cpi data

  • UK wages/UK CPI (Dec) – 16/01 and 17/01

Since March of last year headline CPI in the UK has more than halved, slowing from 10.1%, with November slowing more than expected to 3.9%, prompting speculation that the Bank of England might be closer to cutting rates in 2024 than had been originally priced. The decline in headline inflation is very much welcome, however most of it has been driven by the falls in petrol prices over the past few weeks.

Inflation elsewhere in the UK economy is still much higher although even in these areas it has been slowing. Food price inflation for example is still much higher, slowing to 6.6% in December, while wage growth is still trending above 7% at 7.2%. Services inflation is also higher at 6.3% while core prices rose at 5.1% in the 3-months to November.

 

This week's wages and inflation numbers are likely to be key bellwethers for the timing of when the Bank of England might look at starting to reduce the base rate, however the key test fo

A Bright Spot Amidst Economic Challenges

Commodities Prices And Problems With Supplies Are Still In Charge Considering US Inflation | US corporate pricing power set to delay inflation’s decline | ING Economics

ING Economics ING Economics 11.05.2022 09:23
US small business optimism held steady in April after three consecutive falls. Nonetheless, businesses retain the ability to pass higher costs onto their customers and this will keep inflation sticky. Ongoing supply chain issues and rising fuel costs mean 2% inflation is a distant prospect Business sentiment holds steady, but firms still want to hire The recent US data has been mixed and that has helped to fuel fears that the economy could experience a marked slowdown, especially with the Federal Reserve firmly focused on inflation and hiking interest rates. Dollar strength is acting as a further headwind to growth by making US exports less price competitive in what is already a challenging external demand environment for companies. In this regard this morning’s National Federation of Independent Business survey for April was marginally better than expected at the headline level with optimism holding steady versus expectations of a fourth consecutive monthly drop. Nonetheless it is still the weakest level since April 2020 in the immediate aftermath of the pandemic striking. The details show a slight improvement in the proportion of small businesses expecting higher sales, but there was a little more pessimism on the outlook for the economy and whether it was a good time to expand. Set against this softer environment, firms are still struggling with worker shortages and are desperate to hire. The NFIB released the labour components last Thursday, which a net 46% having raised worker compensation during the past 3 months and 27% expecting to do so further. Inflation pressures show no sign of moderating Looking to tomorrow's inflation data the NFIB report shows a net 70% of companies raised their selling prices in the past 3 month - down from last month's 72% balance, but this is still the second highest reading in the survey's 47-year history. Moreover, a net 46% of firms plan to raise their prices further over the next three months (down from 50%, but this is still the 6th highest reading in the survey's history). This reinforces the message the despite concerns about where the economy is heading, businesses continue to have pricing power and highlights the breadth of inflation pressures in the economy. The ability to raise prices is seen across all sectors and all sizes of businesses NFIB price indicators show no sign of a turn in inflation Source: Macrobond, ING Inflation may be peaking, but 2% is a long way away Tomorrow's CPI report will probably show that inflation has passed the peak, due largely to lower used car prices, but in the absence of major improvements in supply chains and geopolitical tensions, the descent to the 2% target will be very slow and may not be achieved until the very end of 2023. However, with national gasoline prices hitting a new all-time high yesterday that will come as little comfort to most households. TagsUS Inflation Federal Reserve Business optimism   Disclaimer This publication has been prepared by ING solely for information purposes irrespective of a particular user's means, financial situation or investment objectives. The information does not constitute investment recommendation, and nor is it investment, legal or tax advice or an offer or solicitation to purchase or sell any financial instrument. Read more
Canadian Dollar Falters as USD/CAD Tests Key Support Amidst Rising Oil Prices and Economic Data

Some May Even Not Imagine How US Inflation (CPI Data) Can Affect Asian - Chinese Market And Forex Pairs With US Dollar Like USD/JPY And USD/CNH

ING Economics ING Economics 11.05.2022 13:54
All quiet in Asia ahead of US inflation In this article Macro outlook What to look out for: China and US inflation Source: shutterstock Macro outlook Global: The big story today is going to be the April US CPI release, and markets may be quite muted ahead of this. Our Chief US Economist has written about this in the context of the latest NFIB business survey, so please check out this link for more details. But to summarise, whatever happens tonight, he isn’t looking for US inflation to fall quickly. That may bring back concern about potentially more aggressive FOMC behaviour. In this vein, Loretta Mester yesterday suggested that if inflation wasn’t falling by the second half of the year, the FOMC may need to increase the pace of its tightening. US stocks managed to eke out some small gains yesterday after the big falls earlier this week. But trading was choppy, and it could have gone either way. We don’t read too much directional steer into this for Asia’s open today. G-10 FX continued to show USD support, but movements were not large. EURUSD drifted down to about 1.0530 from about 1.0560 yesterday. The AUD still looks pressured lower and is about 0.6937 as of writing. Other Asian FX was fairly muted, though note there is a BNM meeting today, so a “no-change” which is on the cards, could see the MYR softening further. Bond markets were also fairly muted. 2-year US Treasury yields edged up slightly, but the 10Y US Treasury bond yield drifted back under 3.0%. 10Y JGBs have been drifting higher – challenging the 0.25% level, and breaching it intraday, so we may be due an official response of sorts imminently.    China: April CPI and PPI inflation rates are expected to slow from March due to lower metal and coal prices and weak demand for consumer goods. We will probably see higher prices for pork and fertilizer. This set of data reflects slower economic growth resulting from the Covid-19 social distancing measures. Korea: The Jobless rate remained unchanged in April at 2.7% (vs the market consensus of 2.8%) for the third straight month, while the labour participation rate improved to 63.8% (vs 63.5% in March), indicating that the labour market continued on a recovery track. Reopening is supporting employment growth in service sectors such as retail sales, recreation, and transportation. Despite a gloomier outlook for manufacturing, employment in that sector posted a solid gain for the eighth straight month. However, one potential caveat to this month’s report was that the majority of the employment growth came from the older age group (60+) while the 30’s (supposedly the most productive group) lost the most jobs. President Yoon Seok Yeol’s party has proposed a supplementary budget plan to the government this morning. Although the size was in line with the market expectation of about KRW33tr, it is noted that the extra budget would not require additional bond issuance. More details will be released tomorrow. Read next: Stablecoins In Times Of Crypto Crash. What is Terra (UST)? A Deep Look Into Terra Altcoin. Terra - Leading Decentralised And Open-Source Public Blockchain Protocol | FXMAG.COM What to look out for: China and US inflation Korea unemployment (11 May) China CPI and PPI inflation (11 May) US CPI inflation (11 May) Philippines 1Q GDP (12 May) US PPI inflation and initial jobless claims (12 May) Malaysia GDP (13 May) Hong Kong GDP (13 May) US Michigan sentiment (13 May) TagsEmerging Markets Asia Pacific Asia Markets Asia Economics   Disclaimer This publication has been prepared by ING solely for information purposes irrespective of a particular user's means, financial situation or investment objectives. The information does not constitute investment recommendation, and nor is it investment, legal or tax advice or an offer or solicitation to purchase or sell any financial instrument. Read more
Nasdaq Slips as Tech Stocks Falter, US Inflation Data Awaits

Rising Inflation In The US Means Rising US Dollar (USD), Chinese COVID Policy Seems To Be Almost Impossible | US inflation, a make-or-break moment for investors! | MarketTalk: What’s up today? | Swissquote

Swissquote Bank Swissquote Bank 11.05.2022 11:12
It’s D-day of the week: we will see whether inflation in the US started easing in April after hitting a four-decade high in March, and if yes, by how much. A soft inflation read will come as a relief that the Federal Reserve’s (Fed) efforts to tame inflation start paying off, but any disappointment could send another shock wave to the market. In the FX, the US dollar extended gains, despite the easing yields yesterday, as the risk-off flows continued supporting the greenback For now, activity on Fed funds futures give almost 90% chance for a 50-bp hike in FOMC’s June meeting; there is a lot left to be priced for a 75bp hike, if the data doesn’t please. To avoid pricing in a 75bp hike at next FOMC meeting, we must see an encouraging cooldown in inflation. In the FX, the US dollar extended gains, despite the easing yields yesterday, as the risk-off flows continued supporting the greenback.   The barrel of US crude tipped a toe below the $100 level on news that the Europeans softened their sanctions proposal against the Russian oil The levels against the majors like euro, yen and sterling remained flat, but the positive pressure in the dollar, combined with Turkey’s unconventional monetary policy start giving signs of exhaustion. The dollar-try advanced past the 15 mark, and the government asked institutions to make their FX operations within the most liquid trading hours. Two weeks ago, the bank had revised its regulations on banks' reserve requirements, applying them to the asset side of balance sheets in order to strengthen its macroprudential policy toolkit. The latter required reserves now pressure the overnight rates to the upside – suggesting that the unconventional policy is near limits. Energy are up and down… but mostly up. The barrel of US crude tipped a toe below the $100 level on news that the Europeans softened their sanctions proposal against the Russian oil, but oil is already above the $100 this morning. The upside potential is fading due to slower global growth prospects, and the Chinese lockdown. Read next: Stablecoins In Times Of Crypto Crash. What is Terra (UST)? A Deep Look Into Terra Altcoin. Terra - Leading Decentralised And Open-Source Public Blockchain Protocol | FXMAG.COM Watch the full episode to find out more! 0:00 Intro 0:24 All eyes on US inflation data! 2:30 Market update 3:50 Strong US dollar threatens lira stability 5:50 Risks in energy markets remain tilted to the upside 6.35 Why Chinese zero Covid policy won’t work 8.07 Coinbase hit hard by crypto meltdown 8:39 Energy, still the best option for investors Ipek Ozkardeskaya has begun her financial career in 2010 in the structured products desk of the Swiss Banque Cantonale Vaudoise. She worked at HSBC Private Bank in Geneva in relation to high and ultra-high net worth clients. In 2012, she started as FX Strategist at Swissquote Bank. She worked as a Senior Market Analyst in London Capital Group in London and in Shanghai. She returned to Swissquote Bank as Senior Analyst in 2020.  
"Global Steel Output Rises as Chinese Production Surges, Copper Market Remains in Deficit

Where (USD) US Dollar Is Going To Head To In The Next Few Days? May S&P 500 And Gold Become Volatile Shortly? | Daily Reprieve or More | Monica Kingsley

Monica Kingsley Monica Kingsley 11.05.2022 14:17
S&P 500 modest risk-on turn talked yesterday, is underway – with adequate support from bonds. That means the dollar is going to get under daily selling pressure, with positive consequences for assets spanning commonidities, precious metals and sure supporting tech as well (looking at TLT to cast a decisive vote for Nasdaq). Unfolding just fine, but what about the CPI effect? Likely to temper the oh so fast inflation theme, at least temporarily – and that would take pressure off the Fed‘s hand being twisted by the markets. Note though how both the 2-year and 10-year Treasury paused over the last days. Together with the arriving as anticipated negative quarterly GDP print, the temporary slowdown in pace of inflation would get an ally in retreating (especially long-term) Treasury yields reflecting the darkening real economy prospects. Time for a relief S&P 500 rally with both tech and value participation, if only HYG can perform somewhat better. Time for a relief S&P 500 rally with both tech and value participation, if only HYG can perform somewhat better. The bulls have a chance, and can run with it as best as they can. Cryptos thus far are modestly leaning in the „local bottom is in“ direction (in spite of the tectonic Tether developments), so the odds are for price gains across the board (at the expense of the dollar) during today – as long as markets interpret the upcoming CPI reading as slowing down / slowly peaking. Yes, since Jun 2020 when I started to talk early effects of inflation, the last week has been the first time when I raised the good likelihood of inflation making a local peak when May / Jun CPI readings come in, only to spring quickly back to life on the „economy is slowing, do something“ change in tune of demands made to the Fed. Read next: Stablecoins In Times Of Crypto Crash. What is Terra (UST)? A Deep Look Into Terra Altcoin. Terra - Leading Decentralised And Open-Source Public Blockchain Protocol | FXMAG.COM At these trying times for real asset bulls, let‘s take the proper precious metals perspective, enjoy the rich caption: It‘s the dollar, yields and miners coming back to life that would mark the coming upleg arrival Plenty of upside risk to become evident in 2H 2022, with my Monday‘s article covering the game plan for turnaround across the many assets on my daily watch. It‘s the dollar, yields and miners coming back to life that would mark the coming upleg arrival. Lean times until then. Read next: (EUR/USD) German Inflation Meets Forecasts, Pound Sterling Continues To Weaken (EUR/GBP, GBP/USD), (EUR/JPY) Japanese Yen Strengthens As Investors Seek Safe-Haven Assets| FXMAG.COM There, you can subscribe to the free Monica‘s Insider Club Thank you for having read today‘s free analysis, which is available in full at my homesite. There, you can subscribe to the free Monica‘s Insider Club, which features real-time trade calls and intraday updates for all the five publications: Stock Trading Signals, Gold Trading Signals, Oil Trading Signals, Copper Trading Signals and Bitcoin Trading Signals.
Agriculture: Russia's Exit from Black Sea Grain Deal Impacts Grain Prices

Here Is Why US Inflation Data (CPI) Is That Important Not Only For US Dollar (USD) Its Index (DXY), But Also For Stocks, Bonds And Other Assets | Conotoxia

Conotoxia Comments Conotoxia Comments 11.05.2022 15:28
Today at 14:30 important macroeconomic data for the US economy will be published, which may also affect asset valuations outside the United States - we are talking about inflation data. In March 2022, inflation in the United States rose to 8.5 percent, which was the highest reading in 40 years. The rise in prices, in turn, may have affected several market measures. First, it forced the Fed to act, as the Federal Reserve is supposed to care about price stability and should raise interest rates if prices rise. This in turn could have influenced expectations of higher USD interest rates in the future and a strengthening of the dollar to levels last seen 20 years ago. Further expectations of rising rates could lead to an increase in bond yields, where for 10-year bonds they are in the region of 3%. The increase in bond yields, expectations of further tightening of monetary policy, and shrinking of the Fed's balance sheet, in turn, are information that could adversely affect the stock market, which in the case of the Nasdaq 100 index found itself in bear market territory. This spiral seen in many markets may continue until investors fully discount inflation, rising yields, and expectations of interest rate hikes. Interestingly, the latter had already begun to fall earlier in the week as recession fears increased. Currently, based on the federal funds rate contracts, the market is assuming a peak for hikes in mid-2023 at 3.00-3.25 percent. That's lower than the 3.5-.375 percent assumed as recently as the beginning of the month. The determinant, in turn, of whether there is a chance of full pricing for U.S. rate hikes may be where inflation will be. If this one peaks this six months and starts to fall, the market may stop assuming very aggressive Fed action. This, in turn, could bring relief to the bond market, the stock market, and also lead to the US dollar being close to its cyclical peak. Hence, today's and subsequent data on price growth in the U.S. economy could be so important. Daniel Kostecki, Director of the Polish branch of Conotoxia Ltd. (Forex service) Materials, analysis and opinions contained, referenced or provided herein are intended solely for informational and educational purposes. Personal opinion of the author does not represent and should not be constructed as a statement or an investment advice made by Conotoxia Ltd. All indiscriminate reliance on illustrative or informational materials may lead to losses. Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future results. CFDs are complex instruments and come with a high risk of losing money rapidly due to leverage. 80.77% of retail investor accounts lose money when trading CFDs with this provider. You should consider whether you understand how CFDs work and whether you can afford to take the high risk of losing your money.
Forex: GBP/USD. The Support Has Been Rejected 3 Times. Uptrend!

Inflation (US CPI) Rises, So Does US Dollar (USD)! (SPX) S&P 500 And Nasdaq Have Decreased! Is Hawkish Fed Going To Hunt Again? | FxPro |

Alex Kuptsikevich Alex Kuptsikevich 11.05.2022 15:36
The dollar got a fresh boost, with stocks coming under renewed pressure after a new batch of US inflation data. The annual inflation rate slowed from 8.5% to 8.3% The US consumer price index rose 0.3% in April after 1.2% a month earlier. The annual inflation rate slowed from 8.5% to 8.3% but was higher than the expected 8.1% y/y. Particularly worrying for markets is the development of core inflation. The corresponding index added 0.6% m/m and 6.2% y/y last month, higher than the expected 0.4% and 6.0%, continuing the sprawl of inflation. Higher-than-expected inflation is now positive for the dollar and weighs on equities as it suggests a more robust Fed response While the annual rate of core and core inflation seems to have peaked, higher-than-expected inflation is now positive for the dollar and weighs on equities as it suggests a more robust Fed response. With inflation far from the 2% target, the Fed will be inclined to act faster (raise rates more than 50 points at a time) or stop hiking at a higher level. A significant risk demand indicator, bitcoin, has already moved out of the range with a lower boundary in January 2021 Locally, we see a tug-of-war around the dollar against the euro and yen near the lows of the past two weeks and swings against the pound and the franc near this week’s extremes. However, a significant risk demand indicator, bitcoin, has already moved out of the range with a lower boundary in January 2021. The S&P500 and Nasdaq futures were also pushed back to this week’s lows, indicating continued bearish pressure.
The Forex Market Is Under Strong Pressure From Geopolitical Events And Statistics

Gold $1200 Scenario? After Higher US CPI Release, Fed Is Expected To Tackle Inflation, So Gold Price (XAUUSD) May Plunge Again | FxPro

Alex Kuptsikevich Alex Kuptsikevich 11.05.2022 15:38
Gold dipped to $1832 on Wednesday morning, pulling back to a critical support line in the form of the 200-day moving average, losing more than 11% from the peak levels reached in early March. Gold has been losing buyers amid a jump in US government bond yields Gold has been under systematic pressure for the past month and a half amid a rally in the dollar. In addition to this increase in the underlying price, gold has been losing buyers amid a jump in US government bond yields. However, it is too early to talk about a break in the uptrend in gold, but only a retreat into deep defences ahead of essential data. Most of the time, the correlation between inflation expectations and long-term bond yields governs the dynamics in gold. Weak real bond yields lead to a pull in the precious metal as investors look to protect the purchasing value of capital.  A significant event for the gold outlook is today’s US inflation release With high interest rates and inflation control, investors prefer to earn yields in bonds by selling off gold. A significant event for the gold outlook is today’s US inflation release. The market reaction to this event could be decisive for gold in the coming days or weeks. If gold manages to develop a pullback from current levels, we could see a sharp increase in buying over the next few days Consolidation below $1830 on the day would be an essential bearish signal that could rapidly decline towards $1800. Moreover, there would be an immediate question of double-top formation through 2020 and 2022 peaks as an early signal of a long-term downward trend with a potential of $1200. If gold manages to develop a pullback from current levels, we could see a sharp increase in buying over the next few days, as we did in early February and late November. But unlike those episodes, this time, the bears might not wait for a quick reversal, and a further rally would be an important signal that gold continues to claw its way out of the prolonged correction. In this case, the nearest stops might be the levels near $1900, and further, the market might quickly target a renewal of the historic highs above $2075 before the end of the year. 
Forex: Could Incoming ECB Decision Support Euro?

Although US Bonds Yields May Be Higher, Current Circumstances Are Not Clear As US CPI Release And Correlated Fed Interest Rate Decision In June Are To Shape Markets | ING Economics

ING Economics ING Economics 11.05.2022 17:15
The inflation concerns are easing ahead of today’s US CPI reading. We doubt central bankers will back down so soon, however. Markets are coming around to our view that a peak is near in yields, but we think it might still be a couple of months away In this article US 10yr edges back below 3% on remarkable easing in inflation expectations The inflation scare is easing but beware of circular reasonings Global growth gloom means holding psychologically important levels will be more difficult Today’s events and market views The peak in yields may be near US 10yr edges back below 3% on remarkable easing in inflation expectations The juxtaposition between rising real rates and falling inflation expectations remains, and over the past 24 hours the fall in inflation expectations has been dominant. And that’s why the US 10yr yield has dipped back below 3%. Right now, US 10yr inflation expectations are in the region of 2.65%. They were in excess of 3%, albeit briefly, a few weeks back, at which point talk of a 75bp hike in June were sounding like a solid call. Now that inflation expectations are well down, the 50bp promised looks fine. "10yr real rate in the area of 1% would not look out of whack" Meanwhile the 10yr real yield is now above 30bp. Add that to the inflation expectation and we get the sub-3% 10yr Treasury yield. The move higher in the real yield has been spectacular. Back in March it was deeper than -100bp. The move to 30bp is a sign that the economy has morphed away from the need for ultra-loose policy. And a continued move higher takes it towards a more normal footing. In fact a 10yr real rate in the area of 1% would not look out of whack. If we got there, inflation expectations would fall far more. The adjustment higher in real yields is a threat to risk asset valuations Source: Refinitiv, ING   Today’s US CPI number will be important, but not determinative. In other words it should not have a material impact on the 10yr inflation expectation. That said, if it’s an outsized / surprise number, it’s then more likely to have an impact out the curve. Our central view is in line with the market view, where we do see a fall in contemporaneous inflation, consistent with the recent tendency for inflation expectations to ease lower. We’ve been surprised by this though, and think it’s too early to call it a trend. The inflation scare is easing but beware of circular reasonings The ‘peak inflation’ narrative should receive a boost from slowing US annual headline and core inflation readings today but we would be cautious about chasing the move lower in rates. As always, forward-looking markets could apply a heavy discount to central bank rhetoric but an acceleration in monthly core CPI means Fed officials are unlikely to change tack just yet. One should also remember that the decline from the inflation peak will be very slow indeed, keeping pressure on the Fed to act. Swaps show inflation is no longer the market's only concern Source: Refinitiv, ING   US CPI and Eurozone HICP swaps have dropped significantly this month Further afield, inflation compensation offered by US CPI and Eurozone HICP swaps has dropped significantly this month. Should markets conclude that central banks can now afford to be less hawkish? Only up to a point. To some extent, the drop in inflation swaps is owing to a deteriorating global macro environment, but the post-FOMC timing of this drop also suggests that it has at least as much to do with expectations that central banks will deliver on expected tightening. We would be careful with such circular reasonings. Global growth gloom means holding psychologically important levels will be more difficult For an example of the doubt setting in investors’ mind about central banks’ ability to tighten policy, look no further than yesterday’s better-than-expected German (Zew) and US (National Federation of Independent Business) sentiment indicators. None of the readings was enough to alleviate global growth gloom but the NFIB details in particular could have brought inflation fears back to the fore. We suspect it is too early to call the end of the hawkish re-pricing, with central bankers still very much on their front-foot when it comes to delivering monetary tightening. Bonds risk failing a psychologically important test Source: Refinitiv, ING   We have sympathy with the growing view that there is a short time limit to this tightening cycle We think a better candidate for a peak in yields in this cycle is during the third quarter of this year, after the ECB’s expected first hike and after the couple of additional 50bp hikes the Fed has committed to. This being said, turning points are notoriously difficult to pick and we have sympathy with the growing view that there is a short time limit to this tightening cycle. Should 10Y bonds fail to hold on to their recent jump above the psychologically important levels of 3% for Treasuries and 1% for Bunds, it may take a lot of good news to test these levels again. Today’s events and market views Germany (10Y) and Portugal (8Y) make up today’s Euro sovereign supply slate. This will come on top of a dual tranche NGeu syndicated deal in the 3Y (new issue) and 30Y (tap) sectors. In the US session, the Treasury will auction 10Y notes. The main release of note in the afternoon will be the April CPI report. Consensus is for the annual readings to cool down from the previous month but a monthly acceleration in core could muddy the picture for rates. There is also an extensive list of ECB speakers on the schedule, culminating with interventions from Christine Lagarde and Isabel Schnabel. TagsRates Daily   Disclaimer This publication has been prepared by ING solely for information purposes irrespective of a particular user's means, financial situation or investment objectives. The information does not constitute investment recommendation, and nor is it investment, legal or tax advice or an offer or solicitation to purchase or sell any financial instrument. Read more
(NVDA) Nvidia Stock Price Plunged! Meme Stocks' Performance Seems To Be Surprisingly Good

It's Not The End Of US Inflation, Hawkish Fed And Tight Monetary Policy | US inflation has peaked, but it will be a long slow descent | ING Economics

ING Economics ING Economics 11.05.2022 22:13
US inflation has slowed marginally in April thanks to a fall in used car prices and gasoline. Fed rate hikes will bring demand into better balance with supply, but in the absence of major improvements in supply chains, labour shortages and geopolitical tensions the descent back to the 2% target will be slow In this article Inflation finally slows Past the peak? Housing will make inflation especially sticky Fed has a lot more work to do Rental prices continue to remain elevated 8.3% Annual rate of inflation for April 2022   Inflation finally slows In the immediate aftermath of the pandemic amid plunging energy, air fare and hotel prices, inflation bottomed at 0.1% year-on-year in May 2020 and has been on a rapid climbed to 8.5% ever since. Today though, the annual rate of US consumer price inflation has slowed from 8.5% in March to 8.3% in April. The core rate, which excludes food and energy prices slowed marginally more to stand at 6.2% versus 6.5% in March. While this was in line with our forecasts, the market had been looking for a larger moderation with consensus forecasts of 8.1% for headline CPI and 6.0% for core. The details show energy prices fell 2.7% month-on-month on lower gasoline costs, but this will be fully reversed next month given gasoline is back at all-time highs. Used car prices fell 0.4% MoM, not as much as hoped given the Mannheim car auction data, while apparel fell 0.8% after a strong series of price hikes. Everything else was firm though with food prices rising 0.9% MoM, new vehicles up 1.1% and primary rents (0.6% MoM) and owners' equivalent rent up 0.5% MoM. Airline fares jumped another 18.6% MoM! The chart below shows the contributions and clearly shows there is a moderation in core goods prices (orange bars), but this is being offset to a large extent by the service sector (yellow). Contributions to annual US inflation Source: Macrobond, ING Past the peak? We think that March 2022 will have marked the peak for annual inflation. Mannheim used car auction prices are down 6.4% over the past three months so used vehicle prices should fall further and they have quite a heavy weight of 4.1% of the total basket of goods and services within CPI. The shift in consumer demand from goods, whose availability has been significantly impacted by supply chain issues, towards services should also contribute to a gradual moderation in the rate of inflation. Nonetheless, we remain nervous about the impact from gasoline and the growing price pressures within services. Moreover, substantial declines in the annual rate of inflation are unlikely to materialise until there are significant improvements in geopolitical tensions (that would get energy prices lower), supply chain strains and labour market shortages. Unfortunately, there is little sign of any of this happening anytime soon – The Russia-Ukraine conflict shows no end in sight, Chinese lockdowns will continue to impact the global economy while last Friday’s jobs report showed a decline in the labour force participation rate leaving the economy with 1.9 job vacancies for every unemployed person in America. At the moment consumer demand is firm and businesses have pricing power, meaning that they can pass higher costs onto their customers. This was highlighted by yesterday’s National Federation of Independent Businesses survey reporting that a net 70% of small businesses raised prices over the past three months, with a net 46% expecting to raise prices further. We haven’t seen this sort of pricing power for the small business sector before and we doubt it is any weaker for larger firms. NFIB survey shows firms can continue to pass higher costs onto customers Source: Macrobond, ING Housing will make inflation especially sticky Furthermore, the housing market remains red hot and this feeds through into primary rents and owners’ equivalent rent (OER) components of inflation with a lag of around 12-18 months. Rent contracts are typically only changed once a year when your contract is renewed so it takes time to feed through while OER is a based on a survey question for what you would rent the house you own out for. Homeowners may not necessarily closely follow the month-to-month changes in the housing market so there is a delayed response. As the chart below shows, the housing components, accounting for more than 30% of the CPI basket, are not likely to turn lower soon. No reason to expect an imminent turn in rent components Source: Macrobond, ING Fed has a lot more work to do This situation intensifies the pressure on the Fed to hike interest rates. The central bank wants to take some of the heat out of the economy and bring demand back into better balance with the supply capacity of the US economy. This potentially means aggressive rate hikes and the risks of a marked slowdown/recession. This message was re-affirmed by several officials over the past couple of days and we look for 50bp rate hikes at the upcoming June, July and September FOMC meetings. With the Fed running down its balance sheet we expect the Fed to revert back to 25bp from November onwards with the target rate peaking at 3.25% in early 2023. Even with this Fed action and hopefully some improvements in the supply side story we have doubts that CPI will get back to 2% target before the end of 2023. TagsUS Recession Inflation Federal Reserve   Disclaimer This publication has been prepared by ING solely for information purposes irrespective of a particular user's means, financial situation or investment objectives. The information does not constitute investment recommendation, and nor is it investment, legal or tax advice or an offer or solicitation to purchase or sell any financial instrument. Read more
Oil Defies Broader Risk-off Sentiment: Commodities Update

Gold Price (XAUUSD) Nears 3-Month Low, The US Dollar (USD) Performance Agains (EUR) Euro Makes EUR/USD Decrease 2016's Lows And (BTC) Bitcoin Price Is Back Above $30K | Conotoxia

Conotoxia Comments Conotoxia Comments 13.05.2022 11:43
Gold held near three-month lows near 1,825 USD per ounce on Friday and is falling for the fourth week in a row from 1990 USD. One factor for the decline in gold prices could be the strengthening U.S. dollar, which seems to have stabilized near the 20-year high reached on Thursday. The USD strengthening may have followed the release of US consumer and producer inflation data, which seems to reinforce expectations of aggressive interest rate hikes by the Federal Reserve. This, in turn, may raise concerns about a weaker global economic outlook, helping to boost USD demand. The recent strengthening of the USD may also be related to the divergence in monetary policy on both sides of the Atlantic Recall that the U.S. core CPI remained near a 40-year high of 8.3 percent in April, while the core CPI also exceeded expectations at 6.2 percent, fueling fears that high price levels may persist. Thus, markets are anticipating increases of 50 basis points at each of the next two Fed meetings in June and July. Read next: Altcoins: What Is Polkadot (DOT)? Cross-Chain Transfers Of Any Type Of Asset Or Data. A Deeper Look Into Polkadot Protocol | FXMAG.COM This could also be significant for the EUR/USD major pair, which approached the 1.0350 level this week, its lowest level since December 2016. The recent strengthening of the USD may also be related to the divergence in monetary policy on both sides of the Atlantic. The Fed is moving towards aggressive hikes, while the European Central Bank may raise interest rates by 50-75 basis points in total by the end of the year. Thus, the scale of divergences seems to be very large. Bitcoin rebounded yesterday from its lowest level in almost 17 months and crossed the $30,000 mark today In addition to gold and the dollar, attention should again turn to the cryptocurrency market and towards stock market indices, where in both cases an attempt to defend against possible further declines may be underway. Bitcoin rebounded yesterday from its lowest level in almost 17 months and crossed the $30,000 mark today. Despite this, the world's most popular and widely used cryptocurrency is at this point on its way to its worst week in four months, falling more than 10 percent. Yesterday, the market additionally saw a likely panic as the tether to USD exchange rate departed at 1:1. At the apogee of fears for the collapse of the largest stablecoin, the cryptocurrency market seemed to have reached its weekly lows. Currently, USDT is trying to get back to the 1:1 exchange rate, and the rest of the market seems to be stabilizing. Read next: (BTC) Bitcoin’s Price Tanks Along With Equities. U.S. Stock Market Awaits CPI Report, Poor Performance From The FTSE 100. Daniel Kostecki, Director of the Polish branch of Conotoxia Ltd. (Forex service) Materials, analysis and opinions contained, referenced or provided herein are intended solely for informational and educational purposes. Personal opinion of the author does not represent and should not be constructed as a statement or an investment advice made by Conotoxia Ltd. All indiscriminate reliance on illustrative or informational materials may lead to losses. Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future results. CFDs are complex instruments and come with a high risk of losing money rapidly due to leverage. 80.77% of retail investor accounts lose money when trading CFDs with this provider. You should consider whether you understand how CFDs work and whether you can afford to take the high risk of losing your money.
China Restricts Gallium and Germanium Exports, Heightening Global Tech War

EUR/USD: Weak PMIs and Uncertain Outlook Impact Currency Pair

InstaForex Analysis InstaForex Analysis 06.06.2023 08:09
EUR/USD: Yesterday, the euro and other currencies started trading lower, while volatility was weak. The main reason for the change in sentiment was the weak PMIs in the US. The May ISM Services PMI came in at 50.3, down from April's 51.9. The final Services PMI reading was lowered from 55.1 to 54.9. Factory orders increased by 0.4% in April, below the expected range of 0.8-1.1%. Industrial orders excluding transportation decreased by 0.2%. Market expectations for a Federal Reserve rate hike at the June 14th meeting decreased from 25.3% to 21.8%. The S&P 500 stock index declined by 0.20%.       From a technical standpoint, we see the price returning to the range of 1.0692-1.0738, from which unsuccessful breakouts have occurred in both directions over the past week. Take note that the price has not firmly established itself above or below the limits of the range, which complicates the situation since the next breakout could turn out to be false, particularly on the bullish side, as the global trend is bearish.   We acknowledge that resistance at 1.0804 could be tested if there is an upward breakout. The price may even surpass the level with the MACD line acting as a target, which would constitute a deep correction from the decline since May 4th.   Climbing to 1.0804 represents approximately a 38.2% retracement of the downward move since May 4th. However, as long as the price doesn't breach the 1.0738 level, we'll stick to the bearish scenario with 1.0613 as the target.   The Marlin oscillator has already risen enough (removed negative tension) and may now turn into a new downward wave.   On the four-hour chart, the MACD indicator line is gradually flattening out, and the signal line of Marlin is attempting to merge with the neutral zero line.   The trend is neutral and is likely to remain so for another week until the Fed meeting. However, on the 13th, there will be CPI data released, which could further confuse market participants.        
Asia Morning Bites: Singapore Industrial Production and Global Market Updates

Economic Snapshot: Unemployment, Inflation, and Trade in Focus

ING Economics ING Economics 09.06.2023 09:11
Unemployment could edge higher in Australia The Australian labour market data for May may show a further increase in the unemployment rate from 3.7% to 3.8%, though this remains very low by historical standards and won’t provide the Reserve Bank of Australia with too much comfort. Employment growth may register a small increase, with last month’s fall in full-time employment and rise in part-time employment likely to swap signs this month.   The Australian labour market may not be powering ahead as it recently did, but it hasn’t yet delivered a clear sign of weakening either, and we aren’t expecting the picture to change this month.   Inflation comfortably within target in India CPI data for May will show inflation remaining comfortably within the Reserve Bank of India's 2-6% target range. We are expecting inflation to come in at 4.3% YoY after a 0.5% MoM increase. Helpful base effects are keeping inflation within the target range for now, but we need to see the MoM trend to move below 0.5% in the coming months to keep it there.     Indonesia's trade balance to remain in healthy surplus Indonesia reports trade numbers next week. We expect both exports and imports to remain in contraction although the drop off may be less pronounced than the previous month. Imports are likely to dip roughly 12.2% YoY while exports may fall by 2.1% YoY, resulting in a sizable trade surplus of $4.7bn. A trade surplus of this magnitude should help keep the current account balance in surplus and could act as one counterbalance to investment related outflows, which would help provide some support to the rupiah.  
Navigating Financial Markets: Insights on Central Bank Decisions and Currency Quotes

Navigating Financial Markets: Insights on Central Bank Decisions and Currency Quotes

FXMAG Team FXMAG Team 21.06.2023 14:00
In the dynamic world of financial markets, the interplay between macroeconomic data and central bank decisions can significantly impact various asset classes. We had the opportunity to speak with an FXPrimus expert to gain valuable insights into the current market situation and the influence of these factors on currency quotes, particularly the Turkish lira (TRY) and the British pound (GBP), as well as the broader effects on the US and European stock markets. FXMAG.COM: How will Thursday's (22.06) Turkish central bank's decision on interest rates affect TRY quotes? FXPrimus expert: The past rate cuts by Turkish President Erdogan led to a dramatic decline in the price of the Turkish lira, inflation hit 85.5% last year and as a result the overall cost of living of the country had dramatically increased . In a big U-turn, the central bank of Turkey is expected to increase interest rates to 20% to target the negative impacts of a rising inflation and attract investors to its currency.   FXMAG.COM: How will Thursday's (22.06) Bank of England interest rate decision affect GBP quotes? FXPrimus expert: The Market is already pricing in an interest rate hike from the Bank of England and given that CPI data on the 21st of June was higher than expected and at 8.7%, the BoE has no other choice but to act. More interest rate hikes will be expected after this one to target inflation but this will have negative effect on other aspects of the economy i.e. Bank crisis   FXMAG.COM: In the mid-term, how will last week's Fed and ECB decisions affect the US and European stock markets? FXPrimus expert: As interest rates increase, stock investors become unwilling to trade stock prices as the value for future earnings becomes less attractive against bonds which have a higher yield today, the FED have paused interest rate hikes but it remains to be seen in the upcoming economic data releases whether they will change course. The ECB has slowed the pace at which the interest rates where increased however they have indicated that more hikes are yet to come.
Turbulent Times Ahead: ECB's Tough Decision Amid Soaring Oil Prices

The Bank of England Hikes Rates Amid Concerns of Inflation, MPC Split, and Pound's Volatility

Craig Erlam Craig Erlam 22.06.2023 13:46
The Bank of England accelerated its tightening efforts after meeting this week, hiking rates by 0.5% in response to another raft of worrying inflation data.  And it's not just yesterday's CPI data that will have caused considerable discomfort for the MPC, the April figures were also far too high and wage numbers we've had in the interim suggest its becoming increasingly embedded. That had to have caused serious alarm within the BoE, within seven members of the committee anyway. Two policymakers voted to hold rates steady for the fourth meeting highlighting the widening gulf between the views on the MPC which may make finding a consensus going forward that much more challenging.  There's every chance that those backing 50 basis points did so in the hope that doing more now may necessitate the need to do less later on and for a shorter period of time. That's not how markets are initially perceiving it though, with the odds of Bank Rate rising above 6% increasing. It could get rather painful in inflation doesn't improve soon. The pound appears to be weighing up both of these considerations, as is evident in the very volatile response we've seen in the currency. Rate hikes are generally good for a currency but when they're rising to levels that could seriously threaten the economy, there's certainly an argument for the opposite to happen.     Turkish interest rates finally heading in the right direction  Another interest rate decision was announced alongside the BoE, with the CBRT reverting back to hiking interest rates aggressively in order to put a lid on inflation and steady the currency which has fallen another 15% in recent weeks.   President Erdogan won the election promising to defend lower interest rates having led a campaign of aggressive rate cuts under Governor Åžahap KavcıoÄŸlu, before immediately replacing him and the finance minister after the vote. A rate hike today was widely expected but the range of forecasts was vast and if anything, the 6.5% hike was at the lower end of the range.  Turkey faces many problems going forward as a result of the misguided policies over the last couple of years and that will likely warrant more aggressive tightening in the future. For now, investors may be mildly relieved that rates are heading in the right direction, if not fast enough. The risk is that Erdogan hasn't really hesitated to sack Governors that raise rates in the past so investors will never feel fully at ease as long as he's President.
UK Inflation Data Boosts Chances of August Rate Hike

Key Economic Updates: Inflation, PMIs, and Monetary Policy Decisions Across Switzerland, China, India, Australia, and New Zealand

Ed Moya Ed Moya 03.07.2023 10:25
Switzerland CPI inflation data on Monday is expected to show the headline rate falling back below 2% to 1.8% in June. Markets are still pricing in a 25 basis point hike in September at the moment but that may change if the data matches expectations and, importantly, remains below 2%. Unemployment is also released on Friday.   China Another set of lackluster data seen on the official NBS manufacturing and non-manufacturing PMIs for June released on Friday. Manufacturing activities continued to contract for the third consecutive month at 49 and growth in the services sector decelerated to a 5-month low at 53.2 from 54.5 in May. The focus will now turn to the Caixin manufacturing PMI which consists of small and medium enterprises out on Monday. Markets are expecting almost an unchanged condition of 50.2 for June versus 50.9 recorded in May. The Caixin services PMI will be released on Wednesday with a forecasted slowdown in growth to 56.5 for June from 57.1 in May. Time is running out for the implementation of fresh fiscal stimulus measures.   India The manufacturing PMI is released on Monday, where the consensus is expecting a slight growth slowdown to 58 for June from 58.7 in May, its strongest reading since October 2020. A similar trajectory is anticipated for the services PMI on Wednesday where growth is expected to dip to 60.2 in June from 61.2 recorded in May, a continuation of consolidation from April’s near 13-year high of 62.   Australia The key highlight for this week will be RBA’s monetary policy decision on Tuesday. The consensus is calling for another 25 basis points hike on the cash rate, bringing it to 4.35% after recent hawkish guidance inferred from the minutes of the prior meeting. However, the interest rates futures market has implied a reduction in the odds of a 25 bps hike due to the recent softer-than-expected annualized monthly CPI data for May; 5.6% from 6.8% in April and below expectations of 6.1%. As of 29 June, the ASX 30-day interbank cash rate futures has priced in a 28% chance of 25 basis points (bps) hike on the cash rate, down from a 53% chance priced two weeks ago on 16 June. On Thursday, we will have the balance of trade for May where April’s surplus of A$11.16 billion is expected to narrow to A$10.5 billion. If it turns out as expected, it will be the narrowest trade surplus since August 2022.   New Zealand No key data.  
Hungarian Industrial Production Shows Surprise Uptick in Summer

AUD/USD Rebounds and Eyes Key Resistance Levels Amid RBA Decision and Positive Momentum

Kelvin Wong Kelvin Wong 04.07.2023 08:43
AUD/USD rallied by 97 pips from last Thursday, 29 June low of 0.6593. Staged a minor bullish breakout ahead of RBA’s monetary policy decision today. Watch 0.6630 key short-term support to maintain the current bullish tone. Since its 0.6593 minor low printed last Thursday, 29 June, the AUD/USD has managed to stage a rebound of 97 pips to print an intraday high of 0.6692 yesterday, 3 July ahead of Australia central bank, RBA’s monetary policy decision out later today at 0430 GMT. The interest rates futures market has implied a reduction in the odds of a 25 basis points (bps) hike due to the recent softer-than-expected annualized monthly CPI data for May; 5.6% from 6.8% in April and below expectations of 6.1%. As of 3 July 2023, the ASX 30-day interbank cash rate futures has priced in a 16% chance of a 25 bps hike on the cash rate, down from a 53% chance that was priced two weeks ago on 16 June.     Fig 1: AUD/USD short-term trend as of 4 Jul 2023 (Source: TradingView, click to enlarge chart) Minor bullish breakout The AUD/USD has managed to exit from the upper limit of a minor descending channel that was in place since its 16 June 2023 high of 0.6900 now acting as a pull-back support at 0.6630. This latest set of price actions has indicated that the minor downtrend phase from the 16 June 2023 high of 0.6900 to the 29 June 2023 low of 0.6593 is likely to have ended.     Short-term positive momentum has resurfaced The hourly RSI oscillator has just broken above a corresponding resistance at the 47 level after it exited from its oversold region last Thursday 29 June. Watch the 0.6690 short-term pivotal support (the pull-back of the former minor descending channel resistance & former minor swing high area of 29/30 June 2023) and clearance above 0.6790 (20-day moving average) sees the next resistance coming in at 0.6790. However, failure to hold above 0.6630 negates the bullish tone to expose the 0.6580/6550 key medium-term pivotal support zone.    
Asia's Economic Outlook: Bank of Korea Pauses, India and China Inflation in Focus

Asia's Economic Outlook: Bank of Korea Pauses, India and China Inflation in Focus

ING Economics ING Economics 06.07.2023 13:57
Asia Week Ahead: Korean central bank to extend pause; inflation likely subdued in China The Bank of Korea meets to discuss policy next week while India and China report inflation figures. Meanwhile, Singapore will release its latest GDP data.   Inflation in India June CPI data for India will likely show that inflation remained in the low 4% area, close to the mid-point of the Reserve Bank of India’s target range of 2-6%. This leaves real policy rates at one of the highest levels in the region (nominal policy rate is 6.5%) and may help to explain the rupee's recent resilience. We also get India’s industrial production data for June. June’s Manufacturing PMI dropped to 57.8 from 58.7, so we may well see the rate of growth moderate from the 4.2% year-on-year rate recorded in May.   China loan and inflation reports China’s aggregate financing data for June is set to be released. New CNY loans will likely come in lower than the CNY2806bn level recorded in June last year, reflecting weak investment. CPI data will also be published, likely showing inflation remains close to zero. Weak domestic demand is the main culprit, though there are also some helpful base effects and we should see inflation return to around a 2% rate over the coming months. PPI inflation will remain strongly negative, reflecting weak factory gate prices as well as subdued commodity prices.    
Market Analysis: EUR/USD Signals and Trends

GBP/USD Analysis: Sell Signal Triggers Price Decrease, Market Awaits US CPI Data

InstaForex Analysis InstaForex Analysis 12.07.2023 13:43
The test of 1.2942, coinciding with the decline of the MACD line from zero, prompted a sell signal that led to a price decrease of around 20 pips. The latest CPI data in the US lies ahead, and this will likely cause market players to review their positions on risky assets. Demand for pound may drop, which could lead to a decline in GBP/USD. There will be an increase only when inflation drops more than expected. Markets will also pay attention to the speeches of FOMC members Neel Kashkari and Raphael Bostic.   For long positions: Buy when pound hits 1.2946 (green line on the chart) and take profit at the price of 1.3014 (thicker green line on the chart). Further growth will be seen in the case of weak US inflation data. However, when buying, make sure that the MACD line lies above zero or rises from it. Pound can also be bought after two consecutive price tests of 1.2895, but the MACD line should be in the oversold area as only by that will the market reverse to 1.2946 and 1.3014.     For short positions: Sell when pound reaches 1.2895 (red line on the chart) and take profit at the price of 1.2844. Pressure will increase in the event of further growth in US inflation. However, when selling, make sure that the MACD line lies below zero or drops down from it. Pound can also be sold after two consecutive price tests of 1.2946, but the MACD line should be in the overbought area as only by that will the market reverse to 1.2895 and 1.2844.         What's on the chart: Thin green line - entry price at which you can buy GBP/USD Thick green line - estimated price where you can set Take-Profit (TP) or manually fix profits, as further growth above this level is unlikely. Thin red line - entry price at which you can sell GBP/USD Thick red line - estimated price where you can set Take-Profit (TP) or manually fix profits, as further decline below this level is unlikely. MACD line- it is important to be guided by overbought and oversold areas when entering the market     Important: Novice traders need to be very careful when making decisions about entering the market. Before the release of important reports, it is best to stay out of the market to avoid being caught in sharp fluctuations in the rate. If you decide to trade during the release of news, then always place stop orders to minimize losses. Without placing stop orders, you can very quickly lose your entire deposit, especially if you do not use money management and trade large volumes. And remember that for successful trading, you need to have a clear trading plan. Spontaneous trading decision based on the current market situation is an inherently losing strategy for an intraday trader.  
Eurozone Services PMI Contracts, Global Bond Declines, Yen Rallies: Market Insights

China Big Tech Drives Momentum-Driven Rally in Stock Market

ING Economics ING Economics 13.07.2023 11:09
China Big Tech is leading the current momentum-driven rally in China stock market. Supported by a weaker USD/CNH that broke below key near-term support of 7.2160. Further hints from China’s top policymakers that the prior 3-year of stringent regulatory crackdowns on China’s leading technology companies have ended. Current momentum-driven rally of China Big Tech may still see a bumpy ride due to a weak external demand environment. Prior to yesterday’s release of the key US consumer inflation data for June that came out cooler than expected, China’s proxies stock indices have crept up higher since the start of this week; from Monday, 10 July to Wednesday, 12 July, the Hang Seng Index recorded a gain of 2.06%, Hang Seng Tech Index (+3.45%), Hang Seng China Enterprises Index (+2.3%). A higher positive momentum intensity is being seen in the Hang Seng TECH Index which comprises China’s Big Tech firms that reintegrated back above its 50 and 200-day moving averages. Also, a significant price action development in terms of relative momentum has taken shape on China’s Big Tech equities listed in the US stock exchanges (the ADRs) that have continued their outperformance over its peers, the US Big Tech since last week.   Relative positive momentum seen in China Big Tech The KraneShares CSI China Internet exchange-traded fund (ETF) has recorded an accumulated gain of 8% since the week of 3 July 2023 till yesterday, 12 July over a return of +0.86% seen in the Nasdaq 100 over the same period.       Fig 1:  Relative momentum trends of KraneShares CSI China Internet ETF & other China equities ETFs as of 12 Jul 2023 (Source: TradingView, click to enlarge chart) Also, positive relative momentum can also be seen against global equities, the ratio of the KranShares CSI China Internet ETF over the MSCI All Country World Index ETF has notched up four consecutive sessions of positive momentum readings based on a five-day rolling basis. Inter-market and sentiment are likely the factors that are the key catalysts for the ongoing short-term outperformance since in China Big Tech that is driving the momentum-induced rally in the Hang Seng benchmark stock indices.     USD/CNH broke below 7.2160 support triggering a positive feedback loop into China equities   Fig 2:  USD/CNH short & medium-term trends as of 13 Jul 2023 (Source: TradingView, click to enlarge chart)     Fig 3:  USD/CNH correlation with HSCEI & HSCTECH as of 13 Jul 2023 (Source: TradingView, click to enlarge chart) The USD/CNH (offshore yuan) foreign exchange rate has a high degree of inverse correlation with the Hang Seng benchmark stock indices and China Big Tech theme play ETF; a rise in the USD/CNH (a weaker yuan) tends to see a fall the above-mentioned indices and ETF, and vice versa. In the past five days, the USD/CNH has inched lower since its seven-month high of 7.2745 printed on 6 July and broke below key near-term support of 7.2160 (also the 20-day moving average that price actions have traded above it since 19 April 2023) on the onset of yesterday’s US CPI data release. Also, reinforced by the narrowing of the premium of the US Treasury 2-year yield over China’s 2-year sovereign bond yield. These observations suggest a potential short-term downtrend phase is in progress for USD/CNH which triggers a positive feedback loop into the Hang Seng bench stock indices and China Big Tech equities.    
FTC vs. Amazon: Antitrust Battle Looms

FX Daily: Dollar Demand Persists Amidst Waiting Game

ING Economics ING Economics 07.08.2023 08:50
FX Daily: Waiting game keeps the dollar in demand Another mixed US jobs report on Friday has maintained choppy conditions in FX markets. While consensus expects the dollar to edge lower through the year, we are yet to see both the decline in inflation and activity (particularly jobs data) that would cement this trend. Key inputs to FX markets this week will be Thursday's CPI data and the Treasury refunding.   USD: CPI and quarterly refunding will be the highlights Friday's release of a mixed US July jobs report was enough to deliver some calm to the US bond market. Recall that the sharp sell-off at the long end of the curve had upset benign market conditions on Wednesday and Thursday last week. Lower headline employment in July saw 10-year Treasury yields drop nearly 15bp on Friday and investors jump back into their preferred high-yielding currencies such as the Mexican peso.  Looking ahead, we see two key US highlights this week. The main event will be Thursday's release of July CPI figures. Despite base effects nudging the YoY rate higher, MoM readings should deliver another benign 0.2% outcome at the core level and provide another piece of disinflation evidence for the Fed. The problem for FX markets is that it seems that disinflation is not enough to get the dollar lower. Instead, we also need to see signs of softening activity - especially in the labour markets. Unless initial claims spike on Thursday or consumer sentiment falls sharply on Friday, there are few real signs of softer activity coming through just yet. The second highlight of the week will be the US Treasury's quarterly refunding, where a collective $103bn of three, ten, and thirty-year US Treasuries are auctioned Tuesday through Thursday. It is very rare to have a bad Treasury refunding - e.g. consistently low bid to cover ratios or other such metrics. But the risk is that dealers build concessions into bond prices ahead of the auctions - keeping US yields firm and the investment environment mixed. On the face of it then, this week looks unlikely to trigger the kind of benign dollar decline around which the Rest of the World currencies can rally.  Additionally, events in the Black Sea and what they could mean for food and energy prices could keep investors nervous about embracing disinflation trends. For today, we doubt Fed speakers will have a meaningful impact on the dollar and can see DXY trading well within a 101.80-102.80 range.
Bond Markets Feeling Weighted: US 10-Year Yield Still Pressured

Bond Markets Feeling Weighted: US 10-Year Yield Still Pressured

ING Economics ING Economics 10.08.2023 08:43
Rates Spark: Still feeling heavy for bonds The US 10yr fell back below 4% briefly, but it took a decent bout of risk-off to force it there. There is a more natural place for the 10yr yield at above 4%, based on the forward discount for the funds rate (and that has not materially changed).   US yields are off last week's highs, but still feel under net upward pressure It took a bout of risk-off to briefly take the US 10yr yield back below 4%, well below the high of 4.2% seen on Friday. That was always likely to be the cleanest route to taking the US 10yr yield down. But it did not stay below 4% for long, and we remain of the opinion that the 10yr sits more naturally at above 4%, at least for now. The 10yr should trade at a 20-30bp premium to the forward discount for the funds rate low, and that's only just below 4%. We’ll also get an inflation reading on Thursday, likely confirming that US headline inflation moved back up towards 3.5%, while core inflation is finding it tough to make a material break below 5%. The point estimates here at 3.3% and 4.7% respectively on 0.2% month-on-month outcomes. These are much better than they were (the headline peaked at 9%), and the rise in the headline rate for July is just a base effect. But inflation dynamics are not yet in what could be called a comfort zone. We also have continued supply to take down over the course of this week. The 3yr auction on Tuesday saw a good reception. It was well covered, saw a strong indirect bid (including central banks), and no tail (or technically a negative one, which is good). There is more duration to take down ahead as the 10yr and 30yr auctions are up in the coming days. The volume of supply has been upped since the last outing. It should get taken down okay. In fact, the flow of data over the last few weeks shows good demand for the duration despite the upward pressure seen on bond yields. Had it not been for this buying, the 10yr Treasury yield could likely have attacked the previous high seen in the 4.25% area. We’re still at better levels than before for buyers. But supply is also a weight to be taken down, placing upward pressure on market rates.   Off the recent peak, but we think 10Y UST sit more naturally above 4% for now     Today's events and market view Global growth concerns eying developments in China, a new bank tax in Italy, as well as rating jitters surrounding US banks all contributed to the risk-off sentiment that sparked yesterday’s bull flattening.   While tomorrow's US CPI data looms large, today’s calendar holds little to extend that rally. The focus could instead be on today’s supply where Germany taps its 10Y benchmark for €5bn and the US Treasury later sells US$38bn in new 10Y notes.
Romania's Economic Growth Slows in Q2, Leading to Lower 2023 Forecasts

Assessing the Risk of Prolonged Economic Stagnation in China - Insights by Ipek Ozkardeskaya, Senior Analyst | Swissquote Bank

Ipek Ozkardeskaya Ipek Ozkardeskaya 11.08.2023 08:09
Is China on path for longer economic stagnation?  By Ipek Ozkardeskaya, Senior Analyst | Swissquote Bank   Released yesterday, the latest CPI data showed that the headline inflation in the US ticked higher from 3 to 3.2%. That was slightly lower than the 3.3% penciled in by analysts, core inflation eased to 4.7% in July from 4.8% expected by analysts and printed a month earlier.   But the rising energy and crop prices threaten to heat things up in the coming months and inflation's downward trajectory could rapidly be spoiled. That's certainly why an increasing number of investors and the Federal Reserve's (Fed) Mary Daly warned that this was 'not a data point that says victory is ours'.   And indeed, looking into details, the fact that the 20% fall in gasoline prices is what explains the decline in headline number is concerning. The barrel of US crude bounced lower yesterday after a 27% rally since the end of June, and the latest OPEC data indicated that we would see a sharp supply deficit of more than 2mbpd this quarter as Saudi cuts output to push prices higher. And this gap could further widen as global demand continues growing and shift to alternative energy sources is nowhere fast enough to reverse that upside pressure.   On the other hand, we also know that the rising energy prices fuel inflation expectations and further rate hikes expectations around the world. And that means that oil bears are certainly waiting in ambush to start trading the recession narrative and sell the top. The $85pb could be the level that could trigger that downside correction despite the evidence of tightening supply and increasing gap between rising demand and falling supply.   Today, eyes will be on the July PPI figures before the weekly closing bell, where core PPI is seen further easing, but headline PPI may have ticked higher to 0.7% on monthly basis, probably on higher energy, crop and food prices.     In the market  Yesterday's slightly softer-than-expected inflation numbers and the initial jobless claims which printed almost 250K new applications last week - the highest in a month - sent the probability of a September pause to above 90%, though the US 2-year yield advanced past the 4.85% level, and the longer-terms yields rose with a weak 30-year bond action, which saw the highest yield since 2011.   Major stock indices stagnated. The S&P500 was up by only 0.03% yesterday while Nasdaq 100 closed 0.18% higher, as Walt Disney rallied as much as 5% even though Disney+ missed subscription estimates and said that it will increase the price of the streaming service. Disney is considering a crackdown on password sharing, which, combined with higher prices could lead to a Netflix-like profit jump further down the road.     In the FX  The USD index consolidates above the 50 and 100-DMAs and just below a long-term ascending channel base. The EURUSD sees support at the 50-DMA, near the 1.0960 level, and could benefit from further weakness in the US dollar to attempt another rise above the 1.10 mark.   European nat gas futures fell 7% yesterday after a 28% spiked on Wednesday on concerns that strikes at major export facilities in Australia could lead to a 10% decline in global LNG exports. Yet, the European inventories are about 88% full on average and the industrial demand remains weak due to tightening financial conditions imposed by the European Central Bank (ECB) hikes. Therefore this week's massive move seems to be mostly overdone, and we shall see some more downside correction.     Chinese property market is boiling  The property crisis in China is being fueled by a potential default of Country Garden, which is one of the biggest property companies in China and which recently announced that it may have lost up to $7.6bn in the first half of the year as home sales slumped and the government stimulus measures didn't bring buyers back to the market. Equities in China slumped further today, as property crisis is not benign. In fact, China's local governments have plenty of debt, and their major source of income is... land and property sales. Consequently, the property crisis explodes local governments' debt to income ratios- And the debt burden prevents China from rolling out stimulus measures that they would've otherwise, because the government doesn't want to further blast the debt levels.   Shattered investor and consumer confidence, shrinking demographics, property crisis and deflation hints that the Chinese economy could be on path for a longer period of economic stagnation. We could therefore see rapid pullback in investor optimism regarding stimulus measures and their effectiveness. Hang Seng's tech index fell to the lowest levels in two weeks yesterday, as all members fell except for Alibaba which jumped after beating revenue estimates last quarter.   
China Continues to Increase Gold Reserves, While Base Metals Face Mixed Fortunes

UK Services Inflation Rises on Transient Factors, Bank of England's Rate Hike Prospects

ING Economics ING Economics 16.08.2023 11:28
UK services inflation nudges higher on surging social rents The surprise pick-up in UK services inflation was driven by factors that are unlikely to meet the Bank of England's definition of 'persistent'. We expect a September rate hike, but November is still more of a question mark.   UK services inflation, the part of the CPI data the Bank of England is most concerned about, has picked up again from 7.2% to 7.4%. That’s higher than the Bank had forecast (7.3%), but importantly it was down to two factors that are unlikely to meet the BoE’s definition of “persistent” trends. The most eye-catching change was rents, which rose by 1.7% between June and July, which we make out to be comfortably the highest month-on-month change in this category since 2005. The ONS puts this down to social rentals, and the jump seems unlikely to be repeated. We also saw a larger increase in airfares at the start of the summer holidays than we did last year, which also helped to drive services inflation higher. This is a highly volatile category, which the BoE itself typically removes from the index when it looks at "core services". The bottom line is that the figures don’t carry huge implications for the Bank of England, and certainly, the unexpected pick-up in services inflation isn’t as broad-based as it has been in previous months when we’ve had unpleasant surprises. Indeed if we look at catering, which has been a key driver over recent months, the annual rate is gradually coming down. We think this is a trend that will continue, with ONS business surveys suggesting that firms in hospitality (and elsewhere in the service sector) are raising prices less aggressively, partly on account of the sharp fall in gas prices. For this reason, we still expect some moderate improvement in the services inflation numbers over the coming months.   UK services inflation picked up again in July   Elsewhere, headline CPI came down to 6.8%, having fallen by more than a percentage point on account of the near-20% fall in household electricity/gas bills in July. We’ll get another such fall in October. Meanwhile, the news on food inflation continues to improve, and it's now clearly following the path laid out by producer prices, which are now falling in level terms. Consumer food prices rose just 0.1% in July from June, compared to 2.2% a year ago. Bundle those factors together, and we think inflation will end the year at roughly 5% (and should get there, or near enough, by October).   Food inflation finally following producer prices   For the Bank of England, today’s figures will help cement a September rate hike, especially after yesterday’s stubbornly-high wage growth figures. It’s worth saying we get another set of both price and wage data before the September meeting, and another round of numbers before November’s meeting. While we don’t rule out another rate hike in November, the committee appears to be slowly laying the ground for a pause. Barring unpleasant data surprises before November, our base case is that September’s hike will be the last.
European Markets Anticipate Lower Open Amid Rate Hike Concerns

New Inflation Methodology Sparks Hope for BoE as GBPUSD Faces Resistance

Craig Erlam Craig Erlam 23.08.2023 10:33
New inflation methodology offers hope for BoE 1.28 could be major resistance point for GBPUSD A break of 1.26 could be bearish signal   Recent UK economic data has been a mixed bag, with wages rising at a much-accelerated rate but inflation decelerating as expected. While the Bank of England will be relieved at the latter, the former will remain a concern as wage growth even near those levels is not consistent with inflation returning sustainably to target over the medium term. The ONS released new figures overnight that appeared to suggest core inflation is not rising as fast as the CPI data suggests. The reportedly more sophisticated methodology concluded that core prices rose 6.8% last month, down from 7% the previous month and 7.3% the month before. The official reading for July was slightly higher at 6.9% but down from only 7.1% in May. So not only is the new methodology showing core inflation lower last month but the pace of decline is much faster. That will give the BoE hope that price pressures are easing and they’re expected to do so much more over the rest of the year.     GBPUSD Daily     It’s not clear whether this will prove to be a resumption of the uptrend or merely a bearish consolidation. It is currently nearing 1.28, the area around which it has previously run into resistance this month and around the 38.2% Fibonacci retracement level. Another rebound off here could be viewed as another bearish signal, which may suggest we’re currently seeing a bearish consolidation, while a move above could be more promising for the pound. If the pair does rebound lower then the area just above 1.26 will be key, given this is where it has recently seen strong support. It is also where the 55/89-day simple moving average band has continued to support the price in recent months.
Global Economic Data and Central Bank Activity: Key Focus Areas for the Upcoming Week"

Global Economic Data and Central Bank Activity: Key Focus Areas for the Upcoming Week"

Ed Moya Ed Moya 28.08.2023 09:20
US Now that we heard from Fed Chair Powell at the Kansas City Fed’s Jackson Hole Symposium, the focus shifts back to the data. This week is filled with data that will outline how quickly the economy is weakening. Consumer data will show personal income growth is not keeping up with spending, while confidence holds steady. The Fed’s favorite inflation reading is also expected to show subdued growth is holding steady on a monthly basis. Friday’s NFP report will show private sector hiring is cooling.    Over the weekend, the spotlight will be on US-China relations.  US Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo will meet with Chinese officials, striving to lower tensions between the world’s two largest economies.  The week will also be filled with Fed speak.  On Monday and Tuesday, Barr speaks about banking services. On Thursday, we hear from both Bostic and Collins, while Friday contains appearances by Bostic, a couple of hours before the NFP report, and Mester on inflation later in the morning.   Eurozone Next week is data-heavy but there are a few releases that stand out. The most notable is the HICP flash estimate for the eurozone on Thursday which is expected to drop slightly at the headline and core levels. There will be individual country releases in the days running up to this which may signal whether Thursday’s data will likely beat or fall short of expectations. ECB accounts are also released on Thursday which will be of interest considering markets now view the rate decision at the next meeting as a coin toss between 25 basis points and no change.    UK  The week starts with a bank holiday and it doesn’t get much more exciting from there. There are a few tier-three data releases and Huw Pill from the Bank of England will make appearances on Thursday and Friday. Russia A selection of economic data is on offer next week including unemployment on Wednesday, GDP on Thursday, and the manufacturing PMI on Friday.  South Africa No major events next week with PPI on Thursday the only notable release. It follows CPI data this past week which fell to 4.8%, well within the SARB 3-6% target range, following a much lower 0.9% monthly reading in July.  Turkey The CBRT surprised markets last week by hiking rates far more aggressively than expected, taking the repo rate to 25%, up from 17.5%. The move may cost people at the central bank their jobs if history is anything to go by, with President Erdogan openly no fan of higher rates. That said, he did employ these people shortly after his election victory so perhaps with that behind him, he may be more open to it while remaining vocally against. This week offers very little, with GDP on Thursday the only release of note. Switzerland Inflation data on Friday is expected to show prices rising 1.5% on an annual basis, slightly lower than in July and well below the SNB 2% target. The central bank hasn’t appeared satisfied though and markets are fully pricing in a hike in September, with 32% chance of it being 50 basis points. The manufacturing PMI will also be released on Friday, with retail sales on Thursday, and the KoF economic barometer and economic expectations on Wednesday. China Only three key economic releases to monitor for the coming week. First up, the NBS manufacturing and services PMIs for August will be out on Thursday. Another contractionary print of 49.5 is expected for the manufacturing sector, almost unchanged from July’s reading of 49.5. If it turns out as expected, it will be the fifth consecutive month of negative growth for manufacturing activities as China grapples with a weak external environment and domestic financial contagion risk that has been triggered by debt-laden property developers. Secondly, the NBS services PMI for August is forecasted to remain surprisingly resilient at 51, almost unchanged from 51.5 in July. The services sector is still in an expansionary mode albeit at a slower pace that is likely being supported by domestic tourism. Thirdly, the private sector-focused Caixin manufacturing PMI for August which consists of small and medium enterprises will be released on Friday, 1 September. Consensus is still expecting a contractionary reading of 49.5, almost unchanged from July’s print of 49.2. If it turns out as expected, it will be the second consecutive month of negative growth. A slew of key earnings releases to take note of starting this Saturday, 26 August will be China Merchants Bank, and Bank of Communications followed by; BYD (Monday, 28 August), Ping An Insurance, NIO, Country Garden (Tuesday, 29 August), Agricultural Bank of China (Wednesday, 30 August), ICBC, Bank of China, China Minsheng Bank (Thursday, 31 August). Also, market participants will be on the lookout for fiscal stimulus measures to defuse the $23 trillion debt bomb owed by local governments, financial affiliates, and property developers. On Friday, 25 August, China policymakers unveiled a further easing of its home mortgage policies that scrap a rule that disqualifies first-time homebuyers who had a mortgage that is fully repaid from being considered a first-time buyer in major cities in an attempt to boost up residential property transactions.  India Two key data to focus on. Q2 GDP on Thursday where the consensus is expecting a further economic growth expansion to 7% y/y in Q2, a further acceleration from 6.1% y/y recorded in Q1. Lastly, the manufacturing PMI for August will be released on Friday where it is being forecasted to come in at 57, almost unchanged from the July reading of 57.7 which will indicate a 26th straight month of growth expansion for manufacturing activities. Australia Retail sales for July will be out on Monday, with a recovery to 0.3% m/m from -0.8% m/m in June. On Wednesday, the important monthly CPI indicator for July will be out and the consensus forecast is another month of cooling to 5.2% from 5.4% in June. If it turns out as expected, RBA may have more reasons to justify its current pause at 4.1% for two consecutive meetings. Its next monetary policy meeting will be on 5 September, and as of 24 August, the ASX 30-day interbank cash rate futures have priced in a 12% chance of a rate cut to 3.85% (25 bps cut).  New Zealand A quiet week with the only focus on the ANZ business confidence indicator for August on Thursday followed by ANZ consumer confidence for August on Friday. Japan The action comes mid-week. Consumer confidence for August is released on Wednesday and is expected to be almost the same at 37.2 versus July’s 37.1. On Thursday, we will have retail sales and industrial production for July. Growth in retail sales is expected to slip slightly to 5.4% y/y from 5.9% in June. Meanwhile, industrial production is expected to contract to -1.4% m/m from 2.4% m/m in June, and -0.7% y/y is forecasted from 0% y/y recorded in June. Singapore The sole key data to monitor will be the producer prices index for July out on Tuesday with another month of negative growth forecasted at -9% y/y, a slower pace of contraction from -14.3% recorded in June. It would be the 7th consecutive month of decline.
Italian Inflation Continues to Decelerate in August, Reaffirming 6.4% Forecast for 2023

Navigating Energy Prices: Analyzing Trends, Risks, and Impacts on Inflation

ING Economics ING Economics 30.08.2023 13:16
Energy prices Energy must be the starting point when thinking about a second wave. Our base case sees oil edging higher this year, and the risk is that we continue to see a lack of investment in upstream production while demand continues to move higher. That would point to an increasingly tight oil balance in the years ahead. Stricter legislation on new US oil/gas drilling, though unlikely, would be a key source of upside risk given America has been a major driver of supply growth over the last decade. That aside though, the US is largely energy-independent and that makes it far less exposed to 1970s-style shocks. Europe is more vulnerable, though the situation is evolving. National gas reserves are currently well filled and the eurozone looks better prepared to enter the winter heating season. Russian gas exports to Europe are marginal now, so any further supply cuts would be unlikely to take us back to 2022 highs. We’d also argue that natural gas demand has peaked and suspect it will be gradually lower over the next decade. RePowerEU, the bloc’s flagship energy strategy, puts emphasis on moving aggressively towards renewables. At the same time, last winter’s price spike appears to have resulted in a permanent demand loss in energy-intensive industries.   Still, in the short to medium term, the continent is more reliant on liquefied natural gas (LNG). The combination of strike action at Australian producers and a colder-than-usual European winter could prompt a significant price response. So, too, would any disruption to Norwegian natural gas supply.   For inflation though, remember that in Europe electricity/gas prices are still more than 50% higher than they were in 2021 in Germany, and roughly double in the UK, according to CPI data. Even if we got another 2022-style shock to wholesale prices, arithmetically, the scope for a similar shock to inflation at this point is more limited.
Australian Employment Surges in August Amid Part-Time Gains, While US Retail Sales and PPI Beat Expectations

GBP Remains Vulnerable Amidst Mixed Data and Economic Uncertainty

FXMAG Team FXMAG Team 14.09.2023 10:04
GBP: treading water The GBP remains among the G10 FX underperformers MTD, as mixed UK jobs data could not offer the GBP any sort of relief yesterday with GBP rates falling somewhat. Today the focus shifts onto the latest UK GDP and external trade figures for July, although they may not be of a greater help either. A month ago, UK activity for June surprised massively to the upside (0.5% MoM vs 0.2% expected) thanks to positive base effects stemming from the extra bank holiday, but the ebb & flow in activity from one month to another may have had longer legs. The economists surveyed by Bloomberg indeed look for a -0.2% MoM contraction in July UK GDP, as other data sets already suggest that poor weather conditions in the month somewhat deterred UK consumers, on top of tighter monetary conditions more broadly speaking. Ultimately, today’s data is unlikely to change the prospects that the UK economy will likely just continue to stagnate, as per the latest scenario outlined by the BoE in its August MPR and reiterated yesterday by upcoming Deputy Governor Sarah Breeden. Against this not-so-rosy backdrop, the GBP may just muddle through as well, while being possibly more vulnerable to stagflation threats than other FX majors.   JPY: watching the US CPI data Following BoJ Governor Kazuo Ueda’s hawkish words in the Japanese press over the weekend, investors have continued to increase their bets that the BoJ will end its NIRP sometime in early 2024. The 5Y JGB yield has jumped to its highest level since January 2023, when there was last speculation of a shift in the BoJ’s ultraloose monetary policy stance. This was the time ahead of PM Fumio Kishida nominating Ueda to be BoJ Governor and Ueda affirming he would be sticking to the current monetary policy regime. The 10Y JGB yield is also clinging to its recent 5bp gain to around 0.70%. While this speculation and higher JGB yields initially helped the JPY, its rally has faded and the currency is now only modestly less weak than it was before Ueda’s remarks. The culprit of this renewed weakness in the JPY is investors positioning for a potential upside surprise in US inflation when CPI data is released later today. The main driver of the JPY remains UST yields rather than JGB yields given that the latter remain tied down by the BoJ. An upside surprise in US CPI would place further pressure on Japan’s policymakers to verbally intervene in FX markets to support the JPY to potentially be followed by actual intervention. The BoJ meeting next week will be a big litmus test on this front. What is clear from the recent rhetoric of policymakers is that both MoF and BoJ officials now acknowledge a weak JPY is bringing about more cost-push inflation, which is hurting households, than the desirable demand-pull inflation required to bring about a sustainable end to deflation. This is a significant shift in rhetoric given that previously officials constantly said the benefits of a weak JPY for the economy more than offset its drawbacks.
Rates Markets Shift Focus: ECB Reaches Peak as Fed Holds Steady Amid Resilient Data

Rates Markets Shift Focus: ECB Reaches Peak as Fed Holds Steady Amid Resilient Data

ING Economics ING Economics 15.09.2023 08:30
Rates Spark: Transitioning from level to duration The European Central Bank has entered the next stage - rates markets are starting to look beyond the peak, with macro concerns guiding rates lower and the curve flatter. This is in contrast to the US where macro resilience holds hawkish tail risks for the Fed, but for now also gradually lifts the floor for longer rates.   Dovish relief with the ECB peak being reached The ECB delivered a dovish 25bp hike – and, a more mechanical increase in very front-end rates aside, the rest of the curve rallied. The decision was supported by a “solid majority” of the Council. The first reason for that reaction was that the ECB basically said that it has reached the terminal rate. The ECB does add the caveat that this applies given the current assessment of all data and data dependency could still mean that rates will increase –  President Lagarde did add that one could not say key rates reached their peak. Indeed, markets are also discounting tail risks of another hike over the coming months. But for all practical purposes the ECB no longer has a bias in rates and we are at the peak as long as there no larger surprises to the underlying scenario.    The other reason for the curve flattening is that the ECB did not offer anything to prop up longer rates. As Lagarde remarked during the press conference, neither outright asset purchase programme asset sales nor shortening the pandemic emergency purchase programme reinvestment period was discussed at any point. Riskier assets reacted with relief, in particular spreads of Italian government bonds over German Bunds saw a considerable tightening with the key 10Y spread tightening more than 4bp. That still leaves it somewhat wider compared to the end of last week with the Italian government’s growing budget deficits having come under increased scrutiny. Widening risks linger, but at least the ECB is not adding to those concerns for now.   The EUR curve may flatten relative to USD Going into next week’s Fed meeting we have already seen different narratives unfolding across USD and EUR rates. After initial oscillations rates took different directions – 10Y Bund yield closing down 6bp while the 10Y Treasury rose 3bp. While EUR markets were digesting the potential end of the tightening cycle amid growing concerns surrounding the growth outlook, the US was confronted with another slate of better-than-expected data. US CPI data earlier this week had seen some of the hawkish Fed tail risk being priced out. This was now reversed with the 2Y rate crossing above 5% again, and the curve a tad flatter. It is widely anticipated that the Fed will hold next week, but at the same time it will keep another hike on the table. While cooling, for now the data does not show any signs of the economy really toppling over. It may still mean that next week will likely be the last hike of the Fed's cyclce, but at the same time staying pat for longer amid resilient data will mean that gradual steepening pressure from the back end of the curve can take over again.     Today's events and market view The post ECB meeting period is usually marked by more background reporting on the Council’s decision and members giving their personal flavours surrounding the decision. Here we will be looking in particular at any differing assessments of  inflation versus growth concerns, and indeed in a first FT article some ECB hawks have warned taht a hike is still possible if inflation and wages stay hot. But overall the ECB has been quite clear in signalling that it has now entered the next stage, shifting the focus from the level of rates towards the duration that they will now be held steady to achieve its inflation target.   In the US, before we get back to a broader bear steepening theme the market may well want to first digest the import prices as well as the University of Michigan consumer sentiment survey and its inflation expectations component to round off its assessment of inflationary tail risks. Other US data to watch are industrial production and the Empire manufacturing index.  
Hawkish Tail Risks Loom in Rates Markets Amid Central Bank Decisions and Inflation Concerns

Hawkish Tail Risks Loom in Rates Markets Amid Central Bank Decisions and Inflation Concerns

ING Economics ING Economics 19.09.2023 13:34
Rates Spark: Hawkish tail risks The week kicked off with a bearish tone in rates markets, with key central bank decisions just ahead. Ever-rising energy costs only add to fears that the inflation fight is not yet decided. ECB hawks offered more pushback against an overly dovish interpretation of last week's hike, and the focus is shifting to other means of policy tightening than just rates.   A bearish tone in markets to start the week, and a renewed discussion of the ECB balance sheet Ahead of the key Fed and Bank of England meetings, the week kicked off with a bearish tone in rates. It was, in particular, the front end that showed weakness in the US, with the 2Y US Treasury rate pushing further above 5%. The outlier was the UK, where it was more the belly of the curve and rates further out that led rates higher – perhaps it is the “Table Mountain” comparison used by the BoE’s Chief economist gaining more attention. But more broadly speaking, it could also be markets bracing for more hawkish tail risks to their longer views. With a view to the European Central Bank, which had signalled that rates had reached a level which, if held long enough, would make a “substantial contribution” to reaching the inflation goals, markets are having second thoughts about their initial dovish interpretation. Oil prices are pushing higher, EUR market-based inflation expectations, i.e., longer-term inflation swaps, are not coming down, and real interest rates still remain well below the July highs. The decline of the latter, Isabel Schnabel had cautioned ahead of the European Central Bank's meeting, could counteract the ECB’s inflation-fighting efforts. So it may not be all that surprising to see the ECB’s hawks come to suggest it was too early to call the peak, with some also suggesting now is the time to think about speeding up the reduction of the balance sheet. If rates contribute substantially to reaching the inflation target, can the balance sheet provide the minor remainder that is needed?   Next to the ECB officials’ remarks, the key piece of news yesterday was a Reuters background story that the ECB wants soon to tackle the high level of excess reserves in the banking system. Basically, there are two ways this could be done, either via raising the minimum reserve requirement for banks or via the speeding up of quantitative tightening.      According to the article, several policymakers favour raising the reserve ratio from the current level of 1%, which currently is equivalent to around €165bn, to closer to 3% or 4%. As the ECB recently also decided to drop the remuneration of required reserves to 0%, it would also have the benefit of reducing the ECB’s interest rate costs. Most saw room to phase out the Pandemic Emergency Purchase Programme (PEPP) by ending the portfolio’s reinvestments earlier. But all were 'nervous' about the potentially negative impact on sovereign spreads. The argument against outright selling of the other portfolios under the Asset Purchase Program (APP) was that it would crystallise mark-to-market losses, highlighting the ECB’s concern with interest rate costs. Perhaps the article's main take-away on quantitative tightening is that any decision might not come this year and would take effect only in “early 2024 or even later in the spring”.   The ECB still has work to do   Today's events and market view In terms of outright direction, the sell-off in Bunds could slow with 10y yields having pushed above 2.70%, which could also mean that the curve flattening has more room yet. Elsewhere, US politics, with a potential government shutdown and strike action, is muddying the outlook for US rates. It could also imply a bit more caution from the Fed. Data today includes final CPI data out of the eurozone and in the US housing starts and building permits data for August. In government bond primary markets, Finland will tap 7y and 10y bonds for €1.5bn in total. Outside the eurozone, the UK will tap the 30Y Gilt for £2.75bn and later in the day, the US Treasury taps the 20Y bond for US$13bn.    
Renewable Realities: 2023 Sees a Sharp Slide as Costs Surge

Unlocking Opportunities: In-Depth Analysis and Trading Tips for EUR/USD

InstaForex Analysis InstaForex Analysis 08.11.2023 13:49
Analysis of transactions and tips for trading EUR/USD Further decline became limited because the test of 1.0681 coincided with the sharp downward move of the MACD line from zero. This happened even though several Fed representatives hinted at the possible continuation of the rate hike cycle and the lesser chance of a reduction in borrowing costs. Today, CPI data for Germany and retail sales report for the eurozone will come out, but it will not have much impact on the market. Instead, the speech of ECB Executive Board member Philip Lane will generate interest, as well as the speech of Fed Chairman Jerome Powell.     For long positions: Buy when euro hits 1.0700 (green line on the chart) and take profit at the price of 1.0730. Growth will occur after protecting the support at 1.0680. However, when buying, make sure that the MACD line lies above zero or rises from it. Euro can also be bought after two consecutive price tests of 1.0681, but the MACD line should be in the oversold area as only by that will the market reverse to 1.0700 and 1.0730. For short positions: Sell when euro reaches 1.0681 (red line on the chart) and take profit at the price of 1.0656. Pressure will increase after an unsuccessful attempt to hit the daily high, as well as weak data from the eurozone. However, when selling, make sure that the MACD line lies under zero or drops down from it. Euro can also be sold after two consecutive price tests of 1.0700, but the MACD line should be in the overbought area as only by that will the market reverse to 1.0681 and 1.0656.     What's on the chart: Thin green line - entry price at which you can buy EUR/USD Thick green line - estimated price where you can set Take-Profit (TP) or manually fix profits, as further growth above this level is unlikely. Thin red line - entry price at which you can sell EUR/USD Thick red line - estimated price where you can set Take-Profit (TP) or manually fix profits, as further decline below this level is unlikely. MACD line- it is important to be guided by overbought and oversold areas when entering the market   Important: Novice traders need to be very careful when making decisions about entering the market. Before the release of important reports, it is best to stay out of the market to avoid being caught in sharp fluctuations in the rate. If you decide to trade during the release of news, then always place stop orders to minimize losses. Without placing stop orders, you can very quickly lose your entire deposit, especially if you do not use money management and trade large volumes.
The Commodities Feed: Oil trades softer

When Fantastic Falls Short: Fed Minutes and Nvidia Earnings Analysis

Ipek Ozkardeskaya Ipek Ozkardeskaya 22.11.2023 14:50
When fantastic falls short...  By Ipek Ozkardeskaya, Senior Analyst | Swissquote Bank   The minutes from the Federal Reserve's (Fed) latest monetary policy meeting showed that the Fed members agreed to 'proceed carefully' with their future rate decisions. Carefully doesn't mean that the Fed is done tightening, it means that it will 'proceed carefully' in the light of the economic data and the market conditions to decide whether it should hike, pause, or cut the interest rates. Note that 'most' members 'continued to see upside risks to inflation'.   Alas, the cautious tone in Fed minutes went completely unheard as the latest CPI data acted as a shield against the Fed hawks. As such, the market reaction to the Fed minutes was muted. The US 2-year yield remained little changed near the 4.90% level, the 10-year yield rebounded past 4.40%, and is still around 60bp lower than the October levels. The S&P500, which is now trading in the overbought market, retreated 0.20% and Nasdaq 100 fell 0.60% from an almost 2-year high, as investors didn't want to do much before seeing the Nvidia's results.   When fantastic falls short...  Nvidia's Q3 results were strong. The company exceeded the $16bn revenue forecast by $2bn. They earned more than $18bn, made more than $4 profit per share and said that they will be earning around $20bn this quarter. But the latter forecast couldn't meet the top forecast ($21bn) and the share price fell in the afterhours trading, though by less than 2%; investors couldn't decide whether they should buy the fact that the company exceeded the sky-high expectations, or they should sell the reality that the chip sales to China will slow this quarter and that would weigh on revenue – although Nvidia stated that the 'decline will be more than offset by strong growth in other regions' and that they are working to comply with regulations to sell to China, anyway.   Taking a step back: Nvidia is growing, it is growing fast, it has potential to grow further, but the valuation of the company is also sky-high, its price got multiplied by almost five since October 2022. Its PE ratio stands around 120 versus a PE ratio of around 25 in average for S&P500 companies. And its market capitalization is more than $1 trillion more than Intel's, which used to be the world's biggest chipmaker. In summary, the company is growing but that strong growth is already priced in and out. Therefore, we will probably not see a big profit taking post-earnings, we will likely see correction and consolidation instead below the $500 psychological hurdle.   And with that – the Nvidia earnings – out of the way, the S&P500 and Nasdaq futures are slightly in the negative at the time of writing. The market will likely digest the Fed minutes and the Nvidia results in a calm mood before the Thanksgiving holiday.   
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Anticipation Builds: Focus on CPI Data Ahead of Pivotal FED Decision

Walid Koudmani Walid Koudmani 12.12.2023 14:42
Focus on CPI data ahead of crucial FED decision this week While the decision to maintain current interest rates appears highly probable, the primary focus of the market this week will be on Jerome Powell's upcoming speech as the Federal Reserve Chair has a significant opportunity to impact market sentiments by potentially signaling an end to the rate hike cycle. Nevertheless, such a development should not significantly alter investor expectations as it has been a wide topic of discussion for quite some time, however, a significant deviation from those expectations could lead to some noticeable impacts on USD and potentially even on risk assets.   Despite the gradual normalization of macroeconomic data, shifts are aligning favorably for the Fed as the labor market is also exhibiting signs of stabilization while inflation is clearly slowing down which has prompted investors to engage in speculation regarding the timing of potential rate cuts. In this scenario, there is a potential for a boost in bond prices, accompanied by a concurrent reduction in yields as anticipation of a Fed pivot could drive capital accumulation in bonds, taking advantage of the prevailing, albeit high, interest rates. In either case, focus today will be on US CPI data ahead of tomorrow's FED decision and while it is unlikely that the data will change tomorrow's outcome, it could certainly have a short term impact on global markets. 
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Assessing the Impact: UK Wages and CPI Figures for December and Their Implications on Monetary Policy

Michael Hewson Michael Hewson 16.01.2024 11:45
UK wages/UK CPI (Dec) – 16/01 and 17/01 Since March of last year headline CPI in the UK has more than halved, slowing from 10.1%, with November slowing more than expected to 3.9%, prompting speculation that the Bank of England might be closer to cutting rates in 2024 than had been originally priced. The decline in headline inflation is very much welcome, however most of it has been driven by the falls in petrol prices over the past few weeks. Inflation elsewhere in the UK economy is still much higher although even in these areas it has been slowing. Food price inflation for example is still much higher, slowing to 6.6% in December, while wage growth is still trending above 7% at 7.2%. Services inflation is also higher at 6.3% while core prices rose at 5.1% in the 3-months to November.   This week's wages and inflation numbers are likely to be key bellwethers for the timing of when the Bank of England might look at starting to reduce the base rate, however the key test for markets won't be on how whether we see a further slowdown in inflation at the end of last year, but how much of a rebound we see in the January numbers. Whatever markets might look to price as far as rate cuts are concerned the fact that wages are still trending above 7% is likely to stay the Bank of England's hand when it comes to looking at rate cuts. It's also important to remember that at the last rate meeting 3 members voted for a further 25bps rate hike. That means it will take more than a further slowdown in the headline rate for these 3 MPC members to reverse that call, let alone call for rate cuts. Expectations are for wages to slow to 6.7% and headline CPI to come in at 3.8%.  

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