EU flash CPI

In a world where economic indicators and market movements can shift with the blink of an eye, staying updated on the latest offerings and promotions within the financial sector is crucial. Today, we delve into one such noteworthy development that has emerged on the horizon, enticing individuals to explore a blend of banking and insurance services. As markets ebb and flow, being vigilant about trends and opportunities can lead to financial benefits. Let's explore this exciting promotion that brings together the worlds of banking and insurance to offer a unique proposition for consumers.

 

 

By Michael Hewson (Chief Market Analyst at CMC Markets UK)

    US non-farm payrolls (Aug) – 01/09 – the July jobs report saw another modest slowdown in jobs growth, as well as providing downward revisions to previous months. 187k jobs were added, just slightly above March's revised 165k, although the unemployment rate fell to 3.5%, from 3.6%. While the official BLS numbers have been showing

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Inflation Numbers Take Center Stage as Quarter Comes to a Close

Michael Hewson Michael Hewson 30.06.2023 09:50
Inflation numbers a key focus as we round off the quarter       European markets continued their recent patchy performance, as we come to the end of the week, month, quarter, and half year, with the FTSE100 sliding back while the likes of the DAX and CAC40 were slightly more resilient, after German inflation came in slightly higher than expected in June.   US markets were slightly more positive, but even here the Nasdaq 100 struggled after a sizeable upward revision to Q1 GDP to 2%, and better than expected weekly jobless claims numbers sent US yields sharply higher to their highest levels since March, while the US dollar also hit a 2-week high.   The surprising resilience of US economic data this week has made it an absolute certainty that we will see another rate increase in July, but also raised the possibility that we might see another 2 more rate increases after that.   The resilience of the labour market, along with the fact that core inflation remains sticky also means that it makes the Federal Reserve's job of timing another pause much more difficult to time. Today's core PCE Deflator and personal spending numbers for May could go some way to making that job somewhat easier.   Core PCE Deflator is forecast to remain unchanged at 4.7%, while personal spending is expected to slow from 0.8% to 0.2%. While the Federal Reserve isn't the only central bank facing a sticky inflation problem, there is evidence that it is having slightly more success in dealing with it, unlike the European Central Bank which is seeing much more elevated levels of headline and core prices. Yesterday, we saw CPI in Germany edge higher from 6.3% in May to 6.8%, while in Spain core prices rose more than expected by 5.9%, even as headline CPI fell below 2% for the first time in over 2 years.   Today's French CPI numbers are expected to show similar slowdowns on the headline rate, from 5.1% to 4.6%, but it is on the core measure that the ECB is increasingly focussing its attention. Today's EU flash CPI for June is forecast to see a fall to 5.6% from 6.1%, however core prices are expected to edge back up to 5.5% after dropping to 5.3% in May. Compounding the ECB's and other central banks dilemma when it comes to raising rates is that PPI price pressures are falling like a stone and have been since the start of the year, in Germany and Italy. In April French PPI plunged -5.1% on a monthly basis, even as the year-on-year rate slowed to 7% from 12.8%.   If this trend continues today then it might suggest that a wave of deflation is heading our way and could hit sometime towards the end of the year, however while core prices remain so resilient central banks are faced with the problem of having to look in two different directions, while at the same time managing a soft landing. The Bank of England has an even bigger problem in getting inflation back to target, although it really only has itself to blame for that, having consistently ignored regular warnings over the past 18 months that it was behind the curve. The risk now is over tightening just as prices start to fall sharply.   Today's Q1 GDP numbers are set to confirm that the UK economy managed to avoid a contraction after posting Q1 growth of 0.1%, although it was a little touch and go after a disappointing economic performance in March, which saw a monthly contraction of -0.3% which acted as a drag on the quarter overall.   The reason for the poor performance in March was due to various public sector strike action from healthcare and transport, which weighed heavily on the services sector which saw a contraction of -0.5%. The performance would have been worse but for a significant rebound in construction and manufacturing activity which saw strong rebounds of 0.7%.   There is a risk that this modest expansion could get revised away this morning, however recent PMI numbers have shown that, despite rising costs, business is holding up, even if economic confidence remains quite fragile.     One thing we do know is that with the recent increase in gilt yields is that the second half of this year is likely to be even more challenging than the first half, and that the UK will do well to avoid a recession over the next two quarters.       EUR/USD – slid back towards and below the 50-day SMA, with a break below the 1.0850 area, potentially opening up a move towards 1.0780. Still have resistance just above the 1.1000 area.     GBP/USD – continues to come under pressure as we slip towards the 50-day SMA at 1.2540. If this holds, the bias remains for a move back to the 1.3000 area. Currently have resistance at 1.2770.       EUR/GBP – currently being capped by resistance at the 50-day SMA at 0.8673, which is the next resistance area. Behind that we have 0.8720. Support comes in at the 0.8580 area.     USD/JPY – briefly pushed above 145.00 with the November highs of 147.50 beyond that.  Support remains at the 142.50 area, which was the 61.8% retracement of the 151.95/127.20 down move. A fall below this support area could see a deeper fall towards 140.20/30.    FTSE100 is expected to open 18 points higher at 7,489     DAX is expected to open 12 points higher at 15,958   CAC40 is expected to open 8 points higher at 7,320      
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Michael Hewson Michael Hewson 28.08.2023 09:11
In a world where economic indicators and market movements can shift with the blink of an eye, staying updated on the latest offerings and promotions within the financial sector is crucial. Today, we delve into one such noteworthy development that has emerged on the horizon, enticing individuals to explore a blend of banking and insurance services. As markets ebb and flow, being vigilant about trends and opportunities can lead to financial benefits. Let's explore this exciting promotion that brings together the worlds of banking and insurance to offer a unique proposition for consumers.     By Michael Hewson (Chief Market Analyst at CMC Markets UK) US non-farm payrolls (Aug) – 01/09 – the July jobs report saw another modest slowdown in jobs growth, as well as providing downward revisions to previous months. 187k jobs were added, just slightly above March's revised 165k, although the unemployment rate fell to 3.5%, from 3.6%. While the official BLS numbers have been showing signs of slowing the ADP report has looked much more resilient, adding 324k in July on top of the 455k in June. This resilience is also coming against a backdrop of sticky wages, which in the private sector are over double headline CPI, while on the BLS measure average hourly earnings remained steady at 4.4%. This week's August payrolls are set to see paint another picture of a resilient but slowing jobs market with expectations of 160k jobs added, with unemployment remaining steady at 3.5%. It's also worth keeping an eye on vacancy rates and the job opening numbers which fell to just below 9.6m in June. These have consistently remained well above the pre-Covid levels of 7.5m and have remained so since the start of 2021. This perhaps explain why the US central bank is keen not to rule out further rate hikes, lest inflation starts to become more embedded.                          US Core PCE Deflator (Jul) – 31/08 – while the odds continue to favour a Fed pause when the central bank meets in September, markets are still concerned that we might still see another rate hike later in the year. The stickiness of core inflation does appear to be causing some concern that we might see US rates go higher with a notable movement in longer term rates, which are now causing the US yield curve to steepen further. The June Core PCE Deflator numbers did see a sharp fall from 4.6% in May to 4.1% in June, while the deflator fell to 3% from 3.8%. This week's July inflation numbers could prompt further concern about sticky inflation if we get sizeable ticks higher in the monthly as well as annual headline numbers. When we got the CPI numbers earlier in August, we saw evidence that prices might struggle to move much lower, after headline CPI edged higher to 3.2%. We can expect to see a similar move in this week's numbers with a move to 3.3% in the deflator and to 4.3% in the core deflator.       US Q2 GDP – 30/08 – the second iteration of US Q2 GDP is expected to underline the resilience of the US economy in the second quarter with a modest improvement to 2.5% from 2.4%, despite a slowdown in personal consumption from 4.2% in Q1 to 1.6%. More importantly the core PCE price index saw quarterly prices slow from 4.9% in Q1 to 3.8%. The resilience in the Q2 numbers was driven by a rebuilding of inventory levels which declined in Q1. Private domestic investment also rose 5.7%, while an increase in defence spending saw a rise of 2.5%.             UK Mortgage Approvals/ Consumer Credit (Jul) – 30/08 – while we have started to see evidence of a pickup in mortgage approvals after June approvals rose to 54.7k, this resilience may well be down to a rush to lock in fixed rates before they go even higher. Net consumer credit was also resilient in June, jumping to £1.7bn and a 5 year high, raising concerns that consumers were going further into debt to fund lifestyles more suited to a low interest rate environment. While unemployment remains close to historically low levels this shouldn't be too much of a concern, however if it starts to edge higher, we could start to see slowdown in both, as previous interest rate increases start to bite in earnest.            EU flash CPI (Aug) – 31/08 – due to increasing concerns over deflationary pressures, recent thinking on further ECB rate hikes has been shifting to a possible pause when the central bank next meets in September. Since the start of the year the ECB has doubled rates to 4%, however anxiety is growing given the performance of the German economy which is on the cusp of three consecutive negative quarters. On the PPI measure the economy is in deflation, while manufacturing activity has fallen off a cliff. Despite this headline CPI is still at 5.3%, while core prices are higher at 5.5%, just below their record highs of 5.7%. This week's August CPI may well not be the best guide for further weakness in price trends given that Europe tends to vacation during August, however concerns are increasing that the ECB is going too fast and a pause might be a useful exercise.     Best Buy Q2 24 – 29/08 – we generally hear a lot about the strength of otherwise of the US consumer through the prism of Target or Walmart, electronics retailer Best Buy also offers a useful insight into the US consumer's psyche, and since its May Q1 numbers the shares have performed reasonably well. In May the retailer posted Q1 earnings of $1.15c a share, modestly beating forecasts even as revenues fell slightly short at $9.47bn. Despite the revenue miss the retailer reiterated its full year forecast of revenues of $43.8bn and $45.2bn. For Q2 revenues are expected to come in at $9.52bn, with same store sales expected to see a decline of -6.35%, as consumers rein in spending on bigger ticket items like domestic appliances and consumer electronics. The company has been cutting headcount, laying off hundreds in April as it looks to maintain and improve its margins. Profits are expected to come in at $1.08c a share.        HP Q3 23 – 29/08 – when HP reported its Q2 numbers the shares saw some modest selling, however the declines didn't last long, with the shares briefly pushing up to 11-month highs in July. When the company reported in Q1, they projected revenues of $13.03bn, well below the levels of the same period in 2022. Yesterday's numbers saw a 22% decline to $12.91bn with a drop in PC sales accounting for the bulk of the drop, declining 29% to $8.18bn. Profits, on the other hand did beat forecasts, at $0.80c a share, while adjusted operating margins also came in ahead of target. HP went on to narrow its full year EPS profit forecast by 10c either side, to between $3.30c and $3.50c a share. For Q3 revenues are expected to fall to $13.36bn, with PC revenue expected to slip back to $8.79bn. Profits are expected to fall 20% to $0.84c a share.         Salesforce Q2 24 – 30/08 – Salesforce shares have been on a slow road to recovery after hitting their lowest levels since March 2020, back in December last year, with the shares coming close to retracing 60% of the decline from the record highs of 2021. When the company reported back in June, the shares initially slipped back after full year guidance was left unchanged. When the company reported in Q4, the outlook for Q1 revenues was estimated at $8.16bn to $8.18bn, which was comfortably achieved with $8.25bn, while profits also beat, coming in at $1.69c a share. For Q2 the company raised its revenue outlook to $8.51bn to $8.53bn, however they decided to keep full year revenue guidance unchanged at a minimum of $34.5bn. This was a decent increase from 2023's $31.35bn, but was greeted rather underwhelmingly, however got an additional lift in July when the company said it was raising prices. Profits are expected to come in at $1.90c a share. Since June, market consensus on full year revenues has shifted higher to $34.66bn. Under normal circumstances this should prompt a similar upgrade from senior management.   Broadcom Q3 23 – 31/08 – just prior to publishing its Q2 numbers Broadcom shares hit record highs after announcing a multibillion-dollar deal with Apple for 5G radio frequency components for the iPhone. The shares have continued to make progress since that announcement on expectations that it will be able to benefit on the move towards AI. Q2 revenues rose almost 8% to $8.73bn, while profits came in at $10.32c a share, both of which were in line with expectations. For Q3 the company expects to see revenues of $8.85bn, while market consensus on profits is expected to match the numbers for Q2, helping to lift the shares higher on the day. It still has to complete the deal with VMWare which is currently facing regulatory scrutiny, and which has now been approved by the UK's CMA.

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