core measure

EUR: Lagarde may sound more hawkish in Davos

The data inputs for EUR/USD will mostly come from Germany this week, with 2023 GDP figures today and the ZEW survey tomorrow along with final CPI numbers. We have often discussed how European Central Bank rate cut expectations appear way too aggressive (150bp by year-end), although the dovish members of the bank have failed to deliver a coordinated pushback.

Despite ECB hawks' protests against dovish expectations having had little impact on the market, the WEF event in Davos this week – which sees many ECB speakers including President Christine Lagarde – should not be overlooked. Lagarde has a greater potential to influence markets given a clearly divided Governing Council, and we suspect that she will opt for a more hawkish tone compared to last week’s comments. There may be some help for the euro coming from Davos, although we should be wary. Fed expectations have been resistant to data and the same could hold true for the ECB

Italian Inflation Resumes Decline: Energy Still the Driving Force, Tentative Decline in Core Measure

Italian Inflation Resumes Decline: Energy Still the Driving Force, Tentative Decline in Core Measure

ING Economics ING Economics 31.05.2023 15:44
Italian inflation resumes its declining path in May. The headline measure is still being driven by prices of energy-related goods. Interestingly, core inflation posted the second consecutive minor decline, but we don’t expect it to accelerate in the short run.   Energy still in the driving seat The preliminary estimate of May‘s Italian inflation shows a resumption of the decline in the headline measure after April’s rebound. Headline inflation was down to 7.6% in May (from 8.2% in April), driven mainly by a decline in the non-regulated energy component and, to a lower extent, by inflation declines in “other goods”, transport services and non-fresh food, which more than compensated increases in fresh food (very likely weather related) and housing services.     Expect a faster decline in goods inflation than in services The decline in headline inflation, broadly in line with our expectations, confirms that the normalisation of the inflation path is a gradual one, notwithstanding recent sharp falls in the energy component driven by lower gas prices. The sharp decline in producer price inflation in April (down to -1.5YoY from +3.7% in March) suggests that a more marked decline in the goods price inflation is building in the pipeline, which might show up in the CPI components already in the third quarter.   The deceleration in the services component looks set to be slower, also courtesy of a prolonged re-opening effect which could intensify as we enter the hot tourism summer season.   The pricing intention components of business surveys seem to confirm such a pattern, with softening price increase intentions already in place for some months among manufacturers and only a tentative hint in of a decline among service providers in May.   Tentative hints of a declining trend in the core measure Interestingly, the core measure, which excludes energy and fresh food, was marginally down to 6.1% YoY in May (from 6.2% YoY in April), the second decline in a row. A tentative hint to a new trend, likely favoured by slowly adjusting wage dynamics.   Consumption developments will affect the speed of the inflation decline All in all, today’s inflation release comforts our view that the declining path for inflation is set, but that will be a gradual one. As we have seen earlier today in the GDP release, Italian households have been reluctant to adjust down their consumption levels to unfavourable developments in disposable income.   To be sure, resilient employment has helped weather the shock, but we suspect that the saving ratio has reached too low a level (around 5%) for Italian historical standards, which could prove hard to sustain. A marked deceleration in consumption might eventually kick start a more marked deceleration in the core component.   We are currently forecasting average Italian inflation at 6.3% in 2023 and 2.4% in 2024.
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Inflation Numbers Take Center Stage as Quarter Comes to a Close

Michael Hewson Michael Hewson 30.06.2023 09:50
Inflation numbers a key focus as we round off the quarter       European markets continued their recent patchy performance, as we come to the end of the week, month, quarter, and half year, with the FTSE100 sliding back while the likes of the DAX and CAC40 were slightly more resilient, after German inflation came in slightly higher than expected in June.   US markets were slightly more positive, but even here the Nasdaq 100 struggled after a sizeable upward revision to Q1 GDP to 2%, and better than expected weekly jobless claims numbers sent US yields sharply higher to their highest levels since March, while the US dollar also hit a 2-week high.   The surprising resilience of US economic data this week has made it an absolute certainty that we will see another rate increase in July, but also raised the possibility that we might see another 2 more rate increases after that.   The resilience of the labour market, along with the fact that core inflation remains sticky also means that it makes the Federal Reserve's job of timing another pause much more difficult to time. Today's core PCE Deflator and personal spending numbers for May could go some way to making that job somewhat easier.   Core PCE Deflator is forecast to remain unchanged at 4.7%, while personal spending is expected to slow from 0.8% to 0.2%. While the Federal Reserve isn't the only central bank facing a sticky inflation problem, there is evidence that it is having slightly more success in dealing with it, unlike the European Central Bank which is seeing much more elevated levels of headline and core prices. Yesterday, we saw CPI in Germany edge higher from 6.3% in May to 6.8%, while in Spain core prices rose more than expected by 5.9%, even as headline CPI fell below 2% for the first time in over 2 years.   Today's French CPI numbers are expected to show similar slowdowns on the headline rate, from 5.1% to 4.6%, but it is on the core measure that the ECB is increasingly focussing its attention. Today's EU flash CPI for June is forecast to see a fall to 5.6% from 6.1%, however core prices are expected to edge back up to 5.5% after dropping to 5.3% in May. Compounding the ECB's and other central banks dilemma when it comes to raising rates is that PPI price pressures are falling like a stone and have been since the start of the year, in Germany and Italy. In April French PPI plunged -5.1% on a monthly basis, even as the year-on-year rate slowed to 7% from 12.8%.   If this trend continues today then it might suggest that a wave of deflation is heading our way and could hit sometime towards the end of the year, however while core prices remain so resilient central banks are faced with the problem of having to look in two different directions, while at the same time managing a soft landing. The Bank of England has an even bigger problem in getting inflation back to target, although it really only has itself to blame for that, having consistently ignored regular warnings over the past 18 months that it was behind the curve. The risk now is over tightening just as prices start to fall sharply.   Today's Q1 GDP numbers are set to confirm that the UK economy managed to avoid a contraction after posting Q1 growth of 0.1%, although it was a little touch and go after a disappointing economic performance in March, which saw a monthly contraction of -0.3% which acted as a drag on the quarter overall.   The reason for the poor performance in March was due to various public sector strike action from healthcare and transport, which weighed heavily on the services sector which saw a contraction of -0.5%. The performance would have been worse but for a significant rebound in construction and manufacturing activity which saw strong rebounds of 0.7%.   There is a risk that this modest expansion could get revised away this morning, however recent PMI numbers have shown that, despite rising costs, business is holding up, even if economic confidence remains quite fragile.     One thing we do know is that with the recent increase in gilt yields is that the second half of this year is likely to be even more challenging than the first half, and that the UK will do well to avoid a recession over the next two quarters.       EUR/USD – slid back towards and below the 50-day SMA, with a break below the 1.0850 area, potentially opening up a move towards 1.0780. Still have resistance just above the 1.1000 area.     GBP/USD – continues to come under pressure as we slip towards the 50-day SMA at 1.2540. If this holds, the bias remains for a move back to the 1.3000 area. Currently have resistance at 1.2770.       EUR/GBP – currently being capped by resistance at the 50-day SMA at 0.8673, which is the next resistance area. Behind that we have 0.8720. Support comes in at the 0.8580 area.     USD/JPY – briefly pushed above 145.00 with the November highs of 147.50 beyond that.  Support remains at the 142.50 area, which was the 61.8% retracement of the 151.95/127.20 down move. A fall below this support area could see a deeper fall towards 140.20/30.    FTSE100 is expected to open 18 points higher at 7,489     DAX is expected to open 12 points higher at 15,958   CAC40 is expected to open 8 points higher at 7,320      
Italian Inflation Continues to Decelerate in August, Reaffirming 6.4% Forecast for 2023

Italian Inflation Continues to Decelerate in August, Reaffirming 6.4% Forecast for 2023

ING Economics ING Economics 01.09.2023 08:46
Italian inflation continued to decelerate in August The August inflation release provides comforting signals of a broad-based deceleration in inflation, including the core measure. The trend looks set to continue until year-end, at a pace which will be affected by residual base effects. We stand by our 6.4% forecast for 2023 HICP inflation.   Goods and services both decelerate The preliminary estimate by the Italian National Institute of Statistics (Istat) of August consumer prices confirms that inflation is on a solid decelerating path. The headline measure was down to 5.5% (from 5.9% in July), broadly in line with expectations, driven by the non-regulated energy component, recreational services, fresh food, transport services and durable goods, only partly compensated by housing services and regulated energy goods. The statistical carryover for 2023 headline inflation now stands at 5.7%. Both goods and service inflation decelerated to 6.4% and 3.6%, respectively, and food inflation, at 9.6% in August, fell below double digits for the first time since July 2022.   Core inflation falls Core inflation, which strips out energy and fresh food, and is a key indicator in the eyes of the European Central Bank, also sent encouraging signals, falling to 4.8% from 5.2% in July, confirming the deceleration pace seen since June. This reflects the deceleration in services, not yet impacted by the recent acceleration in hourly wages (at 3.2% year-on-year in June)   Further declines in inflation expected... As the pace of the decline in headline inflation is still being set by the energy component, we should be aware that substantial base effects have yet to play out as a decelerating factor over the autumn. Indicators such as import prices and producer prices continue to point to softer headline inflation ahead. Import prices contracted by 9.8% in June and producer price inflation, at -5.5% YoY in June, has been in negative territory since April. The latter is still driven by the energy component (-26.2% YoY in June), however stripping out energy and construction, the PPI inflation read in June of 2% confirms a clear declining trend.   ...but the pace will depend on a combination of factors If the pricing pipeline is sending encouraging signals, other indicators coming from August business surveys deserve attention. For the first time since September 2022, the manufacturers’ pricing intentions balance rose in August from the previous month and increased in services for the second consecutive month. The only area where the deceleration in price increase intentions remains in place is the retail sector. This is a warning signal that the current pace of inflation deceleration, particularly at the core level, cannot be taken for granted. The wage cost variable will likely have a say in the process. Here, indications are mixed. If some more wage concessions look likely over the next few months as a consequence of past inflation surprises, labour market tightness might loosen a bit. July labour market data, also released earlier today, offer some tentative evidence of this. For the first time over the last eight months, employment declined from the previous month and the unemployment rate edged up to 7.6% (from 7.4% in June). The Italian labour market is possibly finally responding to cyclical developments. After today’s inflation release, we confirm our forecast for average HICP inflation for 2023 at 6.4% YoY.
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EUR: Lagarde's Potential Hawkish Shift in Davos Amidst Market Skepticism

ING Economics ING Economics 16.01.2024 12:20
EUR: Lagarde may sound more hawkish in Davos The data inputs for EUR/USD will mostly come from Germany this week, with 2023 GDP figures today and the ZEW survey tomorrow along with final CPI numbers. We have often discussed how European Central Bank rate cut expectations appear way too aggressive (150bp by year-end), although the dovish members of the bank have failed to deliver a coordinated pushback. Despite ECB hawks' protests against dovish expectations having had little impact on the market, the WEF event in Davos this week – which sees many ECB speakers including President Christine Lagarde – should not be overlooked. Lagarde has a greater potential to influence markets given a clearly divided Governing Council, and we suspect that she will opt for a more hawkish tone compared to last week’s comments. There may be some help for the euro coming from Davos, although we should be wary. Fed expectations have been resistant to data and the same could hold true for the ECB as well. The minutes from the December policy meeting are also released this week. We still think it is premature for EUR/USD to trade sustainably above 1.10. Elsewhere, Sweden published inflation figures today. CPIF declined to 2.3% from 3.6% (consensus 2.2%), although the core measure excluding energy remained high, slowing from 5.4% to 5.3% versus a consensus of 5.2%. Despite this, it remains unlikely that the Riksbank will tighten policy again. If anything, this modestly raises the chances that another round of FX sales will be started after the current reserve hedging programme ends in early February (in our view).

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