to wind down at the end of Q1, but given that it will still be buying bonds, tapering may not be as necessary or pronounced as, say, with the Federal Reserve.  The ECB staff will also update forecasts, including a sharp upward revision to next year's while extending the projections to 2024.  There is also interest in what the ECB will do about its long-term loans (TLTRO).    The euro has firmed in the European morning but remains mired in a narrow range.  Indeed, the range over the past five sessions is a little less than a cent (~$1.1260-$1.1355). There is an option for nearly 500 mln euros at $1.1330 that expires today.  For the past month, the euro has been in a $1.12-$1.14 trading range, with the notable exception on November 24, when the low for the year was recorded (~$1.1185).   Sterling slipped below $1.32 in late Asian turnover but found bids lurking there, and Europe has extended its recovery toward $1.3235.  Resistance is seen in the $1.3260-$1.3275 area. Sterling has not traded above $1.33 since December 3, yet a move above there is necessary to lift the technical tone.   America The US reports November producer prices today.  The headline rate is expected to push above 9%, while the core rate pokes through 7%.  The market is understandably more sensitive to consumer prices than producer prices.  Tomorrow, ahead of the FOMC statement, the November retail sales (softer than the 1.7% headline increase in October) and the December Empire manufacturing survey will be released.   Although the Senate is expected to maneuver to lift the debt ceiling today, the Treasury is planning a large bill pay down (~$175 bln) to ensure it would have the space to settle the coupon auctions.  That said, the supply of bills is likely to improve through Q1 22, according to estimates.  By most accounts, the Treasury has overfunded itself, and this will allow it to cut back further on new supply, just as the Federal Reserve is expected to accelerate its tapering.   The Bank of Canada was told its inflation target remains 2% but that it can overshoot to support "maximum sustainable employment."  The central bank's language is important.  It said it would "continue" to support the labor market objective, suggesting that yesterday's adjustment to the mandate will have a minor operational impact.  In fact, with inflation (October CPI 4.7%, an 18-year high), Governor Macklem quickly indicated that this was not the situation when it could probe for the maximum sustainable employment.  Still, the new mandate requires that the central bank explain when it is using its new flexibility and how labor market outcomes are incorporated into monetary decisions.  Separately, Canada is proposing alternatives to the US proposed tax incentives for electric vehicles in the Build Back Better initiative.  Canada and Mexico claim that it violated the USMCA and throws a wrench in the 30-year auto integration.  The EU trade commissioner has also expressed concerns about whether the legislation would break the WTO rules too.   Late today, Chile's central bank is expected to deliver a 125 bp rate hike, the same as in October.  The overnight target rate began the year at 50 bp.  It was hiked by 25 bp in July and 75 bp in August.  With today's hike, it will stand at 4%.  More work is needed as November CPI was at 6.7%.  Chile holds the run-off presidential election this weekend.  In the first round last month, the conservative Kast drew 28% support while the left candidate Boris garnered 26%.  Chile's innovation during Covid was to allow people to withdraw funds from their pensions (yes, like a farmer eating their corn seed).  Three withdrawals were granted, but a fourth effort was rebuffed earlier this month.  The World Bank and the IMF expressed concern about the pension fund industry, which had been among the best in the region.  The Chilean peso is among the worst-performing emerging market currencies this year.  It has fallen nearly 15.5% and has only been "bested" by the Argentine peso (~17.3%) and the Turkish lira (-48%).   The Canadian dollar's retreat is being extended for the fifth consecutive session.  The greenback has largely held above CAD1.2800 and is drawing near the high seen after the employment reports on December 3 (~CAD1.2855).  We usually see the exchange rate is driven by 1) general risk appetite, 2) commodity prices, and 3) rate differential.  Here we note that Canada's 2-year premium has fallen from about 60 basis points at the start of last month to around 27 bp now.  Over the same time, the 10-year premium has wholly disappeared.  It was almost 20 bp on November 1 and currently is trading at a four basis point discount.  Meanwhile, the greenback is consolidating against the Mexican peso. For the fifth consecutive session, it has been mainly chopping in a MXN20.85-MXN21.08 range.   On Thursday, Banxico is expected to hike its overnight rate by 25 bp.  We continue to think it is more likely to hike by 50 bp than standpat.  Since June, it has lifted the target rate by 100 bp to 5%.   November CPI stood at 7.37%.     Disclaimer
A quick story before we start

A quick story before we start

Brent Donnelly Brent Donnelly 16.12.2021 15:18
FAIRFIELD COUNTY, CONNECTICUT May 6, 2010 4:55AM The Connecticut air is cold and damp. The trader moves in silence. He steps quietly through the pitch-black darkness of his Victorian McMansion and toward the door. As he disarms the home security system, the BEEP BEEP BEEP of the keypad code he enters is impossibly loud in the quiet of the pre-dawn morning. He steps out of the house, closes and locks the door, and hops into his car. As he rolls down the driveway and into the foggy morning, he inserts a Deadmau5 CD and blasts it at high volume in an effort to wake up and get pumped for another day of trading. But this will not just be another day of trading. This will be one of the most insane trading days of his career. It has been a frustrating year so far. The Eurozone Crisis has been smoldering for months but the trader’s attempts to sell the euro have been met with massive countertrend rallies as the Fed embarks on another round of USD-negative quantitative easing (QE). They call EURUSD a collision of two garbage trucks. The trader struggles to steer clear of the wreckage. His strongest view recently has been lower USDJPY. There is risk aversion popping up all over the place as markets worry about a domino effect where Greece crashes out of the Eurozone, followed by Spain, Portugal, Ireland and then finally Italy. Everyone is bearish stocks as the S&P 500 rally from 666 in March 2009 to 1050 now is seen as a mirage; the side effect of a money printing magic trick performed by central bankers. Totally unsustainable. EURUSD opened the year at 1.4500 and now trades sub-1.25 so the short trade is hard to stomach. Even when you know it’s the right thing to do, it takes a lot of courage to sell something down >15%. So the trader has shifted his attention to USDJPY and he expects it to go substantially lower as global risk aversion remains elevated and safe haven currencies like the yen should find demand. USDJPY has been inexplicably well-bid given recent risk aversion and the Fed “money printing”. It just rallied from 90 to 94 on air over the last two weeks. Meanwhile, the best leading indicator for USDJPY is always US bond yields and they have been plummeting for a month. USDJPY looks completely wrong. The trader stares at the following chart, which shows US 10-year bond yields and USDJPY. The black bars are USDJPY and the dotted line shows US bond yields. Note they usually follow in lockstep. The divergence is a strong signal to the trader that he should be short USDJPY. USDJPY vs. US 10-year rates November 2009 to May 5, 2010 The chart covers the period up to May 5. This story takes place May 6. Chart courtesy of Refinitiv. If you look in the top right corner, you can see that USDJPY is a bit off the highs, but not much. Two days in a row, the high has been 94.99 and USDJPY is now bouncing aimlessly around 93.80 as he rolls into the hedge fund parking lot. It is still early so there are only three Porsche 911s in the lot right now. More will arrive later. This USDJPY trade has been tiring and painful as the trader got short at 94.00 with a stop loss at 95.05 and those two daily highs mean he has come within a hair (6 pips, or 0.064%) of getting stopped out, two days in a row. Holding on to a trade like this is exhausting as his fight-or-flight stress system remains activated for long stretches. Cortisol overload. Now, he can relax a bit and let things play out. His target is 91.00. Average daily range has been about 1 yen (100 pips) lately so he figures we might get there in the next week or so. 10:45 AM It has been a boring morning with USDJPY in a tight range. The sun comes out and it’s almost shorts weather outside so the trader decides to go for a run before lunch. Less than a mile into his run, he gets his first indication that this is not a random, ordinary day. His Blackberry rings. Bank sales on the line to tell him that USDJPY has just dumped 100 points in 15 minutes. Trading 92.80 now… Odd. He turns around and sprints back to the office, Spidey-sense tingling. By the time he grabs a quick shower and returns to the desk, USDJPY is 91.50. He is short $100 million USDJPY so that puts his profit (aka P&L or profit and loss) around +$2.8 million on the day. That’s more P&L than this trader typically makes in an excellent month. A huge haul. He scans the headlines and Bloomberg chats and finds no good explanation for what is going on. The stock market is down, but not enough to explain the move in USDJPY. This makes no sense. When a trade shows a big profit that makes no sense, he likes to cover it and move on. The trader buys 100 million USDJPY at 91.50. He is back to flat with no position and nearly 3 bucks of P&L in the bank. He sits there calmly and processes what has happened. He allows himself to feel happy, just for a second. He stuck to his plan and had the patience to sit with a decent-sized position for three days. He relaxes and basks in the satisfaction of a job well done. Then… Some dumb voice in his brain says: 2.8 million dollars is an amazing day. But... Maybe I can make 5 million today? And his hands, as if possessed by some mischievous or evil force, move slowly toward the BUY and SELL buttons. For no reason. And like a moron… He goes long USDJPY. First, he buys $50 million at 91.50 and then another $50 million at 91.25. These are impulsive trades with no rationale. His planned stop loss is 90.85 but before he has time to input a stop loss order, he notices S&Ps lurch lower on a huge volume surge. He puts on his headset and fires up the S&P squawk to see what’s going on. [If you want to hear the soundtrack to what happens next, Google “Flash crash stock market 2010 squawk” and select one of the YouTube replay videos] The announcer’s voice is strained as he narrates an unexplained fall in stocks from 1150 to 1120. USDJPY skips through 91.00 and the trader’s P&L shrinks to $2.0 million. He tries to sell at 90.80 and whiffs. USDJPY is suddenly in freefall. 90.10 trades. 90.00 breaks. USDJPY has just dropped more than four percent in a few hours. A monster move. The trader’s eyes flick over to his P&L which has now shrunk back to six digits. Two-thirds of three days’ work, gone in 60 seconds. And then… Stocks sell off hard out of nowhere. Like… REALLY HARD. The S&P squawk guy is losing it. Screaming. 1100 breaks in the S&P. 1080, 1070, 1060. USDJPY is a waterfall. The squawk loses his mind as he yells: “We have some BIG paper sellers here… 7 evens are trading. 6 evens are trading! 5 EVENS ARE TRADING!!! New lows here…” USDJPY breaks 89.00 and the trader has still sold only 23 million USD, leaving him stuck with a position of 77 million USD. It is a fast market, nearly impossible to transact. He picks up a phone to two different banks and neither one answers. He tries to hit the 88.60 and gets a reject notice from the aggregator. The price feed is stale and crossed now; it shows 89.00 / 88.10, which is not possible. The trader is now down on the day. In the red. His face is hot and feels red like his P&L. Urge to slam fist on desk is rising. The trader feels like he is falling, falling::::::::::::::::::::in cinematic slow-mo. USDJPY stabilizes a bit even as the S&P squawk continues to go nuts. “65 even offered! 60 trades… 60 even bid, this is the widest we have seen in years,” his voice cracks, he’s yelling like the announcer at Churchill Downs as the horses turn for the stretch. “60s trading! 50s trading! 50 at 70 now! We are twenty wide!” 1060 trades in S&Ps now, down just about 10% today, on zero news. Nobody knows what the hell is going on and there is panic in the air. The squawk dude continues to scream. He is pouring gasoline on the trader’s agitation. The trader’s P&L is now six figures in the red. Sadness. Anger. He is furious with himself because he had the right trade, waited patiently for almost three days for it to work, caught the move perfectly according to plan … And then flipped the other way on a whim, for no reason and gave everything and more back in half an hour. $2.8 million is a good month for this trader. He just made and lost that much in less than two hours. I am an idiot. How did I get into this mess? He needs to make a decision here and quick but he realizes that he is flooded. It is impossible to make a good trading decision when you’re flooded. He needs a second to clear his mind. He tears off the headphones, drops them on his desk, and stands up. He walks over to the window and tries to find a moment of lucid calm. He has been through these emotional storms before and knows how to get back to shore. He stares over the waters of the Long Island Sound. Gradually, his heart rate lowers. Clarity slowly, slowwwwly returns. His lizard brain retreats and his rational mind takes over. He talks to himself: It doesn’t matter how you got here. What are you going to do about it? 88.00 was the low in March. It’s a massive level. The panic is fading. USDJPY is down 700 points in two days and now bonds are reversing lower. This is the place to buy USDJPY, not sell. He returns to his keyboard, puts his headphones back on. The squawk guy has stopped screaming. He is noticeably more composed. S&P futures have bottomed within a whisker of limit down. They are stable but have not rebounded significantly. The bid/offer is super wide so it’s hard to tell whether they are moving higher or just bouncing along the bottom. The trader looks around the room and sees the panic and electricity levels have dropped. Not as many phones are ringing. Voices in the room are no longer frantic. He buys 50 million USDJPY at 88.85. And another 73 million at 88.95. Max long now, long $200 million USDJPY. But this time it’s thought out, not random, and he feels good about what he is doing. He feels confident but fully in control. He calmly thinks forward: USDJPY could easily rally to 92.50 from here. When you catch a turn like this, you can be greedy. He leaves a stop loss for half his position (sell 100 million USDJPY at 87.94) and then sits back to let things play out. He has his plan and now he knows all he can do is watch and see if it works. There is one more frenetic whipsaw and USDJPY briefly prints to a low of 87.95. One pip from his 100 million USD stop loss. Amazing luck. Seconds later, stocks stabilize, and then it’s like everyone realizes all at once that whatever the heck just happened… It’s over. USDJPY is paid at 88.70, then up through 89.50. It breaks 90.00 and as it hits 90.40, the trader flicks his eyes to the P&L. It is almost exactly back to the level where it peaked earlier: $2.8 million. He praises the trading gods and squares up. NICE! Too bad he didn’t stick with his plan on the way back up, either. A few hours later, USDJPY hit the trader’s original target of 92.50. Here’s the chart of USDJPY that day: USDJPY May 3-7, 2010 (US stock market Flash Crash was May 6) The trader made a multitude of both good and bad decisions in the three hours around the 2010 Flash Crash. The trading described in this story is a microcosm of everything that can go right and wrong in trading. Traders make good, careful decisions and get rewarded, they make bad decisions and get punished … but then sometimes a good decision leads to a bad outcome … or a bad decision is rescued by good luck. Every trader is a steaming hot bowl of bias stew and must maintain self-awareness and lucidity behind the screens as the trading day oscillates between boredom and terror. That story of the 2010 Flash Crash, just like this book, is all about the razor thin line that separates success and failure in trading. Alpha Trader is written to help you understand markets but also, more importantly, to help you better understand yourself as a trader. It is about great decisions and dumb mistakes. It is about how to be rational and why smart people do stupid things. All the time. The book is written for traders at every skill level. I wrote it to be understood by noobs, but I also aimed to write something that will resonate with experienced trading professionals. Alpha Traders are smart, rational, disciplined, flexible, patient, and aggressive… They have the endurance to handle unending ups, downs, hills, and valleys. They come in fired up each day to solve the ultimate puzzle and they get paid incredibly well if they succeed. Alpha Traders work hard (even when they don’t feel like it), seek to continuously improve, and love markets more than they love money. Thank you for taking the time to read my book. I hope you find it entertaining and useful. I hope it helps you unlock your maximum trading potential. By the way, I plan to publish future updates, fresh trading stories and new lessons, tactics and strategies, exclusively for readers of Alpha Trader. If you are interested, please sign up at brentdonnelly.com. Enjoy. /Brent
ECB Quick Analysis: Tapering still leaves Lagarde as the laggard, EUR/USD could turn down

ECB Quick Analysis: Tapering still leaves Lagarde as the laggard, EUR/USD could turn down

FXStreet News FXStreet News 16.12.2021 16:06
The ECB has announced the end of its special PEPP bond-buying scheme in March. Raising the volume of the APP scheme is limited and set to be reduced. Other central banks remain well ahead of the ECB, potentially limiting the euro's rise. A wise owl – that is what European Central Bank Christine Lagarde aspires to be. Her latest move seems to have met that desire, as the ECB all but tapers its bond-buying schemes, following others' footsteps. The Frankfurt-based institution will wind down its Pandemic Emergency Purchase Program (PEPP) in March 2022, two years after its launch. On the other hand, it will expand its regular Asset Purchase Program to €40 billion in the second quarter – but already pre-announced it would squeeze to €30 billion in the third quarter. In other words: tapering. Buying fewer bonds and creating more fewer euros is positive for the common currency, and that explains the 30-pip jump. However, the ECB has stiff competition. The move comes just the Federal Reserve's decision to double its tapering pace to $30 billion/month and projection of three hikes in 2022. The Bank of England surprised markets by announcing a 15bp rate hike – just 45 minutes ahead of the ECB. In the second quarter of 2022, the ECB would still be buying bonds while the Fed would already move toward raising rates and the BOE could be after its second or third move. Investors are unlikely to wait for that to happen before acting. The euro's relative disadvantage does not solely stem from central banks' intentions but from the underlying economic situation. The ECB continues labeling inflation as transitory, and for good reasons. Core inflation is roughly half that in the US, and skewed to the upside by German VAT changes. Europe is more economically sensitive to covid than the US. These gaps, which brought EUR/USD down in recent months, could return to push EUR/USD lower. This current advance could turn into a selling opportunity.
Intraday Market Analysis: USD Weakens Across The Board

Intraday Market Analysis: USD Weakens Across The Board

John Benjamin John Benjamin 17.12.2021 08:56
EURUSD tests key supply zone The euro jumped after the ECB announced it will cut its bond-buying program. The pair’s latest retreat seems to have been an accumulation phase for the bulls. Strong buying interest lies in the demand zone around 1.1230. A break above 1.1320 has put buyers back in the control room. 1.1380 from a previously botched reversal attempt is a major hurdle ahead. Its breach may trigger an extended rally towards 1.1460. The RSI’s overextended situation has caused a brief pullback with 1.1270 as a key support. GBPUSD attempts bullish reversal Sterling surged after the Bank of England raised its interest rates to 0.25%. The pound has been treading water above 1.3170. The sellers’ struggle to push lower and the buyers’ attempts above 1.3260 suggest that the mood could be improving. A break above 1.3300 has prompted the bears to cover, attracting momentum traders in the process with 1.3440 as the next target. That said, an overbought RSI may cause a temporary pullback as intraday traders take profit. 1.3260 has become the closest support. NZDUSD breaks resistance The New Zealand dollar rallied as risk sentiment made its return post-FOMC. A bullish RSI divergence indicates a deceleration in the sell-off momentum. The long candle wick from 0.6700 suggests solid buying interest. Then a break above 0.6800 has put the last sellers under pressure. An overbought RSI has limited the initial surge. A pullback may test 0.6755, previously a resistance that has turned into a support. 0.6860 near the 30-day moving average is the next hurdle, and its breach could trigger a bullish reversal.
Creating silver wealth without fear

Creating silver wealth without fear

Korbinian Koller Korbinian Koller 20.12.2021 09:32
Two weeks ago, we posted the following chart in our weekly silver chart book release, after representing a strong case for a bullish silver play: Silver in US-Dollar, Weekly chart from December 3rd, 2021: Silver in US-Dollar, weekly chart as of December 3rd, 2021. We wrote at the time: “The weekly chart above illustrates that as much as we have entered the “shopping zone” for silver. There is a probability that we might see a quick spike down as we have seen at the end of September.” Weekly chart, Silver in US-Dollar, creating silver wealth without fear: Silver in US-Dollar, weekly chart as of December 18th, 2021. We were spot on anticipating how the market would unfold in the future. Furthermore, we followed the principles of consistent analysis of our surroundings, the market, and ourselves. We advanced confidently in the direction of likely probabilities and tried to keep doubt to a minimum. Hourly chart, Silver in US-Dollar, well positioned: Silver in US-Dollar, hourly chart as of December 18th, 2021. This sequence allowed for a low-risk entry on December 15th, 2021 right at the lows. The entry-level of US$21.47 already allowed for a 2.75% partial profit-taking on half of our position size at US$22.06. As always, we use our low-risk quad exit strategy to reduce risk and, as such, fear of losing profits. Now we are well-positioned with the remainder of the position, and a stop raised to break even entry levels. Silver in US-Dollar, monthly chart, worth the effort: Silver in US-Dollar, monthly chart as of December 18th, 2021. The monthly chart above shows our planned following two targets for this trade. With an entry at US$21.47 and an initial tight stop at US$21.22, our risk/reward-ratio towards our first profit-taking target was about 1:2.37. Now for the next target at US$27.35, it is 1:23, and for the final target at US$47.20, it is 1:103. In other words, with extensive planning and stacking of odds, we were able to identify a trade that had about a percent of risk at entry time. In addition, we quickly mitigated risk by early partial profit-taking. And yet, we still have a profit potential of the final 25% of position size, possibly maturing to a 120% profit. Taking only highly likely and highly profitable trades like these is also confidence-building and a fear eliminator. Creating silver wealth without fear: Michael Jordan’s achievement of playing in the present moment only is nothing short of the accomplishment of monks and so-called enlightened beings. It takes a long stretch of a career to achieve such a skill set. It illustrates that trading is more than just pushing a button or extracting a mathematical edge system. Trading is psychology and requires many skill sets combined to produce the necessary consistency to overcome the dilemma that you are only as good as your last action. Luck alone will get you nowhere in this game. It is not our intention to discourage you. Instead, it is quite the opposite. Often trading can be overwhelming and at times one can be down thinking: „Why can’t I do this, why did I betray my own rules again?” Trading is hard, it takes screen time and skill. Do not let fear and doubt dictate your actions. You can do this! Feel free to join us in our free Telegram channel for daily real time data and a great community. If you like to get regular updates on our gold model, precious metals and cryptocurrencies you can also subscribe to our free newsletter. This article does not contain investment advice or recommendations. Every investment and trading move involves risk, and readers should conduct their own research when making a decision. The views, thoughts and opinions expressed here are the author’s alone. They do not necessarily reflect or represent the views and opinions of Midas Touch Consulting. By Korbinian Koller|December 19th, 2021|Tags: bottoming pattern, Crack-Up-Boom, Gold, Gold/Silver-Ratio, inflation, low risk, Silver, silver bull, Silver Chartbook, silversqueeze, technical analysis, The bottom is in, time frame, trading principles|0 Comments About the Author: Korbinian Koller Outstanding abstract reasoning ability and ability to think creatively and originally has led over the last 25 years to extract new principles and a unique way to view the markets resulting in a multitude of various time frame systems, generating high hit rates and outstanding risk reward ratios. Over 20 years of coaching traders with heart & passion, assessing complex situations, troubleshoot and solve problems principle based has led to experience and a professional history of success. Skilled natural teacher and exceptional developer of talent. Avid learner guided by a plan with ability to suppress ego and empower students to share ideas and best practices and to apply principle-based technical/conceptual knowledge to maximize efficiency. 25+ year execution experience (50.000+ trades executed) Trading multiple personal accounts (long and short-and combinations of the two). Amazing market feel complementing mechanical systems discipline for precise and extreme low risk entries while objectively seeing the whole picture. Ability to notice and separate emotional responses from the decision-making process and to stand outside oneself and one’s concerns about images in order to function in terms of larger objectives. Developed exit strategies that compensate both for maximizing profits and psychological ease to allow for continuous flow throughout the whole trading day. In depth knowledge of money management strategies with the experience of multiple 6 sigma events in various markets (futures, stocks, commodities, currencies, bonds) embedded in extreme low risk statistical probability models with smooth equity curves and extensive risk management as well as extensive disaster risk allow for my natural capacity for risk-taking.
Chip Shortage: My iPhone Won’t Arrive in Time for Christmas – are Bitcoin Miners to Blame?

Chip Shortage: My iPhone Won’t Arrive in Time for Christmas – are Bitcoin Miners to Blame?

BeInCrypto (BeIn News Academy Ltd), we're writing about crypto. BeInCrypto (BeIn News Academy Ltd), we're writing about crypto. 22.12.2021 22:36
The chip shortage affects many industries. But are Bitcoin miners the scapegoat we are all looking for? Cars, smartphones, gaming: the chip shortage is affecting many industries. For example, the Playstation 5 has already been on the market for about a year, but some customers are still waiting for their devices to this day. The same holds for Apple products, such as the new iPhone. Here, too, customers have to brace themselves for higher prices. Those who want to buy a new car must also expect longer waiting times. “Depending on the make and model, the delivery time for a large proportion has leveled off at three to six months,” says Marcus Weller, a market expert at the German Association of Motor Trades and Repairs. Where does the chip shortage come from? The global chip shortage is due to two factors: an intense increase in demand and an inflexible and complicated microchip supply structure. For example, the increase in demand is characterized by car manufacturers investing in the expansion of electric vehicles. Similarly, the demand for electronic devices increased sharply as a result of the global pandemic. This was driven by more home offices being created, and homeschooling. The supply of microchips is inflexible mainly due to the complexity of manufacturing. “In fact, chips today have structures that are often only a few atomic layers thick. Highly sensitive clean rooms are required to produce them. This makes manufacturing facilities enormously expensive and complex. It can cost several billion euros to build a semiconductor plant,” says FHTW expert Peter Rössler. It seems the chip shortage will continue. Chip production is even more time-consuming. A microchip consists of a ‘wafer.’ In semiconductor manufacturing, ‘wafers’ are the disks on which the integrated circuits, the microchips, are produced. Such wafers have a lead time of six weeks to three months in a semiconductor factory. What role does crypto mining play in the chip shortage? What impact crypto mining companies have on the global chip shortage is debatable. Clearly, it can be stated that it makes a difference what type of crypto mining is involved. Bitcoin miners use 5nm or 7nm chips, which are mainly needed for the production of smartphones. Currently, there’s no scientific data or study that reliably sheds light on Bitcoin mining’s share of the microchip shortage. Projections assume that Bitcoin mining takes up about 4-6% of 5nm to 7nm chip production. Ethereum mining relies on graphics cards that are also used for gaming. Estimates suggest that 19% of graphics processing units produced in 2020 were purchased by Ethereum miners. This has led to computing power on the Ethereum network being at an all-time high, currently >900 tH/second. Conclusion The impact of crypto mining on chip shortages is thus industry and currency-specific. While gaming PCs are strongly competing with Ethereum miners, the impact of Bitcoin mining on smartphone production seems to be rather limited. So, if the new iPhone is not found under the Christmas tree in time this year, Bitcoin is probably only partly to blame. Do you think Bitcoin miners are responsible for the chip shortage? Let us know here. The post Chip Shortage: My iPhone Won’t Arrive in Time for Christmas – are Bitcoin Miners to Blame? appeared first on BeInCrypto.
GBPUSD arouses interest, EURUSD is consolidating near June 2020's lows

GBPUSD arouses interest, EURUSD is consolidating near June 2020's lows

John Benjamin John Benjamin 23.12.2021 08:53
EURUSD tests resistance The US dollar stalled over improved risk appetite. The pair is consolidating near June 2020’s lows. A bearish breakout would further extend the downtrend. The euro so far has found buyers at 1.1235. The bulls need to lift offers around 1.1360, the upper band of the recent consolidation range, before they could hope for a reversal. An extended rally may send the price to 1.1460. In the meantime, the RSI’s overbought situation could briefly limit the bullish push as intraday traders take profit near the resistance. GBPUSD makes a bullish attempt The sterling surged after Britain’s economy showed solid growth in Q3. A previous rebound to the supply zone near 1.3370 has put pressure on the short side. Then the pound found bids at 1.3170. Four attempts at this key support suggest a strong interest in keeping the price steady. 1.3370 is a major hurdle as it coincides with the 30-day moving average. A breakout could initiate a bullish reversal and propel the pound to 1.3500. An overbought RSI may cause a short pullback with 1.3240 as the closest support. USOIL awaits breakout WTI crude found support from a larger-than-expected decline in US inventories. Price action saw active buying above 66.00, keeping the early December rally valid in the process. The latest rebound is testing the supply zone around 73.30, which sits along the 30-day moving average. A close above this area of interest would force the bears to cover, paving the way for a rally towards 78.00. On the downside, 71.00 is the immediate support. And 68.50 is a second line of defense in case of a deeper correction.
Negative balance - how much you can actually lose while trading

Negative balance - how much you can actually lose while trading

Finance Press Release Finance Press Release 29.12.2021 10:16
If traders do not properly set stop losses (as some do), their forex trading accounts may wind up with negative balances. Using Stop Loss and Margin Call levels, a forex trader may often avoid a negative balance. Stop losses may be triggered fast during periods of high volatility, resulting in a negative balance. Making a new deposit may help you recover your overdraft.   Negative balance FX protection is a safeguard that brokers use to protect their customers. Negative balance protection is provided when a trader's account balance becomes negative as a result of their trading activity, preventing them from losing more money than they deposited.   On January 15, 2015, the USDCHF plummeted 2780 pips in 30 minutes, putting my account in the red. When the Swiss National Bank removed the euro limit, the franc increased by 30%. Because my broker was unable to alter currency pairings, I used stop losses on all of my transactions. My trading account was losing money.   Foreign currency trading (Forex) is a risky endeavor since the value of various currencies fluctuates drastically owing to a number of factors. Despite the fact that most forex traders only trade with what they have, a negative balance in one's Forex account is not uncommon. On January 15, 2015, the Swiss National Bank (SNB) made an unexpected decision to remove the floor from the EUR/CHF currency pair. When the floor was raised, hundreds of live forex account balances turned negative, much to their amazement.   Many forex accounts had negative balances as a result of the SNB's decision to remove the floor. Changes in the volatility of a certain currency pair may have an impact on some trading systems. As long as there is a significant difference in the values of various currencies, the balance may go below zero. As a consequence, the phrase "negative balance" has become synonymous with currency trading. Despite the use of stop-out levels and margin calls, it is a difficulty that many forex traders face. Negative Balance Protection In Forex Is it possible to lose money while trading currencies? Because traders utilizing leverage may owe more than they have access to in their accounts, the likelihood of a negative balance grows. It's easy to be concerned about a currency account's negative balance from this vantage point.   If you want to avoid your forex trading account from sliding into the red, you must use a stop-loss order. Stop-Loss (SL) and Margin Call (MC) stops may be employed. Furthermore, certain brokerages, such as XM broker, give their clients accounts with negative balance protection. One example is the XM ultra low account, which does not charge traders commission costs. Aside from that, traders are permitted to employ the previously stated stop-loss order, which is often used by investors, to prevent negative balances on their accounts. In certain situations, brokers imposed a Margin Call limit, which meant that floating positions would be terminated at a loss if their expected losses exceeded a predefined limit.   Many forex traders ignore the MC limit for fear of losing their whole account. Even if you have Margin Call activated in your account settings, your account balance might still fall negative or be totally wiped out. Traders tend to ignore Stop Loss orders, despite the fact that they are a crucial risk-reduction instrument.   Traders may be certain that they will not go bankrupt if their forex trading account has a negative balance. If a margin call is made, a trader who is fast losing money may be able to avoid bankruptcy. When you get a margin call, you immediately close all of your open investments that are fast losing value. How To Prevent Negative Balance? A negative balance may be prevented in the first place, and it is possible to avoid it. You will not be asked to pay the negative amount if you have Negative Amount Protection, but your account will be reset to $0. To put it another way, you'll lose all you invested. In other words, why wait for the NBP to kick in when you can halt the loss immediately?   Consider the number of your holdings as well as the number of orders you make when making transactions. Because not all transactions are successful, the more you trade, the more likely you are to lose money. What's the harm in doing so if it allows you to better regulate your transaction and reduce your risk? In this instance, forex brokers' micro accounts, which often contain smaller bets, might be a viable option.   To keep your money in your account, you must create a reasonable stop loss barrier. As a result, the danger of market and price volatility is reduced.   The more leverage you have, the more money you will be able to get. You are, however, put at greater danger as a consequence of it. There are various techniques to reduce your stock market risk.   When the market is volatile, stop losses, margin calls, and stop-outs all fail. This tendency is typically triggered when news or events with a big influence on the market cause fear. Keep an eye on the economic calendar and avoid trading at particular times of the year.   Most forex brokers will announce and change leverage and margin requirements for certain instruments when a major event or news release is near. You should either stay out of the market or adjust your position as a consequence of this warning.
SAVILLS: PROPERTY MARKET HAS ADJUSTED TO THE NEW REALITY AND REGAINS MOMENTUM

SAVILLS: PROPERTY MARKET HAS ADJUSTED TO THE NEW REALITY AND REGAINS MOMENTUM

Finance Press Release Finance Press Release 15.12.2021 10:30
SAVILLS: PROPERTY MARKET HAS ADJUSTED TO THE NEW REALITY AND REGAINS MOMENTUM 14 December 2021 Real estate advisory firm Savills presents a preliminary summary of 2021 and predicts trends for the coming months. The commercial real estate market in Poland is regaining momentum but has changed significantly, reveals Savills. Key trends expected to dominate in the year ahead include rental growth, increasing ESG awareness and a focus on innovation. As expected, the vaccine roll-out has had a positive impact on the commercial property market in 2021. With investors remaining active, this year’s investment is likely to hit EUR 5 billion. Savills expects recent investment trends to continue and industrial assets to account for close to half of the total transaction volume by the end of the year. “Although the real estate market has undoubtedly bounced back in 2021, it has remained mired in uncertainty. In addition to concerns about the course of the pandemic, there were also geopolitical and economic risks. This did not however prevent tenants and investors from gradually resuming activity. Key metrics for the past 12 months illustrating investment volumes and office take-up are likely to remain close to last year’s levels amid a positive outlook for the future. A bright exception is the warehouse sector, which - undeterred by the pandemic - is already setting new highs. The commercial real estate market has adjusted to the new reality and is beginning to return to form,” says Tomasz Buras, CEO, Savills Poland. 2021 was the year of searching for an optimal work model on the office market. Many tenants decided to introduce a permanent hybrid scheme combining in-office work and working from home. According to Savills data, Poland’s total office stock topped 12,315,000 sq m. Flexible offices continued to gain traction with flexible office providers shifting their focus to expansion in regional cities. The Build-to-Rent (multifamily) sector is gradually gaining ground on the Polish market. According to Savills, at the end of 2021 there were close to 40 BtR developments in Poland. Projects that are currently under construction will soon double the stock of rental apartments. As high-tech and e-commerce companies continue to enjoy brisk expansion, these sectors are seeing their headcount grow. According to Savills, even though this has not translated directly into more demand for offices yet, there will be a growing requirement for modern housing as the trend of hybrid working intensifies. The online penetration rate (share of total retail sales) has risen from around 5% pre-pandemic to close to 9% in 2021. The development of omnichannel strategies combining online and offline shopping has gathered pace. The growth of e-commerce remains one of the key drivers of demand for logistics space. Retail has also seen the rise of dark stores - small in-town distribution centres helping shorten delivery times. In 2021, this format was launched in Poland, among others, by Å»abka. Such platforms are also operated by Lisek, Jokr and Swyft, while Biedronka has teamed up with Glovo. According to Savills, 2022 is expected to see another spike in construction costs and land prices, as well as an upward pressure on wages amid a risk of rising inflation. This will, first of all, push service charges up. Tenants will also be affected by exchange rate differences as euro-denominated rents remain a market standard. In addition, 2022 is likely to be the first year in many to witness warehouse and office rental rates go up. “There is potential for the investment market to see more buying in 2022. Investor demand for industrial assets will remain strong while the PRS will increase its market share. Several spectacular office projects are likely to change hands. Next year’s investment volume is expected to come close to pre-pandemic levels. Commercial real estate is considered a safe haven in times of high volatility on currency, stock exchange and bond markets, driving investor activity,” adds Tomasz Buras, Savills Poland. Next year is also shaping up to be a time when ESG strategies will begin to gain prominence on the real estate market. The importance of ESG is rising as a result of the European Union’s taxonomy, or the change of regulations on non-financial sustainability reporting and the entry into force of the CSRD, as well as tenants’ preferences. ESG is not only about a concern for the environment, but also for the human being. According to Savills, this will be visible on the warehouse market, where developers wanting to stand out will also begin to focus on the second social pillar of ESG, i.e. the human aspect, in addition to investing in energy efficiency. On the office market there will be marked differences between ESG compliant buildings and those whose owners will fail to take action in this period of change. Today, both older office buildings and properties in non-central locations are faced with refinancing challenges. Prospective buyers are, however, beginning to look for existing buildings with an intention to upgrade or sometimes repurpose them, or even to pull them down. This is true not only for office assets. Warehouse developers have also become keener to engage in brownfield projects in order to secure good locations. A dichotomy or division of properties into buildings that may soon have to be repurposed for lack of other options and those that have been upgraded will become visible for example in Warsaw’s SÅ‚użewiec district. Office buildings in that area meeting high standards will be able to attract cost-sensitive tenants with an opportunity to bring rents down. Such buildings may, therefore, become the big winners of the pandemic, says Savills. In 2022, the Warsaw office market is likely to begin to slowly switch to a landlord’s market. The office development pipeline is currently at its lowest in 10 years. Savills forecasts that as office buildings whose construction began before the pandemic are gradually filling up with tenants, the second half of the year may see the first signs of an undersupply and landlords gaining the upper hand in negotiations. This trend is already apparent in prime office buildings in Warsaw. Another top trend for 2022 according to Savills is innovation comprising the implementation of new technologies in real estate (proptech) and the use of big data in property management. The drive towards more automation is expected in manufacturing facilities, office buildings and autonomous retail stores. Looking ahead, modern data analytics tools will be used for a growing number of tasks in property management and valuation.
Financial Sector May Rally 11% - 15% Higher Before End Of January 2022

Financial Sector May Rally 11% - 15% Higher Before End Of January 2022

Chris Vermeulen Chris Vermeulen 11.12.2021 10:25
The financial sector is poised for a very strong rally into the end of 2021, and early 2022 as revenues and earnings for Q4:2021 should continue to drive an upward price trend. The US Federal Reserve is keeping interest rates low. At the same time, the US consumer continues to drive home purchases and holiday shopping. Strong economic data should drive Q4 results for the financial sector close to levels we saw in Q3:2021. If that happens, we may see a robust rally in the US Financial sector over the next 45 to 60+ days. The strength of the recent rally in the US major indexes shows just how powerful the bullish trend bias is right now. Some traders focus on the downside risks associated with the US Federal Reserve actions and/or the concerns related to inflation and global markets. I, however, continue to focus on the strength in the US major indexes and various sector trends that show real opportunities for profits. Comparing Sector Strength The following two US market sector charts highlight the performance over the last 12 vs. 24 months. I want readers to pay attention to how flat the Financial Sector has stayed since just before the 2020 COVID event and how the Financial Sector has started to trend higher over the past 12 months. This is because the shock of COVID briefly disrupted consumer activity. Yet, consumers are coming back strong, driving retail sales, home sales, and the continued strong US economic data. Therefore, it makes sense that the Financial sector should continue to show firm revenue and earnings growth while the US consumer is active and spending. Sign up for my free trading newsletter so you don’t miss the next opportunity! Over the past two years, Discretionary, Technology, and Materials drove market growth compared to other sectors. Remember, the initial COVID virus event disrupted market sector trends over the last 24+ months. (Source: StockChart.com) Taking a look at this 1 Year US Market Sector chart shows how various sectors have rebounded and how the Discretionary and Materials sectors have flattened/weakened. Pay attention to how the Energy and Real Estate sectors have been over the past 12 months. Also, pay attention to how the Financial sector is strengthening. I believe that the continued deflation/deleveraging that is taking place throughout most of the world will continue to drive global central banks to stay relatively neutral regarding rising interest rates. This will likely prompt an easy money policy throughout most of 2022 and drive continued revenues/earnings for sectors associated with consumers' engagement with the economy. If inflation weakens into 2022 while wage and jobs data stays strong, we may see more moderate strength in the Financial, Healthcare, Discretionary, and Technology sectors over the next 6 to 12+ months. Read more about Global Deleveraging Here: Delivering Covid Bubble Possible Volatility Risks In Foreign Markets (Source: StockChart.com) Financials May Pop 11% Or More Over The Next 6+ Months This Weekly IYG, IShares US Financial Service ETF, highlights the recent sideways price trend in the Financial sector and the potential for a 9% to 13% rally that may take place as the markets shift into focus for the Q4:2021 earnings. Yes, inflation is still a concern, but as long as the US consumer continues spending and engaging in the economy, the Financial Services and US Banks should show strong returns. If the US markets rally into the end of 2021, possibly reaching new all-time highs again, this trend may carry well into 2022 and drive Q4:2021 and Q1:2022 revenues and earnings for the Financial sector even higher. This Weekly XLF chart shows a very similar setup to IYG. I firmly believe the recent fear in the markets related to the US Federal Reserve, the new COVID variants, and the global markets deleveraging process is missing one critical component – the strength of the US markets and the strength of the US Dollar. As the rest of the world struggles to find support and economic strength, the US markets continue to rebound on the strength of the US consumer, the recovering economy, and the growth of these sectors. As long as the US Federal Reserve does not disrupt this trend, I believe Q1:2022 could be much more robust than many people consider. I also think the deflation/deleveraging process will work to take the pressures away from recent inflation trends. What could this mean for 2022? Early 2022 may well work as a "rebalancing" process for the global markets – possibly taking the pressures away from the strength in energy, commodities, and staple products/materials. This means pricing pressures will decrease while consumers are still earning and spending. The Financial sector should benefit from these trends over the next 6+ months. Watch for the Financials to start to increase throughout the end of 2021 and into early 2022. There are many ways to consider trading this move, but ideally, I think the rally will take place before the end of February 2022. Q1 is usually relatively strong, so that this trend may last well into April/May 2022. It all depends on what happens that could disrupt the current market sector trends. If nothing happens to disrupt the strength of the US Dollar and the strength of the US markets, then I believe the Financial Sector has a very strong opportunity for at least 10% to 11% growth. Want to learn more about the potential for a financial sector rally? Learn how I use specific tools to help me understand price cycles, set-ups, and price target levels. Over the next 12 to 24+ months, I expect very large price swings in the US stock market and other asset classes across the globe. I believe the markets are starting to transition away from the continued central bank support rally phase and may start a revaluation phase as global traders attempt to identify the next big trends. Precious Metals will likely start to act as a proper hedge as caution and concern start to drive traders/investors into Metals. If you need technically proven trading and investing strategies using ETFs to profit during market rallies and to avoid/profit from market declines, be sure to join me at TEP - Total ETF Portfolio. Have a great day! Chris VermeulenChief Market Strategist
2022 and Gold

2022 and Gold

Arkadiusz Sieron Arkadiusz Sieron 30.12.2021 17:54
  2021 was bad for gold. Unfortunately, 2022 doesn’t look any better, especially at the beginning. The end, however, gives the yellow metal some hope… Bye, bye 2021! It definitely wasn’t a year of gold. As the chart below shows, the yellow metal lost 5% of its value over the last twelve months, declining from $1,887.60 on December 30, 2020, to $1,794.25 on December 29, 2021. Thus, the gold bulls won’t miss 2021, I guess. What about me? Well, I correctly predicted in January that “gold’s performance in 2021 could be worse than last year”. However, I expected more bullish behavior. I thought that rising inflation would be more supportive of gold prices. I’m fully aware that gold is not a perfect inflation hedge, but historical analysis suggests that high and accelerating inflation should be positive for gold prices. After all, inflation lowers the real interest rates, the key fundamental factor in the gold market. However, rising inflation has prompted the Fed to tighten its monetary policy and speed up the tapering of its quantitative easing. Expectations of hikes in the federal funds rate in 2022 also strengthened. In consequence, as the chart below shows, bond yields rose, especially those short- and medium-term, creating downward pressure on gold prices. Thus, we’ve learned two important lessons in 2021: don’t just count on inflation, and don’t fight with the (hawkish) Fed. As you can see, bond yields haven’t returned to their pre-pandemic level yet. Although they don’t have to fully recover, they do have room for further increases. The issue here is that when inflation peaks and disinflation starts, inflation expectations could decline, boosting the real interest rates. Actually, market-based inflation expectations already peaked in November, as shown in the chart below. This indicates that worries about inflation had calmed and investors had regained some confidence in the US central bank’s ability to contain upward price pressure.   Implications for Gold Will 2022 be better for gold than 2021? It’s possible, but I’m not an optimist. I mean here: macroeconomic conditions will turn more bearish for gold. Despite the spreading of Omicron variant of coronavirus, 2022 could mark the end of the global Covid-19 epidemic with a full economic recovery and a return to normal conditions. Fiscal policy will tighten, while the Fed will adopt a more hawkish monetary policy than in 2021. Supply shocks are easing, so inflation may peak, while real interest rates go up further. Moreover, the US dollar may strengthen against the euro, as the ECB is slower with its monetary policy tightening. On the other hand, there are also some factors that could support gold prices. In 2021, GDP rebounded greatly after the economic crisis of 2020, and financial markets also recovered robustly. 2022 may be more challenging for economic growth and the financial sector, though. One thing is the base effect, while another is central banks’ policy normalization and rising interest rates. With massive public and private debts, the Fed’s tightening cycle could deflate asset and credit bubbles and even trigger a recession, or at least a market correction. However, there are no signs of market stress yet, so a financial crisis is not in my baseline scenario for the next year. 2023 (or even later) is a more probable timeframe. Hence, I believe that the end of 2022 may be better for gold than the beginning of the year, as mere expectations of the Fed’s tightening cycle could be replaced by worries about the consequences of interest rate hikes. Anyway, 2021 is (almost) dead. Long live 2022! I wish you a return to normalcy, shining profits and all the golden next year! If you enjoyed today’s free gold report, we invite you to check out our premium services. We provide much more detailed fundamental analyses of the gold market in our monthly Gold Market Overview reports and we provide daily Gold & Silver Trading Alerts with clear buy and sell signals. In order to enjoy our gold analyses in their full scope, we invite you to subscribe today. If you’re not ready to subscribe yet though and are not on our gold mailing list yet, we urge you to sign up. It’s free and if you don’t like it, you can easily unsubscribe. Sign up today! Arkadiusz Sieron, PhDSunshine Profits: Effective Investment through Diligence & Care
USDCHF tests daily support, AUDUSD consolidates gains, EURGBP falls below daily support

USDCHF tests daily support, AUDUSD consolidates gains, EURGBP falls below daily support

John Benjamin John Benjamin 03.01.2022 09:59
USDCHF tests daily support The US dollar softens over increased risk appetite. A drop below the lower band of the consolidation range at 0.9160 confirms a lack of interest in the greenback. The pair is testing the major demand zone around 0.9100 from the daily chart. A bearish breakout could jeopardize the pair’s rebound over the past quarter. It could also trigger a sell-off towards the psychological level of 0.9000. The bulls may be tempted to buy the dip. 0.9180 would be the first resistance to lift before they could turn the downbeat inertia around. AUDUSD consolidates gains The Australian dollar finds support from rising commodity prices. A bullish MA cross on the daily chart indicates improvement in underlying sentiment. The former supply zone between 0.7210 and 0.7220 has turned into a demand zone. Buyers may be eager to join the rally after the RSI returned to the neutrality area. 0.7290 is a fresh resistance, and a combination of profit-taking and fresh selling could temporarily weigh on the Aussie. 0.7120 is a second line of defense in case of a deeper retracement. EURGBP falls below daily support The pound outperforms the euro over diverging monetary policies. The break below the daily support at 0.8380 is an invalidation of the rebound in late November. The RSI’s repeatedly oversold situation has attracted some buying interest, but not enough to sustain a meaningful bounce. 0.8420 is now a fresh resistance. And only its breach could prompt sellers to cover. On the downside, 0.8365 is a fragile support. A breakout would further deteriorate sentiment and send the euro to February 2020’s lows near 0.8280.
Quiet Start to New Year

Quiet Start to New Year

Marc Chandler Marc Chandler 03.01.2022 14:10
January 03, 2022  $USD, autos, Canada, China, Currency Movement, Inflation, jobs, Mexico, PMI, Trade Overview:  The New Year begins slowly.  Japan, mainland China, Australia, New Zealand, and the UK markets remain closed.  While Hong Kong shares traded heavily, Taiwan, South Korea, and India moved higher.  Led by consumer discretionary and staple sectors, Europe's Stoxx 600 is up about 0.6%.  US futures are 0.4%-0.6% higher.  European yields have drifted lower, with the periphery doing bettter than the core.   The US 10-year yield will begin the local session at 1.51%.  The dollar is mostly firmer, after weakening broadly at the end of last year.   The Norwegian krone and New Zealand dollar are the most resilient,  while the Canadian dollar is off nearly 0.3% to pare the year-end gains, followed by the euro, which is in the middle of its $1.1335-$1.1380 range.  The greenback is holding above JPY115.00.  Emerging market currencies are mixed but mostly softer.  Higher than expected inflation is weighing on the Turkish lira. The South Korean won leads the other softer EM currencies. It is off about 0.25%.  The South African rand (~0.7%) and Russian ruble (0.5%) lead the advancers.  The JP Morgan Emerging Market Currency Index rose by about 2.5% in the last two weeks of 2021 and is slightly firmer today (~0.2%).  Iron ore is higher for the third consecutive session and rallied more than 45% from the middle of November through Xmas, before falling 5.3% last week.  Copper has a four-week 4.6% rally in tow but is slightly softer today.  Gold is stalling near $1830, the (61.8%) retracement of its sell-off from $1880 mid-November high.  Oil rallied for the last two weeks, with February WTI gaining about 6.2%.  OPEC+ meets tomorrow and WTI is up a nearly 1.5% to push above $76.  US natural gas gained slightly more than 1% in the past two weeks and is hovering around little changed level.  Recall that diverted shipments from the US and Asia to Europe saw natural gas prices collapse from above 180 euros on December 21 to 65.5 euros at the end of last week.   Asia Pacific China's property developers remain in the spotlight. Bloomberg estimates that the sector's debt servicing costs, including deferred wages, and maturing obligations are at $197 bln this month.  Evergrande shares were suspended in Hong Kong.  When the problems, bubbling below the surface for some time, emerged last September, global risk appetites were shaken, and many observers made comparisons to the Great Financial Crisis.  However, so far, the problems seem localized and unlike the US and Europe, new lending has not frozen.   The macro data highlights include China's Caixin PMI after the official one surprised on the upside. The preliminary PMIs for Australia and Japan steal the thunder from the final report. Japan's weekly MOF report on portfolio flows may be noteworthy. Foreign investors have been on a buying spree, buying the most Japanese bonds over the first three weeks of December in at least 20 years.   The dollar has risen for the past four weeks against the Japanese yen.  It closed the last two sessions slightly above JPY115.00 and remains above it today.  Recall, last year's high, set in late November, was near JPY115.50.  Today's high thus far is about JPY115.35.  The market may be reluctant to push the dollar much higher before Tokyo returns.  The Australian dollar advanced almost 2% in the second half of December.  It is stalling near the (50%) retracement of its decline from around $0.7555 in late October, found close to $0.7275.  Support is ahead of $0.7200.  Thin trading on New Year's Eve saw the dollar plunge to its low for the year near CNY6.34 before settling slightly above CNY6.3560.  Chinese officials have signaled their desire to avoid further yuan appreciation. If the divergence of monetary policy and higher fx reserve requirements are not sufficient, investors must be wary that other tools can be deployed.   Europe The uptick in Germany's December manufacturing PMI was revised away, leaving it unchanged from November at 57.4.  The flash estimate put it at 57.9.  In contrast, the French reading was revised up to 55.6 from 54.9.  This pared the decline from 55.9 in November.   Italy's manufacturing PMI held in better than expected, slipping to 62.0 from 62.8, the post-Covid high.  Spain, on the other hand, disappointed, with its manufacturing PMI falling to 56.2 from 57.1, its lowest since last February.  The net result was the flash aggregate estimate of 58.0 was sustained (58.4 in November).   The final Eurozone aggregate PMI is of passing interest. The main takeaway from the preliminary estimate continues to resonate:  the economic activity was slowing. The flash estimate put the composite at 53.4 (down from 55.4), the lowest since March. It has risen once in the last five months. More notable for the market will be the preliminary estimate of December inflation. Consumer prices are expected to have stabilized after reaching 4.9% year-over-year in November (2.6% core).   The Turkish government has tried to absorb the currency-risk that it has unleashed by forcing the central bank to cut key interest rates by 500 bp since mid-September.  It managed to spur a powerful short-covering squeeze in the lira, which saw the dollar fall from around TRY18.36 on December 20 to nearly TRY10.25 on December 23.  The greenback recovered to nearly TRY14.00 today, its sixth consecutive advance.  Today's CPI report blew away expectations.  Just in the month of December, Turkish consumer prices jumped nearly 13.6%.  This sent the year-over-year rate to almost 36.1%.  The core rate rose about 31.9% year-over-year.  Short covering helped lifted the euro a little more than 1.1% over the past two weeks.  It reached about $1.1385 on New Year's Eve.  It has not traded above $1.14 since mid-February.  Ahead of this week's two key economic reports (EMU CPI and US employment), the market may not have the conviction necessary to extend its year-end gains.  Sterling gained about 2.1% in the last two weeks.  It reached $1.3550 at the end of last week, its best level since mid-November.  It is little changed today.  The $1.3575 area corresponds to the (50%) retracement of its sell-off from $1.3835 area in late October.  Initial support is seen in the $1.3455-$1.3465 area.   America The US economic diary is jammed packed to begin the New Year. The highlight is the jobs report at the end of the week. The median forecast (Bloomberg survey) calls for a 400k increase after being disappointed with the 210k increase in November. The unemployment rate is expected to ease to 4.1% from 4.2%, and average earnings growth likely moderated. At the end of last year, an article in the Financial Times made two important observations. First, the uniqueness of the covid-impact renders seasonal adjustments suspect. The response rate was less than two-thirds, the lowest for the month of November in more than a decade. In November, the raw establishment survey showed a 778k gain in nonfarm payrolls, but the BLS adjustment cut a record 568k. Second, also complicating the data is the participation by businesses. The response rate was less than two-thirds, the lowest for the month of November in more than a decade.   The monthly auto sales report seems under-appreciated as a broad economic indicator. The supply chain disruptions depressed auto production and, in turn, auto consumption (not just in the US). However, late in the year, there seemed to be some improvement. The median forecast (Bloomberg survey) December US auto sales (seasonally adjusted annual rate) at 13.1 mln, which would then be the most since July. Elsewhere, the preliminary goods trade balance, like the flash PMI, is the real new news. The final reading tends not to be very meaningful. In any event, the trade deficit will widen considerably. The goods deficit widened to a record $97.8 bln from $83.2 bln.   Lastly, the FOMC minutes will be looked at especially for clues about the timing of the first hike. March? It is unreasonable to expect Canada to match the nearly 154k job increase reported for November. The median forecast is 25k. Canada also reports November trade figures. Canada's trade balance has steadily improved since March 2020, and the 12-month moving average through October was the highest in around six years. The swaps market has a little more than half of the first hike (25 bp) priced in at the January 26 Bank of Canada meeting.   Mexico's data highlights include worker remittances, which could be the most important source of private capital inflows. Without meaningful fiscal support and in the face of tightening monetary policy, the economy lacks much momentum. The December CPI is expected to have edged higher toward 7.5%. Monetary policy is where the drama will be as the new central bank governor takes the reins (Rodriguez). The 50 bp hike in December lifted the overnight target to 5.5%. If the market is concerned about a policy mistake or possible erosion of its independence, you would not know it from looking at the peso. It was the strongest currency in the world in December, rising almost 4.5% against the dollar.   The Canadian dollar rallied about 2% over the past two weeks.  This saw the US dollar retrace half of its rally from the mid-October low below CAD1.23 that peaked on December 20 by CAD1.2965.  That retracement came it near CAD1.2625.  The momentum indicators are still headed down, but the greenback is recovering today.  Initial resistance is seen around CAD1.2700.  A move above CAD1.2750 warns that a low may be in place.  The Mexican peso has rallied for the past five weeks, and despite the poor close at the end of the year, it is bid today.  The US dollar was sold from near MXN20.55 to MXN20.45 in the European morning but has found a bid near midday.  The low from New Year's Eve was set around MXN20.3070 and the 200-day moving average is closer to MXN20.27.    Disclaimer
Can't skip S&P 500 (SPX) and Nasdaq

Can't skip S&P 500 (SPX) and Nasdaq

Monica Kingsley Monica Kingsley 04.01.2022 15:53
Very good S&P 500 entry to 2022, and the HYG intraday reversal is the sight to rejoice. In the sea of rising yields, both tech and value managed to do well – the market breadth keeps improving as not only the ratio of stocks trading above their 200-day moving averages shows. Likewise VIX refused to reach even 19, and instead is attacking 16.50. This is not complacency – the bulls were thoroughly shaken at the entry to the session yesterday – but a buying interest that convincingly turned the tide during the day. As I wrote yesterday: (…) thanks to the credit markets message, I‘m not reading into Friday‘s weakness much. There is still more in this rally – value held better than tech, and high yield corporate bonds didn‘t really slide. The year end rebalancing will likely give way to solid Monday‘s performance. While VIX appears to want to move up from the 17 level, it would probably take more than one day to play out. As the Santa Claus rally draws to its close, the nearest data point worth looking forward for, is Tuesday‘s ISM Manufacturing PMI. It‘ll likely show still expanding manufacturing (however challenged GDP growth is on a quarterly basis), and that would help commodities deal with the preceding downswing driven by energy and agrifoods. Both of these sectors are likely to return to gains, and especially oil is. The only sector taking a beating yesterday, were precious metals. While inflation expectations were little changed (don‘t look for inflation to go away any time soon as I‘ve been making the case repeatedly), the daily rise in yields propelled the dollar to reverse Friday‘s decline, and that knocked both gold and silver off the high perch they closed at last week. Still, none of the fundamental or monetary with fiscal policy originating reasoning has been invalidated – not even the charts were damaged badly by Monday‘s weakness. As economic growth gets questioned while fiscal policy remains expansive unlike the monetary one, volatily in the stock market together with persistent inflation would be putting a nice floor beneath the metals. Even cryptos are refusing to yield much ground, the Ethereum to Bitcoin ratio keeps trading positively, and I‘m not even talking the rubber band that commodities (crude oil and copper) are. Very good for our open positions there, as much as in the S&P 500 – let them keep bringing profits. Let‘s move right into the charts (all courtesy of www.stockcharts.com). S&P 500 and Nasdaq Outlook Really bullish price action in both S&P 500 and Nasdaq – that was the entry to 2022 I was looking for. Embellished with prior downswing that lends more credibility to the intraday reversal. Credit Markets HYG refusing to decline more, is the most bullish sign for today imaginable – let it hold, for junk bonds now hold the key, especially if quality debt instruments keep declining steeply. Gold, Silver and Miners Gold and silver look to have reversed, but reaching such a conclusion would be premature. The long basing pattern goes on, and breakout higher would follow once the Fed‘s attempting to take the punch bowl away inflicts damage on the real economy (and markets), which is what the yield curve compression depicts. Crude Oil Crude oil is about to launch higher – and it‘s not a matter of solid oil stocks performance only. Just look at the volume – it didn‘t disappoint, and in the risk-on revival that I expect for today, black gold would benefit. Copper Copper swooned, but regained composure – the stop run is over, and we‘re back to base building for the coming upswing. Broader commodities certainly agree. Bitcoin and Ethereum Bitcoin and Ethereum are very gently leaning bullish, but I‘m not sounding the all clear there yet thanks to how long Bitcoin is dillydallying. Cryptos aren‘t yet out of the woods, but their posture has improved thus far noticeably. Summary First trading day of 2022 extended prior S&P 500 gains, and the risk-on appetite is improving as we speak. Commodities are reaping the rewards, and we‘re looking at another good day ahead, including in precious metals taking a bite at yesterday‘s inordinately large downswing. Nothing of the big factors ahead for Q1 2022 as described in today‘s analysis (I wholeheartedly recommend reading it in full for the greatest benefits – there is only so much / little that I can fit into a one paragraph summary), and that means we‘re looking at further stock market gains as the bull runs (including in commodities and precious metals, yes precious metals), aren‘t over in the least. Thank you for having read today‘s free analysis, which is available in full at my homesite. There, you can subscribe to the free Monica‘s Insider Club, which features real-time trade calls and intraday updates for all the five publications: Stock Trading Signals, Gold Trading Signals, Oil Trading Signals, Copper Trading Signals and Bitcoin Trading Signals.
Considering Portfolios In Times Of, Among Others, Inflation...

Dollar Eases

Marc Chandler Marc Chandler 05.01.2022 13:19
January 05, 2022  $USD, auto sales, Currency Movement, Omicron, PMI, technology Overview:  The tech sell-off in the US yesterday, ostensibly driven by higher rates, carried over into trading today.  South Korea, China, and Hong Kong led the regional sell-off.  News that China's zero Covid tolerance led to a lockdown of the city of Xian with a population of around 13 mln played on fears of more supply chain disruptions.  A second city, Yuzhou, considerably smaller, has also been lockdown.  Japan, India, and several smaller markets gain.  European bourses, where tech is less prominent have edged higher and the Stoxx 600 is extending its gain for the third consecutive session.  US futures are softer.  Asia and most European bonds yields have risen today, while the US 10-year is steady around 1.64%.  Of note, with Italian politics rising as an issue ahead of the presidential contest later this month, maybe helping lift the 10-year BTP to new six-month highs near 1.22%.  The US dollar is seeing its recent gains trimmed against the major currencies.  The Japanese yen is recovering a little after falling to five-year lows yesterday.  The Canadian dollar is the laggard today, amid a sell-off in its bonds.   The emerging market currency complex is mixed, and the JP Morgan EM FX index is recouping about half of yesterday's 0.35% loss.  Gold is firm but remains within Monday's range (~$1798.50-$1832). Among the industrial metals we monitor, iron ore bounced back after yesterday's minor loss and is at its best level since Xmas eve.  Copper is being turned back after yesterday's rally stalled near the $448 cap.  Crude oil is consolidating yesterday's gain and February WTI is near $77.00.  US LNG firm but within the $3.50-$4.00 range, while European (Dutch) is extending yesterday's dramatic gain (31.6%). Asia Pacific While China has moved quickly to impose lockdowns where cases of the virus appear, the tech sector is off to a poor start.  The Heng Seng Tech Index fell 4.6% today, the most since July, and the third consecutive drop.  Tencent is reducing its investments, and this took a toll on companies it backed.  Some link Tencent decision to Beijing's push against anti-competitive practices.  The NASDAQ Golden Dragon Index, which tracks Chinese lists companies fell 4.3% yesterday.  The tech sell-off was also clear in the US where the NASDAQ shed 1.3%.   Japan's "Mothers" gauge weighted toward small and medium-sized software and technology companies fell 5% to its lowest level since May 2020.  In the last hours of trading, after HK tightened social restrictions, the equity loss intensified.   Japan reported that December auto sales were 10.2% lower than a year ago.  Yesterday, the US reported disappointing December auto sales.  Auto sales were expected to have risen to their best level since August but instead fell to a 12.44 mln unit annual pace.  It was the lowest since September and reflects a 23.6% decline from December 2020.  Last year, US auto sales averaged 14.93 mln a month compared with 14.41 mln in 2020 and 16.91 mln in 2019.  Although supply is argued to be a bigger problem than demand, some producers, like GM, have reported a substantial rebuilding of inventories.   The dollar closed above JPY116.00 yesterday but has failed to sustain the upside momentum.  It peaked near JPY116.35 and is approaching support at the previous resistance around JPY115.50.  A break of JPY115.00, which seems unlikely ahead of the US jobs data on Friday, would lend credence to the idea that it was a false breakout.  The Australian dollar is firm near $0.7250 after recovering from the dip below $0.7200.  Still, it needs to resurface above $0.7275-$0.7280 to be notable.  We suspect the Aussie will pullback in North America and see initial support around $0.7220.  Outside of the dramatic year-end session, the Chinese yuan continues to trade quietly in a well-worn range.  The dollar continues to trade mostly between CNY6.3660 and CNY6.3830.  The PBOC set the dollar's reference rate at CNY6.3779.  The (Bloomberg) survey found a median expectation for CNY6.3773.  Note that offshore yuan (CNH) swaps/forward points are at their lowest level since April 2020 amid reports that overseas branches of state-owned banks are continuing to lend out CNH.  Lastly, we note that the China Securities Journal plays up the possibility that the PBOC eases policy ahead of the Spring Festival holiday (January 31).   Europe The main economic news from the eurozone today is the final reading of the December service and composite PMI.  The takeaway is that it is a little softer than the preliminary estimate.  On the aggregate level, the service PMI eased to 53.1 from 53.3 flash estimate and 55.9 in November.  The composite eased from 55.4 in November to 53.4 preliminary estimate and 53.3 final.  It is the lowest since March and is the fourth decline in five months.  While the German services PMI was revised higher, it remains below 50 boom/bust (48.7) and this coupled with the weakness in manufacturing saw the composite revised to 49.9 from 50.0 initially and 52.2 in November.  It is the weakest composite reading since June 2020.   France's service PMI slipped to 57.0 from the 57.1 flash reading and 57.4 in November.  The composite was revised higher to 55.8 from 55.6.  It stood at 56.1 previously.  Italy and Spain disappointed with readings of both the service and composite below expectations.  The Italian composite stands at 54.7 down from 57.6.  Spain's composite is at 55.4 from 57.6 in November.   Intervention by the Swiss National Bank draws attention as the euro traded at six-year lows at the end of last year.  Sight deposits rose by CHF3.37 bln in December after CHF2.27 bln and CHF2.57 bln in November and October, respectively.  Overall, sight deposits rose by CHF18.85 bln in 2021 after surging CHF119.3 bln in 2020.  Denmark also anchors its monetary policy in the exchange rate peg to the euro.  Its central bank sold DKK47 bln (~$7.1 bln) in December to defend the peg.  It was the largest intervention in seven years.  Although inflation is running a little below 4%, there is some speculation that the Danish central bank may have to cut rates as its next defense of the peg.   The euro is trading inside yesterday's (~$1.1270-$1.1320) range.  It is difficult for bulls or bears to find much to like with it hovering around the middle of the two-cent range that has confined it for nearly two months.  The 480 mln euro option at $1.1290 that expires today has likely been neutralized, but there are options at $1.1275 for 1.3 bln euros that expires tomorrow that may be in play still.  Sterling is steady at the upper end of yesterday's range when it briefly poked above $1.3555.  It is the highest it has been since November 10.  An option for GBP375 mln at $1.3505 expires tomorrow.  Initial support is seen near $1.3520, and a break could test support in the $1.3480-$1.3500 area.   America ADP 's private sector jobs estimate is the early feature in the US today.  The median estimate (Bloomberg survey) is for an increase of 410k after 534k in November.  The final PMI will likely draw little attention.  The FOMC minutes from last month's meeting, at which officials announced the acceleration of tapering will be looked upon for insight into the Fed's balance sheet and any signal that it may allow maturing issues to roll-off soon.  Besides the rate hikes, for which the market has priced in three this year, the balance sheet is quickly emerging as the new focus.   Also, on tap today is the EIA inventory data.  The API reportedly showed a large rise in gasoline inventories but another drop (6.4 mln barrels) in crude stocks.   Canada's build permits are not typically a market mover.  Tomorrow it reports the November trade balance, and the highlight is Friday's jobs data.  It is difficult to envision a report as strong as November’s nearly 154k increase.  Proportionately, it would be as if the US nonfarm payrolls rose by around 1.7 mln.  Mexico reports December domestic auto sales.  In November, its auto sales were off about 13.5% year-over-year.  The highlight of the week is Friday's CPI figures.  The year-over-year pace is expected to have edged up from 7.37% in November.   The US dollar is trading inside yesterday's range against the Canadian dollar (~CAD1.2665-CAD1.2765), which was inside Monday's range (~CAD1.2630-CAD1.2780).  It is trading around CAD1.2720 near midday in London.  The intraday technical indicators seem to favor a retest of the greenback's highs.  The US dollar's performance against the Mexican peso is similar.  It is inside yesterday's range, which was inside Monday's range (~MXN20.41-MXN20.65).  The US dollar looks soft and could test the December 31 low near MXN20.33.   The 200-day moving average is near MXN20.27 and the greenback has not traded below it in a little more than two months.    Disclaimer
Gold and silver - The beginning of the year 2022 may not satisfy

Gold and silver - The beginning of the year 2022 may not satisfy

Przemysław Radomski Przemysław Radomski 04.01.2022 16:10
  Gold, silver, and mining stocks started 2022 with a bang. However, this wasn’t the kind of fireworks investors were hoping for. While gold, silver, and mining stocks partied hard into year-end, the trio woke up to massive hangovers on Jan. 3. Although I’ve been warning for some time that mining stocks would stumble in 2021, the New Year is still filled with old problems. For example, the GDX ETF has been making lower lows and lower highs for months, and when its RSI (Relative Strength Index) approaches 70, the senior miners often run out of gas. For context, I highlighted the events with the blue vertical dashed lines below. Moreover, with the senior miners’ current price action following the ominous paths of 2000, 2008, and 2013, and their stochastic indicator still signaling overbought conditions, Monday’s weakness may be a sign of things to come. Please see below: Please also consider the implications of year-end tax-loss harvesting. With the general stock market rallying to start the New Year, losing positions that were sold to offset capital gains near the end of 2021 were likely repurchased on Jan. 3. However, gold, silver, and mining stocks didn’t benefit from the phenomenon. As a result, while the GDX ETF may have outperformed gold, the relative strength was immaterial within the overall picture. Turning to the HUI Index’s long-term chart, the same bearish forecast is present. For example, I marked the specific tops with red and black arrows. In the current situation, we saw yet another small move up, but that’s most likely because price moves are now less volatile. The areas marked with red ellipses remain similar and show back-and-forth movement before the big decline. As a result, we’ve entered a consolidation phase, and the implications are not bullish, but bearish. Making three of a kind, the GDXJ ETF’s corrective upswing has likely run its course. Interestingly, the junior miners’ current rally mirrors the small correction that materialized in mid-2021. Back then, the GDXJ ETF rallied on low volume and didn’t recapture its 50-day moving average. With the same tepid strength present today, the drawdown that followed in mid-2021 will likely commence once again. On top of that, the behavior of the GDXJ ETF’s RSI is also similar – with the indicator moving from roughly 30 to 50. For context, I highlighted the similarities with green and purple ellipses below. Also noteworthy, similar developments occurred in February/March 2020, before the profound plunge unfolded. As a result, the GDXJ ETF looks set for another sharp drawdown over the medium term and predicting higher prices might be misleading. Finally, while my short position in the GDXJ ETF proved quite prescient in 2021, the junior miners continue to underperform the senior miners. With the GDX/GDXJ ratio likely to confront new lows in the coming months, the GDXJ ETF should remain a material laggard in 2022. In conclusion, gold, silver, and mining stocks started off 2022 with a bang. However, it wasn’t the kind of fireworks that investors were hoping for. With each new celebration shorter in magnitude, it’s likely only a matter of time before their parties are canceled. As a result, the precious metals still confront the same bearish technical outlooks that plagued them in 2021. While mean reversion remains undefeated over the long term, the wait may prove longer than many expect. Thank you for reading our free analysis today. Please note that the above is just a small fraction of today’s all-encompassing Gold & Silver Trading Alert. The latter includes multiple premium details such as the targets for gold and mining stocks that could be reached in the next few weeks. If you’d like to read those premium details, we have good news for you. As soon as you sign up for our free gold newsletter, you’ll get a free 7-day no-obligation trial access to our premium Gold & Silver Trading Alerts. It’s really free – sign up today. Przemyslaw Radomski, CFAFounder, Editor-in-chiefSunshine Profits: Effective Investment through Diligence & Care * * * * * All essays, research and information found above represent analyses and opinions of Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA and Sunshine Profits' associates only. As such, it may prove wrong and be subject to change without notice. Opinions and analyses are based on data available to authors of respective essays at the time of writing. Although the information provided above is based on careful research and sources that are deemed to be accurate, Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA and his associates do not guarantee the accuracy or thoroughness of the data or information reported. The opinions published above are neither an offer nor a recommendation to purchase or sell any securities. Mr. Radomski is not a Registered Securities Advisor. By reading Przemyslaw Radomski's, CFA reports you fully agree that he will not be held responsible or liable for any decisions you make regarding any information provided in these reports. Investing, trading and speculation in any financial markets may involve high risk of loss. Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA, Sunshine Profits' employees and affiliates as well as members of their families may have a short or long position in any securities, including those mentioned in any of the reports or essays, and may make additional purchases and/or sales of those securities without notice.
Will 2022~23 Require Different Strategies For TradersInvestors Part II

Will 2022~23 Require Different Strategies For TradersInvestors Part II

Chris Vermeulen Chris Vermeulen 06.01.2022 00:19
Is The Lazy-Bull Strategy Worth Considering? Part III started this article by highlighting how difficult some 2021 strategies seemed for many Hedge Funds and Professional Traders. It appears the extreme market volatility throughout 2021 took a toll on many systems and strategies. I wouldn't be surprised to see various sector ETFs and Sector Mutual Funds up 15% to 20% or more for 2021 while various Hedge Funds struggle with annual returns between 7% and -5% for 2021.After many years in this industry and having built many of my own strategies over the past decade, I've learned one very important facet of trading strategy development – expect the unexpected. A friend always told me to "focus on failure" when we developed strategies together. His approach to strategy design was "you develop it do too well in certain types of market trends and volatility. By focusing on where it fails, you'll learn more about the potential draw-downs and risks of a strategy than ignoring these points of failure". I tend to agree with him.In the first part of this research article, the other concept I started discussing was how traders/investors might consider moving away from strategies that struggled in 2022. What if the markets continue trending with extreme volatility throughout 2022 and into 2023? Suppose your system or strategy has taken some losses in 2022, and you have not stopped to consider volatility or other system boundaries as a potential issue. In that case, you may be looking forward to a very difficult 12 to 14+ months of trading in 2022 and 2023.Volatility Explodes After 2017Current market volatility/ATR levels are 300% to 500% above those of 2014/2015. These are the highest volatility levels the US markets have ever experienced in the past 20+ years. The current ATR level is above 23.20 – more than 35% higher than the DOT COM Peak volatility of 17.15.As long as the Volatility/ATR levels stay near these elevated levels, traders and investors will likely find the markets very difficult to trade with strategies that cannot properly adapt to the increased risks and price rotations in trends. Simply put, these huge increases in price volatility may chew up profits by getting stopped out on pullbacks or by risking too much in terms of price range/volatility.Sign up for my free trading newsletter so you don’t miss the next opportunity!The increased volatility over the past 5+ years directly reflects global monetary policies and the COVID-19 global response to the crisis. Not only have we attempted to keep easy money policies for far too long in the US and foreign markets, but we've also been pushed into a hyperbolic price trend that started after 2017/18, which has increased global debt consumption/levels to the extreme.2022 and 2023 will likely reflect a very strong revaluation trend which I continue to call a longer-term "transition" within the global markets. This transition will probably take many forms over the next 24+ months – but mostly, it will be about deleveraging debt levels and the destruction of excess risk in the markets. In my opinion, that means the strongest global economies may see some strength over the next 24+ months – but may also see extreme price volatility and extreme price rotation as this transition takes place.Expect The Unexpected in 2022 & 2023The US major indexes had an incredible 2021 – rallying across all fears and COVID variants. The NASDAQ and S&P500 saw the biggest gains in 2021 – which may continue into early 2022. Yet I feel the US markets will continue to transition as the global markets continue to navigate the process of unwinding excess debt levels and potentially deleveraging at a more severe rate than many people expect.Because of this, I feel the US markets may continue to strengthen as global traders pile into the US Dollar based assets in early 2022. Until global pressures of deleveraging and transitioning away from excesses put enough pressure on the US stock market, the perceived safety of US assets and the US Dollar will continue as it is now.(Source: www.StockCharts.com)Watch For Sector Strength In Early 2022 As Price-Pressure & Supply-Side Issues Create A Unique Opportunity For Extended Revenues/ProfitsI believe the US markets will see a continued rally phase in early 2022 as Q4:2021 revenues, earnings, and economic data pour in. I can't see how any global economic concerns will disrupt the US markets if Q4:2021 data stays stronger than expected for US stocks and the US economy.That being said, I do believe certain sectors will be high-fliers in Q1:2022 and Q2:2022 – at least until the supply-side issues across the globe settle down and return to more normal delivery expectations. This means sectors like Automakers, Healthcare, Real Estate, Consumer Staples & Discretionary, Technology, Chip manufacturers, and some Retail segments (Construction, Raw Materials, certain consumer products sellers, and specialty sellers) will drive a new bullish trend in 2022.The US major indexes may continue to move higher in 2022. They may also be hampered by sectors struggling to find support or over-weighted in symbols that were over-hyped through the end of 2020 and in early 2021.I have been concerned about this type of transition throughout most of 2021 (particularly after the MEME/Reddit rally phase in early 2021). That type of extreme trending usually leads to an unwinding process. I still don't believe the US and global markets have completed the unwinding process after the post-COVID extreme rally phase.(Source: www.StockCharts.com)Will The Lazy-Bull Strategy Continue To Outperform In 2022 & 2023?This is a tricky question to answer simply because I can't predict the future any better than you can. But I do believe moving towards a higher-level analysis of global market trends when the proposed "transitioning" is starting to take place allows traders to move away from "chasing price spikes." It also allows them to position for momentum strength in various broader market sectors and indexes.I suspect we'll start to see annual reports from some of the biggest institutional trading firms on the planet that show feeble performance in 2021. This recent article caught my attention related to Quant Funds in China.I believe we will see 2022 and 2023 stay equally distressing for certain styles of trading strategies while price volatility and an extreme deleveraging/transitioning trend occur. Trying to navigate this type of choppy global market trending on a short-term basis can be very dangerous. I believe it is better to move above all this global market chop and trade the bigger momentum trends in various sectors and indexes.Part III of this research article will focus on Q1 through Q4 expectations for 2022 and 2023. I will highlight broader sector/index trends that may play out well for investors and traders who can move above the low-level choppiness in the US and global markets.WANT TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE TECHNICAL INVESTOR AND THE TECHNICAL INDEX & BOND TRADING STRATEGIES?Learn how I use specific tools to help me understand price cycles, set-ups, and price target levels in various sectors to identify strategic entry and exit points for trades. Over the next 12 to 24+ months, I expect very large price swings in the US stock market and other asset classes across the globe. I believe the markets are starting to transition away from the continued central bank support rally phase and may begin a revaluation phase as global traders attempt to identify the next big trends. Precious Metals will likely start to act as a proper hedge as caution and concern start to drive traders/investors into Metals.I invite you to take a few minutes to visit the Technical Traders website to learn about our Technical Investor and Technical Index and Bond Trading strategies and how they can help you protect and grow your wealth.Have a great day!
Game of Chicken

Game of Chicken

Monica Kingsley Monica Kingsley 06.01.2022 16:18
FOMC minutes didn‘t reveal fresh hawkish tunes, but markets were caught off guard – unlike 3 weeks ago during the statement and press conference. It‘s as if S&P 500 and pretty much everything else woke up to the hawkish reality only now. In spite of the new liquidity powered Santa Claus rally, the sudden realization that the March Fed meeting might very well bring in a first rate hike, forced a sharp downturn across the board.The dollar wasn‘t too affected by the daily rise in yields that hit junk bonds particularly hard. The yield curve keeps being compressed, and is getting closer to the point of inversion. The likely good employment data on Friday would provide the Fed with a convenient cover to embark on and keep pursuing the tightening route. Not that it would have the power to break inflation (even at the professed very accelerated tapering pace – let alone the relatively measly hikes when CPI, PPI or PCE deflator are considered) – this game of chicken with the markets risks a tantrum that could bring up the „fond memories“ of Dec 2018.Yes, the risks of crashing the airplane would grow up over the coming weeks and months – the Fed is walking a very tight rope indeed. Markets are spooked, and the coming days would show whether this is already the start of something worse, or whether we can still shake it off and continue upwards till the Olympics. I‘m still leaning towards the latter.Anyway, good to have closed the profitable S&P 500 and crude oil positions in time.Let‘s move right into the charts (all courtesy of www.stockcharts.com).S&P 500 and Nasdaq OutlookTech understandably declined more than value – thanks to yields. S&P 500 bottom might not yet be in really. Bonds and tech need to stabilize first.Credit MarketsHYG is still holding the key, and would provide an early turnaround sign. The plunge in LQD isn‘t looking short-term encouraging in the least – the dust hasn‘t yet settled.Gold, Silver and MinersGold and silver still haven‘t left the sideways consolidation pattern – the white metal would be more affected through the inflation taming fears. That‘s though a premature calculation as inflation might turn out less amenable to be put down fast.Crude OilUnlike practically everything else, crude oil recovered strongly from the FOMC-induced setback – and certainly looks like the strongest of the pack at the moment.CopperCopper gave up advantageous position, and isn‘t really following (energy-led) commodities up yet. The long sideways consolidation is testing the bulls‘ resolve even as the pressure to go higher is building up. The same for silver, by the way.Bitcoin and EthereumBitcoin and Ethereum clearly lost the remainder of the bullish posture – it‘s turning out they aren‘t ready to defy the shrinking global liquidity.SummaryS&P 500 bulls look to get under some more pressure before the repeated hawkish message gets absorbed. The bond markets coupled with the dollar would reveal just how serious the bulls are about buying this dip and now. My bet is that they would remain shaken, and looking hesitantly for a floor. If there is one overarching message from yesterday, it‘s that the hawkish Fed appreciation has been woefully misapprehanded, and if followed through on in its entirety, would lead to a dangerous game of chicken with the markets (we aren‘t there quite yet).Thank you for having read today‘s free analysis, which is available in full at my homesite. There, you can subscribe to the free Monica‘s Insider Club, which features real-time trade calls and intraday updates for all the five publications: Stock Trading Signals, Gold Trading Signals, Oil Trading Signals, Copper Trading Signals and Bitcoin Trading Signals.
Shiba Inu price could surge 30% if SHIB can overcome this hurdle [Video]

Shiba Inu price could surge 30% if SHIB can overcome this hurdle [Video]

FXStreet News FXStreet News 07.01.2022 15:56
Shiba Inu price bounces off the daily demand zone, extending from $0.0000269 to $0.0000293.Increased buying pressure could propel SHIB by 31% to sweep the range high at $0.0000399.A four-hour candlestick close below $0.0000269 will create a lower low, invalidating the bullish thesis.Shiba Inu price is at an interesting point in its journey since it has produced two areas of liquidity in the opposite direction. Adding to this exciting development is one hurdle that blocks the path for SHIB and might hinder the bullish outlook.Shiba Inu price prepares for a rallyShiba Inu price set up two swing lows at $0.0000283 on December 20, 2021, and January 5, creating the double bottom setup. Interestingly, this setup took place inside the daily demand zone, extending from $0.0000269 to $0.0000293.While SHIB has recovered above this area, it needs to rally 12% before it faces the trading range’s midpoint at $0.0000341. Clearing this barrier will lead the meme coin to face $0.0000349, which harbors the buy-stop liquidity resting above it. Shiba Inu price needs to clear $0.0000349 before it can reach the range high at $0.0000399, completing its 31% ascent.SHIB/USDT 4-hour chartDepicting the importance of the hurdle at $0.0000349 is IntoTheBlock’s Global In/Out of the Money (GIOM) model. This on-chain metric shows that roughly 110,570 addresses that purchased 82,785 billion SHIB tokens at an average price of $0.0000350 are underwater.Therefore, Shiba Inu price needs to flip this barrier to reduce the selling pressure from holders trying to break even.Beyond this area, the resistance barriers thin out until $0.0000680, supporting the bullish outlook detailed above.SHIB GIOMFurther indicating the oversold nature of Shiba Inu price is the Market Value to Realized Value (MVRV) model. This on-chain metric is used to determine the average profit/loss of investors that purchased SHIB over the past month.Currently, 30-day MVRV is hovering at -11.53%, an opportunity zone, suggesting that SHIB holders are at a loss and are less likely to sell their tokens. Moreover, long-term holders tend to accumulate in this area, which could serve as a significant source of buying pressure and could be the reason to kick-start an uptrend.SHIB MVRVWhile things are looking up for Shiba Inu price, a four-hour candlestick close below the daily demand zone’s lower limit at $0.0000269 will create a lower low, invalidating the bullish thesis. This development could trigger a crash, knocking Shiba Inu price to retest the $0.0000237 support level.
USD to CAD chart is (probably as expected) linked with jobs stats

USD to CAD chart is (probably as expected) linked with jobs stats

John Benjamin John Benjamin 10.01.2022 10:30
EURUSD tests key resistance The US dollar retreated after December’s nonfarm payrolls came in far below expectations. The pair has been in a narrowing range between 1.1270 and 1.1365. The previous fall below 1.1280 added pressure on the buy side, though it turned out to be an opportunity for the bulls to accumulate at a bargain. A break above the resistance could end the sideways action and trigger a runaway rally towards 1.1460. The RSI surged into the overbought area and may cause a brief pullback above 1.1295. USDCAD tests daily support The loonie rallied after Canada added twice as many jobs as expected in December. The year-end sell-off met strong bids near the daily support at 1.2620. But the rebound came to halt at the supply zone around 1.2810, which used to be a support from the previous consolidation. The RSI’s double top in the overbought zone has restrained the upward momentum. 1.2730 is a fresh resistance as price action is about to retest the critical level at 1.2620. A bearish breakout could trigger a plunge to 1.2540. GER 40 seeks support The Dax 40 edged lower as rising CPI in the eurozone argues in favor of tightening. The index saw stiff selling pressure right under the all-time high at 16300. A bearish RSI divergence in this major supply area indicates a lack of commitment from the bulls as buying slows down. A combination of profit-taking and fresh selling has led to a drop below 16100, a warning sign for a steeper correction. 15800 is the next key support. A breakout could send the index to 15500 at the base of the latest rally.
Bitcoin (BTC) and crypto in general became even more appealing recently

Bitcoin (BTC) and crypto in general became even more appealing recently

Alex Kuptsikevich Alex Kuptsikevich 10.01.2022 10:37
The cryptocurrency market received moderate support from retail buyers over the weekend. Over the past 24 hours, the capitalisation of all coins rose 0.22%, according to CoinMarketCap, approaching $1.97 trillion. The top altcoins lost 11-19% over 7 days but found buyers over the weekend. The $2 trillion mark in total crypto valuation turned into local resistance last week, from where pressure has intensified. However, a strong buy-the-deep mood has kept the market from forming a downward spiral. The cryptocurrency Fear & Greed Index was stuck at 23 over the weekend, indicating extreme fear. The index has been hovering at the lower half of the scale since November 18th. Optimists, however, may note that the indicator has bounced back from the 10 level. The dip here in May and July coincided with the lows within the impulse, hinting at the potential for some technical rebound. Technical analysis also suggests a rebound in BTCUSD, with the RSI on daily charts showing attempts to move up from the oversold area below 30 and the price hovering near the reversal area in September. A longer-term view of the cryptocurrency market makes one more cautious about its prospects. Bitcoin has been in a downward corridor since November last year, having fallen to its lower boundary by the end of last week. Local overselling is a chance for a rebound, but the overall trend is still downwards. Cryptocurrency investors should not dismiss the idea of 4-year cycles in Bitcoin affecting the entire sector just yet. According to this hypothesis, 2022 could turn out to be a repeat of 2018 and 2014 - bear market years after a surge in the previous two years. Thus, it is worth paying increased attention to whether the crypto market manages to return to growth in the coming days and weeks. A strong start to the year will put these fears to rest.
Intraday Market Analysis – USD Under Pressure

Intraday Market Analysis – USD Under Pressure

John Benjamin John Benjamin 12.01.2022 09:05
GBPUSD rally gains tractionThe US dollar fell after the Fed Chair’s remark that no decision has been made on quantitative tightening. The pair showed some weakness near the daily resistance at 1.3600.The RSI’s double top in the overbought area led some buyers to take chips off the table. However, a follow-up close above the resistance indicates that the bulls are still in control of the direction.Sentiment remains upbeat and 1.3700 from the start of the November sell-off would be the next target. 1.3570 is a fresh support in case of a pullback.NZDUSD bounces off major supportThe New Zealand dollar recovers as risk appetite returns following Jerome Powell’s testimony.The previous rebound towards 0.6830 met strong selling pressure. Its failure to achieve a new high suggests that the bearish bias lingers. The drop below 0.6740 further weighs on the kiwi. A bounce could still be an opportunity to sell into strength.The bulls need to clear 0.6835 in order to turn the tide, and 0.6730 is a fresh support. A bearish breakout may test the base of December’s bounce at 0.6700.EURJPY maintains uptrendThe euro recoups losses as traders dump safe-haven currencies. The fall below 130.80 has shaken out some weak hands.Nonetheless, the upward bias remains intact after the single currency saw solid demand over the psychological level of 130.00. The RSI’s oversold situation compounded the attractiveness of the discount.A rise above 131.60 would bring in momentum traders and clear the path for an extended rally to 132.55 near last October’s peak. 129.10 is the second line of defence in case of a deeper retracement.
All Eyes on Copper

All Eyes on Copper

Monica Kingsley Monica Kingsley 13.01.2022 15:36
S&P 500 sold off only a little in the wake of CPI data – probably celebrating that the figure wasn‘t 8% but only 7%. As if that weren‘t uncomfortable already – and the Fed wants to field accelerated taper, and perhaps even four quarter-point rate hikes to tame it? Oh, and perhaps also balance sheet reduction through not reinvesting proceeds from matured bonds and notes as talked on Monday – sure, that will do the trick. Looking at Treasuries over the prior two days shows that the Fed isn‘t being questioned. Value defends the high ground while tech rallies – Monday‘s fear with its brief return Tuesday, is in the rear-view mirror, compacency returning, and VIX again below 18. Prior upswing consolidation right next, is the most likely action for S&P 500. The real gains though are being made elsewhere – in crude oil and copper. With commodities back on fire, these two have certainly greater appreciation potential next than stocks or cryptos – so, long live our open longs there! The red metal has defied base metals intraday consolidation yesterday, and that has consequences for inflation trades – silver is waiting in the wings. To give you an idea how mispriced the risk of persistently unpleasant inflation is, yesterday‘s CPI coming only in line with expectations, caused inflation expectations to decline… At least the dollar took a rightful breather – its prior sideways consolidation has been broken to the downside. Currencies are starting to figure out inflation, and just how far and inadequate Fed‘s promise to take on it, has been... Let‘s move right into the charts (all courtesy of www.stockcharts.com). S&P 500 and Nasdaq Outlook Daily consolidation of prior strong gains that‘s likely to go on today – stocks are making up their mind as to where next in the very short run now that the bears had been repelled. Credit Markets HYG is likewise looking to need some time to move higher next – volume is declining, and a brief sideways move is most likely now. Gold, Silver and Miners Gold and silver are still sideways to up – not down. The pressure to go higher is building up, waiting for the Fed miscalculation, or perception of the consequencies of its upcoming action. The faith in the central bank isn‘t yet really shaken. Crude Oil Crude oil finds it easiest to keep rising – the technical and fundamental conditions are in place, and oil stocks will continue to be the leading S&P 500 performers. Copper Copper is starting to play catch up to the other commodities finally – it‘ll be a rocky ride, but the red metal has waken up, and cast a clear verdict on inflation that has to seep into other markets next. Will take time, but we‘ll get there. Bitcoin and Ethereum Bitcoin and Ethereum didn‘t convince on the upside, and with no dovish surprise on the horizon, the path of least resistance probably remains down for now. Summary S&P 500 turnaround is getting cemented, and worries about the hawkish Fed or inflation look to be momentarily receding. Not even the PPI is waking up the markets – the focus seems to be on measly 0.1% undershoot. Ironic, pathetic. While stocks keep on moving in a tight range, and still want to keep on appreciating modestly, the real action is happening in the commodities, to be followed by precious metals. Thank you for having read today‘s free analysis, which is available in full at my homesite. There, you can subscribe to the free Monica‘s Insider Club, which features real-time trade calls and intraday updates for all the five publications: Stock Trading Signals, Gold Trading Signals, Oil Trading Signals, Copper Trading Signals and Bitcoin Trading Signals.
Having A Look At The Markets Considering Tensions, COVID-19 And National Banks Decisions

US 100 doesn't go really high, XAGUSD seems to feel quite good

John Benjamin John Benjamin 14.01.2022 08:38
US 100 revisits major support The Nasdaq 100 faltered after an unexpected rise in US initial jobless claims. The tech index bounced off the demand zone around 15200 which used to be a resistance on the daily chart. A bullish divergence revealed a slowdown in the sell-off momentum. The latest break above 15820 prompted some sellers to cover but came under pressure at 15980. After intraday traders took profit, 15200 is a critical support to keep the rebound relevant. A deeper correction would send the price to 14900. EURGBP stuck in bearish trend The euro rose after ECB Vice President Luis de Guindos said the inflation spike may last longer than projected. Nonetheless, the bearish sentiment still prevails after the pair failed to hold on to 0.8370. The former support has now turned into a resistance. The current consolidation could be a distribution phase and a drop below 0.8325 could send the price to February 2020’s lows near 0.8290. On the upside, the bulls have the challenging task of lifting offers around 0.8370 and then 0.8415 before they could attract more followers. XAGUSD tests major resistance Silver extends its recovery on the back of a weak US dollar. The metal saw support at the psychological level of 22.00. A break above the resistance at 22.80 and then an acceleration to the upside indicates strong buying interest. An overbought RSI has temporarily held the rally back. The bulls are testing the daily resistance at 23.40. A breakout could shake sellers out and trigger a reversal above 24.00. On the downside, buyers could be lurking around 22.60 in case of a pullback.
(TSLA) Tesla Stock with +1.75% There are many factors which can influence its price.

(TSLA) Tesla Stock with +1.75% There are many factors which can influence its price.

FXStreet News FXStreet News 17.01.2022 15:56
Tesla gains on Friday as Nasdaq finished in the green. TSLA stock closes at $1049.61 for a gain of 1.75%. Tesla shares are still in a downtrend but holding above the key pivot. Tesla (TSLA) returned to the green on Friday as the NASDAQ took the crown for best performing index, while the Dow suffered a bank burnout. Bank stocks reported on Friday in the form of Citigroup (C), JPMorgan (JPM) and Wells Fargo (WFC), and the results were decidedly mixed. Citigroup and JPMorgan fell heavily and dragged the Dow down with them. Yields though remained under control, allowing the Nasdaq to breathe lighter and make some headway after recent losses. This helped Tesla back into the green, but the stock remains choppy and sideways in motion. Tesla Stock News The Wall Street Journal reported over the weekend that a Tesla lawyer asked Cooley LLP, an international law firm, to fire one of its lawyers who had previously worked at the US SEC. The lawyer in question had supposedly interviewed Elon Musk in the SEC investigation in 2018 into Musk after he claimed on Twitter that he had gotten funding in place to take Tesla private. The SEC investigation led to Elon Musk and Tesla each paying $20 million fines. According to the WSJ article, a Tesla lawyer asked Cooley LLP to fire the attorney late last year, but Cooley did not follow through on the request. Tesla has used alternative law firms on several cases since December. Tesla and Cooley LLP have not yet responded to CNBC requests for comment. This may add to pressure on the stock despite Friday's rebound. Earlier in the week, investors and Cybertruck fans were left disappointed with a further delay to the truck's production timeline release, which has now been pushed to 2023. Tesla Stock Forecast Irrespective of the news, we have an indecisive chart here. TSLA stock's most recent high was a lower one than the previous and has put in a series of lower lows. This means it is currently in a short-term downtrend. $980 is the key pivot that will signify more losses. Breaking $980 makes the target $886. Holding above $980, and the target is $1,200. However, we have a declining Relative Strength Index (RSI) and Moving Average Convergence Divergence (MACD). The MACD has also crossed into negative territory. Tesla chart, daily
GWENT Masters Season 3 Concludes! New GWENT Update Coming Tomorrow!

GWENT Masters Season 3 Concludes! New GWENT Update Coming Tomorrow!

Finance Press Release Finance Press Release 06.12.2021 14:27
CD PROJEKT RED announces that Alexander "TLG_Cyberz" Schmidt has claimed the ultimate victory in the Season 3 GWENT World Masters tournament this past weekend, earning the title of GWENT World Champion in the official Witcher Card Game esports series. The season's grand finale tournament played out over the course of Saturday and Sunday, December 4th-5th. Streamed live on Twitch in its entirety, it saw 8 of the best GWENT players from around the world competing in high-stakes battles for a share of the $71,000 prize pool and the title of GWENT World Champion. Relive GWENT World Masters on the official CD PROJEKT RED Twitch channel. The final tournament prize pool distribution and standings are as follows: WINNERAlexander "TLG_Cyberz" Schmidt (Germany)FINALISTSAlexander "TLG_Cyberz" Schmidt (Germany) — $36,140Ilya "BigKuKuRUzina35" Lyapin (Russia) — $9,230SEMIFINALISTSZhang "lord-triss" Yusheng (China) — $8,305Oleg "Akela114" Nikolaev (Russia) — $7,455QUARTERFINALISTSAleksander "TLG_Pajabol" Owczarek (Poland) — $3,480PaweÅ‚ "kams134" Skoroda (Poland) — $2,840Damian "TailBot" Kaźmierczak (Poland) — $1,775Elias "theshaggynuts" Sagmeister (Austria) — $1,775 During the event, before the final match, CD PROJEKT RED also revealed that a new content update for GWENT is coming Tuesday, December 7th. The update will add 12 new cards (2 per each faction), while also introducing a number of regular balance changes. The video overview for the update is available on Twitch, via the GWENT World Masters tournament recording, as well as on GWENT's official YouTube channel. CD PROJEKT RED would like to thank all participants and everyone who watched live to help make GWENT World Masters such a fantastic event.For a complete overview of GWENT Masters — the official esports series for GWENT: The Witcher Card Game — including the ruleset, format, and tournament dates, visit masters.playgwent.com.GWENT: The Witcher Card Game is available for free on PC via GOG.COM and Steam, Apple M1 Macs running macOS, as well as on Android and iOS. For more information on GWENT, visit playgwent.com.   Source: CD Projekt
COT Currency Speculator Sentiment rising for Euro & British Pound Sterling

COT Currency Speculator Sentiment rising for Euro & British Pound Sterling

Invest Macro Invest Macro 24.01.2022 11:36
By InvestMacro | COT | Data Tables | COT Leaders | Downloads | COT Newsletter Here are the latest charts and statistics for the Commitment of Traders (COT) data published by the Commodities Futures Trading Commission (CFTC). The latest COT data is updated through Tuesday January 18th and shows a quick view of how large traders (for-profit speculators and commercial entities) were positioned in the futures markets. All currency positions are in direct relation to the US dollar where, for example, a bet for the euro is a bet that the euro will rise versus the dollar while a bet against the euro will be a bet that the euro will decline versus the dollar. Highlighting the COT currency data is the trend changes in speculator sentiment we are seeing in the Euro and the British pound sterling. Speculators have been boosting their bets for the Euro and pound sterling over the past weeks and have now pushed their bets in both currencies to their best levels since September. Euro positions have gained for five consecutive weeks (a 5-week total rise of +36,463 contracts) and have now been in bullish territory for two straight weeks after spending thirteen out of the past fourteen weeks in bearish territory. This week’s net position of +24,584 contracts marks the best position since September 14th when positions were in a downtrend and on their way into negative territory. British pound speculator bets, meanwhile, have risen sharply with four straight weeks of gains (a 4-week rise by +57,439 contracts) and have now settled into a current position of just -247 net contracts. The net position had been at a multi-year bearish high of -57,686 contracts as recently as December 21st before a turnaround in sentiment. Free Reports: Top 5 Companies Added to Our Stock Watch List this Quarter - Here are the Stock Symbols that stood out so far in the fourth quarter of 2021. Get our Weekly Commitment of Traders Reports - See where the biggest traders (Hedge Funds and Commercial Hedgers) are positioned in the futures markets on a weekly basis. Joining the Euro (18,579 contracts) and British pound sterling (28,919 contracts) with positive changes this week were the yen (6,646 contracts), New Zealand dollar (273 contracts), Canadian dollar (14,868 contracts), Australian dollar (3,032 contracts) and the Mexican peso (9,371 contracts). The currencies with declining bets were the US Dollar Index (-1,458 contracts), Brazil real (-557 contracts), Swiss franc (-3,150 contracts), Russian ruble (-3,195 contracts) and Bitcoin (-172 contracts) Data Snapshot of Forex Market Traders | Columns Legend Jan-18-2022 OI OI-Index Spec-Net Spec-Index Com-Net COM-Index Smalls-Net Smalls-Index EUR 691,882 80 24,584 43 -50,464 61 25,880 17 JPY 201,820 56 -80,879 17 99,740 86 -18,861 9 GBP 183,234 28 -247 74 2,848 31 -2,601 50 AUD 181,136 68 -88,454 3 98,519 92 -10,065 28 MXN 151,778 27 4,920 29 -7,490 70 2,570 54 CAD 143,371 26 7,492 58 -13,723 47 6,231 42 USD Index 53,283 74 36,434 89 -42,397 4 5,963 82 RUB 45,413 46 6,422 29 -7,251 69 829 57 NZD 44,727 33 -8,331 57 10,622 47 -2,291 26 CHF 39,871 14 -10,810 51 13,799 46 -2,989 54 BRL 32,098 30 -11,369 53 10,759 48 610 74 Bitcoin 11,468 62 -549 91 -22 0 571 26   US Dollar Index Futures: The US Dollar Index large speculator standing this week was a net position of 36,434 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly lowering of -1,458 contracts from the previous week which had a total of 37,892 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bullish-Extreme with a score of 88.6 percent. The commercials are Bearish-Extreme with a score of 4.1 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bullish-Extreme with a score of 81.8 percent. US DOLLAR INDEX Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 79.5 3.2 15.4 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 11.1 82.7 4.2 – Net Position: 36,434 -42,397 5,963 – Gross Longs: 42,369 1,684 8,180 – Gross Shorts: 5,935 44,081 2,217 – Long to Short Ratio: 7.1 to 1 0.0 to 1 3.7 to 1 NET POSITION TREND:       – Strength Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 88.6 4.1 81.8 – Strength Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bullish-Extreme Bearish-Extreme Bullish-Extreme NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX:       – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: 2.7 -3.6 6.8   Euro Currency Futures: The Euro Currency large speculator standing this week was a net position of 24,584 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly gain of 18,579 contracts from the previous week which had a total of 6,005 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bearish with a score of 42.5 percent. The commercials are Bullish with a score of 61.5 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bearish-Extreme with a score of 17.3 percent. EURO Currency Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 30.6 56.3 11.5 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 27.1 63.6 7.8 – Net Position: 24,584 -50,464 25,880 – Gross Longs: 211,901 389,617 79,656 – Gross Shorts: 187,317 440,081 53,776 – Long to Short Ratio: 1.1 to 1 0.9 to 1 1.5 to 1 NET POSITION TREND:       – Strength Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 42.5 61.5 17.3 – Strength Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bearish Bullish Bearish-Extreme NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX:       – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: 10.1 -8.6 -4.3   British Pound Sterling Futures: The British Pound Sterling large speculator standing this week was a net position of -247 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly gain of 28,919 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -29,166 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bullish with a score of 73.8 percent. The commercials are Bearish with a score of 31.4 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bullish with a score of 50.3 percent. BRITISH POUND Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 21.7 62.5 14.3 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 21.8 60.9 15.8 – Net Position: -247 2,848 -2,601 – Gross Longs: 39,760 114,486 26,267 – Gross Shorts: 40,007 111,638 28,868 – Long to Short Ratio: 1.0 to 1 1.0 to 1 0.9 to 1 NET POSITION TREND:       – Strength Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 73.8 31.4 50.3 – Strength Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bullish Bearish Bullish NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX:       – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: 27.4 -30.6 28.5   Japanese Yen Futures: The Japanese Yen large speculator standing this week was a net position of -80,879 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly boost of 6,646 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -87,525 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bearish-Extreme with a score of 16.9 percent. The commercials are Bullish-Extreme with a score of 85.7 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bearish-Extreme with a score of 9.0 percent. JAPANESE YEN Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 4.0 86.1 8.7 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 44.0 36.6 18.0 – Net Position: -80,879 99,740 -18,861 – Gross Longs: 8,002 173,701 17,475 – Gross Shorts: 88,881 73,961 36,336 – Long to Short Ratio: 0.1 to 1 2.3 to 1 0.5 to 1 NET POSITION TREND:       – Strength Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 16.9 85.7 9.0 – Strength Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bearish-Extreme Bullish-Extreme Bearish-Extreme NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX:       – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: -11.3 9.5 -3.1   Swiss Franc Futures: The Swiss Franc large speculator standing this week was a net position of -10,810 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly reduction of -3,150 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -7,660 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bullish with a score of 51.1 percent. The commercials are Bearish with a score of 46.4 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bullish with a score of 54.5 percent. SWISS FRANC Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 2.3 67.3 30.0 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 29.4 32.7 37.5 – Net Position: -10,810 13,799 -2,989 – Gross Longs: 925 26,828 11,951 – Gross Shorts: 11,735 13,029 14,940 – Long to Short Ratio: 0.1 to 1 2.1 to 1 0.8 to 1 NET POSITION TREND:       – Strength Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 51.1 46.4 54.5 – Strength Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bullish Bearish Bullish NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX:       – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: 2.2 -7.4 15.5   Canadian Dollar Futures: The Canadian Dollar large speculator standing this week was a net position of 7,492 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly advance of 14,868 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -7,376 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bullish with a score of 57.9 percent. The commercials are Bearish with a score of 46.9 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bearish with a score of 42.2 percent. CANADIAN DOLLAR Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 34.7 41.1 21.8 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 29.5 50.7 17.5 – Net Position: 7,492 -13,723 6,231 – Gross Longs: 49,792 58,921 31,270 – Gross Shorts: 42,300 72,644 25,039 – Long to Short Ratio: 1.2 to 1 0.8 to 1 1.2 to 1 NET POSITION TREND:       – Strength Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 57.9 46.9 42.2 – Strength Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bullish Bearish Bearish NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX:       – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: 15.3 -13.5 6.0   Australian Dollar Futures: The Australian Dollar large speculator standing this week was a net position of -88,454 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly increase of 3,032 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -91,486 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bearish-Extreme with a score of 2.8 percent. The commercials are Bullish-Extreme with a score of 92.4 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bearish with a score of 27.9 percent. AUSTRALIAN DOLLAR Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 5.0 82.2 10.5 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 53.8 27.9 16.1 – Net Position: -88,454 98,519 -10,065 – Gross Longs: 9,051 148,978 19,008 – Gross Shorts: 97,505 50,459 29,073 – Long to Short Ratio: 0.1 to 1 3.0 to 1 0.7 to 1 NET POSITION TREND:       – Strength Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 2.8 92.4 27.9 – Strength Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bearish-Extreme Bullish-Extreme Bearish NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX:       – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: -6.2 -0.3 17.1   New Zealand Dollar Futures: The New Zealand Dollar large speculator standing this week was a net position of -8,331 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly advance of 273 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -8,604 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bullish with a score of 57.3 percent. The commercials are Bearish with a score of 46.8 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bearish with a score of 25.6 percent. NEW ZEALAND DOLLAR Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 26.0 66.8 6.4 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 44.6 43.0 11.5 – Net Position: -8,331 10,622 -2,291 – Gross Longs: 11,612 29,876 2,851 – Gross Shorts: 19,943 19,254 5,142 – Long to Short Ratio: 0.6 to 1 1.6 to 1 0.6 to 1 NET POSITION TREND:       – Strength Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 57.3 46.8 25.6 – Strength Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bullish Bearish Bearish NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX:       – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: -31.9 30.0 -5.2   Mexican Peso Futures: The Mexican Peso large speculator standing this week was a net position of 4,920 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly increase of 9,371 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -4,451 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bearish with a score of 29.4 percent. The commercials are Bullish with a score of 69.7 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bullish with a score of 53.9 percent. MEXICAN PESO Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 49.7 46.1 3.9 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 46.5 51.0 2.2 – Net Position: 4,920 -7,490 2,570 – Gross Longs: 75,461 69,942 5,901 – Gross Shorts: 70,541 77,432 3,331 – Long to Short Ratio: 1.1 to 1 0.9 to 1 1.8 to 1 NET POSITION TREND:       – Strength Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 29.4 69.7 53.9 – Strength Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bearish Bullish Bullish NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX:       – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: 29.4 -30.3 15.6   Brazilian Real Futures: The Brazilian Real large speculator standing this week was a net position of -11,369 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly fall of -557 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -10,812 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bullish with a score of 53.4 percent. The commercials are Bearish with a score of 47.8 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bullish with a score of 74.2 percent. BRAZIL REAL Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 34.1 56.6 8.9 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 69.6 23.1 7.0 – Net Position: -11,369 10,759 610 – Gross Longs: 10,958 18,179 2,841 – Gross Shorts: 22,327 7,420 2,231 – Long to Short Ratio: 0.5 to 1 2.5 to 1 1.3 to 1 NET POSITION TREND:       – Strength Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 53.4 47.8 74.2 – Strength Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bullish Bearish Bullish NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX:       – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: -7.7 6.6 9.9   Russian Ruble Futures: The Russian Ruble large speculator standing this week was a net position of 6,422 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly decrease of -3,195 contracts from the previous week which had a total of 9,617 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bearish with a score of 28.6 percent. The commercials are Bullish with a score of 68.9 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bullish with a score of 57.1 percent. RUSSIAN RUBLE Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 35.3 60.0 4.6 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 21.2 75.9 2.8 – Net Position: 6,422 -7,251 829 – Gross Longs: 16,034 27,233 2,101 – Gross Shorts: 9,612 34,484 1,272 – Long to Short Ratio: 1.7 to 1 0.8 to 1 1.7 to 1 NET POSITION TREND:       – Strength Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 28.6 68.9 57.1 – Strength Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bearish Bullish Bullish NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX:       – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: -17.5 19.1 -25.4   Bitcoin Futures: The Bitcoin large speculator standing this week was a net position of -549 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly decline of -172 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -377 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bullish-Extreme with a score of 90.9 percent. The commercials are Bearish with a score of 28.5 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bearish with a score of 25.9 percent. BITCOIN Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 73.4 3.1 12.3 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 78.2 3.3 7.3 – Net Position: -549 -22 571 – Gross Longs: 8,417 355 1,407 – Gross Shorts: 8,966 377 836 – Long to Short Ratio: 0.9 to 1 0.9 to 1 1.7 to 1 NET POSITION TREND:       – Strength Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 90.9 28.5 25.9 – Strength Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bullish-Extreme Bearish Bearish NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX:       – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: 8.4 -13.2 -5.0   Article By InvestMacro – Receive our weekly COT Reports by Email *COT Report: The COT data, released weekly to the public each Friday, is updated through the most recent Tuesday (data is 3 days old) and shows a quick view of how large speculators or non-commercials (for-profit traders) were positioned in the futures markets. The CFTC categorizes trader positions according to commercial hedgers (traders who use futures contracts for hedging as part of the business), non-commercials (large traders who speculate to realize trading profits) and nonreportable traders (usually small traders/speculators) as well as their open interest (contracts open in the market at time of reporting).See CFTC criteria here. CountingPips Forex Blog Forex and Currency News Opinions   COT Bonds Speculators sharply reduce 5-Year Treasury bearish bets for 2nd week →
S&P 500 Declined, Gold Price (XAU/USD) Isn't Far From November's Levels

S&P 500 Declined, Gold Price (XAU/USD) Isn't Far From November's Levels

Monica Kingsley Monica Kingsley 25.01.2022 15:55
Tough call as select S&P 500 sectors came back to life, but credit markets are a bit inconclusive. Some more selling today before seeing a rebound on Wednesday‘s FOMC (I‘m leaning towards its message being positively received, and no rate hike now as that‘s apart from the Eastern Europe situation the other fear around). VIX looks to have topped yesterday, and coupled with the commodities and precious metals relative resilience (don‘t look at cryptos where I took sizable short profits in both Bitcoin and Ethereum yesterday), sends a signal of upcoming good couple of dozen points rebound in the S&P 500. Taking a correct view at the hightened, emotional market slide yesterday, is through the portfolio performance – as you can see via clicking the link, yesterday‘s setup needn‘t and shouldn‘t be anyone‘s make or break situation. Let‘s move right into the charts (all courtesy of www.stockcharts.com). S&P 500 and Nasdaq Outlook S&P 500 buyers stepped in, and carving out a nice lower knot today is the minimum expectation that the bulls can have. The reversal is still very young and vulnerable. Credit Markets HYG reversed, but isn‘t in an uptrend yet – there is just a marginal daily outperformance of quality debt instruments. More is needed. Gold, Silver and Miners Gold and silver are only pausing – in spite of the miners move to the downside at the moment. HUI and GDX will catch up – they‘re practically primed to do so over the medium-term. Crude Oil Crude oil bulls are still getting tested, and oil stocks stabilized on a daily basis. Some downside still remains, but nothing dramatic – the volume didn‘t even rise yesterday. Copper Copper declined, but didn‘t meaningfully lead lower – the downswing was actually bought, and low 4.40s look to be well defended at the moment. More fear striking, would change the picture, but we aren‘t there yet. Bitcoin and Ethereum Bitcoin and Ethereum reversed, but in spire of the volume, look to need more time to bottom out – and I wouldn‘t be surprised if that included another decline. Summary S&P 500 bulls would get tested today again, and at least a draw would be a positive result, as yesterday‘s tech upswing is more likely to be continued tomorrow than today – that‘s how it usually goes after sizable (think 5%) range days. The table is set for an upside surprise on FOMC tomorrow – the tantrum coupled with war fears bidding up the dollar, is impossible to miss. Best places to be in remain commodities and precious metals, and the coming S&P 500 upswing looks to be a worthwhile opportunity in the making, too – on a short-term and nimble basis. So, I‘m more in the glass half full camp going into tomorrow. Anyway, let‘s take the portfolio view discussed in the opening part of today‘s article. Thank you for having read today‘s free analysis, which is available in full at my homesite. There, you can subscribe to the free Monica‘s Insider Club, which features real-time trade calls and intraday updates for all the five publications: Stock Trading Signals, Gold Trading Signals, Oil Trading Signals, Copper Trading Signals and Bitcoin Trading Signals.
EURUSD, EURCHF and US 30 Chart Don't Show Spectacular Fluctations

EURUSD, EURCHF and US 30 Chart Don't Show Spectacular Fluctations

John Benjamin John Benjamin 26.01.2022 08:44
EURUSD grinds daily support The US dollar inches lower as traders take profit ahead of the Fed meeting. The euro’s struggle to stay above 1.1360 indicates buyers’ weak interest in holding onto previous gains. The latest rebounds have failed to clear the former support that has turned into a resistance. A break below the previous consolidation range and daily support (1.1280) could send the pair to 1.1235. The RSI’s oversold situation attracted some buying interest. But the bulls will need to lift 1.1360 first before a reversal could become a reality. EURCHF attempts reversal The safe-haven Swiss franc retreats as global panic selling takes a breather. A bullish RSI divergence shows a slowdown in the sell-off momentum. Then a rally above 1.0355 has prompted some sellers to cover, taking the heat off the single currency. A bullish MA cross is an encouraging sign for a reversal. 1.0400 is the next hurdle and its breach could be a turning point for traders’ sentiment and a launchpad towards 1.0480. On the downside, 1.0340 is fresh support and then 1.0300 a critical floor to safeguard the rebound. US 30 hits last major support The Dow Jones 30 recoups losses as traders await details on the Fed’s monetary tightening. Breaks below daily supports at 34700 and 34000 have forced buyers to liquidate in bulk. The index saw bids at last June’s low (33200) while the RSI sank into the oversold area on the daily chart. As the quote stabilizes, traders may be looking to buy the dips. A close above 34500 may lead to 35500 which is a key supply zone from a previous breakout. A break below the daily support could trigger a broader correction in the weeks to come.
Considering Portfolios In Times Of, Among Others, Inflation...

EUR To GBP and EURUSD Will Go Down If Dollar Strengthens?

Alex Kuptsikevich Alex Kuptsikevich 26.01.2022 09:39
The US dollar has been gaining steadily against the developed countries' currencies since the beginning of the year. By the way, the yen was an exception: it has been adding 1.8% over the past 11 days after the stock market entered the turbulence zone due to a reassessment of the monetary policy outlook. According to historical data, the Fed often finds itself at the forefront of the monetary policy cycle. That is used to be translating into a stronger USD in the months before and after the first tightening. So the question is in what currency pairs it is most profitable to buy the dollar now. Among the developed and liquid currencies, three scenarios can be considered. The first way is to sell EURUSD. The euro is weaker than the dollar due to the ECB being on several steps behind the Fed. That means that the EU rates will remain lower for a longer period of time, and the balance of bond yields will be shifted towards the dollar. Given the pace the Fed intends to take in tightening monetary policy, this yield gap promises to widen further. Another way is to bet that monetary tightening is stressing the declining markets drag the pound down. We should keep in mind that the Bank of England has already approved its first tightening policy step, and in this case it's not far behind the Fed. At the same time, it's closely correlated with falling market indices. Need to mention that GBPUSD is still far from being oversold with a wide room for further decline. The third way is often more obvious. Traders may consider selling the currencies of developing countries, which are much more sensitive to the Fed monetary policy changes. However, EMs have been raising rates for almost a year, so selling them now is a bet on market volatility in the near term. For the longer perspective, higher interest rates promise to level out short-term gains. In this case, the dollar's down turn may be faster than in the euro.
Intraday Market Analysis – USD Gains Bullish Momentum

Intraday Market Analysis – USD Gains Bullish Momentum

John Benjamin John Benjamin 27.01.2022 08:26
USDCAD breaks higherThe Canadian dollar slipped after the BOC kept interest rates unchanged. Its US counterpart found support at 1.2560 after a brief pullback.An oversold RSI attracted some bargain hunters. The current rebound is a sign that there is a strong interest in pushing for a bullish reversal. 1.2700 is a key supply zone as it coincides with the 30-day moving average.A breakout would definitely turn sentiment around and trigger a runaway rally. In turn, this sets the daily resistance at 1.2810 as the next target.NZDUSD continues lowerThe New Zealand dollar steadied after the Q4 CPI beat expectations.However, the pair is still in bearish territory after it broke below the lower end (0.6750) of the flag consolidation from the daily time frame. The RSI’s oversold situation brought in a buying-the-dips crowd around 0.6660 but its breach indicates a lack of buying interest.The kiwi is now testing November 2020’s low at 0.6600. The bears could be waiting to fade the next bounce with 0.6700 as a fresh resistance.XAUUSD pulls back for supportGold tumbled after the US Fed signaled it may raise interest rates in March. The rally stalled at 1853 and a break below the resistance-turned-support at 1830 flushed some buyers out.1810 at the base of the previous bullish breakout is a second line of defense. The short-term uptrend may still be intact as long as the metal stays above this key support.A deeper correction would drive the price down to the daily support at 1785. The bulls need a rebound above 1838 to regain control of price action.
Flucation of EUR To RUB and USD To RUB

Flucation of EUR To RUB and USD To RUB

Alex Kuptsikevich Alex Kuptsikevich 27.01.2022 09:59
The rate of the Russian currency reached 80.40 per dollar and 90.70 per euro yesterday after the close of the regular session. However, from these levels, the ruble seemed attractive for purchases. This brought the price back down from the psychologically significant round marks. The dollar was temporarily near peak levels, from where it has been unfolding since the end of 2014. Of course, the fact that the ruble previously went up from 80 does not allow one to blindly hope that the same will happen this time. However, it is a good reason to closely monitor the dynamics of the Russian currency, as well as the rhetoric of officials and the central bank when approaching these levels. Now it seems that geopolitics is more than embedded in premiums, which reduces the prices of Russian assets, including the ruble. However, there are other factors playing a part. In recent weeks, there has been increased attention to the Fed, which has entered the warpath against inflation, although for most of the past year, it was simply denied. If the tough tone of the American regulator causes pressure on the markets, this will be a new reason for the ruble to fall, even if not as sharp as under the influence of geopolitics. The best tactic for investors now is to watch the dynamics of the Russian currency near significant round levels. A sharp turn down in the EURRUB and USDRUB pairs will indicate strong purchases and will be another confirmation of how unbreakable these levels are. If we see a further slide of the ruble, we can say that the lowest point for it has not yet been reached. In general, it is worth being aware that the bottom may come very soon.
COT Euro Currency Speculators boosted their bullish bets to 23-week high

COT Euro Currency Speculators boosted their bullish bets to 23-week high

Invest Macro Invest Macro 29.01.2022 18:55
By InvestMacro | COT | Data Tables | COT Leaders | Downloads | COT Newsletter Here are the latest charts and statistics for the Commitment of Traders (COT) data published by the Commodities Futures Trading Commission (CFTC). The latest COT data is updated through Tuesday January 25th and shows a quick view of how large traders (for-profit speculators and commercial entities) were positioned in the futures markets. All currency positions are in direct relation to the US dollar where, for example, a bet for the euro is a bet that the euro will rise versus the dollar while a bet against the euro will be a bet that the euro will decline versus the dollar. Highlighting the COT currency data was the further gains of bullish bets in the Euro currency futures contracts. Euro speculators raised their bullish bets for a sixth consecutive week this week and for the seventh time in the past eight weeks. Over the last six-week time-frame, Euro bets have improved by a total of +43,439 contracts, going from -11,879 net positions on December 14th to +31,560 net positions this week. This week’s net speculator standing marks the highest level for Euro bets since August 17th, a span of twenty-three weeks. Joining the Euro (6,976 contracts) with positive changes this week were the yen (12,606 contracts), US Dollar Index (427 contracts), Australian dollar (5,181 contracts), Swiss franc (2,014 contracts), Canadian dollar (4,825 contracts) and Bitcoin (515 contracts). The currencies with declining bets were the British pound sterling (-7,516 contracts), New Zealand dollar (-2,442 contracts), Brazil real (-1,247 contracts), Russian ruble (-2,478 contracts) and the Mexican peso (-5,710 contracts). Data Snapshot of Forex Market Traders | Columns Legend Jan-25-2022OIOI-IndexSpec-NetSpec-IndexCom-NetCOM-IndexSmalls-NetSmalls-Index USD Index 52,328 72 36,861 89 -42,505 4 5,644 78 EUR 682,952 77 31,560 45 -56,258 60 24,698 15 GBP 182,040 27 -7,763 68 16,842 40 -9,079 37 JPY 197,830 53 -68,273 25 82,863 77 -14,590 18 CHF 39,742 14 -8,796 55 13,479 46 -4,683 50 CAD 146,448 28 12,317 60 -19,581 44 7,264 44 AUD 190,020 75 -83,273 8 97,749 92 -14,476 17 NZD 53,316 50 -10,773 53 13,281 51 -2,508 23 MXN 150,142 26 -790 27 -1,478 72 2,268 53 RUB 46,883 48 3,944 23 -4,288 76 344 44 BRL 46,657 54 -12,616 52 11,258 48 1,358 83 Bitcoin 11,756 64 -34 100 -478 0 512 25   US Dollar Index Futures: The US Dollar Index large speculator standing this week resulted in a net position of 36,861 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly rise of 427 contracts from the previous week which had a total of 36,434 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bullish-Extreme with a score of 89.4 percent. The commercials are Bearish-Extreme with a score of 4.0 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bullish with a score of 78.3 percent. US DOLLAR INDEX Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 79.8 3.4 14.6 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 9.4 84.6 3.8 – Net Position: 36,861 -42,505 5,644 – Gross Longs: 41,772 1,777 7,658 – Gross Shorts: 4,911 44,282 2,014 – Long to Short Ratio: 8.5 to 1 0.0 to 1 3.8 to 1 NET POSITION TREND:       – Strength Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 89.4 4.0 78.3 – Strength Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bullish-Extreme Bearish-Extreme Bullish NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX:       – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: 9.7 -9.8 3.0   Euro Currency Futures: The Euro Currency large speculator standing this week resulted in a net position of 31,560 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly rise of 6,976 contracts from the previous week which had a total of 24,584 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bearish with a score of 44.7 percent. The commercials are Bullish with a score of 59.8 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bearish-Extreme with a score of 15.3 percent. EURO Currency Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 31.2 55.5 11.6 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 26.6 63.8 8.0 – Net Position: 31,560 -56,258 24,698 – Gross Longs: 213,408 379,154 79,273 – Gross Shorts: 181,848 435,412 54,575 – Long to Short Ratio: 1.2 to 1 0.9 to 1 1.5 to 1 NET POSITION TREND:       – Strength Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 44.7 59.8 15.3 – Strength Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bearish Bullish Bearish-Extreme NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX:       – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: 13.3 -11.2 -6.2   British Pound Sterling Futures: The British Pound Sterling large speculator standing this week resulted in a net position of -7,763 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly lowering of -7,516 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -247 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bullish with a score of 68.4 percent. The commercials are Bearish with a score of 39.6 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bearish with a score of 36.8 percent. BRITISH POUND Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 20.1 64.7 13.7 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 24.4 55.5 18.7 – Net Position: -7,763 16,842 -9,079 – Gross Longs: 36,666 117,812 24,909 – Gross Shorts: 44,429 100,970 33,988 – Long to Short Ratio: 0.8 to 1 1.2 to 1 0.7 to 1 NET POSITION TREND:       – Strength Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 68.4 39.6 36.8 – Strength Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bullish Bearish Bearish NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX:       – 6-Week Change in Strength Index: 31.0 -31.7 22.0   Japanese Yen Futures: The Japanese Yen large speculator standing this week resulted in a net position of -68,273 contracts in the data reported through Tuesday. This was a weekly advance of 12,606 contracts from the previous week which had a total of -80,879 net contracts. This week’s current strength score (the trader positioning range over the past three years, measured from 0 to 100) shows the speculators are currently Bearish with a score of 24.9 percent. The commercials are Bullish with a score of 77.3 percent and the small traders (not shown in chart) are Bearish-Extreme with a score of 18.3 percent. JAPANESE YEN Statistics SPECULATORS COMMERCIALS SMALL TRADERS – Percent of Open Interest Longs: 8.0 81.0 9.1 – Percent of Open Interest Shorts: 42.5 39.1 16.4 – Net Position: -68,273 82,863 -14,590 – Gross Longs: 15,866 160,178 17,950 – Gross Shorts: 84,139 77,315 32,540 – Long to Short Ratio: 0.2 to 1 2.1 to 1 0.6 to 1 NET POSITION TREND:       – Strength Index Score (3 Year Range Pct): 24.9 77.3 18.3 – Strength Index Reading (3 Year Range): Bearish Bullish Bearish-Extreme NET POSITION MOVEMENT INDEX:       – 6-