currency markets

Czech National Bank Preview: Time to catch up

We expect the pace of cutting to accelerate to 50bp, which will push the CNB key rate to 6.25%. The main reasons will be low inflation in the central bank's new forecast, which should allow for more cutting in the future. For year-end, we see the rate at 4.00% but the risk here is clearly downwards.

 

Optimistic forecasts could speed up the cutting pace to 50bp

The Czech National Bank will meet on Thursday next week and will present its first forecast published this year. We are going into the meeting expecting an acceleration in the cutting pace from 25bp in December to 50bp, which would mean a cut from the current 6.75% to 6.25%. This means a revision in our forecast, which previously saw an acceleration taking place in March. Still, it's certain to be a close call given the cautious approach of the board – and that could bring a 25bp cut.

 

The board will have a new central bank forecast, which is likely to be a key factor in

USD/JPY Climbs Above 143 as Japan's Core CPI Remains Above 3%

USD/JPY Climbs Above 143 as Japan's Core CPI Remains Above 3%

Kenny Fisher Kenny Fisher 26.06.2023 08:34
USD/JPY climbs above 143 Japan’s core CPI remains above 3%   The Japanese yen has stabilized on Friday after falling close to 1% a day earlier.  In the European session, USD/JPY is trading at 143.05, down 0.04%. Earlier, USD/JPY touched a high of 143.45, the highest level since early November 2022. On the data calendar, the US releases ISM Services PMI later today. The consensus stands at 54.0 for June, following 54.9 in May. The services sector has posted four straight readings over the 50 level, which separates expansion from contraction.     Japan’s core inflation higher than expected Japan continues to grapple with high inflation and core CPI for May was higher than expected. With inflation around 3%, other central banks would love to trade places with the Bank of Japan, but Japan’s inflation remains above the 2% target and has become an issue for the central bank after decades of deflation.   Nationwide core CPI, which excludes fresh food but includes energy items, climbed 3.2% in May y/y, down from 3.4% in April but above the consensus of 3.1%. What was more worrying was the “core-core index”, which excludes fresh food and energy, jumped 4.3% in May, up from 4.1% in April. This was above expectations and marked the highest level since June 1981.     Core CPI has now remained above the BoJ’s inflation target of 2% for 14 consecutive months. This puts into question the BoJ’s stance that cost-driven inflation is temporary and therefore there is no need to tighten monetary policy. Inflation risks are tilted to the upside and the BoJ will find it more difficult to defend its ultra-loose policy if inflation pressures don’t ease.   The BoJ maintained its policy settings at last week’s meeting and has no plans to tighten interest rates anytime soon. This puts the BoJ at odds with other major central banks, which have been aggressively tightening rates in order to curb inflation. The US/Japan rate differential has been widening as the Fed raises rates while the BoJ stands pat. This has sent the yen sharply lower, raising concerns that the government could intervene in the currency markets in order to prop up the yen.   The Ministry of Finance stunned the global financial markets in September and October when it intervened, at a time when the yen had fallen below the 150 line. The yen hasn’t fallen quite that low, but I would expect to hear louder verbal intervention out of Tokyo if the yen falls below 145.     USD/JPY Technical USD/JPY tested support at 142.82 earlier. The next support level is 142.07 There is resistance at 143.83 and 144.27  
Yen's Rapid Weakening: Japan's Warning and Potential Currency Intervention

Yen's Rapid Weakening: Japan's Warning and Potential Currency Intervention

Kenny Fisher Kenny Fisher 29.06.2023 08:28
Earlier this week, Japan’s top currency diplomat, Masota Kanda warned that the yen’s weakening was “rapid and one-sided”. Kanda said he would not rule out any options, including currency intervention.   The markets have become accustomed to verbal intervention when the yen drops sharply, but Tokyo followed its bark with a bite late last year, when it intervened in the currency markets after the yen fell below 151. As the yen continues to depreciate, currency intervention becomes a stronger possibility.   On Tuesday, the US posted solid releases, an indication that the economy remains resilient despite the Fed’s aggressive tightening. Durable Goods Orders and New Home Sales were higher and beat expectations, and Conference Board Consumer Confidence jumped in June from 102.5 to 109.7, its highest level since January 2022. The strong numbers provide support for a Fed hike in July, with the markets pricing rate increase at 79%, according to FedWatch.     USD/JPY Technical USD/JPY is testing resistance at 144.65. The next resistance line is 145.36 There is support at 142.94 and 142.00       US Data MBA mortgage applications in the US rose for a third straight week, despite surging rates as housing demand remains healthy. The effects of the tightening of lending conditions are being reflected in the data, as the credit jumbo rate(expensive homes) rose to 6.91%, which is well above the Average 30 year fixed rate of 6.75%. The housing market isn’t weakening yet despite rising costs because demand is still growing and supplies remain tight.    
August CPI Forecast: Modest Inflation Increase Expected Amidst Varied Price Trends

USD/JPY Outlook: Tokyo Core CPI Data and Ueda's Policy Stance Impact Yen's Direction

Kenny Fisher Kenny Fisher 29.06.2023 14:18
Japan releases Tokyo Core CPI on Friday USD/JPY moves closer to symbolic 145 line Ueda says no changes to policy unless core inflation rises USD/JPY has edged lower on Thursday. In the European session, the yen is trading at 144.19, down 0.20%. The yen dropped as low as 144.70 in the Asian session, as the symbolic 145 line remains under pressure.   Tokyo Core CPI expected to tick higher Japan releases a key inflation indicator, Tokyo Core CPI, on Friday. The indicator dipped to 3.2% in May but is expected to inch up to 3.3% in June. Tokyo CPI excluding food and energy, currently at 2.4% and known as the “core core index”, will be under the microscope after the National “core core index” rose unexpectedly in June. Earlier this week, BoJ Core CPI, the preferred inflation gauge of the central bank, rose from 2.9% to 3.1%, above the consensus of 3.0%. If today’s inflation report also shows that inflation is creeping higher, it will put into question the BoJ’s stance that cost-driven inflation is temporary and therefore there is no need to tighten monetary policy. Governor Ueda reiterated this position at the ECB Bank Forum on Wednesday. Ueda stated that he would continue the BoJ’s ultra-easy monetary policy unless he was “reasonably sure” that inflation accelerated in 2024. He said that the BoJ was not confident that this would occur, noting that even though headline inflation was above 3%, core inflation remained below the Bank’s 2% target. The BoJ’s ultra-accommodative policy has seen the yen slide to 7-month lows, which has drawn warnings from the Ministry of Finance about intervening in the currency markets. Ueda declined to comment on the possibility of intervention, saying that the BoJ was closely monitoring the exchange rate and that the yen was influenced by many other factors besides BoJ policy.     USD/JPY Technical There is resistance line at 144.65 and 145.36 143.94 and 142.94 are providing support  
EUR/USD Outlook: Dovish Shift and Inflation Data Impact Forex Markets

Canada's Retail Sales Slow as Former Fed Chair Suggests Last Hike

Kenny Fisher Kenny Fisher 24.07.2023 10:27
Canada’s retail sales expected to slow Former Chair Bernanke says the July hike may be the last increase The Canadian dollar is trading quietly on Friday. In the European session, USD/CAD is trading at 1.3157, down 0.09%. It has been a busy week in the currency markets, with the US dollar rebounding and posting strong gains against the major currencies. The notable exception has been the Canadian dollar, which has held its own against the greenback this week. We could see some movement from USD/CAD in the North American session when Canada releases retail sales for May.   Will Canada’s retail sales point to a softer economy? We’ll get a snapshot of consumer spending later on Friday, as Canada releases the May retail sales report. The markets are bracing for a slowdown in May after an impressive April release. The consensus estimate for retail sales is 0.5% in May, down from 1.1% in April. The core rate is expected to fall to 0.3%, compared to 1.3%. If the estimates prove to be accurate, it would point to the economy cooling down and provide support for the Bank of Canada to take a pause at the next meeting in September.   Is the Fed finally done? The Federal Reserve meets on July 26th and investors have priced in a 0.25% hike as a near certainty. September is less clear, but the markets have priced another hike at just 16%, according to the CME FedWatch tool. Are the markets being too dovish? Fed members have said that inflation isn’t falling fast enough, which could mean that another hike is coming after July. Former Fed Chair Ben Bernanke appeared to side with the market view, saying on Thursday that the July hike could be the final rate increase in the current tightening cycle. Bernanke said that the economy would slow further before the 2% inflation target was reached, but he expected any recession to be mild.   USD/CAD Technical There is resistance at 1.3205 and 1.3318 1.3106 and 1.2993 are providing support  
Fed's Watchful Eye on Inflation Expectations Amid Rising Energy Prices

Japanese Yen Rebounds Amid Intervention Concerns Ahead of Inflation Data

Kenny Fisher Kenny Fisher 18.08.2023 10:08
Japanese yen rebounds, but intervention worries remain Japan releases July inflation on Friday The Japanese yen has bounced back on Thursday after failing to post a winning day since August 4th. In the North American session, USD/JPY is trading at 145.92, down 0.30%. USD/JPY has been the worst performer among the major currencies over the past month, declining about 7%. The yen dropped below the 146 line on Wednesday which marked a new nine-month low. The Japanese currency lost ground in the aftermath of the Federal Reserve minutes, in which members expressed concern about high inflation. The sharp depreciation of the Japanese currency is raising concerns that Japan’s Ministry of Finance (MOF) could respond by intervening in the currency markets in order to prop up the yen. The yen is now trading at levels at which the MOF shocked the markets last September and instructed the Bank of Japan to sell billions of dollars in support of the yen. The MOF and the BoJ have stated in the past that they are more concerned with sharp swings in the exchange rate and not so much with a particular value for the yen. The yen has plunged about 800 points since late July which means that another intervention cannot be ruled out. The US/Japan rate differential has been widening, with the yen depreciating as a result. The economic troubles in China have led to a sharp drop in the Chinese yuan, which is another factor weighing on the ailing yen. Japan releases the July CPI inflation report on Friday. Headline CPI is expected to fall from 3.3% to 2.5%, while the core rate is projected to dip from 3.3% to 3.1%. The ‘core-core’ rate, which excludes food and energy items, is projected to rise to 4.3%, up from 4.2%. Any surprises from the inflation report could mean volatility for the Japanese yen.   USD/JPY Technical There is resistance at 146.74 and 147.31 USD/JPY tested support at 145.71 earlier. Below, there is support at 144.92  
Declining Bank Lending and Negative Money Growth Raise Concerns for Eurozone Economy

Japan's CPI Eases, Yen Gains, and BoJ Policy Considerations

Kenny Fisher Kenny Fisher 21.08.2023 12:31
Japan’s core CPI eases in July The decline supports expectations that BoJ will maintain policy USD/JPY has dipped lower on Friday The Japanese yen has extended its gains on Friday. In the North American session, USD/JPY is trading at 145.29, down 0.38%. The month of August has been kind to the US dollar, which has posted strong gains against all of the major currencies. USD/JPY has risen 2.34% in that period and on Thursday, the yen fell as low as 146.56, a nine-month low against the US dollar. The yen has been the worst performer among the majors over the past month, and the currency’s sharp depreciation has raised speculation that Tokyo could respond by intervening in the currency markets. Japan’s Ministry of Finance (MOF) shocked the markets in September 2022 when it intervened and bought billions of dollars with yen, which propped up the Japanese currency. At that time, the yen was also trading around the 146 level, and that has many investors on edge that the MOF may be planning another intervention.   Japan’s core CPI eases in July Japan’s inflation has been hovering above 3% for a prolonged period, higher than the Bank of Japan’s target of 2%. The BoJ has insisted that it will not loosen its ultra-accommodative monetary policy until it has evidence that inflation is sustainable, such as higher wage growth. The markets are not taking the BoJ at its word, as the BoJ keeps its cards very close to the chest in order to surprise the market when it shifts policy. Clearly, transparency is not high on the BoJ’s list, in contrast to the Federal Reserve and other major central banks. Since inflation data could well lead to a shift in policy, every inflation report out of Japan attracts significant attention. The July CPI report, released today, was no exception. Core CPI, which excludes fresh food, eased to 3.1% y/y, matching the consensus estimate and down from 3.3% in June. The indicator is closely watched by the BoJ and the decline supports expectations that the BoJ will maintain its current policy. This, despite the fact that Core CPI has now exceeded the BoJ’s 2% inflation target for 16 consecutive months.   The BoJ is not expected to make any major shifts to policy in the near-term, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that the central bank will stay completely on the sidelines. At the July meeting, the BoJ surprised the markets with a tweak to its monetary policy which provided more flexibility to the 10-year bond yield cap. Governor Ueda insisted that this was not a move towards normalization, but investors have learned the hard way that the BoJ is not hesitant to make policy moves that have blindsided the markets.   USD/JPY Technical USD/JPY is testing support at 145.71. Below, there is support at 144.07 There is resistance at 1.4640 and 147.31  
SEK: Enjoying a Breather as Technical Factors Drive Correction

FX Daily: Anticipating Jackson Hole - PMIs, Yuan Stability, and Nvidia Earnings Take Center Stage

ING Economics ING Economics 23.08.2023 10:18
FX Daily: A busy day ahead of Jackson Hole While the People's Bank of China continues its battle to keep the USD/CNY under 7.30, markets will take a close look at PMIs today. The main focus will be on the eurozone – Germany in particular – and the UK. In the US, Nvidia’s quarterly results are seen as pivotal for the AI-led equity run.   USD: Nvidia results in focus The Jackson Hole Economic Symposium starts tomorrow and should become the overwhelmingly predominant driver for currency markets. For now, investors are keeping a close eye on China and how effectively Beijing is defending its own currency. The 7.30 level in USD/CNY has emerged as the discomfort level for Chinese authorities, and a full session below that mark yesterday and overnight has prompted some optimistic calls that the worst is past us for the yuan’s mini currency “crisis”. It seems a bit premature, but the intent from the People's Bank of China (PBoC) to put a line in the sand at 7.30 is now clear, and would admittedly require another substantial deterioration in sentiment to accept a higher barrier for the pair. USD/CNH drops normally bring the dollar lower across the board. For now, the renminbi is stable rather than truly rebounding, which allowed a small EUR/USD drop yesterday. Markets will be looking at PMIs across developed economies today. The surveys have a larger market impact in European markets but have recently also been looked at with interest in the US, where consensus is expecting few changes from the July read. New home sales are also on the calendar. Another event to keep an eye on today will be the release of quarterly results from Nvidia. The firm is a key player in the AI space and some see today’s results as a key turning point for the recent AI-led equity rally. The impact will likely extend to the currency market. Still, with Jackson Hole kicking off tomorrow and the material risk of Fed Chair Jerome Powell reiterating a hawkish message, any dollar bearish trend may struggle to find solid momentum.
Turbulent FX Markets: Peso Strength, Renminbi Weakness, and Dollar's Delicate Balance

Turbulent FX Markets: Peso Strength, Renminbi Weakness, and Dollar's Delicate Balance

ING Economics ING Economics 01.09.2023 10:28
FX Daily: Peso too strong, renminbi too weak, dollar just right FX markets await today's release of the August US jobs report to see if we've reached any tipping point in the labour market. Probably not. And it is still a little too early to expect the dollar to embark on a sustained downtrend. Elsewhere, policymakers in emerging markets are addressing currencies that are too weak (China) and too strong (Mexico).   USD: The market seems to be bracing for soft nonfarm payrolls data Today's focus will be the August nonfarm payrolls jobs release. The consensus expects around a +170k increase on headline jobs gains, although the "whisper" numbers are seemingly nearer the +150k mark. Importantly, very few expect much change in the 3.5% unemployment rate. This remains on its cycle lows, continues to support strong US consumption, and keeps the Fed on its hawkish guard. We will also see the release of average hourly earnings for August, which are expected to moderate to 0.3% month-on-month from 0.4%. As ING's US economist James Knightley notes in recent releases on the US economy and yesterday's US data, there are reasons to believe that strong US consumption cannot roll over into the fourth quarter and that a recession is more likely delayed than avoided. But this looks like a story for the fourth quarter. Unless we see some kind of sharp spike higher in unemployment today, we would expect investors to remain comfortable holding their 5.3% yielding dollars into the long US weekend. That is not to say the dollar needs to rally much, just that the incentives to sell are not here at present. If the dollar is at some kind of comfortable level, policy tweaks in the emerging market space over the last 24 hours show Beijing trying to fight renminbi weakness and Mexico City trying to fight peso strength (more on that below). We suspect these will be long, drawn-out battles with the market. DXY can probably stay bid towards the top of a 103-104 range.
Bank of Japan Governor Hints at Rate Hike: A Closer Look

Bank of Japan Governor Hints at Rate Hike: A Closer Look

Craig Erlam Craig Erlam 12.09.2023 10:46
Ueda hints that BoJ could raise rates How seriously should we take the comments amid intervention speculation? Divergences suggest traders becoming nervous A relatively quiet start to the week from an economic data perspective but we’re still seeing some decent moves in the markets this morning, particularly in the Japanese yen. The yen has jumped this morning on the back of comments from Bank of Japan Governor, Kazuo Ueda, who hinted that interest rates may not be negative for much longer. Ueda reportedly claimed that if they become confident that prices and wages will keep rising sustainably, which could be as early as year-end, then an end to negative interest rates could be one option on the table. The focus for so long has been on the central bank’s yield curve control policy but perhaps these comments suggest abandoning that will not be the first major move. Of course, at a time of so much speculation around currency intervention and a rapidly weakening yen, you have to wonder what the real motivation behind these comments is and how seriously to take them. Only time will tell but for now, they’ve managed to give the yen a boost.     Are we seeing signs of nerves? The dollar has run into resistance repeatedly over the last week around 148 against the yen which suggests there’s some apprehension around these levels.   Source – OANDA on Trading View   We are very much in the territory where interventions have occurred in the past which may explain those nerves and Ueda’s comments gave traders further reason to fear action that could significantly boost the yen. You can see from the MACD in particular that recent rallies have not been matched by increasing momentum and that divergence may support the idea of nerves creeping in. A move below 145 would be interesting, with the area around here having been notable support recently and resistance back in late June and early July. It’s also around where the Ministry of Finance intervened last September. Traders have not been fully deterred by verbal intervention in the past though and if we do see another move to the upside, it will be interesting to see whether it’s matched by momentum or a deepening divergence.    
ECB Faces Dilemma as European Commission Downgrades Eurozone Growth Forecasts

ECB Faces Dilemma as European Commission Downgrades Eurozone Growth Forecasts

ING Economics ING Economics 12.09.2023 10:48
EC downgrades eurozone growth for this year and next Will the ECB be deterred if their forecasts have similar downgrades? EURUSD slips below key support ahead of US inflation data and ECB   The European Commission downgraded its forecasts for the EU this year and next, weighed down by much weaker growth in Germany. The new forecasts won’t come as a major surprise and may even prove overly optimistic over time but they do come days ahead of the next ECB meeting and could tempt some policymakers into voting to pause the tightening cycle. ECB policymakers will obviously be armed with their own forecasts when it comes to the vote but it’s likely their growth expectations will be revised lower on the basis of recent releases. While markets are currently pricing in a pause this week, around 60/40 at the time of writing, I’m probably leaning more toward a final hike before pausing in October. It’s probably easier to justify a hike this week than it may be at the end of next month and I’m not sure there’s enough desire at the ECB to stop at the current rates. Weaker economic readings will probably drive a lively debate and they obviously won’t suggest, if they do hike, that it’s job done, rather more finely balanced. But they can’t ignore the progress in recent months, other economic indicators, and the lag effect of past moves.   A cautious breakout but perhaps still a significant one Recent strength in the US dollar has prompted a breakout against the euro in the last week which may prove to be very significant.   EURUSD Daily Source – OANDA on Trading View   While it continues to trade in a descending channel, the pair has broken below the 200/233-day simple moving average band for the first time since November. It then ran into support around 1.07 which has been a notable level of support in the past and the May low isn’t far below here. The interesting thing is that while the breakout hasn’t been the catalyst for a sharper move lower, yet, the decline isn’t lacking momentum. The MACD and stochastic are continuing to make new lows alongside price. Perhaps the MACD histogram is an exception but even this isn’t particularly clear. A break of the May low could confirm the move and see the sell-off accelerate. But with the US CPI to come on Wednesday and the ECB meeting on Thursday, there may be some apprehension among traders. That may even explain why it’s been more of a cautious breakout until this point.    
Sticky US Inflation Expected to Maintain Dollar Strength Ahead of FOMC Meeting

Sticky US Inflation Expected to Maintain Dollar Strength Ahead of FOMC Meeting

ING Economics ING Economics 13.09.2023 08:52
FX Daily: Sticky US inflation to keep dollar bid Today sees the last major US inflation report ahead of the next FOMC meeting on 20 September. Higher gasoline prices and base effects are expected to push August CPI up to 3.6% YoY, and on a core and month-on-month basis, we also see an upside risk to the 0.2% MoM consensus estimate – clearly not enough to feed a bearish dollar narrative.   USD: CPI figures to keep the dollar firm The highlight of today's session will be the August US CPI release. As our US economist James Knightley discusses here, the headline year-on-year rate is expected to rise to 3.6% from 3.2% on base effects and higher gasoline prices. And while the core YoY rate may drop to 4.4% from 4.7%, an above consensus core month-on-month reading – possibly on the back of airfares and medical costs – will hardly support any narrative of the Federal Reserve's work being done. This will probably lay the groundwork for a reasonably hawkish FOMC meeting this time next week, where despite unchanged rates, the Fed will (through its Dot Plots) hold out the threat of one further hike this year. All of the above should keep the dollar reasonably bid and keep policymakers in the likes of China and Japan busy fighting local currency weakness (more below). We are bearish on the dollar from the fourth quarter of this year, but this bearish narrative requires a few more weeks of patience. We favour DXY edging back to the top of its 104.50-105,00 range today.
US Treasury Rates Hold Strong as Inflation Report Looms, Dollar Resilience Continues

US Treasury Rates Hold Strong as Inflation Report Looms, Dollar Resilience Continues

Kenny Fisher Kenny Fisher 13.09.2023 09:03
Treasury rates remain attractive: 2-year at 5.009%, 5-year at 4.428%, 10-year at 4.288%, and 30-year at 4.370% US inflation report expectations are for core readings to remain subdued, while headline jumps on rising gas prices. CPI M/M: 0.6%e v 0.2%; Y/Y: 3.6%e v 3.2% prior; core m/m: 0.2%e v 0.2% prior; y/y: 4.3.%e v 4.7% prior Fed rate hike expectations are pricing in slightly a greater chance of more tightening this winter. Implied rate peak at 5.452% vs 5.446% last Tuesday.   USD/JPY is not ready to turn bearish despite BOJ Governor Ueda’s verbal intervention that kicked off the trading week.  The higher for longer and risks of more Fed tightening could keep the dollar supported a little while longer.  This afternoon’s US 10-year auction went as planned, awarding 4.289%, which was the highest yield since 2007.  Yesterday we saw strong demand for the Treasury’s three- and six-month bill auctions.  The flows that are coming the dollar’s way are not going to be easing anytime soon and that should provide a level underlying support for the dollar. The big risk for the dollar is if inflation cools and economic resilience quickly vanishes.  A bearish dollar outlook should not be the base case just yet, but if the data suggests that is happening currency markets could jump on that trade.       While dollar strength has resumed it is still over 50 pips away from levels that trade before BOJ Governor Ueda’s comment on a ‘quiet exit’ reducing monetary policy easing.  This week will either see a resilient US economy force more jawboning from Japan, or support the belief that the Fed’s done raising rates.  Initial support resides at the 146.80 level, followed by Monday’s low of 145.90. To the upside, key resistance is provided by the 147.90 level, followed by the psychological 150 handle.    
US Inflation Report Sets the Tone for Upcoming FOMC Meeting

US Inflation Report Sets the Tone for Upcoming FOMC Meeting

ING Economics ING Economics 14.09.2023 08:39
Today sees the last major US inflation report ahead of the next FOMC meeting on 20 September. Higher gasoline prices and base effects are expected to push August CPI up to 3.6% YoY, and on a core and month-on-month basis, we also see an upside risk to the 0.2% MoM consensus estimate – clearly not enough to feed a bearish dollar narrative USD CPI figures to keep the dollar firm The highlight of today's session will be the August US CPI release. As our US economist James Knightley discusses here, the headline year-on-year rate is expected to rise to 3.6% from 3.2% on base effects and higher gasoline prices. And while the core YoY rate may drop to 4.4% from 4.7%, an above consensus core month-on-month reading – possibly on the back of airfares and medical costs – will hardly support any narrative of the Federal Reserve's work being done. This will probably lay the groundwork for a reasonably hawkish FOMC meeting this time next week, where despite unchanged rates, the Fed will (through its Dot Plots) hold  out the threat of one further hike this year. All of the above should keep the dollar reasonably bid and keep policymakers in the likes of China and Japan busy fighting local currency weakness (more below). We are bearish on the dollar from the fourth quarter of this year, but this bearish narrative requires a few more weeks of patience. We favour DXY edging back to the top of its 104.50-105,00 range today.   Chris Turner.
Euro-dollar Support Tested Amidst Rate Concerns and Labor Strikes

Euro-dollar Support Tested Amidst Rate Concerns and Labor Strikes

Ipek Ozkardeskaya Ipek Ozkardeskaya 25.09.2023 11:28
Euro-dollar at important support By Ipek Ozkardeskaya, Senior Analyst |Swissquote Bank   The week started on a cautious note as stocks in Asia mostly sold off following a rough week in the US, where the Federal Reserve's (Fed) hawkish pause triggered a fresh wave of worries that the rates would stay higher for longer. The US 2-year yield bounced lower after hitting 5.20%, yet the US 10-year continues its journey higher and hit 4.50% on Friday. The S&P500 slipped below its ascending base since last October, fell below its 100-DMA, and closed the week at the lowest levels since June, having recorded the worst performance over the week since the banking crisis in March. BoFA said that equity investors are dumping stocks at the fastest level since last December, and Morgan Stanley warned that stocks are now 'fragile'. Indeed! More fragile than the S&P500 are the rate sensitive technology stocks, and the small cap stocks. The growing divergence between the S&P500 and Russell 2000 index is also flashing 'recession', on top of the heavily inverted US yield curve.  Elsewhere, the UAW strikes will broaden to all GM and Stellantis parts plants in the US, which means that 5600 more workers will join the movement (Ford will likely be spared, for now, as some good progress is made on negotiations with the UAW) and the US will shut down by the end of the week if politicians fail to pass a dozen of bills. The latest US GDP update will fall in this chaotic environment, but the expectation is a positive revision from 2.1% to 2.3%.  In the currency markets, the US dollar extends gains. The dollar index entered the bullish consolidation zone after the Fed kept the possibility of another rate hike before the year ends on the table when it met last week, and said that the rates will likely stay higher for longer next year.   The EURUSD tested an important Fibonacci support last week, the major 38.2% retracement level which should distinguish between the positive trend building since last year, and a slide into the bearish consolidation zone. There is a stronger case for further euro weakness than the contrary. Released last Friday, the preliminary September PMI figures were mixed; the Eurozone manufacturing further slowed but German numbers hinted at some improvement. This week, we will see how the recent slowdown impacted the inflation dynamics in September. Headline inflation in the euro area is expected to have slowed from 5.2% to 4.5% this month, a slowdown that would defy the rising energy prices and the euro depreciation. Core inflation is seen softening from 5.3% to 4.8%. Any softness in inflation figures should give further support to the euro bears, while higher than expected numbers, which I believe could be the surprise of this week could revive the European Central Bank (ECB) hawks, but will hardly prevent the euro from seeking into a deeper depression, as further ECB action would also mean a bigger hit on economies. That's a fear that will likely keep euro bulls away from the market for now.  On the corporate calendar, Micron Technology and Nike will be releasing their latest quarterly results, and TotalEnergies Investor Day Event will gather happy industry players as US crude consolidates gains above $91pb with no big sign of a significant downside correction.  
USD/JPY Eyes Psychological Level of 150.00 Amidst BoJ's Monetary Policy and Fed's Rate Hike Expectations

USD/JPY Eyes Psychological Level of 150.00 Amidst BoJ's Monetary Policy and Fed's Rate Hike Expectations

InstaForex Analysis InstaForex Analysis 27.09.2023 14:12
For the fourth consecutive day, the USD/JPY pair is steadily heading towards the psychological level of 150.00, currently trading above the 149.00 mark.   The Japanese yen continues to face pressure due to the Bank of Japan's decision last week to maintain the status quo. At the end of the September meeting, the Japanese central bank left its ultra-loose policy unchanged, refraining from any hints of possible changes in the near future.   Additionally, earlier this week, Bank of Japan Governor Kazuo Ueda stated that the current policy has a significant stimulative effect on the economy, and the main position is to patiently maintain monetary easing. He added that Japan's economy is at a critical stage in achieving a positive wage growth cycle and sustainable inflation at 2%, which is not yet visible. Such statements dispel hopes of a future exit from the massive stimulus program and continue to undermine the yen. On the other hand, the Federal Reserve has indicated that interest rates will not be falling in the near future. It openly stated that there will be further rate hikes by the end of the year, with only two rate cuts expected in 2024, instead of the previously speculated four, as anticipated three months ago.   Many FOMC members still express uncertainty about the end of the fight against inflation. Consequently, this supports the prospects for further tightening of monetary policy. This, in turn, led to selling in the U.S. bond market and pushed the yield on 10-year Treasury bonds to the highest level since 2007, which became a key factor in the recent rise of the U.S. dollar to a 10-month peak and continues to support the USD/JPY pair's upward trajectory.   Nevertheless, the prevailing risk-off environment favors the relative status of JPY as a safe haven and limits the potential for spot price growth. But it should not be forgotten that Japanese authorities will intervene in the currency market to support the national currency. This restrains bulls from pushing USD/JPY to new levels. In fact, Japanese Finance Minister Shunichi Suzuki issued a new warning against the recent weakness of the yen and stated last week that the government would not rule out any options to address excessive volatility in the currency markets.   This, in turn, requires caution before taking positions regarding the continuation of the established upward trend observed since mid-July. However, for now, the fundamental backdrop supports the pair's growth. But it is worth paying attention to today's news regarding the dollar before rushing into betting on further moves.  
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Immobile Fed: Anticipating a Pause with a Nod to Higher Yields

ING Economics ING Economics 02.11.2023 12:28
FX Daily: Immobile Fed to give a nod to higher yields We expect the Fed to pause today, in line with expectations. There is a mild risk of a dollar correction, but that should be short-lived. Japanese authorities are stepping up efforts to contain unwanted volatility in rates and FX, but we suspect markets will keep pushing USD/JPY higher and into the new intervention level.   USD: A quiet Fed meeting The Federal Reserve is in a desirable position as it prepares to announce policy this evening thanks to the combined effect of rate hikes and higher Treasury yields keeping pressure on prices. The economy has proven resilient so far. In the art of central banking, inaction is action, and inaction is broadly what we expect from the Fed today as we discuss in our preview. A pause is widely expected by markets and economists, as numerous FOMC members signalled higher Treasury yields were adding enough extra tightening of financial conditions to stay put. One question for today is to what extent the statement and Fed Chair Jerome Powell will acknowledge this non-monetary tightening of financial conditions. It’s unlikely the Fed wants to drop any dovish hints at this stage, but a market that is well positioned for a broadly unchanged policy message could be rather sensitive to the wording on this topic and may interpret an “official” recognition of tighter financial conditions as an implicit signal more tightening is off the table. The typically cautious Powell may anyway try to mitigate any dovish interpretation of the statement during the press conference. After all, the Fed dot plot still says one more hike by year-end and has a strong commitment to higher rates for longer. The first of these two statements was never taken at face value, but the latter is what is contributing to higher yields. Expect no divergence from it. The Fed isn’t the only event in the US calendar today, and markets will likely move on the ADP payrolls release (although these are unreliable), JOLTS jobs openings and the ISM manufacturing figures for October. There is room for a short-lived dollar correction today as markets will be on the hunt for implicit admissions that another hike is actually off the table with higher yields. Positioning adjustments have favoured some dollar slips recently but they have not lasted, as the overall message by the Fed has been one of higher for longer with a hawkish bias. That message won’t change today (barring any great surprises) and we think that buying the dips in any dollar correction will remain a popular trade, especially given the more and more unstable ground on which other major currencies (JPY, EUR) are standing.
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US Dollar Rises as Bond Market Ignites: A Look at Dollar's Resurgence

ING Economics ING Economics 10.11.2023 10:03
FX Daily: Bond bears give new energy to the dollar A very soft 30-year Treasury auction and hawkish comments by Powell triggered a rebound in US yields and the dollar yesterday. Dynamics in the rates market will remain key while awaiting market-moving US data. In the UK, growth numbers in line with expectations, while in Norway, inflation surprised to the upside. USD: Auction and Powell trigger dollar rebound The dollar chased the spike in US yields yesterday following a big tailing in the 30-year Treasury auction and hawkish comments by Fed Chair Jerome Powell. Speaking at the IMF conference, Powell warned against reading too much into the softer inflation figures and cautioned that the inflation battle remains long, with another hike still possible. If we look at the Fed Funds future curve, it is clear that markets remain highly doubtful another hike will be delivered at all, but Powell’s remarks probably represent the culmination of a pushback against the recent dovish repricing. Remember that in last week’s FOMC announcement, the admission that financial conditions had tightened came with the caveat that the impact on the economy and inflation would have depended on how long rates would have been kept elevated. The hawkish rhetoric pushed by Powell suggests that the Fed still prefers higher Treasury yields doing the tightening rather than hiking again, and that is exactly what markets are interpreting. The soft auction for long-dated Treasuries also signals the post-NFP correction in rates may well have been overdone and could set a new floor for yields unless data point to a worsening US outlook. Today’s highlights in the US calendar are the University of Michigan surveys. Particular focus will be on the 1-year inflation gauge, which is expected to fall from 4.2% to 4.0%. On the Fed side, we’ll hear from Lorie Logan, Raphael Bostic and Mary Daly. Dynamics across the US yield curve will have a big say in whether the dollar can hold on to its new gains. Anyway, we had called for a recovery in DXY to 106.00 as the Fed would have likely pushed back against the dovish repricing. The rebound in yields should put a floor under the dollar, but we suspect some reassurances from the data side will be needed for another big jump in the greenback.
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Navigating the FX Landscape: Evaluating the Dollar Bear Trend Amidst Market Dynamics

ING Economics ING Economics 27.11.2023 15:16
FX Daily: Don’t chase the dollar bear trend At the start of a quiet week for data, the dollar is hovering near recent lows. However, we do not think this is yet the start of the big, cyclical turn lower in the dollar we expect for next year. Instead, falling volatility and firm short-dated US yields can probably see the dollar hold onto current levels. Highlights this week include OPEC+ and key speakers. USD: Too soon The DXY dollar index is down around 3.5% from its highs seen in October. The drop looks largely down to the view that the Federal Reserve's tightening cycle is over and that portfolio capital can now be put back to work in bonds, equities, and emerging markets. While acknowledging that November and December are seasonally soft months for the dollar, our view is that this dollar sell-off has come a little early. We are bearish on the dollar through 2024 but expect the core driver to be a bullish steepening of the US Treasury curve – which has not happened yet. Indeed, US two-year Treasury yields remain firm near 5%. We thus urge caution in chasing this dollar decline much further. In terms of what this week has to offer, we pick out three themes: the Fed, OPEC+ and US data. Fed communication this week will come from the release of the Fed's Beige book and also some key speakers, including Fed Chair Jay Powell, on Friday. Remember that the Beige Book paints a picture of the economy to prepare the FOMC for its meeting on 13 December. It certainly is not clear that the Beige Book will paint a soft enough picture to support the 80bp of fed easing already priced for next year.  In terms of the OPEC+ meeting, our commodities team believe that the Saudis will extend their voluntary supply cut and that the oil market can find some support - a mild dollar positive. In terms of US data, the highlight should be some stable (0.2% MoM) core PCE inflation data for October and the ISM Manufacturing data on Friday.  Thursday's US inflation data is probably the largest bearish risk to the dollar this week. However, with cross-market volatility falling, it seems investors are once again interested in carry trade strategies. We have seen this theme several times this year already, and it is not a dollar negative. It is a negative for the funding currencies like the Japanese yen and the Chinese renminbi. Until we get some clear dovish communication from the Fed or US data is materially weak enough, we think this dollar drop might have come far enough for the time being and suspect that the 103.00/103.50 support area could well hold the DXY this week.
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China's Caixin Manufacturing Shows Marginal Growth, Boosts Australian Dollar

Kenny Fisher Kenny Fisher 02.01.2024 13:20
China Caixin Manufacturing posts slight growth The Australian dollar is in positive territory on Tuesday. In the European session, AUD/USD is trading at 0.6826, up 0.22%. The week between Christmas and New Year’s was subdued in the currency markets. Still, the Australian dollar hit a six-month high on Christmas Day, rising to 0.6871. The Aussie ended the year on a roll, gaining 3.1% in December. China’s Caixin Manufacturing PMI ticked up to 50.8 in December, up from 50.7 in November and above the consensus of 50.4. This was the highest reading since August, but the reading points to stagnation in manufacturing. The reading was better than the official Manufacturing PMI release on Saturday of 49.0 which indicates contraction. The non-manufacturing PMI edged up to 50.4, compared to 50.2 in November. Activity in the non-manufacturing sector has been minimal over the past six months, as China remains mired in an economic slowdown as we move into 2024. Where is RBA headed? The Reserve Bank of Australia meets next on February 6 and it’s anyone’s guess what the central bank has in mind for 2024. The RBA has raised interest rates just once since June and held the cash rate at 4.35% at the December meeting. It’s likely that the RBA is done with raising rates, but the timing of a rate cut is unclear. Many economists are circling September for the first rate cut, while Bank of America is predicting a rate cut only in 2025. The markets are more optimistic and have priced in a rate cut in mid-2024. What all the views can agree on is that the inflation rate will play a critical role in determining the RBA’s rate path. Inflation has fallen to 4.9% but remains much higher than the RBA’s target band of 2-3%. Australia will release the December inflation report on January 10 and the release should be treated as a market-mover.   AUD/USD Technical AUD/USD is testing resistance at 0.6812. Next, there is resistance at 0.6845 0.6779 and 0.6746 are providing support  
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Treading Cautiously: Markets Await Today's Core PCE Data for Fed Insight

Michael Hewson Michael Hewson 26.01.2024 14:13
Today's core PCE the next key signpost ahead of next weeks Fed meeting By Michael Hewson (Chief Market Analyst at CMC Markets UK)   European markets managed to eke out a small gain yesterday after the ECB kept rates unchanged but left the door ajar to the prospect of a rate cut before the summer. ECB President Christine Lagarde did push back strongly on speculation that policymakers had discussed anything like that insisting that such talk was premature, echoing her comments made earlier this month. It was noteworthy however that the possibility of a cut before June wasn't ruled out completely, and it was that markets reacted to yesterday as yields declined sharply, which does keep the prospect of an earlier move on the table given how poor this week's economic data has been.   US markets also managed to finish the day higher with the S&P500 and Nasdaq 100 putting in new record closes, after US Q4 GDP came in well above expectations at 3.3%. The core PCE price index also remained steady at 2% for the second quarter in succession, and in line with the Federal Reserve's inflation target, thus keeping faint hopes of a US rate cut in March alive. It also places much greater importance on today's December core PCE deflator inflation numbers which aren't expected to vary much from what we saw in the November numbers. At the moment markets seem convinced that the Fed might spring a surprise in March and slip in an early rate cut if inflation shows further signs of slowing. That might make sense if the US economy was struggling but this week's economic numbers clearly suggest it isn't, and if anything is still growing at a decent clip. There is a danger that in cutting rates in March they drive market expectations of further cuts into overdrive, something they have been keen to push back on with recent commentary.   In any case with the Federal Reserve due to meet next week markets are continuing to try and finesses the timing of when the first rate cut is likely to occur, after Powell's surprisingly dovish shift when the central bank last met just before Christmas. That means today PCE numbers are likely to be a key waypoint for markets and the central bank, after the PCE core deflator slowed to 3.2% in November, slipping from 3.4% in October, and the lowest level since April 2021. A further slowdown to 3% or even lower, which appears to be the consensus could see markets continue to build on the prospect of a rate cut in March, which took hold back in December. The bigger concern for some Fed officials is that headline CPI appears to be ticking higher again, which may make the last yards to 2% much trickier. This will be the Fed's key concern over an early cut as it could reignite the inflationary pressures that have taken so long to get under control. This caution would suggest that March is too early for a US rate cut, and that the market is getting ahead of itself, with policymakers also likely to pay attention to consumer demand. This means personal spending is also likely to be a key indicator for the FOMC and here we are expecting to see a pickup to 0.5% from 0.2%. With the US consumer still looking resilient the Fed is likely to be extra cautious if inflation starts ticking higher again as it already has with headline CPI.   It was also interesting to note that while yields fell sharply yesterday, the US dollar didn't, it actually finished the day higher and well off the lows of the week.       EUR/USD – slipped back towards the 200-day SMA at 1.0820/30 yesterday, with a break below 1.0800 targeting a potential move towards 1.0720. Resistance at the highs this week at 1.0930 and behind that at 1.1000.  GBP/USD – while the pound has struggled to push higher this week, we've managed to consistently hold above the support at the 50-day SMA as well as the 1.2590 area. We need to get above 1.2800 to maintain upside momentum. EUR/GBP – finally slipped to support at the 0.8520 area, which needs to hold to prevent a move towards the August lows at 0.8490. Resistance at the 0.8620/25 area and the highs last week. USD/JPY – currently finding resistance at the 148.80 area which has held over the last week or so which could see a move back towards the 146.25 area. A fall through 146.00 could delay a move towards 150 and argue for a move towards 144.00. FTSE100 is expected to open 30 points higher at 7,559 DAX is expected to open 50 points lower at 16,857 CAC40 is expected to open 28 points higher at 7,492.
Czech National Bank Poised for Aggressive Rate Cut: Unpacking Monetary Policy Dynamics, Market Reactions, and Economic Forecasts

Czech National Bank Poised for Aggressive Rate Cut: Unpacking Monetary Policy Dynamics, Market Reactions, and Economic Forecasts

ING Economics ING Economics 02.02.2024 15:29
Czech National Bank Preview: Time to catch up We expect the pace of cutting to accelerate to 50bp, which will push the CNB key rate to 6.25%. The main reasons will be low inflation in the central bank's new forecast, which should allow for more cutting in the future. For year-end, we see the rate at 4.00% but the risk here is clearly downwards.   Optimistic forecasts could speed up the cutting pace to 50bp The Czech National Bank will meet on Thursday next week and will present its first forecast published this year. We are going into the meeting expecting an acceleration in the cutting pace from 25bp in December to 50bp, which would mean a cut from the current 6.75% to 6.25%. This means a revision in our forecast, which previously saw an acceleration taking place in March. Still, it's certain to be a close call given the cautious approach of the board – and that could bring a 25bp cut.   The board will have a new central bank forecast, which is likely to be a key factor in decision-making. Here we see the need for revision in a few places, but overall everything points in a dovish direction. On the global side, compared to the November forecast, we expect the CNB to revise down both GDP growth, rates and oil prices. On the domestic side, inflation has surprised downwards only slightly in the past three months for both headline and core inflation. Still, we expect some downward profile shift due to a better outlook for food, energy and oil prices. As for GDP, the CNB was the most pessimistic forecaster in the market in November and the incoming data was rather mixed in this regard, so we expect only modest changes here. The CZK was 0.35% stronger than the central bank's expectations in the fourth quarter of last year. On the other hand, it was slightly weaker in January. Overall, we do not see any significant impact on the new forecast here, but the lower EURIBOR profile after the revision may indicate a stronger CZK in the new forecast, or allow for faster rate cuts in the CNB model. The November forecast indicated roughly a 50bp cut in the fourth quarter last year and reaching 3.50% by the end of this year, delivering a total 350bp of rate cuts. As we know, the CNB delivered only 25bp last year, which will need to be reflected in the new forecast. Overall, we expect a slightly steeper rate path again with a 3.00% level at the end of 2025, which should have a dovish outcome for the market in our view. As always these days, we can also expect several alternative scenarios, one of which will be the board's preferred scenario, showing a slightly slower rate cuts profile than the baseline.   Inflation nowcast will be key to the decision We see from public statements that the dovish wing of the board (Frait, Holub) will push for a faster pace of rate cuts given inflation numbers indicating a quick return to the 2% inflation target this year and will be open to more than 50bp of rate cuts. For the rest of the board, we think the inflation indication for January and beyond in the central bank's new forecast is key. We are currently expecting 2.7% for January headline inflation, with room for it to come in lower if the anecdotal evidence of January's repricing is confirmed. This, in our view, will give the rest of the board the confidence to accelerate the pace of cutting as early as this meeting.   4% at the end of the year or lower depending on core inflation Looking forward, we believe the favourable forecast for the coming months will allow the 50bp pace to continue. Here, our forecast remains unchanged and we think core inflation will still prevent the board from going faster later. We therefore still assume a 4% key rate at the end of this year. But if core inflation continues to surprise to the downside, we find it easy to imagine lower levels here.     What to expect in FX and rates markets The CZK has weakened in recent days following comments made by Deputy Governor Jan Frait and touched 24.90 EUR/CZK, which is basically the weakest level since early 2022. If the CNB delivers a 50bp rate cut, it's obviously negative news for the CZK. But on the other hand, we believe that the market positioning is already heavy short and rates are already pricing in the vast majority of CNB rate cuts. That's why we see the cap at 25.20 EUR/CZK. A minor cut, however, could bring a temporary strengthening towards 24.70 given heavy dovish expectations. In our base case scenario, we think that after the 50bp rate cut and January inflation, the market should have hit the limit of what can be priced in and the CZK should start appreciating again later this year thanks to the economic recovery, good current account results and falling EUR rates improving the interest rate differential. The rates market fully priced in a 50bp move recently and expects another 50bp move for the next meeting, which is close to our forecast. However, the terminal rate is already priced in at 3% at the end of this year, which we don't have on paper until next year – but we still see this as a possible scenario if inflation remains under control. If we do see the CNB's forecast, the market can easily get excited for a lower terminal rate and overshoot market pricing. Therefore, we expect the combination of the 50bp cut and the dovish forecast to push market rates further down, resulting in further steepening of the curve. In the bond space, we maintain our positive view here going forward. Czech government bond supply has fallen significantly as we expected and, combined with the inflation profile and central bank cutting rates, offers a perfect combination in the CEE region. Here, we continue to prefer belly curves and see more steepening.

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