ADP report

By Michael Hewson (Chief Market Analyst at CMC Markets UK)

    US non-farm payrolls (Nov) – 08/12 – last month's October jobs report was the first one this year when the headline number came in below market expectations, though not by enough to raise concerns over the resilience of the US economy. Unlike September, when US jobs surged by 297k, jobs growth slowed in October to 150k, while the unemployment rate ticked higher to 3.9%, in a sign that the US economy is now starting to slow in a manner that will please the US central bank. Combined with a similarly weak ADP report the same week, where jobs growth slowed to 113k, and a softer ISM services survey yields have slipped back significantly from their October peaks, as well as being below the levels they were a month ago in a sign that the market thinks that rate hikes are done and has now moved on to when to expect rate cuts. This is the next challenge for the US central bank who will be keen to continue to push the higher for

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Unexplained Surge of GBP/USD: Market Confusion and Fundamental Disconnect

InstaForex Analysis InstaForex Analysis 02.06.2023 11:17
The GBP/USD currency pair calmly continued its upward movement on Thursday. And we are forced to state that the rise of the British currency is once again completely illogical. The market is returning to its favorite activity of the past few months - buying the pound regardless of its fundamental background. And if that's the case, we can do nothing about it. It is worth noting that at the same time, the euro continues to trade below the moving average and shows no signs of growth.   At most, a correction may occur soon due to the CCI indicator entering the oversold area. In other words, the pound and the euro do not correlate this week, which always raises questions. The fundamental background has indeed been very different for these pairs. We have received diverse news, statements, speeches, and reports from the European Union. The market has not yet figured out which of this data is primary and which can be disregarded.       However, at the same time, from the UK, we have only received the report on business activity in the manufacturing sector for May in its final assessment. This secondary indicator could not have caused a strong British currency rise yesterday. What could be the problem? We can only assume one thing. The market believes that the ECB is approaching the end of its tightening cycle. Still, at the same time, it expects several more rate hikes from the Bank of England, which puts the British pound in a more favorable position than the dollar or the euro.   It is worth noting that the probability of an interest rate hike by the Federal Reserve in June has sharply increased this week, as several members of the monetary committee have expressed their readiness to support a "hawkish" decision without pausing. But yesterday, Thomas Jefferson and Patrick Harker, on the contrary, spoke in favor of a pause, which further confused traders. If the market is confused, seeing flat or cautious movements would be more logical. However, the pound is rising again like yeast. Therefore, the issue lies in the CCI indicator entering the oversold area and maintaining a bullish sentiment in the market. The pound should resume its decline, but strong bearish signals are now needed, which are currently lacking.   Nonfarm payrolls and unemployment can pleasantly surprise the market. On the last trading day of the week in the United States, the publication of the nonfarm payroll reports is scheduled. Since the British pound is rising again for unclear reasons, these reports are intended to set everything straight. The dollar may resume growth if they show good values (not below forecasts).   If the values are weak, the pound may rise even stronger in joy. And it doesn't matter that globally, it should decline by another 500-600 points to contemplate new growth. It is worth noting that we did not receive any "hawkish" signals from the United States this week. And if so, there are no strong reasons for the pound to rise.   On Thursday, the ADP report on changes in the number of private sector employees in the United States showed a higher value than expected - 278,000 against the forecast of 170-200. However, this report is rarely perceived by traders as important. They usually prefer to wait for the Nonfarm Payrolls. Moreover, the nature of the ADP and NonFarm reports rarely coincides. Thus, today's NonFarm report may be weaker than the forecasts (180-190 thousand), and the bulls will have a new legitimate opportunity to buy the pound and sell the dollar.   Therefore, the week may end unexpectedly. The fact that the euro and the pound are already trading in different directions causes surprise, but the current week shows that there have been and will be surprised. Volatility has started to rise again, but at the same time, frequent corrections and pullbacks occur. It is worth noting that there are better types of movement for trading in the 4-hour timeframe.     The average volatility of the GBP/USD pair over the past five trading days is 92 pips. For the pound/dollar pair, this value is considered "average." Therefore, on Friday, June 2nd, we expect movement within the channel bounded by the levels of 1.2424 and 1.2608. A downward reversal of the Heiken Ashi indicator will signal a correction against the recent upward trend.   Nearest support levels: S1 - 1.2482 S2 - 1.2451 S3 - 1.2421   Nearest resistance levels: R1 - 1.2512   Trading recommendations: On the 4-hour timeframe, the GBP/USD pair has settled above the moving average line, so long positions with a target of 1.2608 are currently relevant, which should be held until the Heiken Ashi indicator reverses downwards. Short positions can be considered if the price consolidates below the moving average with targets at 1.2360 and 1.2329.   Explanation of illustrations: Linear regression channels - help determine the current trend. If both channels are directed in the same direction, it indicates a strong trend. Moving average line (settings 20.0, smoothed) - determines the short-term trend and direction for trading. Murray levels - target levels for movements and corrections. Volatility levels (red lines) - the probable price channel in which the pair will move the next day, based on current volatility indicators. CCI indicator - its entry into the oversold region (below -250) or overbought region (above +250) indicates an upcoming trend reversal in the opposite direction.    
Services PMIs and Fed Minutes: Analyzing Market Focus and Central Bank Strategy

Services PMIs and Fed Minutes: Analyzing Market Focus and Central Bank Strategy

Michael Hewson Michael Hewson 05.07.2023 08:19
Services PMIs and Fed minutes in focus By Michael Hewson (Chief Market Analyst at CMC Markets UK) In the absence of US markets yesterday, European markets underwent a modestly negative session on a fairly quiet day, and look set to open modestly lower this morning, with Asia markets drifting lower. For the past few days, markets have been trading in a broadly sideways range with little in the way of momentum, as investors weigh up the direction of the next move over the next quarter.   The last few weeks have been spent obsessing about the timing of a possible recession, particularly in the US, with the timing getting slowly pushed back into 2024, even as bond markets flash warnings signs that one is on the horizon.     As we look ahead to Friday's US payrolls report, speculation abounds as to how many more central bank rate hikes are inbound in the coming weeks, against a backdrop of economic data that by and large continues to remain reasonably resilient, manufacturing notwithstanding.     Despite the dire start of manufacturing activity as seen earlier this week, services have held up well, although we are now starting to see some pockets of weakness. A few days ago, in the flash numbers France saw a sharp fall in economic activity, sliding from 52.5 to 48 for June, although activity in the rest of the euro area remains broadly positive.     This is an area of the economy that could help boost economic activity, particularly in Italy and Spain now we're in the holiday season and has seen these two countries perform much better in recent months. The outperformance here could even help avert a 3rd quarter of economic contraction for the euro area.       Expectations for Spain and Italy are 55.7, and 53.1, modest slowdowns from the numbers in May, while France and Germany are expected to slow to 48 and 54.1.     We're also expected to see a positive reading from the UK, albeit weaker from the May numbers at 53.7. US PMI numbers are due tomorrow given the July 4th holiday yesterday.     Later today with the return of US markets, we get a look at the most recent Fed minutes, when the FOMC took the collective decision to keep rates on hold, with the likelihood we will see a resumption of rate hikes later this month.     In the lead-up to the decision there had been plenty of discussion as to the wisdom of pausing given how little extra data would be available between the June and July decisions. The crux of the argument was if you think you need to hike again, why wait until July when the only data of note between the June and July decisions is one payrolls report, and one set of inflation numbers.     All of that is now moot however and while inflation has continued to soften, the labour market data hasn't. Here it remains strong with tomorrow's June ADP report, the May JOLTs report, weekly jobless claims, as well as Friday's June payrolls numbers.     Tonight's minutes may offer up further clues as to the Fed's thinking when it comes to why they think that two more rate hikes at the very least will be needed by the end of this year.     A few members changed their dots to reflect the prospect that they were prepared to raise rates twice more by the end of the year, with a hike in July now almost certain. This stance caught markets off guard given that pricing had been very much set at the prospect of one more rate hike, before a halt.     A key part of the thinking may have been the Fed's determination that markets stop pricing rate cuts by the end of this year. This insistence of pricing in rate cuts by year end has been one of the key characteristics that has helped drive recent gains in stock markets.     This has now been largely priced out, so in this regard the Fed has succeeded,   The key now is to make sure that the Federal Reserve, along with other central banks, while prioritising pushing inflation down, don't break something else, and start pushing the rate of unemployment sharply higher.   This is the balancing act central banks will now have to perform, and here it might be worth them exercising some patience. Given the lags being seen in the pass through of monetary policy it may be that a lengthy pause after July, keeping rates at current levels for months, is a wiser course of action than continuing to raise rates until the tightrope snaps, and the whole edifice comes tumbling down.       Today's minutes ought to give us an indication of the thought processes of the more dovish members of the FOMC, and how comfortable they are with the prospect of this balance of risks.             EUR/USD – remains range bound with support around the 1.0830/40 area and 50-day SMA, with resistance remaining at the 1.1000 area. A break below the lows last week opens the way for a potential move towards 1.0780.     GBP/USD – still looking well supported above the 50-day SMA at 1.2540, as well as trend line support from the March lows, bias remains higher for a move back to the 1.3000 area. Currently it has resistance at 1.2770.       EUR/GBP – rolling over again yesterday, sliding below the 0.8570/80 area, and looks set to retarget the 0.8520 area. Resistance remains at the 50-day SMA which is now at 0.8655. Behind that we have 0.8720.     USD/JPY – currently capped at the 145.00 area, with support at the 144.00 area this week.  The key reversal day remains intact while below 145.20.  A break below 143.80 targets a move back to the 142.50 area. Above 145.20 opens up 147.50.      FTSE100 is expected to open 5 points lower at 7,514     DAX is expected to open 28 points lower at 16,011     CAC40 is expected to open 23 points lower at 7,347
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US crude surges above 50-DMA as Fed minutes reveal hawkish stance

Ipek Ozkardeskaya Ipek Ozkardeskaya 06.07.2023 08:18
US crude jumps above 50-DMA  Minutes from the Federal Reserve's (Fed) latest policy meeting were more hawkish than expected. The minutes revealed that some officials preferred another 25bp hike right away instead of a pause. Almost all of them said that additional hiking would likely be appropriate, and the forecasts showed that they also expect mild recession.     The minutes came to confirm how serious the Fed is in further tightening monetary conditions, and boosted the Fed hike expectations. The US 2-year yield came very close to 5%, the stocks fell, but very slightly. The S&P500 closed the session just 0.20% lower, while Nasdaq 100 gave back only 0.03%. The US dollar gained however, the EURUSD slipped below its 50-DMA, as the Eurozone services PMI fell short of expectations. The June number still hinted at expansion, but the composite PMI slipped into the contraction zone for the first time since January, hinting that activity in Eurozone is slowing because of tightening monetary conditions in the Eurozone as well. On the inflation front, the producer prices fell 1.5% y-o-y in May, the first ever deflation since February 2021. The expectation for the 12-month inflation in EZ fell to 3.9% in May. It's still twice the ECB's 2% policy target, but it's coming down slowly. And the trajectory is certainly more important than the number itself.     Moving forward, further opinion divergence will likely appear along with softening data, but the ECB will continue hiking the rates because officials will be too afraid to stop hiking too early. And as the economic picture worsens, the credit conditions become tighter, the cheap loans dry up and the post-pandemic positivity on peripheral countries fade, we will likely see the yield spread between the core and periphery widen. And the latter could have a negative impact on the single currency's positive trajectory against the US dollar.     Due today, the ADP report is expected to reveal that the US economy added around 228K new private jobs in June, while the JOLTS is expected to have slipped below 10 mio job openings in May.      By Ipek Ozkardeskaya, Senior Analyst | Swissquote Bank  
Strong Jobs Data Spurs Fed Rate Hike Expectations, Pressures Equities

Strong Jobs Data Spurs Fed Rate Hike Expectations, Pressures Equities

Ipek Ozkardeskaya Ipek Ozkardeskaya 07.07.2023 08:52
Jobs surprise.  497'000 is the number of private jobs that the US economy added last month. 497'000. The number of quits rose to 250'000. But happily, the job openings fell by almost half a million, and more importantly for the Federal Reserve (Fed) – who is fighting to abate inflation and not necessarily jobs, the sector that saw the biggest jobs gains – which is leisure and hospitality which accounted for more than 230'000 of the jobs added – also saw the sharpest decline in annual pay growth. The pay for this sector's workers grew 7.9% last year, down from 8.4% printed a month earlier. But that detail went a bit unheard, and under the shadow of the stunning 497'000 new jobs added. And the too-strong ADP report that, again, hinted at a too-resilient US jobs market to the Fed's very aggressive rate hikes, ended up further fueling the Fed rate hike expectations. The US 2-year yield spiked above 5%, and above the peak that we saw before the mini banking crisis hit the US in March, while the 10-year yield took a lift as well, and hit 4%, on indication that, recession doesn't look around the corner... at least if you follow the US jobs numbers.  So today, the official US jobs data could or could not confirm the strength in the ADP figures, but we are all prepared for another month of strong NFP data, and lower unemployment. If anything, we could see the wages growth slow. If that's the case, investors could still have a reason to see the glass half full and bet that the US economy could achieve the soft landing that it's hoping for.     Equities pressured.  The S&P500 and Nasdaq fell yesterday as the US yields spiked on expectation that the Fed won't stop hiking rates with such a strong jobs data, as such a strong jobs market means resilient consumer spending, which in return means sticky inflation.   Other data confirmed the US' economy's good health as well. ISM services PMI showed faster-than-expected growth and faster-than-expected employment, and slower but higher-than-expected price growth in June. If we connect the dots, the US manufacturing is slowing but services continue to grow, and services account for around 80% of the US economic activity, so no wonder the US jobs data remains solid and consumer spending remains resilient, and the US GDP growth comes in better than expected, and we haven't seen that recession showing up its nose yet.   But the darker side of the story is, this much economic strength means sticky inflation, and tighter monetary conditions, and the dirty job of pricing it is done by the sovereign markets. And many investors think that when there is such a divergence of opinion between stock and bond traders, bond traders tend to be right.   But at the end of the day, the stock market's performance  will depend on how much pain the Fed will put on the Wall Street from the balance sheet reduction. If the Fed just continues hiking the rates and do little on the balance sheet front, it will only hit Main Street, and there will be no reason for the equity rally to stall. Voila.    By Ipek Ozkardeskaya, Senior Analyst | Swissquote Bank  
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Oil Retreats Despite Positive Momentum, Gold's Rebound in Jeopardy

Craig Erlam Craig Erlam 07.07.2023 09:00
Despite positive momentum, oil falls short once more Oil prices are retreating in risk-averse trade today. The ADP report has clearly had a negative impact given it likely means we’re facing another red-hot jobs report tomorrow and the prospect of higher rates for longer. It also came at an opportune time, with the price flirting with the peak from two weeks ago, only to turn south having fallen just shy of surpassing it. That means we’re seen yet another failed new high or low in recent weeks and the gradual consolidation, roughly between $72-$77 is still in play. This time it was close and there was good momentum going into the ADP release but it seems the jobs number was just too big. A repeat performance tomorrow could cement that and undo the efforts of the Saudis and Russians earlier this week in seeking to drive the price higher.   Is gold vulnerable to another big break? Gold’s brief rebound is seemingly over, with the price already struggling around $1,930-$1,940 before ADP delivered a hammer blow to it. The yellow metal is back trading just above $1,900, a level that’s now looking very vulnerable ahead of tomorrow’s jobs report. If it manages to hold above in the interim, a hot report could be the straw that breaks the camel’s back. Suddenly it will become a question of whether another hike in September is unavoidable against the backdrop of such a hot labour market. These aren’t the only figures that matter but they do significantly weaken the case for another pause.
US Non-Farm Payrolls Disappoint: What's Next for EUR/USD?

US Non-Farm Payrolls Disappoint: What's Next for EUR/USD?

InstaForex Analysis InstaForex Analysis 10.07.2023 11:54
First impressions can be deceiving. US non-agricultural employment rose by 209,000 in June fell short of the Bloomberg expert consensus forecast and was the weakest since December 2020. Moreover, the data for April and May were revised down by 110,000. Initially, the market perceived the report as weak, which led to a drop in Treasury bond yields and a rise in EUR/USD above 1.092. However, the devil is always in the details. In the lead-up to the report, investors were counting on strong numbers as private sector employment from ADP rose by nearly half a million people.   However, the actual non-farm payrolls turned out to be worse than that report by the largest amount since the beginning of 2022. This fact can be seen as a sign of a cooling labor market. Nevertheless, unemployment in June dropped from 3.7% to 3.6%. As long as it does not increase, we can forget about a recession in the US economy. In addition, the average wage increased faster than expected, so it's still too early for the Federal Reserve to relax.     The employment report for the US private sector turned out to be mixed. It reduced the probability of a rate hike to 5.75% in 2023 from 41% to 36%, which worsened the position of the US dollar against the main world currencies. However, Deutsche Bank noted that only a figure of +100,000 or less for non-farm payrolls could change the worldview of FOMC officials and make them abandon their plans for two acts of monetary restriction this year. June employment data gave food for thought to both the "hawks" and "centrists" of the Fed, as well as the "bulls" and "bears" for EUR/USD.   Now, investors' attention is shifting to US inflation data and Fed Chair Jerome Powell's speech in Jackson Hole. Bloomberg experts expect consumer prices to slow in June from 4% to 3.1%, and core inflation from 5.3% to 5% year-on-year. CPI is moving so quickly towards the 2% target that it's as if Fed officials have not changed their minds. Could it be that this time the financial market will be right? And those who went against the Fed will make money? We'll see.     Not everyone agrees with this. ING notes that the minutes of the FOMC's June meeting set a very high bar for incoming data for the Bank to abandon its plans. The US labor market report is unlikely to have surpassed this bar. Core inflation continues to remain high, and the economy is firmly on its feet.   All this allows ING to predict the EUR/USD pair's fall towards 1.08 within the next week. Technically, on the daily chart, there is a battle for the fair value at 1.092. Closing above this level will allow you to buy on a breakout of resistance at 1.0935. This is where the upper band of the consolidation range within the "Spike and Ledge" pattern is located. On the contrary, if the 1.092 mark persists for the bears, we will sell the euro from $1.089.      
ECB's Potential Hike Faces Limited Rate Upside as Macro Headwinds Persist

European Equity Markets Brace for a Shocking Week, Fueled by Economic Anxiety and Resilient Data

Craig Erlam Craig Erlam 10.07.2023 12:56
It’s been a shocking week for European equity markets, on course to shed almost 5% and it could get worse if the US jobs report reflects what we saw yesterday from ADP. You wouldn’t always guess it when looking at the performance of stocks but there is mounting anxiety about the resilience of the economy and what that will mean for interest rates going into the end of this year and 2024. Investors always seem to find a way to look on the bright side which may explain the disconnect between economic fears on the back of rapidly rising interest rates and the performance of indices. And that may be rewarded if central banks can achieve the soft landing they’re hoping for but with every piece of resilient data and additional rate hike, that’s looking harder and harder. And you can see it reflected in their language more and more. That’s not to say investors have suddenly turned bearish on the basis of this week, although it has been quite a sharp sell-off, but we may have reached a point in which they are questioning whether markets are no longer reflecting reality. The ADP report doesn’t always attract that much attention, in fact for years it’s been borderline disregarded, but it’s impossible to ignore yesterday’s release. It smashed expectations and once again indicated we may be looking at another consensus-beating NFP number. Further signs that the labor market is red-hot and resilient.   Choppy trading in bitcoin but ultimately range-bound Trading has remained choppy in bitcoin over the last week or so but we haven’t yet seen any significant developments, with it still largely contained to the $30,000-$31,000 range it’s traded within since bursting higher last month. There’s more cause for optimism on the back of the ETF filings but there’s no guarantee they will yield a positive outcome even if the chances are enhanced by the backing of those involved. It could also be a lengthy process which may explain the stall we’ve seen over the last couple of weeks.  
GBP: ECB's Dovish Stance Keeps BoE Expectations in Check

Market Insights Roundup: A Glimpse into Economic Indicators and Corporate Performance

Michael Hewson Michael Hewson 28.08.2023 09:11
In a world where economic indicators and market movements can shift with the blink of an eye, staying updated on the latest offerings and promotions within the financial sector is crucial. Today, we delve into one such noteworthy development that has emerged on the horizon, enticing individuals to explore a blend of banking and insurance services. As markets ebb and flow, being vigilant about trends and opportunities can lead to financial benefits. Let's explore this exciting promotion that brings together the worlds of banking and insurance to offer a unique proposition for consumers.     By Michael Hewson (Chief Market Analyst at CMC Markets UK) US non-farm payrolls (Aug) – 01/09 – the July jobs report saw another modest slowdown in jobs growth, as well as providing downward revisions to previous months. 187k jobs were added, just slightly above March's revised 165k, although the unemployment rate fell to 3.5%, from 3.6%. While the official BLS numbers have been showing signs of slowing the ADP report has looked much more resilient, adding 324k in July on top of the 455k in June. This resilience is also coming against a backdrop of sticky wages, which in the private sector are over double headline CPI, while on the BLS measure average hourly earnings remained steady at 4.4%. This week's August payrolls are set to see paint another picture of a resilient but slowing jobs market with expectations of 160k jobs added, with unemployment remaining steady at 3.5%. It's also worth keeping an eye on vacancy rates and the job opening numbers which fell to just below 9.6m in June. These have consistently remained well above the pre-Covid levels of 7.5m and have remained so since the start of 2021. This perhaps explain why the US central bank is keen not to rule out further rate hikes, lest inflation starts to become more embedded.                          US Core PCE Deflator (Jul) – 31/08 – while the odds continue to favour a Fed pause when the central bank meets in September, markets are still concerned that we might still see another rate hike later in the year. The stickiness of core inflation does appear to be causing some concern that we might see US rates go higher with a notable movement in longer term rates, which are now causing the US yield curve to steepen further. The June Core PCE Deflator numbers did see a sharp fall from 4.6% in May to 4.1% in June, while the deflator fell to 3% from 3.8%. This week's July inflation numbers could prompt further concern about sticky inflation if we get sizeable ticks higher in the monthly as well as annual headline numbers. When we got the CPI numbers earlier in August, we saw evidence that prices might struggle to move much lower, after headline CPI edged higher to 3.2%. We can expect to see a similar move in this week's numbers with a move to 3.3% in the deflator and to 4.3% in the core deflator.       US Q2 GDP – 30/08 – the second iteration of US Q2 GDP is expected to underline the resilience of the US economy in the second quarter with a modest improvement to 2.5% from 2.4%, despite a slowdown in personal consumption from 4.2% in Q1 to 1.6%. More importantly the core PCE price index saw quarterly prices slow from 4.9% in Q1 to 3.8%. The resilience in the Q2 numbers was driven by a rebuilding of inventory levels which declined in Q1. Private domestic investment also rose 5.7%, while an increase in defence spending saw a rise of 2.5%.             UK Mortgage Approvals/ Consumer Credit (Jul) – 30/08 – while we have started to see evidence of a pickup in mortgage approvals after June approvals rose to 54.7k, this resilience may well be down to a rush to lock in fixed rates before they go even higher. Net consumer credit was also resilient in June, jumping to £1.7bn and a 5 year high, raising concerns that consumers were going further into debt to fund lifestyles more suited to a low interest rate environment. While unemployment remains close to historically low levels this shouldn't be too much of a concern, however if it starts to edge higher, we could start to see slowdown in both, as previous interest rate increases start to bite in earnest.            EU flash CPI (Aug) – 31/08 – due to increasing concerns over deflationary pressures, recent thinking on further ECB rate hikes has been shifting to a possible pause when the central bank next meets in September. Since the start of the year the ECB has doubled rates to 4%, however anxiety is growing given the performance of the German economy which is on the cusp of three consecutive negative quarters. On the PPI measure the economy is in deflation, while manufacturing activity has fallen off a cliff. Despite this headline CPI is still at 5.3%, while core prices are higher at 5.5%, just below their record highs of 5.7%. This week's August CPI may well not be the best guide for further weakness in price trends given that Europe tends to vacation during August, however concerns are increasing that the ECB is going too fast and a pause might be a useful exercise.     Best Buy Q2 24 – 29/08 – we generally hear a lot about the strength of otherwise of the US consumer through the prism of Target or Walmart, electronics retailer Best Buy also offers a useful insight into the US consumer's psyche, and since its May Q1 numbers the shares have performed reasonably well. In May the retailer posted Q1 earnings of $1.15c a share, modestly beating forecasts even as revenues fell slightly short at $9.47bn. Despite the revenue miss the retailer reiterated its full year forecast of revenues of $43.8bn and $45.2bn. For Q2 revenues are expected to come in at $9.52bn, with same store sales expected to see a decline of -6.35%, as consumers rein in spending on bigger ticket items like domestic appliances and consumer electronics. The company has been cutting headcount, laying off hundreds in April as it looks to maintain and improve its margins. Profits are expected to come in at $1.08c a share.        HP Q3 23 – 29/08 – when HP reported its Q2 numbers the shares saw some modest selling, however the declines didn't last long, with the shares briefly pushing up to 11-month highs in July. When the company reported in Q1, they projected revenues of $13.03bn, well below the levels of the same period in 2022. Yesterday's numbers saw a 22% decline to $12.91bn with a drop in PC sales accounting for the bulk of the drop, declining 29% to $8.18bn. Profits, on the other hand did beat forecasts, at $0.80c a share, while adjusted operating margins also came in ahead of target. HP went on to narrow its full year EPS profit forecast by 10c either side, to between $3.30c and $3.50c a share. For Q3 revenues are expected to fall to $13.36bn, with PC revenue expected to slip back to $8.79bn. Profits are expected to fall 20% to $0.84c a share.         Salesforce Q2 24 – 30/08 – Salesforce shares have been on a slow road to recovery after hitting their lowest levels since March 2020, back in December last year, with the shares coming close to retracing 60% of the decline from the record highs of 2021. When the company reported back in June, the shares initially slipped back after full year guidance was left unchanged. When the company reported in Q4, the outlook for Q1 revenues was estimated at $8.16bn to $8.18bn, which was comfortably achieved with $8.25bn, while profits also beat, coming in at $1.69c a share. For Q2 the company raised its revenue outlook to $8.51bn to $8.53bn, however they decided to keep full year revenue guidance unchanged at a minimum of $34.5bn. This was a decent increase from 2023's $31.35bn, but was greeted rather underwhelmingly, however got an additional lift in July when the company said it was raising prices. Profits are expected to come in at $1.90c a share. Since June, market consensus on full year revenues has shifted higher to $34.66bn. Under normal circumstances this should prompt a similar upgrade from senior management.   Broadcom Q3 23 – 31/08 – just prior to publishing its Q2 numbers Broadcom shares hit record highs after announcing a multibillion-dollar deal with Apple for 5G radio frequency components for the iPhone. The shares have continued to make progress since that announcement on expectations that it will be able to benefit on the move towards AI. Q2 revenues rose almost 8% to $8.73bn, while profits came in at $10.32c a share, both of which were in line with expectations. For Q3 the company expects to see revenues of $8.85bn, while market consensus on profits is expected to match the numbers for Q2, helping to lift the shares higher on the day. It still has to complete the deal with VMWare which is currently facing regulatory scrutiny, and which has now been approved by the UK's CMA.
Rates and Cycles: Central Banks' Strategies in Focus Amid Steepening Impulses

Asia Morning Bites: Australian Inflation in Focus Amid Market Movements

ING Economics ING Economics 30.08.2023 09:38
Asia Morning Bites Eyes down for Australian inflation. Markets brace for weaker payrolls after JOLTS decline in job openings. ADP due later.   Global Macro and Markets Global markets:  There was a lot of green on the boards across the equity world yesterday. Both US, European and Chinese stock indices all rose on the day. The S&P and NASDAQ rose 1.45% and 1.74% respectively, while the Hang Seng and CSI 300 rose 1.95% and 1.0%. The earlier announcement in China of stamp duty cuts and curbs on share sales by major shareholders may have provided some lingering support. Falling US Treasury yields possibly added some additional “oomph” to the US equity market. 2Y US Treasury yields fell 11bp to 4.894%, and the yield on the 10Y Treasury bond fell 8.2bp taking it to 4.12%. EURUSD picked up to 1.0876, having briefly traded below 1.08 intraday.  Other G-10 currencies also rallied against the USD. The AUD rose to 0.6480, Cable pushed up to 1.2644, and the JPY reversed a move up towards 147.50 and came all the way back to 145.89. These moves lifted the SGD too, which has pulled back below 1.35. The PHP and VND both lost ground yesterday.   G-7 macro:  It was a thin day for Macro, but it nonetheless contained some interesting data releases. The US JOLTS survey showed a sharp drop in job openings, falling from 9165K to 8827K. This was way down on the 9500K openings that had been forecast. There was also an unexpected and sharp decline in the Conference Board’s consumer confidence indicators, including those relating to the labour market. And the US house price purchase index also came in a little softer than had been expected. Germany’s GfK consumer confidence survey also came in on the low side. Today, German preliminary  CPI data for August are due. The US publishes the second release of 2Q23 GDP as well as the ADP employment survey (195K expected), to whet our appetites (or perhaps just to confuse us) before Friday’s payroll numbers.   Australia: July CPI inflation data is forecast to decline to 5.2%YoY from 5.4% in June. But the July data will also include some chunky electricity tariff increases, so we think there is a chance the number is higher than this, with an outside chance that inflation actually rises from last month.     What to look out for: US ADP report Australia building approvals and CPI (30 August) South Korea retail sales (30 August) US MBA mortgage applications, ADP employment, GDP and pending home sales (30 August) South Korea industrial production (31 August) Japan retail sales (31 August) China PMI manufacturing and non-manufacturing (31 August) Thailand trade balance (31 August) Hong Kong retail sales (31 August) India GDP (31 August) US initial jobless claims, PCE deflator and personal spending (31 August) Japan capital spending and Jibun PMI (1 September) South Korea trade (1 September) Regional PMI (1 September) China Caixin PMI (1 September) Indonesia CPI inflation (1 September) US NFP, ISM manufacturing and industrial production (1 September)
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US Payrolls Report and Global Central Banks' Monetary Policies

ING Economics ING Economics 01.09.2023 10:17
05:55BST Friday 1st September 2023 A soft US payrolls report could seal a Fed pause later this month   By Michael Hewson (Chief Market Analyst at CMC Markets UK)     After 6 days of gains, the FTSE100 ended the month on a sour note bringing the curtain down on a negative month for European markets, as sentiment soured somewhat on concerns over the outlook for interest rates, and the China recovery story.     US markets also ended a similarly negative month on a downbeat note, although we have seen a shift in some of the negative sentiment in the past few days due to softer than expected US economic data which has brought yields lower and encouraged the idea that this month's Fed meeting will see US policymakers vote to keep rates on hold. This week we've seen the number of job openings for July slow to their weakest levels since March 2021, a sharp slowdown in August consumer confidence, a weaker than expected ADP payrolls report, and a downgrade to US Q2 GDP.     US continuing claims also rose sharply to a 6-week high, suggesting that recent rate hikes were starting to exert pressure on the US economy and a tight labour market. If today's non-farm payrolls report shows a similarly modest slowdown in the rate of jobs growth, then there is a very real sense that we could see further gains in stock markets, as bets increase that the Federal Reserve may well be done when it comes to further rate hikes. At the very least it could go some way to signalling a pause as the US central bank looks to assess the effects recent rate hikes are having on the US economy.     In July we saw another modest slowdown in jobs growth, along with downward revisions to previous months. 187k jobs were added, just slightly above March's revised 165k, although the unemployment rate fell to 3.5%, from 3.6%.     While the official BLS numbers have been showing signs of slowing, up until this week's 177k, the ADP report had proven to be much more resilient, adding 371k in July on top of the 455k in June. The resilience in the US labour market is also coming against a backdrop of sticky wages, which in the private sector are over double headline CPI, while on the BLS measure average hourly earnings remained steady at 4.4% and are expected to stay around this level.       Today's August payrolls are set to see paint another picture of a resilient but slowing jobs market with expectations of 170k jobs added, with unemployment remaining steady at 3.5%, although it is important to remember that whatever today's jobs numbers tell us, vacancies in the US are still well above pre-Covid levels on a participation rate which is also lower at 62.6%.     After the payroll numbers we also have the latest ISM manufacturing report which is expected to continue to show that this part of the US economy is in contraction territory for the 10th month in a row. Before today's US payrolls report, we'll also get confirmation of the dire state of the manufacturing sector in Europe with the final August PMIs from Spain, Italy, France and Germany, with expectations of 48.8, 45.7, 46.4 and 39.1 respectively.     UK manufacturing PMI similarly is also expected to be confirmed at 42.5 and the lowest level since June 2020. Weak numbers here, along with similarly weak services numbers next week will also go a good way to ensuring that the ECB and perhaps even the Bank of England err on the side of a pause when they also meet later this month.     The bar to a pause for the Bank of England appears to be a much higher one, however yesterday's comments from Chief Economist Huw Pill would appear to suggest that the MPC is already leaning towards the idea that monetary policy in the UK is already restrictive. In a speech made in South Africa he said that he preferred to see a rate profile along the lines of a "Table Mountain" approach, in other words keeping them at current levels, or even a little higher for a lengthy period of time. The contents of the speech appeared to suggest that while inflation levels remained elevated, there was an acknowledgement that a lot of the recent rate hikes hadn't yet been felt, raising the risk of overtightening, and that monetary policy was already sufficiently restrictive. This would appear to suggest that a consensus is growing that the Bank of England could be close to the end of its rate hiking cycle, with perhaps one more at most set to be delivered in September.     There also appears to be an increasing debate over the sustainability of the current 2% inflation target as being too low given current levels of inflation, with arguments being made for increasing it to 3% or 4%. The 2% target has been a key anchor of central bank monetary policy over the last 30-40 years, and while it has served a useful purpose in anchoring inflation expectations some are arguing that trying to return it to 2% could do more harm than good.     That may well be true, but there is also the argument that in moving the goalposts on the current inflation target now sends the message that central banks are going soft in getting inflation under control, and that rather than return it to target over a longer period, it's easier to move the goalposts.     This comes across as unwise particularly in terms of timing. The time to have moved the inflation target was when inflation was below or at 2%, not while it is miles above it. Optics are everything particularly when inflation is well above target, with central banks needing to send the message that inflation remains their number one priority, and not water down their long-term commitment to it because it's too hard. The time to discuss a change of a target is when that target has been met and not before. Once that happens in perhaps 1-2 years' time the discussion on an inflation target, or an inflation window of between 1.5% to 3.5% can begin.       EUR/USD – the retreat off the 1.0950 area this week has seen the euro slip back with the 1.0780 trend line support from the March lows coming back into view. We need to push through resistance at the 1.1030 area, to signal a return to the highs this year. Below 1.0750 targets 1.0630.     GBP/USD – pushed up the 1.2750 area earlier this week but has failed to follow through. We need to push back through the 1.2800 area to diminish downside risk and a move towards 1.2400.         EUR/GBP – having failed at the 0.8620/30 area earlier this week has seen the euro slip below the 0.8570/80 area. While the 50-day SMA caps the bias is for a retest of the lows.     USD/JPY – the 147.50 area remains a key resistance and remains the key barrier for a move towards 150.00. Support comes in at last week's lows at 144.50/60.     FTSE100 is expected to open 16 points higher at 7,455     DAX is expected to open 50 points higher at 15,997     CAC40 is expected to open 21 points higher at 7,335
Uncertain Waters: Saudi's Oil Production Commitment and Global Economic Jitters

Uncertain Waters: Saudi's Oil Production Commitment and Global Economic Jitters

Ipek Ozkardeskaya Ipek Ozkardeskaya 05.10.2023 08:17
Saudi's commitment is not written into a law By Ipek Ozkardeskaya, Senior Analyst | Swissquote Bank   Markets are on an emotional rollercoaster ride this week. The slightest data is capable of moving oceans. Yesterday, the significantly softer-than-expected ADP report, and the announcement that 75'000 healthcare workers at Kaiser went on strike sparked a positive reaction from the market in a typical 'bad news is good news' day. The US economy added only 89K new private jobs in September, much less than 153K penciled in by analysts. It was also the slowest job additions since January 2021. The rest of the data was mixed. US factory orders were better than expected in August, but the services PMI came close to slipping into the contraction zone, and the ISM's non-manufacturing component also hinted at slowing activity. Mortgage activity in the US fell to the lowest levels since 1995, as the 30-year mortgage rates spiked higher toward 8%. Housing and services are among the biggest contributors to high inflation besides energy prices, therefore, seeing these sectors cool down has a meaningful impact on inflation expectations, hence on Federal Reserve (Fed) expectations. As such, yesterday's soft-looking data tempered the Fed hawks, after the stronger-than-expected JOLTs data triggered panic the day before. The US 2-year yield took a dive toward the 5% mark, the 10-year yield bounced lower after flirting with the 4.90% level, while the 30-year hit 5% for the very first time since 2007 before bouncing lower on relieving news of soft job additions. Hallelujah.  The US dollar index retreated across the board, and equities rebounded. The S&P500 jumped from the lowest levels since the beginning of June. The score is now one to one. One good news for the US jobs market, and one bad news. Everyone is now holding his or her breath into Friday's jobs data, which will determine whether we will end this week with a sweet or a sour taste in our mouth. Sweet would be loosening jobs data, sour would be a still-strong jobs data which would fuel the hawkish Fed expectations and further boost US yields while the US yields are at a critical moment.   For the first time since 2002, the US 10-year yield comes at a spitting distance from the S&P500 earnings. The index is just about 60 points above its critical 200-DMA. Looking at the seasonality chart, the S&P500 could dip at about now. In this context, there is a chance that soft jobs data from the US marks a dip in the S&P500 selloff. But one thing is sure: the yields and the US dollar must come down to keep the S&P500 on a rising path. Profits at the S&P500 companies are inversely correlated with the US dollar as their international profits account for about a third of the total. If the yields and the US dollar continue to rise, the S&P500 will face severe headwinds into the year end.    Oil fell nearly 6%!  Rising suspicions that the global economy is headed straight into a wall didn't spare oil bulls yesterday. The barrel of American crude dived almost 6%, slipped below the 50-DMA ($85pb), and below the positive trend base building since the end of June. The 6.5-mio-barrel build in gasoline stockpiles last week helped bring the bears back to the market even though the data also showed a more than 2-mio-barrel draw in crude inventories over the same week.   Yesterday's move shows that what matters the most for intraday moves is the rhetoric. This summer, the market focus was on the tightening global oil supply and how the US will 'soft land' despite the aggressive Fed tightening. Now we start talking about slowing economies and recession worries.   OPEC decided to maintain its oil production strategy unchanged at yesterday's decision. Saudi and Russia repeated that they will keep their production restricted to maintain the positive pressure on oil. But if global demand cools down and volumes fall, both Saudi and Russia will be tempted to increase profits by selling more oil at a cheaper price. Saudi Arabia shouldering all the production cuts for OPEC is not written into a law, it could become uncertain if market conditions turn sour.
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Market Jitters: Strong US Jobs Data Sparks Fear of Tightening Labor Market and Rising Yields

Michael Hewson Michael Hewson 05.10.2023 08:54
The fear of strong jobs By Ipek Ozkardeskaya, Senior Analyst | Swissquote Bank   Even a hint of an improving US jobs market sends shivers down investors' spines.  This is why the stronger than expected job openings data from the US spurred panic across the global financial markets yesterday. Although hirings and firings remained stable, the financial world was unhappy to see so many job opportunities offered to Americans as the data hinted that the US jobs market could be going back toward tightening, and not toward loosening. And that means that Americans will keep their jobs, find new ones, asked better pays, and keep spending. That spending will keep US growth above average and continue pushing inflation higher, and the Federal Reserve (Fed) will not only keep interest rates higher for longer but eventually be obliged to hike them more. Alas, a catastrophic scenario for the global financial markets where the rising US yields threaten to destroy value everywhere. PS. JOLTS data is volatile, and one data point is insufficient to point at changing trend. We still believe that the US jobs market will continue to loosen.  But the market reaction to yesterday's JOLTS data was sharp and clear. The US 2-year yield spiked above 5.15% after the stronger than expected JOLTS data, the 10-year yield went through the roof and hit the 4.85% mark. News that the US House Speaker McCarthy lost his position after last week's deal to keep the US government open certainly didn't help attract investors into the US sovereign space. The US blue-chip bond yields on the other hand have advanced to the highest levels since 2009, and the spike in real yields hardly justify buying stocks if earnings expectations remain weak. The S&P500 is now headed towards its 200-DMA, which stands near the 4200 level. The more rate sensitive Nasdaq still has ways to go before reaching its own 200-DMA and critical Fibonacci levels, but the selloff could become harder in technology stocks if things got uglier.  In the FX, the US dollar extended gains across the board. The Reserve Bank of New Zealand (RBNZ) kept the interest rate steady at 5.5% as expected. Due today, the ADP report is expected to show a significant slowdown in US private job additions last month; the expectation is a meagre 153'000 new private job additions in September. Any weakness would be extremely welcome for the rest of the world, while a strong looking data, an - God forbid – a figure above 200K could boost the Federal Reserve (Fed) hawks and bring the discussion of a potential rate hike in November seriously on the table.   The EURUSD consolidates below the 1.05 level, the USDJPY spiked shortly above the 150 mark, and suddenly fell 2% in a matter of minutes, in a move that was thought to be an unconfirmed FX intervention. Gold extended losses to $1815 per ounce as the rising US yields increase the opportunity cost of holding the non-interest-bearing gold.  The barrel of American crude remains under pressure below the $90pb level. US shale producers say that they will keep drilling under wraps even if oil prices surge to $100pb, pointing at Joe Biden's war against fossil fuel. A tighter oil supply is the main market driver for now, but recession fears will likely keep the upside limited, and September high could be a peak. 
The Fear of Strong Jobs: How US Labor Market Resilience Sparks Global Financial Panic

The Fear of Strong Jobs: How US Labor Market Resilience Sparks Global Financial Panic

Ipek Ozkardeskaya Ipek Ozkardeskaya 05.10.2023 08:55
The fear of strong jobs By Ipek Ozkardeskaya, Senior Analyst | Swissquote Bank   Even a hint of an improving US jobs market sends shivers down investors' spines.  This is why the stronger than expected job openings data from the US spurred panic across the global financial markets yesterday. Although hirings and firings remained stable, the financial world was unhappy to see so many job opportunities offered to Americans as the data hinted that the US jobs market could be going back toward tightening, and not toward loosening. And that means that Americans will keep their jobs, find new ones, asked better pays, and keep spending. That spending will keep US growth above average and continue pushing inflation higher, and the Federal Reserve (Fed) will not only keep interest rates higher for longer but eventually be obliged to hike them more. Alas, a catastrophic scenario for the global financial markets where the rising US yields threaten to destroy value everywhere. PS. JOLTS data is volatile, and one data point is insufficient to point at changing trend. We still believe that the US jobs market will continue to loosen.  But the market reaction to yesterday's JOLTS data was sharp and clear. The US 2-year yield spiked above 5.15% after the stronger than expected JOLTS data, the 10-year yield went through the roof and hit the 4.85% mark. News that the US House Speaker McCarthy lost his position after last week's deal to keep the US government open certainly didn't help attract investors into the US sovereign space. The US blue-chip bond yields on the other hand have advanced to the highest levels since 2009, and the spike in real yields hardly justify buying stocks if earnings expectations remain weak. The S&P500 is now headed towards its 200-DMA, which stands near the 4200 level. The more rate sensitive Nasdaq still has ways to go before reaching its own 200-DMA and critical Fibonacci levels, but the selloff could become harder in technology stocks if things got uglier.  In the FX, the US dollar extended gains across the board. The Reserve Bank of New Zealand (RBNZ) kept the interest rate steady at 5.5% as expected. Due today, the ADP report is expected to show a significant slowdown in US private job additions last month; the expectation is a meagre 153'000 new private job additions in September. Any weakness would be extremely welcome for the rest of the world, while a strong looking data, an - God forbid – a figure above 200K could boost the Federal Reserve (Fed) hawks and bring the discussion of a potential rate hike in November seriously on the table.   The EURUSD consolidates below the 1.05 level, the USDJPY spiked shortly above the 150 mark, and suddenly fell 2% in a matter of minutes, in a move that was thought to be an unconfirmed FX intervention. Gold extended losses to $1815 per ounce as the rising US yields increase the opportunity cost of holding the non-interest-bearing gold.  The barrel of American crude remains under pressure below the $90pb level. US shale producers say that they will keep drilling under wraps even if oil prices surge to $100pb, pointing at Joe Biden's war against fossil fuel. A tighter oil supply is the main market driver for now, but recession fears will likely keep the upside limited, and September high could be a peak.   
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Asia Morning Bites: BoJ Policy Speculation and Chinese PMI Data in Focus

ING Economics ING Economics 02.11.2023 11:49
Asia Morning Bites Following rising speculation, will the BoJ tweak policy today? Chinese PMI data also due. Global Macro and Markets Global markets:  US stocks bounced off recent lows on Monday. Both the NASDAQ and S&P 500 gained more than a per cent ahead of this week’s expected no-change  FOMC meeting. Equity futures suggest that today’s open may take back some of these gains. Chinese stocks also had a reasonable day. The CSI 300 rose 0.6%, but the Hang Seng was more or less unchanged on the day. US Treasury yields also rose on Monday. 2Y UST yields rose 5.2bp to 5.054%, while 10Y yields rose 6bp to 4.894%. There was no macro data of note for the US on Monday driving these moves, and this close to the FOMC meeting, no Fed speakers either due to the blackout period. Despite the rise in yields, the USD had a softer day. EURUSD rose to 1.0613 in spite of weak GDP and inflation figures (see below) and also the failure of the EU and Australia to agree on a free trade deal due to disagreements over agriculture access. The AUD rose to 0.6366, Cable rallied to 1.2165, and the JPY dropped back briefly through 149 on speculation of further tweaks to BoJ policy at today’s meeting (see below), though it is currently 149.14. Other Asian FX also rallied against the USD on Monday. The THB and KRW led gains. The CNY dropped to 7.311. G-7 macro:  German GDP was slightly less awful in 3Q23 than expected, but still fell 0.1%QoQ (see here for more by Carsten Brzeski). The flip side of this is that this economic weakness is weighing on inflation, which fell to 3.8% YoY in October, down more than expected from the September rate of 4.5%. Eurozone GDP and inflation are released today, so with the German figures already out, there is some chance of an undershoot to the respective consensus expectations of 0.0% QoQ and 3.0%YoY for these figures. House price data and the Conference Board’s consumer confidence survey are today’s US data offerings. None of these releases look likely to alter the expectation for a pause at the Fed’s 2 November meeting. China:  Official PMI data is due at 0930 (HKT/SGT) today. Both manufacturing and non-manufacturing surveys are expected to confirm the slight firming in activity suggested by other recent activity data. Japan:  The BoJ has its policy meeting today. Speculation has been growing over the last couple of days that they may take steps to relieve pressure on Japanese government bonds (JGBs) and the JPY. Yesterday, local news media Nikkei, reported that the BoJ may allow the upper limit for 10Y JGBs to rise above 1% and also make some adjustments to their bond purchase operations. The latest quarterly outlook report will also be closely watched. We think that the BoJ will revise up its FY24 inflation forecast to above 2%, but leave untouched the FY25 forecast number. That way, they can maintain that sustainable inflation is not yet reached or that they are not yet confident about reaching the sustainable inflation target, which will buy them some more time to keep their negative interest rate policy until next year. Still, if FY24 inflation is above 2% then the market’s expectations for a policy change in early 2024 will rise. Japan's September monthly activity data was a bit soft.  September industrial production (IP) rebounded less than expected (0.2% MoM sa vs -0.7% in August, 2.5% market consensus) while retail sales unexpectedly dropped -0.1% (vs revised 0.2% in August). As September IP and retail sales were softer than expected, we think 3Q23 GDP is likely to record a small contraction. However, labour market conditions remained tight and showed some improvement. The jobless rate edged down to 2.6% in September (vs 2.7% in August, 2.6% market consensus) and labour participation rose to 63.3% from the previous month’s 63.1%. Also, the job-to-applications ratio was unchanged at 1.29. South Korea:  Monthly activity data was solid as suggested by 3Q23 GDP (0.6% QoQ sa). All industry industrial production (IP) rose for a second month (1.1% MoM sa) in September with manufacturing (1.9% MoM sa), services (0.4%), construction (2.5%), and public administration (2.3%).  Among manufacturing industries, semiconductors (12.9%) and machinery (5.1%) were big gainers, offsetting a big drop in motor production (-7.5%). Solid demand for high-end chips, which are higher value-added and have higher prices than legacy chips, is the main reason for the rise in chip production. Meanwhile, production cuts in legacy chips continued as inventory levels came down, and we believe that this differentiated trend will continue for the time being. We think October exports will finally bounce back after twelve months of year-on-year declines on the back of a recovery in semiconductors. Other activity data also made gains. Retail sales (0.2%) rebounded marginally after having fallen for the previous two months. Equipment investment gained (8.7%) with increases in transportation (12.6%) such as aircraft, and special machinery (7.3%) such as semiconductor manufacturing machines. Construction also rose 2.5% despite the contraction in residential building construction as civil engineering rose solidly (20.0%). September monthly activity data showed some recovery in the domestic economy but forward-looking data such as machinery orders (-20.4% YoY) and construction orders (-44.1%) all fell, suggesting a cloudy outlook for the current quarter and we expect 4Q23 GDP to decelerate.   What to look out for: BoJ meeting and China PMI reports South Korea industrial production (31 October) BoJ meeting, Japan retail sales, industrial production and labour data (31 October) China PMI manufacturing and non-manufacturing (31 October) Taiwan GDP (31 October) Philippines bank lending (31 October) US Conference board confidence (31 October) Australia Judo PMI manufacturing (1 November) South Korea trade (1 November) Regional PMI manufacturing (1 November) Indonesia CPI inflation (1 November) US ISM manufacturing, ADP report, JOLTS report (1 November) FOMC decision (2 November) South Korea CPI inflation (2 November) Australia trade balance (2 November) Malaysia BNM policy (2 November) US factory orders and initial jobless claims (2 November) Australia retail sales (3 November) China Caixin PMI services (3 November) Singapore retail sales (3 November) US NFP and ISM services (3 November)
All Eyes on US Inflation: Impact on Rate Expectations and Market Sentiment

Navigating Economic Crossroads: US Non-Farm Payrolls and Services PMIs Analysis by Michael Hewson

Michael Hewson Michael Hewson 04.12.2023 13:31
By Michael Hewson (Chief Market Analyst at CMC Markets UK) US non-farm payrolls (Nov) – 08/12 – last month's October jobs report was the first one this year when the headline number came in below market expectations, though not by enough to raise concerns over the resilience of the US economy. Unlike September, when US jobs surged by 297k, jobs growth slowed in October to 150k, while the unemployment rate ticked higher to 3.9%, in a sign that the US economy is now starting to slow in a manner that will please the US central bank. Combined with a similarly weak ADP report the same week, where jobs growth slowed to 113k, and a softer ISM services survey yields have slipped back significantly from their October peaks, as well as being below the levels they were a month ago in a sign that the market thinks that rate hikes are done and has now moved on to when to expect rate cuts. This is the next challenge for the US central bank who will be keen to continue to push the higher for longer rates mantra. It's also worth noting that JOLTS job openings are still at elevated levels of 9.55m, and weekly jobless claims continue to trend at around 210k which means the Fed still has plenty of leeway to push back on current market pricing on rate cuts. Expectations are for 200k jobs to be added in November; however, it should also be remembered that a lot of additional hiring takes place in the weeks leading up to Thanksgiving and the Christmas period so we're unlikely to see any evidence of cracking in the US labour market this side of 2024.          Services PMIs (Nov) – 05/12 –while manufacturing activity in Europe appears to be bottoming out, the same can't be said for the services sector which on the basis of recent inflation data is experiencing sticky levels of inflation, which is prompting a continued hawkish narrative from the ECB despite rising evidence that the bloc is already in contraction and possible recession as well. Recent data from the French economy showed economic activity contracted in Q3 and there has been little evidence of an improvement in Q4. The recent flash PMIs showed that services activity remained stuck in the low 45's, although economic activity does appear to be improving, edging higher to 48.7. The UK economy appears to be more resilient where was saw a recovery into expansion territory in the recent flash numbers to 50.5. The main concern is that the resilience shown by the likes of Spain and Italy as their tourism season winds down appears to have gone after Italy fell sharply in October to 47.7, while Spain was steady at 51.1.  

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